Abortion Means the Early Removal of a Term Paper

Download this Term Paper in word format (.doc)

Note: Sample below may appear distorted but all corresponding word document files contain proper formatting

Excerpt from Term Paper:

Abortion means the early removal of a human fetus, whether impulsively as in a miscarriage or unnaturally caused by surgical or chemical abortion. As of today, the most general usage of this term abortion stands for the artificially caused abortion. A decision by Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton that authorizes abortion was passed over by the Supreme Court in 1973 that allowed abortion for any basis like medical, social or otherwise in all the 50 states during all nine months of pregnancy. But most of the abortions done in the present days are done not based on medical grounds but on social basis, as some women are not prepared for a child at that time and her spouse wants her to have an abortion. Almost 93% of these induced abortions are done not for medical reasons but are voluntary.

Evolution of the law concerning abortion

The chronicle of American abortion law shows an intricate process of a range of trends working in favor of and against the legitimacy of abortion. An unspoken age of illegality refers to the era up to the beginning of 1960s. Abortion was not lawfully controlled in the course of the development of the New World. Connecticut was the first U.S. state to pass legislation on abortion, where abortions of fetuses beyond the point of quickening were acknowledged as an offense by decree in 1821. All other U.S. states passed analogous legislation during the second half of the nineteenth century permitting abortions only under very isolated situations like when the life of the mother was put in danger. The states of Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, permitted no exemptions to the abortion against the law. This state of affairs did not alter until the 1960s and early 1970s when many U.S. states passed more moderate abortion laws.

Specifically, during the mid 1960s, the abortion restructuring development had acquired ground and pushed for legislative changes, depending on the backing of women's groups, birth control organizations, civil rights advocates, the medical and legal professions and Protestant churches. These led, during the period of 1966 to 1973, to reformation of their statutes by about fourteen states to lawfully allow abortions for therapeutic reasons, when the fetus could be born with a grave mental or physical handicap, in addition to when pregnancy was the consequence of incest or rape. Four other states, New York, Alaska, Hawaii, and Washington, went to the extent of permitting abortions on stipulation upon meeting just few routine requirements relating to the site of abortion facilities, the phase of fetal development, and the pregnant woman's place of living.

This moderation of abortion laws initiated many, at times victorious efforts to confront the constitutionality of the statutes at the state level, along with increased efforts to push for reform in the state legislatures, strengthened mobilization on the part of reform and repeal movements, and some famous prosecutions of abortionists. In 1973, the Supreme Court arrived at two significant conclusions talk have put the stage for the legal abortion discussion until this day. In Roe v. Wade- 1973, called Roe and the companion ruling Doe v. Bolton (1973), the Supreme Court judged the constitutionality of two state abortion laws. In Roe, the Supreme Court cancelled an 1857 Texas statute talk banned abortions at any stage of pregnancy excepting to rescue the life of the mother. In Doe v. Bolton case of 1973, the Supreme Court cancelled a Georgia abortion statute and declared that "those portions of the statute requiring that abortions be conducted in hospitals, or accredited hospitals, requiring the interposition of a hospital abortion committee, requiring confirmation by other physicians, and limiting abortion to Georgia residents, are unconstitutional."

The Supreme Court, with the help of these two verdicts, successfully legalized abortion. With the sustained impact of Roe v. Wade until this day, it is valuable to elucidate the opinions the Court proposed here. Most basically, the Supreme Court founded its verdict in Roe on a woman's privacy right. Additionally, the Court declared that this confidentiality right is not total and that it should be considered with regard to the state's concern to save possible life. In order to decide this concern, the Supreme Court did not care about the personhood of the fetus because constitutional references to the person apply only after birth. On the other hand, the Court bear in mind the time of fetal feasibility, that is, when the fetus is ready for autonomous survival exterior to the womb, and the enhanced danger of the pregnant woman's death in abortion. The Texas statute, on the basis of these considerations, was ruled to constitute a breach of the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Almost in all U.S. states, the 1973 Supreme Court verdicts resulted in legislative changes on abortion. As a consequence, Roe restricted the legal powers of the U.S. states by not permitting them to pass laws that banned abortion.

Legal Issues of abortion

All over the world, about 13% of all maternity mortality reports for abortion mortality. Insecure abortion methods, inexperienced abortion providers, preventive abortion laws and high maternal death and melancholy from abortion are likely to take place together. Unwelcome and unplanned pregnancies represent grave public health accountability.

Adolescent's health and lives are at risk due to unsafe and legal abortion services and weakens their right to make decisions regarding childbearing. For teenagers and young women, insecure abortion has mainly grave health problems particularly where abortion is unlawful, strictly confined, or difficult for teenagers to access.

In countries where avoiding maternal mortality and morbidity from abortion stays to be high is an issue of good public health policy and medical practice, and represents an important part of secure motherhood initiatives. Over the past 15 years, in many countries, a number of constructive measures have been taken to minimize deaths and morbidity from abortion. The necessary requirement in making abortion secure is to make it lawful.

History proposes that abortions even if they are lawful or not women will look for it. An estimated 200,000 to 1.2 million abortions were done yearly in the United States before the corroboration in 1973. In 1972, the rate of death due to unlawful abortion has been reported at between 30 and 40 per 100,000. On the other hand, lawful abortion is the reliable surgical method and is ten times safer than childbirth. These days, a woman's possibility of expiring from problems concerned to a lawfully got abortion in this country when done before eight weeks' gestation is considerably lower than her risk of expiring due to pregnancy or childbirth.

Permission to have abortion is necessary for the economic safety of women and girls, and the capability of women to manage their reproductive lives affects educational and employment opportunities thus influencing their ability to flee or shun poverty.

Since the 1970's, Roe v. Wade has made a noteworthy part to the varying role of women in society and to enhance the economic prospects available to women. The Supreme Court, in the 1992 Planned Parenthood v. Casey decision has greeted that the talent of women to take part equally in the economic and social life of the Nation has been made easy by their capacity to control their reproductive lives. Women are given essential freedom in fixing professional objectives for themselves and making educational and career plans by giving access to abortion and efficient methods of birth control. But since Roe v. Wade, the federal government and individual states have also taken measures to curb abortion by inflicting more arduous requirements. At both the national and state level, this wearing away of reproductive freedom in the U.S. can be seen. Since Row v. Wade, the Supreme Court has issued about 30 extra decisions concerning the right to abortion in these 30 years.

The federal government and individual states were given much freedom in limiting access to abortion care with an uneven effect on low income women, young women, and women who live in rural areas, in these ensuing decisions. Numerous states and districts have agreed laws that control women's access to abortion. For instance, twenty-two states have authorized waiting periods varying from one hour following acceptance of state materials about abortion to 48-72 hours. Forty-three states have put into practice the limitations on minors' access to abortion, and 25 states have passed Targeted Regulation of Abortion Provider -- TRAP rule relevant in the first trimester, and 27 states have applied TRAP ordinances relevant in the second trimester.

Other steps are curbing financial support of abortions for poor women; curbing addition of abortion and family planning coverage in insurance packages; permitting non-compliant "principles" sections into otherwise sound contraceptive coverage legislation; permitting hospital and health insurance amalgamation between secular and religious organizations that result in the removal of abortion, contraception, and fertility services; and passing local regulations intended to make it more complicated and cost-prohibitive for providers of abortion to practice medicine. On the basis of these results, we must prolong to maintain Row v. Wade,…[continue]

Cite This Term Paper:

"Abortion Means The Early Removal Of A" (2005, February 14) Retrieved December 4, 2016, from http://www.paperdue.com/essay/abortion-means-the-early-removal-of-a-62048

"Abortion Means The Early Removal Of A" 14 February 2005. Web.4 December. 2016. <http://www.paperdue.com/essay/abortion-means-the-early-removal-of-a-62048>

"Abortion Means The Early Removal Of A", 14 February 2005, Accessed.4 December. 2016, http://www.paperdue.com/essay/abortion-means-the-early-removal-of-a-62048

Other Documents Pertaining To This Topic

  • Policy Analysis and Evaluation Report on Abortion

    Abortion Over the years, given the awareness and exposure that came with the advent of media and the internet, human societies and cultural norms across the globe have evolved from being very conservative to moderate to liberal. With apparent increases in literacy rates, standards of living and awareness in general, people around the world have reconsidered many of their notions and have adopted more liberal approaches towards social norms and myths.

  • Abortion and the Significance Towards Women s Health With Evidence...

    Abortion and the Significance Towards Women's Health With Evidence Induced abortion represents a multifaceted ethical, moral, biological, psychological, and legal human issue. The complex issue of induced abortion has been the source of substantial debate, controversy, and activism over the course of several decades. Induced abortion is medically defined as the removal or expulsion of a fetus or embryo before the fetus is able to survive outside of the uterus (Grimes

  • Virtue Ethics and Nursing Care for Abortion Services

    Nurses and the Ethics of Abortion Abortion and Virtue Ethics In the Crossfire: Nurses and the Ethics of Abortion In the Crossfire: Nurses and the Ethics of Abortion Nebraska's Attorney General, Jon Bruning, announced his efforts to revoke the license of the only nurse working at Dr. LeRoy Carhart's abortion clinic in a suburb of Omaha (Funk, 2013). The revocation proceedings are based on allegations of substandard care and the delegation of patient care

  • Does Certain Economic Factors Affect Abortions in Teenage Pregnancy...

    Teen Abortion Abortion among teenage girls has been an issue of much debate for many years. Many people believe that all abortions should be illegal while others believe that there are circumstances that warrant the right to choose. Currently there is a 40% occurrence of pregnancy among teenagers an estimated 25% of these pregnancies end in abortions. (Pregnancy & Childbearing among U.S. Teens 2003) At the forefront of this issue is

  • Lesbian Health Issues Living in a Heterosexual Society

    Lesbian Health Care Lesbian Health Issues in a Heterosexual Society The additional burdens placed on the lives of minorities as a result of social exclusion can lead to health disparities. Social exclusion theory has been used in previous research to investigate the health disparities that exist between socioeconomic classes and individuals of different ethnic backgrounds living in the United States, but it has not yet been applied to another important minority group:

  • Cloning Our Group Is a

    Experiments in the late nineteenth century on frogs provided the groundwork for cloning (McKinnell 9-10). The method used a decade ago for the successful nuclear transplantation in amphibians required that the egg be enucleated, which meant removing the maternal hereditary material contained in the egg nucleus. Other hereditary material contained in the nucleus from a body cell would then be placed in the enucleated egg, and the resulting clone would

  • Sport as a Vehicle for Change

    Social Change Through Women's Sports Promoting Social Change Through Women's Sports Leadership The problems that cry out for social change solutions No one who is intelligent, literate, and who is paying attention could avoid the fact that much of the world today is in need of fresh and creative ways to resolve cultural and social conflicts and to build better communities where families feel safe and futures seem secure. War, bloodshed, racial rage,


Read Full Term Paper
Copyright 2016 . All Rights Reserved