Mormons' Upward the Lds Church Term Paper

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For example, to attend the temple, advance in the Priesthood, or serve a mission, individuals must adhere to the Law of Chastity (e.g., no premarital or extramarital sexual intimacy) and abstain from alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drugs. They are also required to promise to care for others, including both family and other church members. Similarly, all physically and emotionally capable young men between the ages of 18 and 27 are expected to serve missions and young women are invited to do so as well. While serving a mission, young people leave all individualistic pursuits (i.e., jobs, scholarships, dating relationships, etc.) behind for an extended period of time (i.e., 2 years or 18 months, for men and women, respectively). During this time they are engaged full time (all day, every day with no trips home to see family) in sharing their beliefs with others and engaging in service projects.

The mission component of the church is an ingrained and intensely well utilized program. The mission is assumed to be something any and all individuals who are healthy enough and who have and continue to live by the strict code of morality will participate in. Serving a mission is assumed to be the outcome of every youth organization participation that the child is involved in. On this mission, a huge time commitment and for many a large social and emotional sacrifice is made and acts as a rite of passage for the individual into adult participation in the faith and potential upward mobility in life.

The Mormon church also has a significant interest in higher education and has a well developed college system when LDS members can seek education in an environment that does not go against their moral code. The emphasis on higher education is also essential to the development of upward mobility in the faith, as the Mormons long ago determined that this society would require education to increase the earning potential of the individual and therefore established systems to meet these needs that did not help the individual "unlearn" all the moral lessons he or she had learned as a member of the LDS church.

This work provides a limited overview with regard to the LDS emphasis son youth organizations and participation to instill in the individual church members from very early in life the codes of success. Success is built on living up to the standards of society, and to some degree the morality of the church. Church participation in youth organizations instills early recognition of social and community needs, such as the individual's ability to complete a goal driven program, such as these Boy Scout graduated program and still hold true to the standards of the faith, ensured by adult leadership participation in youth organizations. To some degree the whole greater purpose of the LDS church is to raise children in a manner that will make them more successful that their parents were and in turn make the church an organization populated by upwardly mobile and capable individuals.

Bibliography

Barry, Carolyn Mcnamara, and Larry J. Nelson. "The Role of Religion in the Transition to Adulthood for Young Emerging Adults." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 34, no. 3 (2005): 245. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5009936607.

Coates, James. In Mormon Circles: Gentiles, Jack Mormons, and Latter-Day Saints. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1991. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100261702.

Mangum, Garth, and Bruce Blumell. The Mormons' War on Poverty: A History of LDS Welfare, 1830-1990. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1993. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=3525193.

Riley, Naomi. "God on the Quad: At Religious Colleges-Which Are Growing Fast-Student Life Is Different." The American Enterprise, March 2005, 22. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5008837726. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5009936607

Carolyn Mcnamara Barry, and Larry J. Nelson, "The Role of Religion in the Transition to Adulthood for Young Emerging Adults," Journal of Youth and Adolescence 34, no. 3 (2005), http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5009936607. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=3525193

Garth Mangum, and Bruce Blumell, the Mormons' War on Poverty: A History of LDS Welfare, 1830-1990 (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1993), 114, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=3525193. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100261702

James Coates, in Mormon Circles: Gentiles, Jack Mormons, and Latter-Day Saints (Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1991), 101, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100261702. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=3525193

Garth Mangum, and Bruce Blumell, the Mormons' War on Poverty: A History of LDS Welfare, 1830-1990 (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1993), 114, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=3525193. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5009936607

Carolyn Mcnamara Barry, and Larry J. Nelson, "The Role of Religion in the Transition to Adulthood for Young Emerging Adults," Journal of Youth and Adolescence 34, no. 3 (2005), http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5009936607. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5008837726

Naomi Riley, "God on the Quad: At Religious Colleges-Which Are Growing Fast-Student Life Is Different," the American Enterprise, March 2005, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5008837726.[continue]

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