Bible in Roman Catholic Theology Research Paper

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The Roman Catholic Church took advantage of the fact that it received criticism and went on to produce new and better interpretations of the Bible, without damaging the image of Roman Catholicism.

Throughout time, those who came against Roman Catholic theological interpretations of the Bible received little support from influential members of society and rarely represented a worthy adversary for the church. In contrast, Roman Catholic theologians were provided with resources that were almost unlimited and were supported by some of the most notable members of the Roman Catholic Church. Mostly because of the support they received, Roman Catholic theologians were better prepared to deal with interpreting the Bible and in certain cases produced versions that were too accurate for critics to condemn. It is difficult to determine the level of freedom that Roman Catholic exegetes are provided with, especially considering that some leading members of the exegesis movement have left the church once they discovered that they were not allowed to employ personal convictions in the process of interpreting the scripture.

One cannot possibly focus on providing an unbiased interpretation on the Bible, given that the very process of interpreting relates to the respective person's personal convictions in regard to the document he or she is studying. Present-day theologians have gotten involved in an interpretation process "in which faith is being stressed as prior to reason, one in which the possibility and necessity of an apologetic theology is often being overlooked" (Grant 1948, 169). In trying to interpret the scripture, an individual needs to choose which philosophy he or she will make use of in the process, since particular philosophies can prevent one from accurately developing an exegesis.

Works cited:

Ayres, Lewis and Fowl, Stephen E. "(Mis)reading the Face of God: The Interpretation of the Bible in the Church," Theological Studies 60, no. 3 (1999): 513

Binde, Per "Nature in Roman Catholic Tradition," Anthropological Quarterly 74, no. 1 (2001)

Burton, William L. "Buried Treasure: Why Catholics Should Learn More about Scripture," Commonweal, 6 April 2007

Firth, Frank J. The Holy Gospel: A Comparison of the Gospel Text as it Is Given in the Protestant and Roman Catholic Bible Versions in the English Language in Use in America [book online] (New York: Fleming H. Revell, 1911, accessed 7 January 2011), 240

Grant, Robert M. The Bible in the Church: A Short History of Interpretation [book online] (New York: Macmillan, 1948, accessed 7 January 2011), 169

Harrisville, Roy a. And Sundberg, Walter the Bible in Modern Culture: Theology and Historical-Critical Method from Spinoza to Khasemann [book online] (Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans, 1995, accessed 7 January 2011), 149

Mayeski, Marie Anne "Quaestio Disputata: Catholic Theology and the History of Exegesis," Theological Studies 62, no. 1 (2001): 140

Mcclymond, Michael J. "Through a Gloss Darkly: Biblical Annotations and Theological Interpretation in Modern Catholic and Protestant English-Language Bibles," Theological Studies 67, no. 3 (2006)

Oberman, Heiko a. And O'Hanlon, Daniel J. eds., Christianity Divided, Protestant and Roman Catholic Theological Issues [book online] (New York: Sheed and Ward, 1961, accessed 7 January 2011), 37

Heiko a. Oberman and Daniel J. O'Hanlon, eds., Christianity Divided, Protestant and Roman Catholic Theological Issues [book online] (New York: Sheed and Ward, 1961, accessed 7 January 2011), 36.

Robert M. Grant, the Bible in the Church: A Short History of Interpretation [book online] (New York: Macmillan, 1948, accessed 7 January 2011), 143.

Idem, 144.

Robert M. Grant, the Bible in the Church: A Short History of Interpretation [book online] (New York: Macmillan, 1948, accessed 7 January 2011), 145.

Marie Anne Mayeski, "Quaestio Disputata: Catholic Theology and the History of Exegesis," Theological Studies 62, no. 1 (2001): 140.

Michael J. Mcclymond, "Through a Gloss Darkly: Biblical Annotations and Theological Interpretation in Modern Catholic and Protestant English-Language Bibles," Theological Studies 67, no. 3 (2006)

Idem

Michael J. Mcclymond, "Through a Gloss Darkly: Biblical Annotations and Theological Interpretation in Modern Catholic and Protestant English-Language Bibles," Theological Studies 67, no. 3 (2006)

Frank J. Firth, the Holy Gospel: A Comparison of the Gospel Text as it Is Given in the Protestant and Roman Catholic Bible Versions in the English Language in Use in America [book online]…[continue]

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