Video Games Violence Aggression and Term Paper

  • Length: 7 pages
  • Sources: 5
  • Subject: Recreation
  • Type: Term Paper
  • Paper: #22378202

Excerpt from Term Paper :



Methodology

The methodology that will be employed in this study will be a desk survey of existing studies. The data complied by the studies will be analyzed, as will be the processes and methodology used in those studies. The data compilation and yield will be discussed in comparison between studies, and an attempt will be made to take the information and use it in an overall presentation that shows that the data yields produced the same outcomes, demonstrating and supporting the hypothesis of this study.

There is no need to develop tables and perform experiments when previous studies have done that, and the information that exists is pertinent to the hypothesis of this study. What does need to occur in gathering the data from other sources, is that that data needs to be coordinated and presented together here in a way that the results are more visually comparable. It should, then, be possible to use a standard methodology formula in extrapolating evidence in support of the hypothesis here.

Results

The results will be presented not just in the form of an extrapolation of the supporting data, but in terms of the data taken from opposing studies that supposedly demonstrate that the hypothesis is flawed or wrong. The outcome of the data, and whether or not it supports or refutes the hypothesis, will depend upon the thoroughness, techniques, analysis of the data, and methodology employed by the researchers whose studies are the subject of this study.

This study could in fact demonstrate that the proposed hypothesis here is wrong, and that industry analysts who say that there is no relationship between video game violence and aggressive behavior in children, even violent crimes committed by children, are associated.

Discussion

The results will be discussed in a subsequent essay section, about 6 pages, which will put the data yields and comparisons into a review format.

There is a high level of confidence that the study will demonstrate, by way of existing data and studies, that an action above and beyond merely rating video games as violent or as to their content needs to be pursued by the legal community. That there needs to be a limit placed on video game viewing, and penalties associated with distributing that material to inappropriate age groups.

Informed Consent

Is not an factor in this desk study, because it relies upon an existing body of professional studies and data, and will be an analytical process of reviewing existing data, charts, methodologies. The process being proposed circumvents the need for being concerned about the legalese of informed consent.

References

Dietz, T.L. (1998). An Examination of Violence and Gender Role Portrayals in Video Games: Implications for Gender Socialization and Aggressive Behavior. Sex Roles: A Journal of Research, 38(5-6), 425+. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001342230

Gillespie, T. (2000, Summer). Violence, Games & Art. Technos: Quarterly for Education and Technology, 9, 16. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002362726

Heckel, R.V., & Shumaker, D.M. (2001). Children Who Murder: A Psychological Perspective. Westport, CT: Praeger. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101018967

Herzfeld, N. (2004, May 4). Video Shootout: The Games Kids Play. The Christian Century, 121, 22+. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5006860992

Kafai, Y.B. (1995). Minds in Play: Computer Game Design as a Context for Children's Learning. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27123339

Kerr, J.H. (2004). Rethinking Aggression and Violence in Sport. New York: Routledge. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108273548

Loftus, G.R., & Loftus, E.F. (1983). Mind at Play: The Psychology of Video Games. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100284172

Newman, J. (2004). Videogames. London: Routledge. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=107633249

Redmond, D. (2004). The World Is Watching: Video as Multinational Aesthetics, 1968-1995. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=110651210

Screen Violence 'Can Harm Even Well-Behaved Children'. (2005, June 13). The Daily Mail (London, England), p. 16. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5009589826

Twitchell, J.B. (1989). Preposterous Violence: Fables of Aggression in Modern Culture. New York: Oxford University Press. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=59080102

The Video Generation; What Effects Do Games Have on Children? Opinions Differ. (2003, March 9). The Washington Times, p. D01. Retrieved November 29, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000609339

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