Branded Forever Brands Cannot Be Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

These can bring in new audiences, retain old audiences (like dieters who might be alienated from Coke because of concerns about calories) or can encourage greater consumption (as children with the smallest of scrapes might want a Sponge Bob Band-Aid for fashion's sake). But all of these examples of product extensions do not alter the fundamental associations of the brand as synonymous with America, or with gentle and loving care (Kotler & Keller, 2003).

Brands can endure a great deal -- even Aunt Jemina, Barbie, and Betty Crocker remain, although the Civil Rights and feminist movements may shudder at their images -- the product remains popular, so people continue to buy. Of course, the downside to such ubiquitous associations between a brand and a product is that if the product, such as fast food, becomes unpopular for cultural reasons beyond the marketer's control, like the current war against obesity, the product (like McDonald's) may suffer. However, by changing its brand positioning, and stressing value with its Dollar Menu, rather than food, folks, and fun and a more homespun image, the brand is
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still solvent.

Brand durability may have a great deal to do with what consumers identify by and use in their homes -- for example: "The listing of the most frequently promoted brands is dominated by consumer packaged goods companies reflecting the prevalence of the food, drug and mass merchants in the advertising analysis and marketers reliance on circulars and print ads to appeal to consumers who shop those channels. The lone exception was Sony, which ranked as the sixth most frequently promoted brand and the only manufacturer of durable goods to make the list"(Troy, 2005). Brands that ranked high in customer identification were Coca-Cola, Tylenol, and Huggies. Thus, when forecasting likely brand death, a computer company like Dell a hundred years from now might struggle more than Hershey's Chocolate to remain a solvent brand. Still, it seems like forecasts of inevitable brand death may be overly pessimistic, or at least often unduly premature.

Works Cited

Kotler, P. & Keller, K. (2003). Marketing Management

12th Ed.). Upper Saddle River: Prentice-Hall.

Troy, Mike. (24 Oct 2005) "The Roto role: how leading brands maintain their top-shelf status." DSN Retailing Today. Retrieved 19 Mar 2007 at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FNP/is_20_44/ai_n15789798

Sources Used in Documents:

Works Cited

Kotler, P. & Keller, K. (2003). Marketing Management

12th Ed.). Upper Saddle River: Prentice-Hall.

Troy, Mike. (24 Oct 2005) "The Roto role: how leading brands maintain their top-shelf status." DSN Retailing Today. Retrieved 19 Mar 2007 at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FNP/is_20_44/ai_n15789798

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