Training Effective Training for Career Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :

Perhaps the most compelling finding in the study by Kotey & Folker is that which denotes that in early growth stages, family firms will actually tend to demonstrate a greater formality in training approaches than will nonfamily firms. Ultimately though, the research finds that size is a major driver of how training strategies are designed. This supports the notion that training must largely be constructed with the specific characteristics of the hiring organization as the foremost determinant.

A good training process will not only offer education and instruction on performing in one's responsibilities and working within company procedural norms, but it should also help to demonstrate the value system of the company, to convey its ethical priorities, to induce a sense of belonging within its culture and to reinforce a consistency of company identity. This means that certain company characteristics must be captured through the training process in addition to the practical requirements of transferring knowledge.

It is also important to convey the expectations that will relate to performance evaluations. Further, it is incumbent upon the training organization to tailor these performance evaluation strategies to individual strengths and abilities. As such, measurement of learning levels will be complemented by ongoing reaction level observations. This will help to individualize responses to training implications and the indicators of those performance standards there promoted. In order to accomplish this, employees should be consulted in private one-on-one sessions with Human Resources, in which "an open dialogue should occur which allows the exchange of performance oriented information." (OHR, 1)

This approach should have a positive reciprocal effect of bringing to the surface the strengths and shortcomings of the training program while simultaneously offering employees feedback on the administrative perceptions as to the justification for the approach taken and the learning benchmarks set. By ensuring that employees are aware of and engaged in the process of both training and training evaluation, an organization significantly improves the sense amongst its personnel that they have a vested stake in the company's decisions, its process and its future.

This discussion demonstrates that while training is critical in and of itself, it must be properly approached in order to achieve its desired impact. This means devising strategy that is suited to both the nature of the company and to the personnel in whom this training will be invested.

Works Cited:

eCornell. (2010). Best Practices in Employee Development. www.ecornell.com/enterprise

Kotey, B. & Folker, C. (2007). Employee Training in SMEs: Effect of Size and Firm Type -- Family and Nonfamily. Journal of Small Business Management, 45(2), 214-238.

OHR. (2002). Employee Performance…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited:

eCornell. (2010). Best Practices in Employee Development. www.ecornell.com/enterprise

Kotey, B. & Folker, C. (2007). Employee Training in SMEs: Effect of Size and Firm Type -- Family and Nonfamily. Journal of Small Business Management, 45(2), 214-238.

OHR. (2002). Employee Performance Evaluation: Procedures Guide. East Tennessee State University.

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