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Addiction Treatment Essays (Examples)

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Treatment Efficacy Do Treatments and
Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Reaction Paper Paper #: 55595769
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Alcohol and drug abuse is not limited to any socioeconomic category, race, religion, or gender. Finding the right drug, the right type of support group, and the right type of intervention can be a long and difficult process. For example, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) offers special resources for recently-deployed combat officers, teens, and even obese individuals, all of which are tailored to meet the different challenges that life circumstances, age of life, or biology can pose that predispose an individual to addictive behaviors or affect an addict's treatment plan.

However, improving opportunities for jobs and treating communities as well as individuals seems essential to aiding those who are disproportionately affected by addiction. All addicts feel the effects of tolerance and physiological and psychological dependency to some degree, depending on the nature of the drug and their biology (Oakley & Ksir, 2003, pp45-46). But while social…

References

Adrian, Manuella. (2001). Do treatments and other interventions work? Some critical issues.

Substance Use & Misuse, 36 (13): 1759-1780

NIAAA. Alcoholism. Getting the Facts. Retrieved October 8. 2010 at  http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/ 

Oakley S. Ray & Charles Ksir. (2003). Drugs, society, and human behavior. New York:

Treatment of Women Offenders The
Words: 3904 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52229761
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CAEFS takes the position that women with mental health problems do not belong in prisons and that the treatment, support and assistance they need should be provided to them in the community, rather than in prison.

Recommendation #2)

The above statement clearly outlines central problem areas that should be the focus of investigation. As this study and others emphasize, women who enter prison with mental issues and problems require intensive support. However, this is at present not the case and many women prisoners who suffer from mental problems are not afforded the necessary support and adequate intensive therapy. Some critics also suggest that alternatives be investigated for women with mental issues. "... The public need for the appearance of retribution may deter government from considering alternatives to sentencing persons with mental disabilities to imprisonment." www.elizabethfry.ca/submissn/dawn/17.htm" (ibid)

Another factor which relates to mental and psychological issues is that women experience stress…

Bibliography

Bilchik, Shay, Cyntha Seymour, and Kristen Kreisher. "Parents in Prison." Corrections Today Dec. 2001: 108+. Questia. 17 Feb. 2005  http://www.questia.com/ .

Bjorhus, Jennifer. "Getting into Prison." Columbia Journalism Review July-Aug. 1994: 14+. Questia. 17 Feb. 2005

Treatment and Management of Cancer Diagnosis Obligations
Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16892447
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Treatment and Management of Cancer

Cancer Diagnosis

Obligations of community health nurse in providing healthcare

Cancer Diagnosis

The high demand for healthcare services, especially to those managing dreadful illnesses such as cancer, there is a dire need to understand the health promotion strategies and also ensure quality lives. Here, is a discussion assisting to analyze how best to improve health and better management of dreaded conditions like diseases such as cancer. Those affected will learn to adopt the right measures that will help to improve functional abilities, and what to practice in case self-care is not an option. The mandate of community health nurses will be scrutinized, to help acquire general knowledge on efficient management of diseases.

Cancer is a disease, which has characteristics of growths that cannot be controlled, and also the abnormality of how rapidly the cells are spread to other organs. Cancers vary in their areas of…

Treatment of Alcoholics in Low-Income Areas
Words: 2687 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31166019
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S. Census Bureau) It is clear after having reviewed this information that this area is quite needy in provision of alcoholism treatment and intervention.

VI. Treatment Program Community Marketing Process

In the initiative of reaching the community both through media and public relations as tools to raise awareness the organization will be enabled to alert members of the community about the services available. Promotions, marketing, public relations and media advocacy are all critical specifically as these are all integrated with the business sector and as well adapted by nonprofit organizations. In the attempt to market or advertise to the community the available services all venues of the media should be sought and the mass media in the form of newspaper and magazines and other printed material as well as media through television and radio broadcast communications and finally through the Internet's provision of electronic media. Communication with the media should…

References

Ervin, N.E. (2002). Advanced community health nursing practice: Population-focused care. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall. ISBN# 0-8053-7364-0.

Bensley, R.J., & Brookins-Fisher, J. (EDs). (2003). Community health education method: a practitioners guide. (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Jones and Bartlett. ISBN# 0-7637-1801-7

Andreasen, A.R. (1995). Marketing social change: Changing behavior to promote health, social development, and the environment. San Francisco CA: Jossey-Bass. ISBN# 0-7879-0137-7

Medicaid EPSDT and AOD Treatment Services Policy Brief entitled Resources for Recovery: State Practices that Expand Treatment Opportunities" Medicaid EPSDT and AOD Treatment Services" (O'Brien, et al., 2005) National Program Office, Technical Assistance Collaborative, Inc. Online located at: www.resourcesforrecovery.org

Chemical Addiction Progress More Rapidly in Young
Words: 2102 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98392642
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Chemical Addiction Progress More apidly in Young People than Adults?

Chemical dependency is the obsessive use of chemicals like drugs, alcohol, and tobacco and the incapacity to stop using them, in spite of all the troubles caused by their use. People with a chemical dependency can stop using for a while but find it hard to start all together. This is where professional help is needed to stop it for life. Those who quit without professional help, typically overcome with an agonizing desire to resume alcohol, tobacco or drug use. Alcohol and drug addiction are progressive diseases. In most, addictions begin gradually and grow until one's life becomes increasingly uncontrollable. As recurring efforts to gain control over the addiction are unsuccessful, life for the person who has developed a chemical dependency begins to fall apart (Chemical dependency, n.d.).

Drug addictions in young people have been found to progresses more quickly…

References

Chapter 2 -- The Role of PPC in a Managed Care Environment. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://kap.samhsa.gov/products/manuals/tips/13b.htm

Chemical Dependency. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.aboutdrugtreatment.org/chemical_dependency.htm

Chemical Dependency. (2011). Retrieved from  http://www.galaxrecovery.com/chemical_dependency_treatment.asp 

Drug and Alcohol Information. (2005). Retrieved from http://www.egetgoing.com/drug_addiction/chemical_dependency_treatment.asp

Psychology Motivational Interviewing and Addiction Substance
Words: 1252 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 42659880
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The book adds substance, extent, lucidity, and substantiation to the clinical and training processes, and will add energy to mainstreaming motivational advances to behavior change in health care. Primary care physicians and practitioners can augment their expert work and improve patient outcomes by learning about motivational interviewing.

Motivational Interviewing can be defined as a client-centered, directive method for making better inherent motivation to change by investigating and resolving ambivalence. It comprises a mixture of philosophical and clinical aspects that together make up the whole of MI. Motivational interviewing distinguishes and recognizes the fact that clients who need to make changes in their lives move toward counseling at dissimilar levels of eagerness to change their behavior. If the counseling is mandated, they may never have thought of altering the behavior in question. A few may have thought about it but not taken action to do it. Others, particularly those freely seeking…

References

Miller, William R. & Rollnick, Stephen. (2002). Motivational interviewing: preparing people for change. New York: The Guilford Press.

Smith, David E. & Seymour, Richard. (2001). Clinician's Guide to Substance Abuse. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Personal'statement on how to properly improve addiction outcomes
Words: 898 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Admission Essay Paper #: 63929176
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As a nurse, for nearly 20 years, I have demonstrated my passion for helping others in their time of need. The recent COVID-19 pandemic has reinforced this commitment to saving the lives of others who require the assistance of competent healthcare professionals. The pandemic has only exacerbated the need of selfless healthcare workers who often to the detriment of their own families, look to care for others. Over my nearly two decades within the profession I have seen first-hand, how important high quality of care is to patient outcomes. One such area I have become particularly passionate about is that of substance abuse addiction. Here, the recent COVID-19 pandemic has placed an unprecedented amount of stress of individuals and their families. Healthcare workers are continually putting their lives and families lives in danger, patients are dealing with significant job loss and lack of income, children are dealing with lack of…

Natural Remission Has Had on the Addiction
Words: 2625 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 86323293
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Natural Remission Has Had on the Addiction Field

Spontaneous remission from addiction is often referred to under different titles. These include, natural recovery, maturing out, and unassisted change. All of these titles refer to the process of recovering or being in remission from an addiction without the intervention of conventional methods and techniques of addiction treatment. Until fairly recently the idea of spontaneous remission had been vilified in the medical profession as being misleading and even dangerous. A paper by Chiauzzi and Liljegren ( 1993) entitled Taboo topics in addiction treatment: an empirical review of clinical folklore, stated that the concept of natural recovery was identified as a ... Taboo topic, stating that disease model advocates had put forth a tautological argument that an ability to cease addictive behaviors on one's own suggests that the individual was not addicted in the first place, .the failure to seek treatment for a…

Bibliography

Burman, S. (1997) The challenge of sobriety: Natural recovery without treatment and self-help groups. Journal of Substance Abuse, 9, 41-61.

Granfield, R. & Cloud, W. (1996). The elephant that no one sees:

Natural recovery among middle class addicts. Journal of Drug Issues, 26, 45-61.

Hester Reid K., Miller, William R. ( 1995) editors: Handbook of Alcoholism Treatment Approaches: Effective Alternatives: (2nd Ed.) Allyn & Bacon (Review) ( PDF) Retrieved April 15, 2005. Web site: http://www.unhooked.com/booktalk/hester_miller_handbook.html.

Combating Alcoholism and Addiction
Words: 2074 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 46383990
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vignette pertaining to addiction. Ethical and legal factors will be considered. Also discussed will be cross cultural matters related to the topic. Possible solutions to the issue at hand will also be considered.

Middle-aged couple, Anna and James, drops in for an appointment as Kevin, their son aged 16 years, faces suspension from school because of 'drug paraphernalia' found in his school bag. While James is Native-American, Anna is Japanese-American. James goes on to say that it is all Anna's fault, stating that she has smoked pot on a daily basis for the most part of their married life. Anna is of the view that she at least isn't a slobbering drunk like James, further elucidating that James over-indulges in drinking alcohol on weekends. It is discovered, in the course of assessment that James as well as Anna come from alcoholic homes.

Session one

Much is to be taken into…

References

(n.d.).CASAColumbia - Addiction Science, Prevention & Treatment Research. Designing an Addiction Treatment Plan | CASAColumbia. Retrieved May 19, 2015, from  http://www.casacolumbia.org/addiction-treatment/treatment-plan 

(n.d.). Internet Archive: Digital Library of Free Books, Movies, Music & Wayback Machine. DSM-5.pdf (PDFy mirror).Retrieved May 19, 2015, from http://archive.org/stream/pdfy-85JiVdvN0MYbNrcr/DSM-5#page/n637/mode/2up

(n.d.).National Center for Biotechnology Information. Chapter 4 Integrated Models for Treating Family Members - Substance Abuse Treatment and Family Therapy - NCBI Bookshelf.Retrieved May 19, 2015, from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64266/ 

(n.d.).National Center for Biotechnology Information. Chapter 4: Screening and Assessment - Substance Abuse Treatment: Addressing the Specific Needs of Women - NCBI Bookshelf. Retrieved May 19, 2015, from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK83253/

A Puerto Rican Woman with Comorbid Addiction A Case Study
Words: 947 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 47748394
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Puerto ican Woman with Comorbid Addiction: A Case Study

Ms. Perez is a 53-year-old Puerto ican female who has complained that she is suffering from co-morbid addictions of alcoholism and gambling. Ms. Perez has sought treatment for alcoholism in the past but the combination of living near a casino and the availability of alcohol has caused her to relapse as well as to engage in gambling on a regular basis. Her gambling has negatively impacted her marriage and has also caused her to borrow significant sums from her retirement account. The patient is exhibiting the symptoms of depression, including a sad and lethargic demeanor.

Decision One

One option for the patient is prescribing Antabuse (Disulfiram), a medication which "blocks an enzyme that is involved in metabolizing alcohol intake" and "produces very unpleasant side effects when combined with alcohol in the body" ("Antabuse," 2017). The drug is designed to interfere with…

References

Antabuse. (2017). Drugs.com. Retrieved from:  https://www.drugs.com/antabuse.html 

Armand, W. (2016). What's the best way to quit smoking? Harvard Health Publications.

Retrieved from:  http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/whats-best-way-quit-smoking-201607089935 

Campral. (2017). Drugs.com. Retrieved from:  https://www.drugs.com/campral.html

Treatment modalities for ACT and IPT
Words: 1012 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22005872
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IPT have distinct roles, and different patients may be referred to one of these treatment modalities yet resist treatment in some way. Rather than viewing these patients as categorically "difficult," therapists would be better off repositioning and rebranding ACT and IPT to better sell their respective models. It is also helpful to understand patient reservations, recognize there may be cross-cultural variables at stake in the communication process, or other patient-centric variables impacting their attitudes toward the particular modality. Many patients naturally mistrust a treatment modality that is new or unfamiliar to them, or which they have never heard of before in the media. Therefore, therapists of either ACT or IPT need to use a variety of communications strategies to encourage patient compliance when necessary. It may be helpful to describe examples of noncompliant or resistant patients in order to better grasp the types of techniques used to educate and inform,…

Treatment of Bi-Polar Disease Is
Words: 1058 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 18562355
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Studies conducted by Doughty et al. (2004) suggest that panic disorders, potentially exacerbated by the panic-inducing qualities of drug usage, are significantly associated with bi-polar disease, and Long finds that panic disorders are generationally related to bi-polar. Therefore, the well-known panic- and anxiety-related effects of drug usage have been shown to be related to bipolar disorder, so that both diseases correlate. Further, chemical responses that drive the bi-polar are complicated by the chemical effects of drug addiction, making treatment difficult to sort out. The associated risk of suicide, already high with sufferers of bi-polar disorder, is heightened. Care and treatment, both physical and mental, must be approached in an integrated fashion.

Drug and chemical treatments for dual diagnosis patients have attempted to sort out the effects of each disorder. However, because the brain centers that are impacted by drug abuse and addiction are often driven by the same or similar…

Works Cited

Doughty, C., Wells, J., Joyce, P., Olds, R., & Walsh, A. (2004). Bipolar-panic disorder comorbidity within bipolar disorder families: a study of siblings. Bipolar Disorders, 6(3), 245-252. doi:10.1111/j.1399-5618.2004.00120.x.

Long, M. (2005). Bipolar Disorders. Retrieved from http:/ / www.mentalhealth.com/dis/p20-md02.html. Internet Mental Health.

Michael's House. n.d. 10 important facts about dual diagnosis and bipolar disorder. Retrieved from  http://www.michaelshouse.com/dual-dual-diagnosis/about-dual-diagnosis-bipolar-disorder .

Whitten, L. (2008). Aripiprazole prevents rats from resuming cocaine seeking. Nida Notes, 22(2), 4-5. Retrieved from CINAHL database.

The Disease Model of Addiction
Words: 704 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 88748244
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Addiction as a Disease

While drug addiction may not bring about obvious physical changes like some diseases, it still causes permanent changes to the brain. Drugs circumvent the natural system of rewards generated by the brain, whereby performing a pleasurable action will cause a release of dopamine. "The natural capacity to produce dopamine in the reward system is reduced, while the need persists and the drug seems to be the only way to fulfill it. The brain is losing its access to other, less immediate and powerful sources of reward. Addicts may require constantly higher doses and a quicker passage into the brain" ("The addicted brain," 2009). Contrary to Hojung Lee's suggestion, addiction is not really analogous to a habit, despite the fact that it is often called that (as in "he has a drug habit"). The compulsion to use is irresistible to the addict, which is why addicts will…

References

The addicted brain. (2009). Harvard Mental Health Letter. Retrieved from:

 http://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/the_addicted_brain 

Bevilacqua, L. & Goldman, D. (2009). Genes and Addictions. Clinical Pharmacology

Therapeutics, 85 (4): 359-361. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2715956/

Category or Type of Treatment or Services
Words: 933 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3575171
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category or type of treatment or services does your program or facility provide?

The program was one for Sex and Love Addiction (SLAA). It uses the 12-step format to address the addiction

Is there a well-defined structure used for the type(s) of treatment provided?

Two qualified facilitators lead the group. They use the manual of the 12 steps for general addiction and apply it to the group. Approximately 12-15 people attend. The group starts off by facilitators welcoming the members and describing the objectives of the group as well as asking new members if they wish to introduce themselves. They pass around a paper that briefly describes their group. They then say what they hope to achieve in this session and ask members whether anyone has any success that they wish to report about related to the last. Each member then takes a turn in reading an excerpt of the…

Causes and Treatment for Food Addiction
Words: 924 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61445747
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Addiction…Final Outline

Food Addiction: Causes and Treatment

First Study

Fortuna, J.L. (2012). The obsesity epidemic and food addiction: Clinical similarities to drug

Dependence. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 44(1), pp. 56-63.

As of 2010, nearly 70% of adult Americans were overweight or obese. Fast food establishments are abundant, portion sizes are larger, and people generally have insufficient intake of Omega 3 fatty acids. Additionally, Americans do not get sufficient physical exercise.

Sugar primes endorphin and dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, similar to the "high" experienced by users of illegal drugs. In some individuals, this brings about addictive behavior very similar to that seen in alcoholics and substance addicts.

Methods

Fortuna reviewed the literature that investigated two clinical similarities between food addiction and drug dependence.

Animal studies show that bingeing on high-sugar foods, compared to fat dense foods, trigger the release of endorphin and dopamine.

3. Similar results were obtained with human…

References

Fortuna, J.L. (2012). The obesity epidemic and food addiction: Clinical similarities to drug

Dependence. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 44(1), pp. 56-63.

Karim, R., and Chaudhri, P. (2012). Behavioral Addictions: An overview. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 44(1), pp. 5-17.

Liebman, B. (2012). Food & addiction: Can some foods hijack the brain? Nutrition Action

Etiology of Theories on Addiction
Words: 1301 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48595172
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Etiology of Theories on Addiction

There are different sorts of addictions and substance abuse methods that plague the world today. However, in order to cure an addiction, one needs to go down to its root cause, and eliminate it, after which the damages caused can be mitigated and prevented. There are several theories and approaches to tackle an addiction problem. Most trained professionals use these theories in their treatment plan to get a better understanding of when and how the addiction came into being. After which, along with therapy, counseling and medication, the road to recovery can begin.

Medical etiology is the study of causes of an illness or any psychological condition. When a diseases is uncovered which the doctors are unable to explain and understand, an etiologist is responsible for determining the reason for its origin and being (Alcoholism, 2005). In this manner, the etiologist and the doctors are…

Bibliography

Alcoholism, N.I. (2005). Module 2: Etiology and Natural History of Alcoholism. National Institute of on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

O' Farrell, T., & Fals-Stewart, W. (1999). Treatment models and methods: Family models. New York: Oxford University Press.

Sheehan, T., & Owen, P. (1999). Addictions: A comprehensive guidebook. New York: Oxford University Press.

Substance Addiction the Magnitude of
Words: 1751 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43378451
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ILIOGRAPHY

NLM (2012). Substance abuse treatment of women. Chapter 4. National Library of Medicine: National Institutes of Health. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NK83257

- Screening and assessment. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books.NK83253

rauser, D (2010), Sublingual buprenorphine relieves symptoms of neonatal opioid abstinence syndrome, Medscape: Medscape LLC. Retrieved on December 9, 2012

from http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/730366

Fisher, P.A. et al. (2011). The combined effects of prenatal drug exposure and early adversity on neurobehavioral dis-inhibition in childhood and adolescence,

Developmental Psychopathology. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3335443

Hamdan, a.H. (2012). Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Medscape: Medscape LLC.

Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.emedicine.medscape.com/article/978763-clinical

Johnson, K et al. (2003). Treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome, Archive of Disease

in Childhood. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.bmj.com/content/88/1/F.2.2.ful

Johnson, K and Leff, M (1999). Children of substance abusers. Pediatrics. American Academy of Pediatrics. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from http://www.pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/103/Supplement_2/1085.long

Kraft, W.K. et al. (2010). Future trends…

BIBLIOGRAPHY

NLM (2012). Substance abuse treatment of women. Chapter 4. National Library of Medicine: National Institutes of Health. Retrieved on December 9, 2012 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK83257 

- Screening and assessment.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books.NBK83253 

Brauser, D (2010), Sublingual buprenorphine relieves symptoms of neonatal opioid abstinence syndrome, Medscape: Medscape LLC. Retrieved on December 9, 2012

from  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/730366

Enforcement of Psychology Treatment for the Mentally Ill
Words: 8451 Length: 27 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 95839705
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Psychology Treatment

For most of U.S. history up to the time of the Community Mental Health Act of 1963, the mentally ill were generally warehoused in state and local mental institutions on a long-term basis. Most had been involuntarily committed by orders from courts or physicians, and the discharge rate was very low. Before the 1950s and 1960s, there were few effective treatments for mental illnesses like depression, anxiety disorders and schizophrenia, which were commonly considered incurable. Only with the psycho-pharmacological revolution in recent decades and new anti-depressant and anti-psychotic medications has it been possible for the severely mentally ill to be treated on an outpatient basis through community mental health centers. Of course, as the old state hospitals have emptied many of the mentally ill have ended up homeless, since they are unable to hold maintain regular employment or continue on a medication regimen without supervision. According to present-day…

REFERENCES

Bacon. H. "Book Review: Jonathan Willows, Moving On after Childhood Sexual Abuse: Understanding the Effects and Preparing for Therapy in Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry. (15)1 January 2010, pp. 141-42.

Bartels, S.J., A.D. van Citters and T. Crenshaw (2010). "Older Adults" in Levin, B.L., J. Petrila and K. Hennessy Mental Health Services: A Public Health Perspective. Oxford University Presss: 261-82.

Behar, E.S. And T.D. Borkovec. (2003). "Psychotherapy Outcome Research" in I.B. Weiner et al., eds. Handbook of Psychology: Research Methods in Psychology. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Carron, V.G. And K. Hull. (2009). "Treatment Manual for Trauma-Exposed Youth: Case Studies." Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry 15(1) 13 November 2009, pp. 27-38.

Ethics and Addiction it Is
Words: 1677 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87736357
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These kinds of compulsive behaviors are observed on a daily basis. It has been highlighted by the authors that there is an acceptable use policy implicated on the students in academic institutions and on the daily basis, without regarding the restrictions placed by these policies, students work against the policy. According to the policy, computers within the universities can only be used for academic purposes only. The policy has highlighted that computers in an academic environment should not be used for online sharing, downloading, social networking and gaming (Nykodym, Ariss, & Kurtz, 2008, p. 7). But in the campuses and academic institutions, it is seen that the students usually sit in for social networking and gaming. Thereby, from here it can be seen that either the students don't want to follow the policies or they don't want to understand the restrictions placed in the policies.

The authors have highlighted that…

References

Nykodym, N., Ariss, S., & Kurtz, K. (2008). Computer Addiction and Cyber Crime. Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics .

Poulsen, K. (2011). Kingpin: how one hacker took over the billion-dollar cybercrime underground. Crown Publishing Group.

Roberts, K. (2010). Cyber Junkie: Escape the Gaming and Internet Trap. Hazelden Publishing.

Ross, A.J. (2008). How to Hug a Porcupine: Negotiating the Prickly Points of the Tween Years. McGraw-Hill Professional.

Physiological Effects and Treatments for
Words: 902 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 68982866
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Different routes of cocaine administration can produce different adverse effects. egularly snorting cocaine, for example, can lead to loss of sense of smell, nosebleeds, problems with swallowing, hoarseness, and an overall irritation of the nasal septum, which can lead to a chronically inflamed, runny nose. Ingested cocaine can cause severe bowel gangrene, due to reduced blood flow. Persons who inject cocaine have puncture marks and tracks, most commonly in their forearms. Intravenous cocaine users may also experience an allergic reaction, either to the drug, or to some additive in street cocaine, which can result, in severe cases, in death. Because cocaine has a tendency to decrease food intake, many chronic cocaine users lose their appetites and can experience significant weight loss and malnourishment. The human liver combines cocaine and alcohol and manufactures a third substance, cocaethylene, which intensifies cocaine's euphoric effects 3. The mixture of cocaine and alcohol is the…

References

1. Quaglio G, Lugoboni F, Pajusco B, Fornasiero a, Mezzelani P, Lechi a. [Clinical manifestations of cocaine abuse]. Ann Ital Med Int. Oct-Dec 2004;19(4):291-301; quiz 302-293.

2. White SM, Lambe CJ. The pathophysiology of cocaine abuse. J Clin Forensic Med. Mar 2003;10(1):27-39.

3. Velasquez EM, Anand RC, Newman WP, 3rd, Richard SS, Glancy DL. Cardiovascular complications associated with cocaine use. J La State Med Soc. Nov-Dec 2004;156(6):302-310; quiz 311.

4. Sofuoglu M, Kosten TR. Novel approaches to the treatment of cocaine addiction. CNS Drugs. 2005;19(1):13-25.

Psycho-Social Dynamics of Alcoholic Addiction Family
Words: 1931 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 86530127
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Psyco-Social Dynamics of Alcoholic Addiction Family

Alcoholism is a disease.

It affects the entire family and creates an environment of dysfunction and disorganization.

ithin the family, the social and psychological ramifications of alcoholism affect the alcoholic, his or her spouse, and the children.

Children Supporting Paragraph

Children must cope with the effects of an alcoholic on the family (disorganization).

There are five roles which serve as coping mechanisms.

The mascot, placater, acting out child, lost child, responsible child.

Child Roles Supporting Paragraph

Roles either make things better or worse.

The responsible child excels

The mascot and placater child intermediate.

The former does so from foolery, the second from caring.

The lost child disassociates.

The acting out child gets in trouble.

Spouse Supporting Paragraph

A. Spouses are more of a determinant of an alcoholic's behavior than children.

B. Spouses have three perspectives on actions of the alcoholic.

1. They like alcoholism…

Works Cited

Devine, Cindy and Valerie Braithwaite. "The Survival Roles of Children and Alcoholics: Their Measurement and Validity." Addiction 88.1: 69-78. 1993. Print.

Glover, Geraldine. "The Hero Child in the Alcoholic Home: Recommendations for Counselors." School Counselor 41: 185-191. 1994. Print.

Janzen, Curtis. "Family Treatment for Alcoholism: A Review." Social Work 23.2: 135-144. 1978. Print.

Johnson, Patrick. "Dimensions of Functioning in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Families." Journal of Mental Counseling 23 (2001): 127-136

Impact of meditation on addiction therapy
Words: 1104 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31783494
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A synthesis of what the studies reveal about the current state of knowledge on the question developed

The mindfulness meditation theory appears to have the potential to treat addictive disorder patients. Zgierska and coworkers (2009) state that such models seem to be safe if implemented within the context of clinical studies. One can find considerable methodological shortcomings in a majority of existing works on the subject. Further, which addiction-diagnosed individuals may derive maximum benefits out of mindfulness meditation isn’t clear. But, of late, related initiatives and practices in the role of complementary clinical aids for treating multiple physical and psychological ailments have grown in popularity. MBCT (mindfulness-based cognitive therapy) and MBSR (mindfulness-based stress reduction) as clinical initiatives have specifically been analyzed, with a sound evidential pool recording their efficacy. Integration of the latter initiative’s aspects and cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive psychology strategies resulted in the former’s creation. At first,…

Homelessness Addiction and Mental Illness
Words: 1447 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55796950
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The recurrence of homelessness for individuals may be frequently attributed to drug addiction.

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

8.

The recurrence of homelessness for individuals may be frequently attributed to mental illness.

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

9.

There is a clear reciprocal relationship between homelessness, drug addiction and mental illness.

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

10.

Mental illness plays a significant role in preventing homeless individuals from f inding suitable long-term housing. .

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

Implementation:

Singleton identifies the systematic procedure as a form of data gathering in which a survey or interview will be utilized in order to gather information for further analysis. His text points to the large-scale probability study as a form in which substantial populations can be measured according to representative sample sets. The "scientific sampling…

Works Cited:

The National Institutional Health (NIH). (1979). Regulations and Ethical Guidelines. The National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research.

Singleton, R.A. & Straits, B.C. (1999). Approaches to Social Research. Oxford

Porter Treatment and Support for June Porter
Words: 947 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62158693
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Porter

Treatment and support for June Porter sufferer of Depression and Drug & alcohol

Depression

Drug

Alcohol

Support

The patients using excessive alcohol, drugs, or suffering from other mental and physical illness can only be treated according to the prescribed methods adopted by the doctors and physicians. The usage of drugs and alcohol is also one of the factors that hold the tendency to create a potential for depression. There are other multiple means of developing depression and related mental illnesses. The issues related to June Porter are discussed in the sections below with a solution provided in the concluding section.

Depression:

Depression is regarded as a one of the mental health issue which cannot be considered as a reaction to everyday normal events. The result of these events might be interpreted in terms of happiness or grief. There are multiple dimensional impacts of depression on human beings. It is…

References:

Mental Health Information Service (2010a).Dual Diagnosis. Retrieved From: http://www.mentalhealth.asn.au/

Mental Health Information Service (2010b).Depression.Retrieved from: www.mentalhealth.asn.au

National Health and Medical Research Council (2009).Australian Guidelines to Reduce Health Risks from Drinking Alcohol.

National Health and Medical Research Council (2009).Australian guidelines to reduce health risksfrom drinking alcohol.Retrieved from: www.nhmrc.gov.au/publications

Self-Harm Treatment Self-Harm Classification and
Words: 1467 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 27672759
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' A cognitive behavioral therapist might ask, what will harming yourself do to improve your grades on the test? Cognitive therapies in general have been shown to be more effective than traditional supportive talk therapies when treating anxiety conditions because they offer concrete steps for self-improvement on a continuing basis (Reeves 2003, p1.). Patients are also asked to identify things they would like to do in which current behavior patterns prevent them from engaging, such as wearing short-sleeved shirts.

Cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapy shows a higher success rate in anxiety disorders and OCD than traditional psychotherapy, likely because of its behavioral component. The fact that many DSH patients are diagnosed with BPD may complicate treatment, but BPT responds well in some instances to these therapies, too. BPT patients manifest disordered patterns of relationships, thinking, behavior, and coping mechanisms that contribute to unstable life patterns as well as contribute to the…

Works Cited

Bland, Ann R., Georgina Tudor & Deborah McNeil Whitehouse (2007, October). Nursing care of inpatients with Borderline Personality Disorder.

Perspectives in Psychiatric Care.

Retrieved from FindArticles.com on February 16, 2009  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3804/is_200710/ai_n21099913?tag=content;col1 

Mangnall, Jacqueline & Eleanor Yurkovich. (2008). A literature review of deliberate self-harm.

Assessment and Treatment of Criminal Offenders
Words: 2787 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76109918
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Treatment of Criminal Offenders

As a clinician, how can you apply the knowledge you gained from this course to more effectively serve your clients?

A connection has been established by researchers between brutal and violent susceptibility to impair a particular area of the brain. Till date, several evidence, have assisted to bring into limelight the shady aspect of human attitude and might pave the way for important interference. For instance, several types of spontaneous aggression might be a result of defective balancing of emotion within the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the centre of superior intellectual activities like judgment, analysis and substantial control of impulses. The degree of malfunctions in the core circuits of the brain related to aggressive behavior and if these circuits are capable of being repaired is of course debatable. esearchers have mentioned that individuals inclined to violence have structured blueprints in the brain that can be…

References

Allen, Harry E; Simonsen, C.E. (1998) "Corrections in America" New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Gendreau, P & Goggin, C. (1996) "Principles of Effective Programming with Offenders" Forum on Corrections Research, Volume: 8; No: 3, pp: 38-40.

Hoge, R.D. & Andrews, D.A. (1996) "Assessing the Youthful Offender: Issues and Techniques" New York: Plenum.

Jacobs, B. L; Azmitia, E.C. (1992) "Structure and function of the brain serotonin system" Physiological Reviews. Volume: 72; pp:165-229.

Intervention & Addiction Therapy Theory
Words: 3133 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96162245
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.

The two hypothetical systems working on an individual's brain during the experience of addiction are complementary within and between system changes. The first counteradaptation results in a decrease in the transmission of dopamine and serotonin release during withdrawal phases of the cycle (obinson & Berridge 2001). Effectively, dopamine and serotonin transmission is artificially increased beyond the normative range during drug use, then virtually stopped once the drug has left the body. This intensifies not only the "come down" feeling but also the preoccupation anxieties associated with substance abuse as well as the existing emotional, environmental, or social vulnerability which lead to the initial lapse. Sensitization is the component of addiction which compels an individual to continually seek greater quantities of the substance (obinson & Berridge 2001). Effectively once the brain has been exposed to a chemical which alters neural transmission, the body attempts to return to a homeostatic state.…

References

1. Nesse, R. (1994). An evolutionary perspective on substance abuse. Ethology and Sociobiology, 15, 339- 348.

2. Robinson, T, & Berridge, K. (2001). Mechanisms of action of addictive stimuli incentive- sensitization and addiction. Addiction, 96, 103- 114.

3. Koob, G., & Le Moal, M. (1997). Drug abuse: Hedonic homeostatic dysregulation. Science, 278, 52- 58.

4. Brown, J.M., & Miller, W.R. (1993). Impact of motivational interviewing on participation and outcome in residential alcoholism treatment. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors,7, 211-218.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Alcoholism Addiction
Words: 4543 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57309421
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Alcoholism/Addiction

Narrative

Alcoholism and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Overview

PTSD and Co morbidity of Alcoholism: The ole of Trauma

Childhood Abuse and Gender Differences in PTSD

Association Between Alcoholism and Emotion

Genetic and Environmental Influences

Models of Assessment/Conclusions

Abstract TC "Abstract" f C l "1"

This study will examine the relationship between post traumatic stress disorder and alcoholism/addiction. The author proposes a quantitative correlation analysis of the relationship between PTSD and alcoholism be conducted to identify the influence of trauma on subsequent alcohol abuse in patients varying in age from 13-70.

A survey of the literature available on PTSD and alcohol/substance abuse on patients is conducted leading to a conclusion that a direct relationship does exist between Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Alcoholism/Addiction. This conclusion coincides with a large body of evidence and prior studies which link the prevalence of traumatic disorders with alcohol and substance…

References" f C l "1":

Brady, S.; Rierdan, J. Penk, W; Losardo, M; Meschede, T. (2003). "Post traumatic stress disorder in adults with serious mental illness and substance abuse." Journal of Trauma and Dissociation, 4(4): 77-90

Brown, P.J. (2001). "Outcome in female patients with both substance use and post-traumatic stress disorders." Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 18(3):127-135

Bulijan, D.; Vreek, D.; Cekic, A.A.; Karlovic, D.; Zoricic, Z; Golik-Gruber, V. (2002).

'Posttraumatic stress disorder, alcohol dependence and somatic disorders in displaced persons." Alcoholism: Journal on Alcoholism and Related Addictions, 38(1-2)35-40

Mental Health and Addiction
Words: 2699 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64549580
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ecovery can be a difficult journey for many. The reality of having to change old habits for new ones can take a lifetime. The recovery approach/model realizes the struggle of change and transformation and makes it so that way emphasis is not placed on the destination, but rather the journey. Although other approaches like the disease/medical model aim to treat one aspect of recovery from addiction, the recovery model encompasses all aspects making it one of the most advantageous models to adopt to fight addiction.

The recovery approach/model to addiction and/or mental disorder places a strong emphasis on a support for an individual's potential for recovery. ecovery means a person undergoing a personal journey instead of determining and setting an outcome. This personal journey involves the development of hope, a sense of self, a secure base, social inclusion, meaning, empowerment, and coping skills that will take that person past the…

References

Barker, P. & Buchanan-Barker, P. (2012). Tidal Model of Mental Health Nursing. Currentnursing.com. Retrieved 24 July 2016, from  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Tidal_Model.html 

Best, D. & Lubman, D. (2012). The recovery paradigm - a model of hope and change for alcohol and drug addiction. Aust Fam Physician., 41(8), 593.

Hall, W., Carter, A., & Forlini, C. (2015). The brain disease model of addiction: is it supported by the evidence and has it delivered on its promises?. The Lancet Psychiatry, 2(1), 105-110.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s2215-0366 (14)00126-6

Hammer, R., Dingel, M., Ostergren, J., Partridge, B., McCormick, J., & Koenig, B. (2013). Addiction: Current Criticism of the Brain Disease Paradigm. AJOB Neuroscience, 4(3), 27-32.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21507740.2013.796328

Drug Addiction
Words: 1836 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 50095903
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An addiction can be considered a physical and psychological incapability to avoid the consumption of drugs, chemicals, substances, or even taking part in an activity even when doing so causes both physical and psychological harm (Nutt, 2018). The Addiction term is not only applicable when it comes to cocaine and heroin use. Any person who cannot function normally without taking some specific chemical or drug is considered to be substance dependent (Nutt, 2018). The obsession with some activities such as working, eating, and gambling is considered an addiction (Clark & Limbrick-Oldfield, 2013). This type of addiction is commonly referred to as behavioral addiction. As stated by Robbins and Clark (2015) behavioral addictions have gradually become a recognized psychiatric disorder. Recently pathological gambling has been allocated to the DSM-5 category (American Psychiatric Association, 2013).
There are several other disorders that have been suggested as being part of the behavioral addiction category…

Substance Abuse Treatment in Community
Words: 3814 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 61851475
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The inclusion of alcohol and drug education is a vital component of most drug and alcohol abuse interventions, for both the users and non-user. (Montagne et al., 1992). This education can be offered as a preventive measure to beginners of abuse of substances of to the vulnerable group to save the future generations from the menace and the whole society from the drug's association with crime. Alternatively, it should be offered to be taught as part of the educational curriculum in schools

ecent literature reviews have not found enough evidence to convince many researchers that drug and alcohol awareness programs have great impact on changing substance and drug use, attitude and behavior (Eliany et al., 1993). Although it is of great effort, it has been observed that education alone is not enough to change the actual behavior of alcohol and drug use (Tobler et al1976), in the actual examination of…

References

ADAM (1998) Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program):1998 Annual Report on Adult and Juvenile Arrestees. Addiction Research Foundation ( 1994). Alcohol and Drug Treatment in Ontario, Toronto:

BUREAU of JUSTICE STATISTICS (1998). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Burrell, N. And K. English. 2006. "Successful completion rates from Community Corrections in Colorado decreased for the first time in many years." Elements of Change: Highlighting Trends & Issues in the Criminal Justice System. Colorado Division of Criminal Justice, Office of Research and Statistics. Vol. 10, No.1. Viewed December 26, 2007 at  http://dcj.state.co.us/ors/pdf/docs/EOC_No1_071906.pdf .

Bloom, B.E., and Covington, S.S. (2001) "Effective gender-responsive interventions in juvenile

Couples Counseling for Sexual Addiction
Words: 917 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 31072191
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Research Proposal for Couples Counseling
Problem
Sexual addiction is currently not recognized by the DSM-V as an addiction, and therefore some discrepancy among counselors about how to approach this issue exists, particularly when it comes to couples counseling. Research indicates, however, that sexual addiction is on the rise and that counselors require advanced training in this area to know how to treat it effectively and help couples address this issue that may be negatively impacting their relationship (Gilbert, 2014; Griffiths & Dhuffar, 2014; Karila et al., 2014; Rosenberg, Carnes & O’Connor, 2014; Phillips, Hajela & Hilton, 2015; Kraus, Voon & Potenza, 2016). In order to better understand how to help counselors address the issue of sexual addiction in couples counseling, there needs to be more research on how counselors themselves view this issue and whether or not they recognize it as something that serves as an obstacle for healthy relationships…

Women & Addiction Substance Addiction
Words: 1079 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93397394
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Physiological effects are also a give away when we think of the effects of substance abuse. For instance, it has been noted that women have higher chances of developing liver disease, brain and heart damage than men even if their period of drinking is lesser than their male counterparts. A link between breast cancer and alcohol abuse was also found (National Women's Health eport Online, 2007).

Treatment-wise, it was noted that women who struggle with substance-related problems do not have accessible services and resources. There is also a need to "develop training curriculum for workers on the issues of domestic violence..." (Institute for Women's Leadership, n.d., pp. 3-4) as domestic violence often leads to substance abuse as it is used by women as coping mechanism to such kind of marital difficulties (NCADV, 2009). The method of "intervention" or other forms of therapy which are confrontational in nature are also problematic…

References

Califano, J.A. Jr. (1998). Substance Abuse and Addiction - the Need to Know. American Journal of Public Health, 1, pp. 9-10.

Chih-Hung, K. et al. (2006). Tridimensional Personality of Adolescents With Internet Addiction and Substance Use Experience. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 51(14), pp. 887-894.

Diaza, D. (2009). Women and Substance Abuse. Retrieved from www.womeningovernment.org/policies_publications/policy-issues/women-and-substance-abuseonMarch 14.

Estronaut (1999). Women and Substance Abuse. Retrieved from www.estronaut.com/a/women_substance_abuse_drugs_alcohol.htm. onMarch 14.

Gordian Knot of Addiction and Attachment
Words: 518 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21289399
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go Psychology

LaFond Padykula, N. And Conklin, P. (2010). The self-regulation model of attachment trauma and addiction. Clinical Social Work, 38(4), 351-360.

DOI: 10.1007/s10615-009-0204-6

LaFond Padykula theorized the self-regulation model (SRM) as a means of informing the practice of assessing and treating addiction and attachment trauma. dialectical philosophy John Bowlby[footnoteRef:1] (1988) developed the theory of attachment through his seminal work observing the distress of infants and young children who had been separated from their mothers. Bowlby asserted that attachment was not consciously controlled but was instead hard-wired in humans and many other animals. [1: Bowlby, J. (1988). A secure base: Parent-child attachment and healthy human development. New York, NY: Basic Books.]

The theory builds on and integrates the attachment behavior research by Bowlby, positing addiction as the efforts of an individual to regulate their own attachment in the direction of more normal adaptive behavior. The theoretical foundation for the self-regulation…

Erickson, E.H. (1950). Childhood and Society. New York, NY: Norton.

Erickson contributed to the development of ego psychology beyond the framework that Freud presented in that Erickson attributed the formation of personality to culture and society in addition to sexuality. Erickson's theories consider the ego to be the most important aspect of personality as it can function independently from the id and the superego. Because the ego is an influential and powerful aspect of the personality, it adapts to the presenting situations to promote mental health and appropriate social adaptation. Erickson studied individuals exhibiting normal personality in addition to people who were considered to be neurotic. In this way, Erickson contributed to theory in the fields of normal psychology as well as abnormal psychology.

[Type text]

Exist on Kleptomania They May Include Treatment
Words: 2765 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 64686264
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exist on kleptomania. They may include treatment options, background on the disorders, or even how to identify a person suffering from kleptomania. New research however, has begun linking the disorder to others in hopes of better understanding what causes kleptomania and how to effectively treat it. Kleptomania has been linked to compulsive buying and binge-eating disorder. omen are known to suffer more from these disorders than men. This suggests these three disorders may have more in common than initially believed.

Prevalence

Kleptomania is a rare disorder found in both men and women with women producing higher occurrences than men. Shoplifting although similar to kleptomania, is not habitual nor does it produce the same effects that someone suffering from kleptomania would. The disorder is commonly characterized by a need to steal things, sometimes trivial things, in order to feel better or feel in control. Normally people who show symptoms of kleptomania…

Works Cited

Chong, S.A., and B.L. Iow. "Treatment of kleptomania with fluvoxamine." Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 93.4 (1996): 314-315. Print.

Grant, Jon, Brian Odlaug, Liana Schrieber, Samuel Chamberlain, and Suck Won. "Memantine reduces stealing behavior and impulsivity in kleptomania: a pilot study." International Clinical Psychopharmacology 28.2 (2013): 106-111. Print.

Grant, Jon E., and Suck Won Kim. "An Open-Label Study of Naltrexone in the Treatment of Kleptomania." The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 63.4 (2002): 349-356. Print.

Grant, Jon E., and Marc N. Potenza. The Oxford handbook of impulse control disorders. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Print.

Interning at an Addiction Rehab Facility
Words: 660 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 91132395
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Interning at an Addiction Rehab Facility

Strategies of Care within Addiction Rehab Facilities

There is no other time that one needs help more than when in the context of facing a drug addiction. It is important than our modern facilities be able to incorporate viable strategies for patients and addicts who need real results the most. Working within a drug rehab context, it is important to see how important strategies of applied research are in finding methods that are actually effective in treating the myriad of different signs and symptoms the disease of addiction has within the individual case loads.

In a number of health organizations operating today, one of the most fail safe methods of collecting research and data is through a more qualitative approach. This is often difficult because it is not as fail safe as more quantitative measures, such as forcing patients to take drugs tests or…

Examination of Addiction in Families
Words: 1822 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58408084
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Substance use and mental health problems often go hand-in-hand. People who feel depressed or anxious may depend on marijuana, alcohol, or other substances to feel at better or at ease. Although not everyone who experience mental health problems abuse substances, it is more common than imagined with people abusing prescription medication as well from Adderall to Vicodin (Montvilo, 2013). Although my immediate family has not experienced substance abuse problems, some within my family have gone through depression and anxiety issues. Other more distant relatives have experienced problems with marijuana and prescription medication. While their reasons differ, it amazing how family dynamics play a role in the creation of substance abuse and mental health problems.

B.)

The first person to look at is my father. He experienced a bout of depression when he had to deal with a potential loss of work a few years ago. He is the main provider…

References

Montvilo, R. (2013). Addictions & substance abuse. Ipswich, Mass.: Salem Press.

How to Assess Whether Outpatient Treatment Is Successful
Words: 2989 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 97856247
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gathered using a number of key word searches and combinations of terms, such as "adolescent," "substance abuse," "treatment," "drug," "outcome," "drug abuse, "juvenile drug abusers," juvenile drug use," "juvenile drug treatment," "adolescent drug treatment," and "adolescent drug use." These key word searches were conducted in online databases such as PsychInfo, PubMed, NCBI, JSTO, National Institute of Mental Health, National Criminal Justice eference Service, and Google Scholar. These searches resulted in a number of studies that appeared useful for this analysis. The five chosen were chosen because of common key words and their relevance to this study's focus on if adolescent males with substance disorder are given inpatient treatment instead of outpatient treatment whether they will have a greater chance of maintaining their sobriety.

Description and Technique

Article

Branson, Clemmey, and Mukherjee (2013). This study is a sample size 48 adolescents with roughly half Latino and half African-American, male and female.…

References

Branson, C., Clemmey, P., Mukherjee, P. (2013). Text message reminders to improve outpatient therapy attendance among adolescents: a pilot study. Psychol Serv, 10(3): 298-303.

Esposito-Smythers, C., Spirito, A., Kahler, C., Hunt, J., Monti, P. (2011). Treatment of Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Suicidality among Adolescents: A Randomized Trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 79(6): 728-739.

Friedman, A, Terras, A., Ali, A. (1998). Differences in characteristics of adolescent drug abuse clients that predict to improvement: for inpatient treatment versus outpatient treatment. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse, 7(3): 97-119.

Waldron, H., Slesnick, N., Brody, J. (2001). Treatment outcomes for adolescent substance abuse at 4 and 7-month assessments. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 69(5): 802-813.

Hina Mauka Is a Top Tier Treatment
Words: 931 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36124793
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Hina Mauka is a top tier treatment and rehabilitation center located in Waipahu, Hawaii, in the United States. he services that it offers include programs directed at adults, adolescents, and families to overcome alcoholism and addiction issues in a setting that is safe and nurturing (Hina Mauka, 2009). Each of these programs has different goals and objectives that are outlined as manners to measure its success. his essay will exam Hina Mauka's een C.A.R.E. program, which is aimed at middle and high school students.

Hina Mauka's een C.A.R.E. program is an innovative program that offers outpatient treatment to adolescent patients during the school day and on campus. he program collaborates with a number of high schools on both the Island of Oahu and the Island of Kauai (2009). It locates counselors on the campuses of these high schools and middle schools, which facilitates consistency, visibility, and accessibility of the services,…

There are both manifest and latent characteristics of the goal and objective listed on the Hina Mauka Teen C.A.R.E. website. The latent characteristics include such achievements as receiving respect and learning that it can be safe and healthy to trust: these accomplishments may not be outwardly evident to a third party, thus making them latent. Meanwhile, there are a number of manifest goals which can be witnessed by a third party. They include staying in school, staying away from legal activity, giving respect, and reducing and abstaining from drug and alcohol use.

While it is evident that Hina Mauka has defined the reduction and abstinence of alcohol and drugs as its goal, and the role modeling of healthy communication and the teaching of life skills to their participants as the objective, the two also follow the traditional characteristics that would be found in a goal or objective, respectively. Again, the reduction and abstinence of alcohol and drugs is a goal because it is a long-term goal that is to be accomplished. It, in itself, is the reason the Teen C.A.R.E. program exists, and is based on ideas and incorporates a broad plan and fairly generic action. Meanwhile, role modeling healthy communication and teaching life skills is clearly an objective because it is more tangible and exists on a shorter term, comparatively speaking. The objective is based on fact, and incorporates a much narrower plan, such as promoting staying in school and staying away from illegal activity. It also consists of much more specific action that must be taken. Therefore, the goal and objective listed on the Hina Mauka website are accurate in their claims.

Teen Care. Hina Mauka. Retrieved 30 March 2011 from  http://hinamauka.org/teen-care.asp .

Is AA the Best Treatment of Alcoholism
Words: 1031 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 78372067
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McKella, J., Stewat, E., & Humpheys, K. (Apil, 2003). Alcoholics Anonymous: Involvement and Positive Alcohol-Related Outcomes: Cause, Consequence, o Just a Coelate? A Pospective 2-Yea Study of 2,319 Alcohol-Dependent Men. Jounal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology; 71 (2): 302-308.

McKella, Stewat, and Humpheys study the causality between A.A. involvement and positive alcohol elated outcomes in 2319 male subjects (p. 304). Thei model included involvement afte 1 yea of sobiety in elation to a 2-yea follow-up, examining the levels of alcohol elated poblems (p. 305). Thei findings include that the paticipation in the A.A. pogam can have a positive effect of alcohol-elated poblems, independent fom motivation factos o psychopathology (p. 306-308).

This souce is impotant because the study was done in a scientific manne, with a contol goup and sound methodology (p. 303-305). The study involves analysis of pevious woks, using the same hypothesis (p. 302-303), and comes to the same…

references so that the research can be reviewed by the reader (p. 560-561, p. 566). Also the journal in which the study was published is a reputable journal, so the results and study can be trusted for validity.

Call Number: AN 6582532, EBSCO Host

Vick, R. (Fall, 2002). Questioning the Use of Alcoholics Anonymous With College Students: Is an Old Concept the Only Alternative for a New Generation? Journal of College Counseling, 3 (2): 158-168.

Vick examines the effectiveness of A.A. within the college student subset of the population (p.160-161), and includes research in the area of A.A. related treatment (p. 160). In addition, Vick focuses on the reasons why A.A. may not be the best solution for college students (p. 160-161). Research of the prevalence of drinking in college students is also provided (p. 185-159). Alternative approaches which may be more effective than A.A. are also evaluated (p. 161-164). Vick concludes that, for many college students, alternative treatment methods are more successful than A.A for college students (p. 164-165).

This article is important because it shows that A.A. may not be the best treatment solution for all areas of the population (p. 164). In addition, relevant research is evaluated (p. 160-197), and appropriate citation is given at the end of the article (p. 168). Alternate methods are evaluated, providing a counter point to other studies (p. 161-165). In addition, the journal in which the article is published is a well-known, credible source of information.

Caffeine Addiction Someone Who Become
Words: 1876 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39624835
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There is also a specific technique involving this method that is specifically intended to relieve the withdrawal symptoms of addiction (Addicted to caffeine).

In the final analysis, it was a combination of a healthy diet and a planned exercise program, complemented by yoga and a changing mindset that helped Nick to finally overcome his problem. One of the cardinal factors in his rehabilitation process was the understanding of what caffeine was doing to his body and his life. The most important factor in his recovery was the realization that he was in fact addicted and that his problem was not helped by a regular intake of coffee but was in fact worsened by the excessive amount of caffeine that he was ingesting. Once he realized that caffeine was not an aid but rather the central cause of his stress and anxiety he soon began to change his habits. At first…

Bibliography

Addicted to caffeine. Retrieved September 25, 2009, from  http://www.queendom.com/advices/advice.htm?advice=241 >

Am I Addicted to Caffeine? Retrieved September 25, 2009, from  http://www.wisegeek.com/am-i-addicted-to-caffeine.htm 

Common Sources of Caffeine. Retrieved September 25, 2009, from  http://lds.about.com/library/weekly/aa121202b.htm 

GERD. Retrieved September 25, 2009, from  http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/gerd.html

Treating Addiction
Words: 554 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 34019169
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Mental Health in America

Mental health: Population-based study

Given the intractability of treating drug addiction, it is troubling that the rates of addiction of young people to illegal drugs and alcohol continues to persist. Despite a decrease in cigarette smoking, "daily marijuana use among high school seniors has increased to its highest point in 30 years" and "nearly two thirds (65%) of high school seniors and nearly one third (29%) of eighth graders have used alcohol in the past month" (Winters, Botzet & Fahnhorst 2011). Treatment rates are not comparable with the demonstrated need for addressing addiction in young people: "about 1.5 million teenagers meet criteria for an SUD [substance abuse dependence]. Of those adolescents, only 111,000 (7%) receive treatment for the disorder" (Winters, Botzet & Fahnhorst 2011). The article "Advances in adolescent substance abuse treatment" offers a summary of the major therapeutic approaches to treating adolescent addicts vs. their…

References

Winters, K, Botzet, A. & Fahnhorst, T. (2011). Advances in adolescent substance abuse treatment. Current Psychiatry Rep, 13(5): 416 -- 421.

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3166985/

Computer Games esearch

When considering the short history of computers, video and PC gaming are very recent on the timeline of technology. This is one of the reasons why there have not been many conclusive studies on the negative and/or positive effects of electronic games on children and young adults -- the most formative years. With the ever-increasing interest and involvement of children in this activity, much concern has been expressed about the impact of these games, especially ones of a more violent nature, on physical and psychological development. At the crux of the debate is the question of whether they are detrimental to a young person's health. There are specific concerns about such factors as aggression, addiction, criminal activity, obesity and reduced academic achievement.

Studies thus far show both positive and negative results from playing video and PC games. Some research finds that the playing or observing of violent…

References Cited

Anderson, C.A., and K.E. Dill "Video Games and Aggressive Thoughts, Feelings, and Behavior in the Laboratory and in Life. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2000, 78, 772-790.

Ask, A., Autoustinos, M., and A.H. Winefield, "To kill or not to kill: Competitive aggression in Australian adolescent males during videogame play." Children in the New Media Landscape. C. van Feilitzen and U. Carlsson (Eds.). Goteborg, Sweden: UNESCO International Clearinghouse on Children and Violence on the Screen, 2000.

Bowman, R.P. And J.C. Rotter. "Computer games: Friend or foe?" Elementary School Guidance and Counselling, 1983, 18, 25 -- 34

Calvert, S.L., and S. Tan, (1994). "Impact of Virtual Reality on Young Adults' Physiological Arousal and Aggressive Thoughts." Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 1994, 15, 125-139.

Causes Discernment and Treatment of Spiritual Abuse
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Ma Pastoral Theology -- Spiritual Abuse

HEN THE SYSTEM BECOMES THE PERSECUTOR

Veenhuizen's dissertation explores spiritual abuse, using Relational Theology to understand a healthy spiritual relationship vs. spiritual abuse. In Relational Theology, God offers a bilateral covenant with Him and with others of unreserved love and commitment with the gifts of blessing to anyone accepting His offer. Spiritual abuse sharply contrasts with God's covenant. Spiritual abuse has existed for quite some time; consequently, theological writers such as Veenhuizen and mental health professionals have all addressed the causes, discernment and treatment of spiritual abuse.

Foundation of Relational Theology

Veenhuizen's dissertation correctly shows that there are various definitions of Spiritual Abuse (Veenhuizen, 2011). The most inclusive one found in my research is from Lisa Oakley's "Developing safeguarding policy and practice for Spiritual Abuse" (Oakley & Kinmond, 2014). After studies and interviews with numerous survivors of Spiritual Abuse, Oakley and her team concluded…

Works Cited

Anonymous, 2012. Spiritual abuse rising in many places, it seems. [Online]

Available at:  http://the-end-time.blogspot.com/2012/04/spiritual-abuse-rising-in-many-places.html 

[Accessed 19 May 2016].

Berry, B. O., 2010. Spiritual abuse in the Christian community. Orlando, FL: Asbury Theological Seminary.

Interning at an Addiction Rehab Facility
Words: 890 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 70682373
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Interning at a drug and alcohol addiction rehabilitation facility offers a tremendous opportunity to learn about psychological treatment methods, theories, and interventions. The experience also allows the intern to learn about healthcare management and administration, which entail their own research methods. One of the key things that an intern will learn in the rehabilitation center relates to research methods and methods of data collection. For example, we learn about the ethics of conducting research such as receiving informed consent. There are ample opportunities to conduct correlational and experimental studies in the clinical setting because of the fact that the patient population will in many cases already have been thoroughly assessed and diagnosed by psychologists. The patient status renders them a particular status in an any given research design, allowing for robust investigations of cause and effect. For example, if I wanted to find out what the treatment outcomes are between…

Painkiller Addiction
Words: 956 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83353780
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Oxycodone: A brief history of a potentially addictive drug

Most of us think of opium and opiates in fairly dramatic terms. e think of Dorothy in the izard of Oz, lulled into a stupor after falling asleep in a field of poppies or, worse, the image of a junkie hopelessly captivated by heroin. However, the face of drug addiction is changing. Many people are addicted to supposedly healthy, doctor-prescribed painkillers by their physicians. Drugs like oxycodone have the same chemical composition as opiates like heroin, even though they were scientifically created in laboratories. This paper will provide a brief history of the drug oxycodone and its use and abuses. Although oxycodone has many legitimate applications in pain management, it is not a harmless drug and has the potential to become extremely addictive. This addictive property was not initially noted but after cases of abuse began to surface, concerns began to…

Works Cited

"Oxycodone." CESAR (Center for Substance Abuse Research). Web. 29 Dec 2014.

Pope. Tara. "The problem with pain pills." The New York Times. 26 Jun 2013. Web.

29 Dec 2014.

Evidence Based Practices in the Diagnosis and Treatment of ADHD
Words: 1326 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90368134
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Program-Evaluation -- Evidence-Based Practice: Case Study eview

There is growing recognition that the used of evidence-based practices promotes improved clinical outcomes and can help guide clinicians in their respective disciplines. This paper draws on the Clinician's Guide to Evidence-Based Practices: Mental Health and the Addictions to provide a description of a salient case study and the identification of the critical elements that require the review of published research to guide professional practice. In addition, a summary of a research study by Spengler, P. M., White, M. J., Egisdottir (2009) that informs evidence-based counseling practice related to the selected case study as it would occur in a specialization area is followed by a discussion concerning relevant ethical, legal, and socio-cultural considerations that apply to the case and research article selected. Finally, a summary of the research and important findings concerning the need for evidence-based practices to guide professional practice today are…

References

Dodson, W. W. (2007, April). Make ADHD treatment as effective as possible. Current Psychiatry, 6(4), 82-85.

Elik, N. & Corkum, P. (2015, January 1). Overcoming the barriers to teachers' utilization of evidence-based interventions for children with ADHD. Perspectives on Language and Literacy, 41(1), 40-45.

Holland, K. & Higuera, V. (2015, February 26). The history of ADHD: A timeline. Healthline. Retrieved from  http://www.healthline.com/health/adhd/history#Overview1 .

Norcross, J., Hogan, T., & Koocher, G. (2008). Clinician's guide to evidence-based practices: Mental health and the addictions. New York, NY: Oxford Press.

Against Increasing Funding for Prison-Based
Words: 1945 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71638724
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The cost for processing a drug court case through the court system is only a fraction of the cost for processing criminal drug cases through the court system. Furthermore, the cost of drug court and other drug treatment for drug offenders is only a fraction of the cost for imprisonment of these individuals. Drug offenders finishing alterative drug court or other treatment programs have been found less likely to have repeated charges and convictions of drug offenses and to have longer abstinences from use of drugs. Finally, in terms of costs to society that cannot be measured in monetary terms, the alternative sentencing of drug offenders to drug courts and other treatment programs will end the breakdown of society that has been witnessed due to imposition of prison sentences on drug offenders. The research conducted in order to prepare for the debate and in order to complete the research within…

Bibliography

The Federal Prison Population: A Statistical Analysis (2004) the Sentencing Project. Online available at http://www.sentencingproject.org/Admin/Documents/publications/inc_federalprisonpop.pdf

Clay, Rebecca (2006) Incarceration vs. Treatment: Drug Courts Help Substance Abusing Offenders. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration News March/April Vol. 14. No.2. Online available at  http://www.samhsa.gov /samhsa_news/VolumeXIV_2/index.htm

Shaffer, Deborah; Bechtel, Kristin; and Latessa, Edward J. (2005) Evaluation of Ohio's Drug Courts: A Cost Benefit Analysis. Center for Criminal Justice Research Dec 2005. Online available at  http://www.uc.edu/criminaljustice/ProjectReports/Ohio_Drug_Courts_Cost_Benefit_Analysis_2005.pdf 

Drug Court Benefits (nd) Online NCDI.org available at  http://www.ndci.org/courtfacts_benefits.html

Substance Abuse Continued Use of Research Continued
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Substance Abuse

Continued use of research

Continued use of research in professional life:

Stable housing for substance abusers

Substance abuse is strongly correlated with a wide array of risky behaviors, including a failure to live in some form of stable housing, as well as high-risk sexual behaviors. This is significant, because stable housing situations in the form of rehabilitation centers or 'halfway' homes are often used as bases of treatment for addicts. However, a review of the existing literature indicates that simply providing housing for addicts should not be regarded as a panacea or as an automatic form of treatment for addiction. In fact, the results are mixed regarding a correlation between substance abuse and the ability to obtain stable housing. For the purposes of this review, a definition of 'stable housing' will be defined as "not having lived on the street" versus "living in a shelter or single room…

References

Des Jarlais, D., C., Braine, N., & Friedmann, P. (2007). Unstable housing as a factor for increased injection risk behavior at U.S. syringe exchange programs. AIDS and Behavior, 11, 78-84.

Elifson, K.W., Sterk, C.E., & Theall, K.P. (2007). Safe living: The impact of unstable housing conditions on HIV risk reduction among female drug users. AIDS and Behavior, 11, 45-55. Retrieved: doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10461-007-9306-8 

Palepu A, Marshall BD, Lai C, Wood E, Kerr T. (2010). Addiction treatment and stable housing among a cohort of injection drug users. PLoS One. 5(7):e11697. Retrieved:

 http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0011697

Psychology Theories and Models of
Words: 3348 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26105035
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There's an understood supposition of opposing causal agency at work. No matter what pressures and factors came to bear, the addict could have done something else, but simply decided not to (Choice and Free Will: Beyond the Disease Model of Addiction, 2010).

A more behavioral approach to understanding addiction is the social learning model, which suggests that people learn how to behave by watching others in their environment and by duplicating actions that create affirmative consequences. One learns to take drugs or alcohol through ones connections with family, friends, or even popular media. And through personal experimentation with drugs or alcohol, one learns that they like the way drugs make them feel. Whether it is the elation of a high, the augmented confidence they feel while intoxicated, or a reduced sense of social nervousness, intoxication can be a positively reinforcing state of being.

As one discovers how much they like…

References

Choice and Free Will: Beyond the Disease Model of Addiction. (2010). Retreived from  http://www.addictioninfo.org/articles/4173/1/Choice-and-Free-Will-Beyond-the-Disease -

Model-of-Addiction/Page1.html

Drug Addiction. (2006). Retreived from  http://www.flyfishingdevon.co.uk/salmon/year3/psy337DrugAddiction/theorydrugaddiction.htm 

Drug and Alcohol Information - Disease Model of Addiction-. (2011). Retreived from http://www.egetgoing.com/drug_addiction/addiction_disease_model.asp

Contingency Management Alcohol & Marijuana
Words: 11354 Length: 41 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27822679
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" (1995)

The authors state: "The amphetamines occasioned dose-related increases in d- amphetamine-appropriate responding, whereas hydromorphone did not. Amphetamines also occasioned dose-related increases in reports of the drug being most like "speed," whereas hydromorphone did not. However, both amphetamines and hydromorphone occasioned dose-related increases in reports of drug liking and in three scales of the ARCI. Thus, some self-report measures were well correlated with responding on the drug-appropriate lever and some were not. Lamb and Henningfield (1994) suggest that self-reports are complexly controlled by both the private event and the subject's history of experience with the drug. Some of the self-reports they observed (e.g., feels like speed) are probably occasioned by a relatively narrow range of stimuli because in the subject's experience with drug administration, these reports have been more selectively reinforced by the verbal community relative to other reports (e.g., drug liking). They also suggest that these results imply…

Bibliography

Budney, Alan J. et al. (2006) Clinical Trial of Abstinence-Based Vouchers and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Cannabis Dependence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 2006. Vol.. 74 No. 2. 2006 American Psychological Association.

McRae, a.; Budney, a.; & Brady, K. (2002) Treatment of Marijuana Dependence: A Review of the Literature. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 24 (2003)

Pathways of Addiction: Opportunities in Drug Abuse Research (1996) Institute of Medicine (IOM)

Kamon, J; Budney, a. & Stanger, C. (2005)a Contingency Management Intervention for Adolescent Marijuana Abuse and Conduct Problems. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. 44(6):513-521, June 2005.

Behavioral Health Changes
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Behavioral Health Changes

Behavioral health, rehab, and detox diagnoses: eimbursement and treatment philosophy

Although mental and physical health statuses are clearly interrelated, mental health diagnoses are treated differently both on a social and institutional level. According to the AHA Task Force on Behavioral Health (2007) one-fifth of patients who suffer a heart attack are also found to suffer from major depression. Depression after a heart attack significantly increases the likelihood of a patient dying from a second attack and mental health issues and heart problems are often co-morbid (Behavioral health challenges, AHA2007:1) However, despite this 'mind-body' connection, reimbursement services have been problematic, particularly for case management services and services provided by non-physicians, but also for more standard forms of mental health care for many patients (Mauch, Kautz, & Smith 2008:2).

Patients with all forms of health insurance have faced considerable obstacles in accessing high-quality mental health care. The privately-insured often…

References

ARMS. (2013). MGH-Harvard Center for Addiction Medicine (CAM). Retrieved from:

 http://www.massgeneral.org/psychiatry/services/arms_home.aspx 

Barkil-Oteo, A. (2013). The paradox of choice: When more medications mean less treatment.

The Psychiatric Times. Retrieved:

The Book Addict and Disease Model
Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90425930
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Addict, Michael Stein uses a case study approach to exhibit, analyze, and discuss addiction in general and how addiction impacts the lives of individuals specifically. The author takes into account psychological trauma, psycho-social issues, and other situational variables but ultimately ascribes to the disease model of addiction. Stein concludes from his case study with Lucy that substance abuse is a disease just as heart disease is but does not provide any substantial evidence backing up this claim. In fact, Stein (2010) simply calls addiction "the disease of wanting more," which is hardly a scientific assessment of substance abuse (p. 25). If the disease model were supported by the literature, there would be clear outlines of disease etiology and the neurobiological pathways upon which it works. In fact, the disease model has not received unequivocal research support. Although popular and politically effective in terms of freeing up funding for addiction treatment,…

References Not Cited

Lilienfeld, S.O., Lynn, S.J. & Lohr, J.M. (2015). Science and Pseudoscience in Clinical Psychology. New York: The Guilford Press.

Rasmussen, S. (2013). A management model for a chronic disease called addiction. APHA 275427. Retrieved online:  https://apha.confex.com/apha/141am/webprogram/Paper275427.html 

Volkow, N.D., Koob, G.F. & McLellan, T. (2016). Neurobiologic advances from the brain disease model of addiction. The New England Journal of Medicine 2016(374), 363-371.

Parenting Program for Women and
Words: 41621 Length: 150 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 12171638
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There are many of these individuals, and it is time that this is changed.

Parents often look away from these kinds of problems, or they spend their time in denial of the issue because they feel that their child will not be harmed by parental involvement with drugs or alcohol. Some parents have parents that were/are addicts themselves, and some are so busy with their lives that they do not actually realize that their child has any kind of problem with the lifestyle of the parent until it becomes so severe that it cannot be overlooked, or until it is brought to their attention by police, the school, or someone else that has seen it first hand. Parents are not the only ones that overlook this issue, though.

Sometimes siblings and friends also see problems that they ignore, do not understand, or do not talk to anyone about, and the…

Bibliography

Aleman-Padilla, L. 2002. Babies First gets last word on infant care Hundreds recognize groups contribution at fourth annual event. The Fresno Bee.

Anderson, D. 2004. Funding cuts impact health services. Precinct Reporter.

Anderson, S.A. (2000). How parental involvement makes a difference in reading achievement. Reading Improvement.

Baker, P.L. (2000). I didn't know: discoveries and identity transformation of women addicts in treatment. Journal of Drug Issues, 30, 863-881.

Proposal for Unmet Community Need
Words: 1853 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32883355
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Geagua County, OH

Planning -- The most effective strategy within a community for any public health issue is two-fold: education and focus. To accomplish this at the community level, there needs to be a broad level of focus and support from all levels of the government: local, State and Federal, in order for there to be a consistent and proactive message. Education should begin at the elementary school level, with teaching talking about substances, abuse and alternatives; and move through the school system as appropriate for the cognitive abilities of various age groups. In this way, the community can collaborate with schools to provide initiatives and programs that address the problem prior to it becoming as endemic, and offer proposed solutions in a way that almost everyone involved knows they can receive help if necessary. The educational process must also be pervasive and accessible -- people need a number to…

Works Cited

Bangeret-Drowns, R. (1988). The Effects of School-Based Substance Abuse Education. Journal of Drug Education, 18(3), 243-64.

Berkowitz, M., et al. (1991). Sociomoral Development and Drug and Alcohol Abuse. In W. Kurtines (Ed.), Handbook of Moral Behavior and Development (Vol. 3). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Earlbaum.

Blondell, R. (2005). Ambulatory detoxification of patients with alchohol dependence. American Family Physician, 71(3), 495-502.

Cook, P., & Moore, M. (2002). The Economics of Alchohol Abuse. Health Affairs, 21(2), 120-33.

Dually Diagnosed African-American and Latino
Words: 13893 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27469635
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(1999) which are:

1) Those with serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, bi-polar disorder with major depression and who use alcohol and drugs to self-mediate to cope with the symptoms; and 2) Those with borderline personality and anti-social personality disorders including anxiety disorder that is complicated by use of alcohol and illicit drugs. (Mather et al. 1999)

Presenting further difficulty is the establishment of problems with alcohol and illicit drug use for adolescents entering service programs outside of the AOD system. (National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2005) In an analysis of data taken form a sample group of youth in five San Diego county sectors of AOD treatment, mental health, juvenile justice, child welfare and public school-based services for severely emotionally disturbed [SED] youth gives indication that "there are relatively high rates of substance use disorders among adolescents in these systems, as determined in diagnostic interview with DSM-IV…

Bibliography

Amaro, Hortensia, et al. (2005) Racial/Ethnic Differences in Social Vulnerability Among Women with Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Disorders: Implications for Treatment Services - Journal of Community Psychology. Vol. 33 Issue 4.

An Overview of the Effectiveness of Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment Models (2001) Thousand Oaks, December 2001. Online available at http://web.utk.edu/~dap/SA2003/EffectadolescentSATx.html

Blane, H.T. (1993) Recent Development in Alcoholism: Ethnicity: Recent Development in Alcoholism, 11, 109-122.

Bridging the Gap: What We Know and Don't Know About Dual Diagnosis (1998) Healing Hands Journal. Vol.2, No.4 July 1998.

Gateway Rehab Center
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function for the Gateway ehabilitation Center (GC) is the drug and alcohol treatment that assists addicts in kicking their dependency on either drugs or alcohol. As the GC website touts "if you are abusing alcohol or other drugs, Gateway ehab's personalized treatment plans can help. Our highly trained experts will give you the tools you need to reclaim your health -- and rediscover a life worth living" (GC, 2015). In other words, GC is a regional Center with locations throughout Ohio and Pennsylvania that offers a variety of treatment options for addicts of alcohol and drugs.

Clients Served

GC offers treatment services to those men, women, and youth addicts from Eastern Ohio and Western Pennsylvania. There are 20+ locations, with a main campus in Alquippa, Pennsylvania. There are four locations in Ohio and 16 locations in Pennsylvania. Services are geared towards males, especially the Extended Care division that includes a…

References

Ford, L.K. & Zarate, P.; (2010) Closing the gaps: The impact of inpatient detoxification and continuity of care of client outcomes, Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 42, p. 303-314

GRC (2015) Hope has a home, accessed on May 9, 2015 at  http://www.gatewayrehab.org/ 

McCrystal, P. & Percy, A.; (2010) Factors associated with teenage ecstasy use, Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, 17(5) p. 507-527

National Institute on Drug Abuse; (2012) Principle of drug addiction treatment: A research-based guide (3rd edition), accessed on May 9, 2015 at  http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment-research-based-guide-third-edition/frequently-asked-questions/how-effective-drug-addiction-treatment

Drug Policies Major Policies History
Words: 3387 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8012701
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14). Soon, Congress passed the Marijuana Tax Act, which was signed into law in 1937. Like the Harrison Act, the Marijuana Tax Act placed marijuana into the same category as the cocaine and opium drugs. It was now illegal to import marijuana into the United States (McWilliams, 1991). However, this law was ineffective in curbing marijuana use (Brecher, 1986, p. 14).

By the early 1940s narcotic addiction had significantly reduced in the United States (Harrison, Backenheimer and Inciardi, 1999). However, this was not the result of legislative initiatives. Instead, it was because World War II was cutting off the "supplies of opium from Asia and interrupt the trafficking routes from Europe" (Inciardi, 1992, p. 24).

Several other legislative efforts in the supply reduction department served to establish more severe penalties for violations of drug laws, and tighten controls and restrictions over legally manufactured narcotic drugs (Harrison, Backenheimer and Inciardi, 1999).…

References

1999). Recreational Drug Information. History of Drug Use U.S. Retrieved from the Internet at www.a1b2c3.com/drugs/.

Brecher, E. (1986). Drug Laws and Drug Law Enforcement: A Review and Evaluation Based on 111 Years of Experience,' Drugs and Society 1:1.

Drucker, Ernest. (1999). Harm Reduction: A Public Health Strategy. Current Issues in Public Health, 1: pp. 64-70.

Drug Policy Alliance. (February 17, 2005). Harm Reduction: Options that Work. Retrieved from the Internet at  http://www.drugpolicy.org/news/021705harm.cfm .