Using Evidence to Support Your Case

Using Evidence to Support Your Case in a Research PaperWhen writing a research paper, it is very important to use a variety of types of evidence to support your argument. This means using both primary and secondary sources to defend your position. Primary sources include original historical and literary texts and raw data from an experiment you performed; secondary sources include information about primary sources written by other scholars or literature reviews of previous experiments. It is also a good idea, when compiling secondary sources, to solicit a variety of opinions on the topic. Particularly when researching a controversial issue, you should consider the opposing side and explicitly refute major arguments. It makes your case look much stronger, versus merely ignoring the opposition.

Sometimes, of course, your professor will tell you very specifically what sources to use: an assignment might require you to simply do a textual analysis of a single document required in class, versus going out on your own to do research. But in instances where you are required to do independent research, the professor is actually grading your ability to find and vet high-quality sources, not simply the quality of your analysis. A paper that is built upon poorly-researched sources (such as anonymous web pages or crowd-sourced documents like Wikipedia) will likely receive a poor grade, regardless of the quality of the prose.

That is why using PaperDue is such a valuable resource for so many students and has resulted in better grades for its users year after year and semester after semester. Our sample assignments and professional examples of research help you get a better understanding of what constitutes scholarly research and acceptable academic writing. It’s easy to feel like you’re lost in a wilderness of information when trying to construct a credible research paper. We can help.

 

 

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Writing a Good Introduction for Your Essay / Term Paper

Writing a good Introduction for your Essay or Term Paper

It’s a common but very true cliché that you only get one chance to make a good first impression. This is not only true at parties and during job interviews but also on the written page: a good introductory paragraph with a strong attention-getting ‘hook’ that is grammatically correct and compelling can predispose your professor to view your paper much more favorably. Unless you are writing a creative assignment or your professor says otherwise, always have a clearly-signposted thesis at the beginning of your essay. It is also a good idea under most circumstances to have a general outline for the body paragraphs of your essay. In the classic five-paragraph essay format, this usually means approximately three separate and distinct points to support your original thesis. Think of a good introduction as a roadmap, and a good map always has appropriate ‘signposts’ when needed for readers.

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Writing the Perfect Short Essay

Writing the Perfect Short Essay

By now, most students are beginning to get their first assignments for their classes. Even if these are short assignments, they still matter in terms of creating a good impression for the professor of the student’s quality of work. In fact, with shorter assignments it is all the more important to write well and make sure that every last syllable has value and meaning, since the format is far more compressed than with a long research paper.

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Preparing for the Spring Semester

Preparing for the spring semester

There is snow on the ground and the temperature is below freezing in many areas—but classes begin soon so it’s time to start preparing for the spring semester. Preparation means more than buying new school supplies and books. Look over your classes and see what challenges await you. If you struggle with long research papers and one of your required classes for your major requires a long one, start looking around for sources of assistance now, like help from your university writing center. If you have a day when you must take many classes back-to-back, have a plan to deal with the mental fatigue that may set in, like bringing a snack with you to get you through your lunchtime classes. Create a calendar of your class times and deadlines so you can coordinate them with outside commitments to family and work.

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Choosing Classes Wisely for the Upcoming Semester

choosing classes wisely for your semester

Although sometimes the last thing you want to think about is the upcoming semester during your winter break, inevitably you have to consider—or reconsider—your class selection at some point. If you are a freshman, you may be still exploring and trying out new classes in search of your passion or your prospective major. If you are a senior, you may be most intent upon finishing up your requirements for graduation. Regardless, it is a good idea to keep certain factors in mind when selecting classes.

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