Atlantic World in the 18th Essay

  • Length: 4 pages
  • Sources: 4
  • Subject: Economics
  • Type: Essay
  • Paper: #71652777

Excerpt from Essay :

The increase in the productivity of the Atlantic market created a demand for tools that for use in production. The European farmers were obtaining the tools cheaply from these Afro-Asian areas

. Through the exchanges, it is true that the interactions were an avenue for the creation of an increase in trade opportunities in the Atlantic world.

Labor implications to the conflict

Sourcing for labor for the sugar industries was initially from the indigenous America but the increase in the demand for labor prompted the Europeans to source for labor in Africa. Africans, just like the Amerindians and other slaves were resistant to the forceful slavery. On this basis, quite a number of rebellions arose. Quite a number of the American and African natives who were resisting the forceful enslavement were killed; some of them ran away to places where they could not be found. The Spanish authorities were placing the Amerindian slaves to the Caribbean plantations as slaves and in exchange, they were getting protection. The opportunity for the Spaniards in this case was the provision of civilization to the Spanish people. The contention arose from the forceful enslavement of the laborers, which brought about some conflicts

The enslavement of the Africans for labor in the European plantations was good for the owners of the plantations, despite the fact that they had difficulties in communication in comparison to the European laborers. Most of the African slaves were coming from tropical areas, which was advantageous to them. They were a little bit comfortable with the humidity and heat in the farms where they were working, which gave them a higher life expectancy in comparison to their American counterparts

. On the same note, the Africans were more skillful in agriculture than their counterparts were. During this time, the African slaves were so many that they outnumbered the Caribbean slaves since the plantation owners preferred them. The low death rates, high life expectancy and the agricultural skills of the Africans were less costly to the owners of the plantations

. The only advantage that the European laborers had over the Africans was the ability to communicate effectively with their masters. The black slaves from Africa were getting a very hostile reception and treatment by their masters, which is a factor that led to the several slave uprisings in the area. The slave trade provided the opportunity for the landowners to make high profits, but they did not treat their slaves with dignity, prompting them to rebel against their masters and the whole idea of slavery

Conclusion

The development of trade channels in the Atlantic world in the 18th century gave the people the opportunities to accumulate wealth, mainly the European countries. On the other hand, the kind of treatment they were giving their slaves was not impressive, prompting the slaves to rebel against their masters. Arguing on this basis, there is an indication that the opportunities in the 18th century were presenting avenues for violence or rebellion and conflicts.

Bibliography

Coclanis, Peter A. 2005. The Atlantic Economy during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: Organization Operation, Practice and Personnel. Columbia, S.C.: Univ. Of South Carolina Press.

Goldstone, Jack A. 1991. Revolution and rebellion in the early modern world. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Klein. 2003. The Atlantic Slave Trade. Cambridge University press.

Klooster, Wim. 2010. Revolution in the Atlantic world: A Comparative History. NYU Press.

Goldstone, Jack A. 1991. Revolution and rebellion in the early modern world. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Goldstone, Jack A. 1991. Revolution and rebellion in the early modern world. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Coclanis, peter A. 2005. The Atlantic Economy during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: Organization Operation, Practice and Personnel. Columbia, S.C.: Univ. Of South Carolina Press.

Coclanis, peter A. 2005. The Atlantic Economy during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: Organization Operation, Practice and Personnel. Columbia, S.C.: Univ. Of South Carolina Press.

Klooster, Wim. 2010. Revolution in the Atlantic world: A Comparative History. NYU Press.

Coclanis, peter A. 2005. The Atlantic Economy during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: Organization Operation, Practice and Personnel. Columbia, S.C.: Univ. Of South Carolina Press

Coclanis, peter A. 2005. The Atlantic Economy during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: Organization Operation, Practice and Personnel. Columbia, S.C.: Univ. Of South Carolina Press

Klein. 2003. The Atlantic Slave Trade. Cambridge University press.

Klein. 2003. The Atlantic Slave Trade. Cambridge University press.

Klein. 2003. The Atlantic Slave Trade. Cambridge University press.…

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