U S Involvement in El Salvador essay

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..accused of being an assassination bureau, used for reprisals against the VC, GVN critics and personal enemies. Torture was common, and "elimination" was the preferred method of dealing with Phoenix's suspects.

In a similar vein there have been accusations that the United States supported the 'death-squads' in countries like El Salvador during the Cold War period in order to bolster what they saw to be a threat to the democratic growth of the country. There is a large body of documentation and evidence to support this view. This view also suggests that the government and military of the United States not only aided the death squads through policy and advice, but also through training and financial support.

The issue of the involvement of the United States raises various crucial ethical and moral issues. Can supporting terror groups in the name of democracy be a legitimate reason for such support? Does this support not in fact undercut the very essence of a democratic idealism based on the importance and value of human rights? In other words, does such support not destroy the very essence of what democracy is all about? This can lead various levels of discussion and debate. However, what is relatively certain is that the United States, for whatever reason or rationale, was complicit in the creation and running of the Salvadorian death squads.

Bibliography

Allan Nairn. BEHIND the DEATH SQUADS:an exclusive report on the U.S. role in El Salvador's official terror. From: Nairn, Allan. "Behind the Death Squads." The Progressive May 1984: 20-28. http://www.votb.org/newsanalysis/behind_the_death_squads.html (Accessed September 20, 2008)

Blachman, Morris J., and Kenneth E. Sharpe. "Central American Traps: Challenging the Reagan Agenda." World Policy Journal 5, no. 1 (1987): 1-28.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002111739

Buckley, William F. "Death Squads & U.S. Policy." National Review, February 24, 1984, 62+.

Clark, Gregory R Words of the Vietnam War the Slang, Jargon, Abbreviations, Acronyms, Nomenclature, Nicknames, Pseudonyms, Slogans, Specs, Euphemisms, Double-Talk, Chants, and Names and Places of the Era of United States Involvement in Vietnam. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1990.

Gutierrez, Donald K. "Review of Gareau, State Terrorism and the United States." Social Justice 33, no. 1 (2006): 138+.

Kirsch, David. Death Squads in El Salvador: A Pattern of U.S. Complicity. http://www.ciponline.org/dethsqud.txt (Accessed September 20, 2008)

Leogrande, William M. "Through the Looking Glass: the Kissinger Report on Central America." World Policy Journal 1, no. 2 (1984): 251-284.

Livingstone, Neil C. "Death Squads." World Affairs 146, no. 3 (1983): 239-248.

Steinfels, Margaret O'Brien. "DEATH & LIES in EL SALVADOR: The Ambassador's Tale." Commonweal, October 26, 2001, 12.

Truth on El Salvador." The Nation, April 27, 1998, 3+.

Tulchin, Joseph S., Gary Bland, Joseph S. Tulchin, and Gary Bland, eds. Is There a Transition to Democracy in El Salvador?. Boulder, CO: L. Rienner Publishers, 1992.

US Military Dictionary: ORDEN. http://www.answers.com/topic/orden. (Accessed September 20, 2008)

Truth on El Salvador," the Nation, April 27, 1998.

David Kirsch. Death Squads in El Salvador: A Pattern of U.S. Complicity. http://www.ciponline.org/dethsqud.txt (Accessed September 20, 2008)

Neil C. Livingstone, "Death Squads," World Affairs 146, no. 3 (1983): 241.

ORDEN is referred to as: A government-sponsored paramilitary group created in El Salvador in the 1960s to counter a surge of political activity among peasants and urban workers. It is considered to be the precursor of El Salvador's death squads." (U.S. Military Dictionary: ORDEN) www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=95195901

Neil C. Livingstone, "Death Squads," World Affairs 146, no. 3 (1983): 241.

Joseph S. Tulchin, Gary Bland, Joseph S. Tulchin, and Gary Bland, eds., Is There a Transition to Democracy in El Salvador? (Boulder, CO: L. Rienner Publishers, 1992), 170/171. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=96895967

Joseph S. Tulchin, Gary Bland, Joseph S. Tulchin, and Gary Bland, eds., Is There a Transition to Democracy in El Salvador? (Boulder, CO: L. Rienner Publishers, 1992), 171.

David Kirsch. Death Squads in El Salvador: A Pattern of U.S. Complicity. http://www.ciponline.org/dethsqud.txt (Accessed September 20, 2008)

Allan Nairn. BEHIND the DEATH SQUADS:an exclusive report on the U.S. role in El Salvador's official terror. From: Nairn, Allan. "Behind the Death Squads." The Progressive May 1984: 20-28. http://www.votb.org/newsanalysis/behind_the_death_squads.html (Accessed September 20, 2008)

David Kirsch. Death Squads in El Salvador: A Pattern of U.S. Complicity. http://www.ciponline.org/dethsqud.txt (Accessed September 20, 2008)

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002111739

William F. Buckley, "Death Squads & U.S. Policy," National Review, February 24, 1984, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002111739.

Gregory R. Clark, Words of the Vietnam War the Slang, Jargon, Abbreviations, Acronyms, Nomenclature, Nicknames, Pseudonyms, Slogans, Specs, Euphemisms, Double-Talk, Chants, and Names and Places of the Era of United States Involvement in Vietnam (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1990), 399.

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