Adolf Hitler Essays (Examples)

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Hitler as Evil There Is

Words: 1619 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 651096

But there cannot be any doubt that in harnessing that energy to extraordinary projects and horrible crimes, Hitler placed his stamp on that war and on the twentieth century. (Weinberg)

He captures it succinctly in that we cannot think of war, rulers, and mass murder without attaching those thoughts to Adolf Hitler. A smart man with a deadly mission means trouble and Hitler shows us why. He was able to catch waves of people at a time when they needed something to believe in and convince them that he was their answer. He was, in one word, evil. He used people's fear against them; he killed indiscriminately; he believed that he was right. These are just a few traits that make Hitler stand out as one of the most evil and detestable individuals to walk the earth.… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adolf Hitler." Encyclopedia of World Biography. GALE Resource Database. Site Accessed March 28, 2008. http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/HistRC/

Bessel, Richard and Kershaw, Ian. "Hitler and the Germans: Life in the Third Reich." EBSCO History Resource Database. Site Accessed March 28, 2008. http://search.epnet.com

Evans, Richard J. "Hitler's Dictatorship." EBSCO History Resource Database. Site Accessed March 28, 2008. http://search.epnet.com

History Channel Online. Site Accessed March 28, 2008. http://www.history.com/minisite.do-content_type=Minisite_Generic&content_type_id=949&display_order=6&sub_display_order=27&mini_id=1090
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Hitler and His Rise to Power

Words: 1499 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40365632

The way in which Hitler took over Germany was very open, but yet it was not thwarted by others in the political realm. By the time they realized what was taking place, it was already done.

Hindenburg was still president of Germany at that time, but right before he died a law was passed that the presidency would be abolished with his death, and all power over the government and the country would go to the chancellor (Hitler) (Benderwky, 62). This was a very insidious way to get the remaining power that he was still lacking, and it provided him with completely political and legal control over Germany and its people. In 1934, Hitler told a reporter how people had laughed at him 15 years prior, when he stated that he would become ruler of Germany (McNab, 70). At that time, he said he would remain in power, and his National Socialist party would endure for 1,000 years (McNab, 70). Once Hitler had complete power, a number of people who had been against him in the past -- and many who still were -- were rounded up, arrested, and executed. Many people were shocked by this display of power, both…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aigner, Dietrich. Hitler's ultimate aims -- A programme of world dominion? In Koch, H.W. Aspects of the Third Reich. London: MacMillan. 1985. Print.

Bendersky, Joseph W. A History of Nazi Germany: 1919 -- 1945. NY: Rowman & Littlefield. 2000. Print.

Maser, Werner. Hitler: Legend, Myth, Reality. London: Allen Lane. 1973. Print.

McNab, Chris. The Third Reich. NY: Amber Books Ltd. 2009. Print.
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Hitler's Youth and Politics Perhaps

Words: 1466 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52712052

The latter was an important member of this party, and also a staunch anti-Semite. The association with Eckart therefore further solidified Hitler's prejudice against Jews and other non-Aryan races (Fuchs 12)

Like many Germans, Hitler was deeply shocked by Germany's surrender. At the time, he was lying in a military hospital, recovering from a mustard gas attack. Recalling the anti-Semitic and political pamphlets he read as a teenager, Hitler came to believe that Jewish politicians had signed the armistice, thereby surrendering Germany at the point of victory (Schwaab 46).

The German surrender thus served as a catalyst for Hitler's entry into politics

Hitler believed that these Jewish politicians were preparing the way for a communist takeover of the German nation.

Shortly after meeting Eckart, Hitler produced his first anti-Semitic writing, advocating for a solution to the growing German problem. Hitler's solution involved "rational anti-Semitism." He vowed not to use traditional tactics previously employed against Jews, such as pogroms and forced relocation. Rather, he vowed to "legally fight and remove the privileges enjoyed by the Jews as opposed to other foreigners living among us. Its final goal, however, must be the irrevocable removal of the Jews themselves" (Toland 91).

The German…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fuchs, Thomas. A Concise Biography of Adolf Hitler. Boston: Berkly, 2000

Haffner, Sebastian. The Meaning of Hitler.

Boston: Harvard University Press, 2004

Housden, Martyn. Hitler: Biography of a Revolutionary? New York: Routledge, 2000.
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Hitler's Personality and Rise to Power Adolph

Words: 2883 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4563154

Hitler's Personality And Rise To Power

Adolph Hitler's rise to power over the course of the 1920s and 30s was due to a confluence of political and personal factors which served to make Hitler the ideal person to take control of Germany's failing fortunes. In many ways one may view Hitler's frightening success as a case of being the right person, in the right place, at the right time, because his peculiar personality was an almost perfect match for the disillusioned Germans suffering from the ignominy and economic disaster which followed their defeat in the first World War. Numerous researchers have attempted to diagnose Hitler's personality in psychological or psychiatric terms, and while these studies some useful insights, this study will focus more on Hitler's personality as it relates to his audience, because regardless of the specific neuroses Hitler exhibited, the image he cultivated in the minds of Germans and some in the international community was dependent on a perceived logic, humility, and charm, even as his actions and speeches, from the perspective of the historian, appear illogical, fanatical, and megalomanic. Combining recent historical work with contemporary accounts of Hitler given by those who engaged with him during his rise…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Girls Who Danced before Hitler Praise His Personality." Los Angeles Times (1923-Current

File): A. ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Los Angeles Times (1881-1987). Aug 03

1939.

In this almost tragically naive account of a 1939 performance for Hitler, this article gives some insight into the dominance of personality as the means by which Hitler was considered in the press.
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Hitler's Rise to Power How

Words: 1797 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27189920

It started in the fall of 1932, Evans explains; Jewish businesses were bombed, Jewish synagogues and other Jewish places were destroyed. In the weeks after Hitler's appointment as Reich Chancellor "…stormtroopers broke into synagogues and desecrated the religious furniture, smashed the windows of Jewish shops, and subjected Jews to random acts of humiliation," like forcing them to drink castor oil and shaving their beards forcibly in public, Evans goes on.

The Jewish judges and lawyers were not spared from this violence. All over Germany, the Nazi stormtroopers "burst into courthouses… dragged Jewish judges and lawyers out of the proceedings and beat them up…" (Evans). It is hard to imagine the horror that participants must have experience during court proceedings, to have armed storm troopers burst in and grab the judge, drag him into the street and beat him. Of all the outrageously violent and terrifying events in Nazi Germany -- outside of the death camps -- that certainly was among the most egregious.

Conclusion

The way in which Hitler went from an unknown, complaining veteran of Germany's involvement in WWI to the dictator that the whole world feared is a fascinating slice of world political history. But there was nothing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barsam, Richard Meran. 1975. Filmguide to Triumph of the Will. Bloomington, IN: Indiana

Evans, Richard J. 2005. The Coming of the Third Reich. New York: Penguin Books.

Hegi, Ursula. 2000. Stones from the River. Madison, WI: Demco Media.

Hitler, Adolph. 1926. Mein Kampf. Retrieved May 30, 2011, from http://www.hitler.org/writings/Mein_Kampf.
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Hitlers' Germany the Role Propaganda

Words: 1434 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63619546

Marie Corelli writes in her article: Poisoning Young Minds in Nazi Germany: Children and Propaganda in the Third Reich about a math problem taught in the German schools under the Nazi regime: "The Jews are aliens in Germany -- in 1933 there were 66,060,000 inhabitants in the German Reich, of whom 499,682 were Jews. What is the percent of aliens?"(Corelli, 2002).

Another important age group, the youth, received full attention from the part of the Nazis and the first youth organization was established in 1922 and was called the Jungsturm Adolf Hitler. It went through a series of transformations and had several different names, till it finally became the name: Hitler Yugend. By 1935 over a half of the total German youth was member of this organization. After 1939 it became compulsory for the young Germans to join the organization.

It is obvious that children, young people, mothers were only used as means of producing a nation that would enable the government to keep its power and expand as much as it pleased and suited it. A strong indoctrinated nation, ready to fight and to send its offspring in battle at whatever cost was the best the Nazi Party could…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Eher, Franz. On the German People and Its Territory.Nazi Propaganda: 1933-1945. 2007. Retrieved: Oct. 21, 2007. Available at http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/hjhandbuch.htm

2. Spielvogel, Jackson J. Hitler and Nazi Germany a History 5th Edition. Prentice Hall. Upper Saddle River. 2004

3. Welch, David. The Third Reich Politics and Propaganda 2nd edition. London. Routledge. 2002.
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Hitler Youth & the Holocaust

Words: 1226 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66644155

Prior to compulsory membership the belief was that membership would serve to advance them in the world around them which was quickly evolving and on a basis of "uniformity and solidarity." (Kater, 2004) Just as in American civic organizations for youth whom enjoyed wearing "spiffy uniforms" the same can be said of the German youth. As well the satisfaction in belonging to a safe community that was dominant in the world around them and that offered protection the participation in camping, marching, and communal singing in groups was appealing to these youth and the presence of the "omniscient and omnipotent father, Adolf Hitler, who provided immense guarantees of safety at a time shaken by continued economic depression and recurrent fears of war." (Kater, 2004)

V. Bund Deutscher Madel (BMD) - the League of German Girls

Included in the Hitler Youth groups were the BDM which was established in 1930 and was the female branch of the Nazi Party's youth movement. The group's official title was the League of German Girls in the Hitler Youth (Bund Deutscher Madel in der Hitler-Jugend). In 1933 this group began a rapid expansion and compulsory membership existed for girls between the ages of 10 and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bund Deutscher Madel (BDM) the League of German Girls (2009) Jewish Virtual Library Online available at:  http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/BDM.html 

Dearn, Alan and Sharp, Elizabeth (2006) the Hitler Youth 1933-45 Osprey Publishing, 2006. Google Books online available at: http://books.google.com/books?id=EP54o1ERi9cC

Kater, Michael H. (2004) Hitler Youth. Harvard University Press, 2004. Google Books online available at: http://books.google.com/books?id=v9xJPe0QchcC
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Hitler's Rise to Power

Words: 751 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9393957

Appeasement

Abraham Ascher was a noted author of history and distinguished Professor Emeritus at City University of New York until his death in 2012. His scholarly article in The Journal of the Historical Society discusses in great depth the failure of European leaders to recognize the harmful intentions of Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich -- until it was too late.

Ascher points out with well-crafted narrative and well-verified sources that Hitler should not have been a riddle at all -- albeit the Nazi leader had a "penchant for contradictory pronouncements" and few European leaders had read Mein Kampf -- because all the signs showed Hitler's villainous obsession with power and his ability to stir up extreme nationalistic emotions (Ascher, 2009).

The purpose that Ascher had in writing the article was to carefully, thoroughly review the way in which European leaders (in particular, British leaders) came to slowly understand Hitler's "…commitment to militarism" and in the process appeased the fanatical dictator who hated Jews.

The article's main contention / argument is that Hitler was crafty and clever in his ability to use propaganda to coax the German people into giving him dictatorial powers; and that all along Hitler had hideously…… [Read More]

Here are quotes that present the principal supporting arguments from Ascher vis-a-vis Britain's appeasement policies: a) officials in London (in 1938) "…shied away from confronting him as a leader unscrupulous in the pursuit of his goal, the enhancement of Germany's Power" (p. 14); b) ambassador Nevile Henderson reported (1938) that Hitler "…may have crossed the border-line of insanity" (p. 16) and yet Henderson also said Hitler "hates war as much as anyone" (p. 17); c) Prime Minister (PM) Neville Chamberlain was "the chief architect of appeasement"; and after visiting with Hitler three times in September, 1938, the PM said Hitler could be "relied upon when he had given his word" (p. 17-18); d) "It had taken Chamberlain over six years" to fully understand what "Rumbold and Phipps" had been saying (p. 19); and e) had the advice of ambassadors in the early 1930s been "heeded" the British "could have stopped Hitler… history of the twentieth century might well have been different…" (p. 19).

Critique on the article: Ascher makes his points without using emotional language, and every new point is logically linked to the last point. The author's juxtapositions (pointing to Hitler's madman outbursts contrasted with Britain's apparent indifference to vividly presented dispatches from its ambassadors) are very effective. I really enjoyed reading this article and most of the points Ascher makes are credible. I most certainly bought into his narrative approach to identifying appeasement towards Hitler. The article achieves its goal and there were only a couple points in his conclusion that were less than totally believable.

In conclusion, as Ascher points out in his last pages, and as this paper points out, if the leaders of Western Europe had heeded the dispatches from Britain's ambassadors in the early 1930s, things might have been different. However, I do feel that Ascher's last paragraph was very speculative and uncharacteristic of the rest of the piece. That is, even if Europe had been totally up to speed early on what Hitler was planning, there is -- contrary to Ascher's assertion -- absolutely no assurance that using economic measures against the Nazis would have stopped Hitler's war machine. Yes, there was a failure of "political will" but hindsight is indeed 20-20 and there is absolutely no certainty that had those ambassadors' warnings been transitioned into Britain's foreign policies that Hitler could have been stopped. Hitler was not a riddle, but explaining how and why early assessments of his fanaticism were ignored is a kind of riddle itself.
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Adolph Hitler

Words: 538 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92304428

Adolf Hitler was born on April 20, 1889 in Austria, just near the country's border from Germany. He lived a life in poverty during his childhood and adolescent years. After his parents died, he lived his life alone, working precariously as a painter while transferring from one place to stay to another (HTRC). According to HTRC online, the early life of Hitler is already characterized by the disturbed person that he came to be. Following are some of Hitler's characteristics (HTRC).

A inability to establish ordinary human relationships;

intolerance and hatred both of the established bourgeois world and of non-German peoples, especially the Jews; tendency to passionate, denunciatory outbursts; and a readiness to live in a world of fantasy to escape from his poverty and failure.

Adolf Hitler had been a volunteer soldier in World War I. Being in the military gave him a relief from his poverty and provided him with enthusiasm in war, violence, and politics. After the war, Hitler once again experienced a deprived life until he became an army political agent for the Bavarian military command (Sauer). In 1919, he joined the German Workers' Party (Who2) in an aim to spread nationalism. Hitler soon became the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Grobman, Gary M. Adolf Hitler.

1990. Teacher's Guide. 23 July 2004. http://www.remember.org/guide/Facts.root.hitler.html

Sauer, Wolfgang. Hitler.

University of California, Berkeley. 23 July 2004. http://www.grolier.com/wwii/wwii_hitler.html
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Hitler as a Politician Hitler

Words: 1154 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90079531

This included the
annexation of Czechoslovakia. He reneged on areas in Poland which had been
ceded from German in the Versailles treaty. While Britain and the Soviet
Union were unable to come to an alliance, Germany was able to develop a non-
aggression pact with Stalin, negotiated over the partitioning of Poland.
Hitler continued to work against significant disbelief on the part of the
general European public and conquered France, the Netherlands, Luxembourg
and Belgium. Hitler took advantage of Europeans disbelief that another war
to the extent degree of World War I was possible, and certainly not
possible under the restrictions placed on Germany by the Treaty of
Versailles. Hitler's victory brought France and Italy to his side.
Hitler was unable to obtain air superiority over Britain, despite
blistering attacks on British cities. The ability of the British to hold
out against the rest of Europe was a rallying cry against Hitler. His
greatest failure was likely related to his duplicitous nature, in which he
broke the non-aggression pact with the Soviet Union and ordered the attack
on Russia in June 1941. Hitler had anticipated a quick victory in the
Soviet Union, and the unexpected hold out by Moscow, Leningrad…… [Read More]

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What I Have Learned About Hitler

Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74499515

Hitler's early life as well as his rise to power in Germany. This paper will discuss the Nazi Party and the start of the Second World War.

Early Life

Adolf Hitler was born on April 20, 1889, in Braunau, Austria, a small town across the Inn River from Germany. He was the fourth child of his father's third marriage. His father, Alois was born illegitimate and this would later have bearing on Adolf's mental state. Years later, some of Hitler's political opponents would insult him by calling him Schicklgruber or German for bastard. Adolf received good marks in elementary school, but did poorly high school. This greatly disappointed his father who wanted his son to have a career as a civil servant. Instead Adolf wanted to study art.

In 1907, Hitler went to Vienna where he wanted to be an art student. He failed the entrance examination of the Academy of Fine Arts twice. His mother died in 1907. Adolf had an income from the money his mother left him and inherited some money from his aunt. He lived comfortably and idly during most of his stay in Vienna, considering himself an artist.

Rise to Power

It was during this…… [Read More]

In closing, many think Adolf Hitler was a mad man. Still he displayed amazing leadership skills. He is considered one of the great villains of modern times.

Word Cited

World Book Multimedia Encyclopedia. New York: World Book, Inc., 2003.
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Austria Which Influenced Hitler and

Words: 5425 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6458210

During this period, Austria also continued industrial expansion, but at a slower pace than Germany.

With growth came further instability. Investment and founding of new organizations exploded since 1867, with over 400 new corporations being founded (Pulzer 1964) from 1867 to 1872. This was the age of the Gruender, which meant "entrepreneur," but also came to be associated with financially shaky schemes which resulted in the bursting of a speculative bubble in 1873.

The period of the Liberal government spanned from 1867 to 1879, a period during which Austria lost its power and prestige, unemployment and economic insecurity reigned, and newly-vociferous minorities were exerting their rights to equality in language and culture. In the meantime, Germany seemed to be growing from success to success, as its liberalization engendered national unity and a growth in wealth and military power.

Conservative Ascendancy in Austria

The nature of the conservatives in Austria was different than in other Germanic countries. It was backward-looking in a way that rejected the new industrializing tendencies of neighboring Germany and Switzerland. Although a democracy, the Austrian government only enfranchised wealthier working men (largely guild members) in 1882; these so-called "5-guilder men" were generally urban and in the elite.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Burant, S.R. Hungary: A Country Study. Washington: Library of Congress, 1989.

Campbell, D.P. The SHADOW of the HABSBURGS: MEMORY and NATIONAL IDENTITY in AUSTRIAN POLITICS and EDUCATION 1918-1955. PhD Thesis, College Park: University of Maryland, 2006.

Grandner, M. Conservative Social Politics in Austria, 1880-1890. Working Papaer 94-2, Vienna: University of Vienna, 1994.

Habe, H. Our Love Affair with Germany. New York: Putnam, 1953.
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Contest Enter Entering Who Bravely Opposed Adolf

Words: 602 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82754329

Contest, enter, entering. Who bravely opposed Adolf Hitler Holocaust? Use 3 simple sentence: bold, 3 complex sentences: italicize, 3 complex sentences: underline, proposal.

White Rose Essay Contest Proposal

A true heroine: Miep Gies

Miep Gies is one of the great heroines of World War II. During World War II, Jewish people living in the Nazi-occupied nations lived in fear. The Nazis rounded up Jews and sent their prisoners to concentration camps. All Jews were forced to wear a yellow Star of David to identify them as Jewish. The Nazis were relentless, and there was only so much even good gentiles could do to help their fellow Jewish citizens. But the Dutch woman Miep Gies did more than the average person to help the Jewish people of Amsterdam.

The definition of a hero is someone who goes above and beyond what is expected of an average person to help others. The Frank family was a Jewish family who decided to go into hiding after their oldest daughter Margot was ordered to report to a work camp. The Frank family fled their home with only the clothes they could wear on their backs, and hid in what they called 'The Secret Annex,'…… [Read More]

Reference

Frank, Anne. The Diary of a Young Girl. New York: Bantam, 1993.
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Intelligence Profiling - Hitler Intelligence

Words: 362 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85543704

At the same time, Hitler had very old-fashioned ideas when it came to his behavior towards the opposite sex. He believed that women belonged in the home, and had no role in public life of the Reich. Their main role was to mother racially pure Aryan children.

If Hitler were to have removed himself to a German-speaking part of Argentina in order to pursue an art career rather than remain in Europe and become leader of the Third Reich, one can only assume that he would have limited his contacts to Argentineans of German descent. Hitler felt that Jews, Slavs, and other racial "undesirables" were polluting the purity of the German race. Add to that his repressed nature that surfaced in the form of traditional attitudes towards sex and procreation, and it seems readily apparent that he would attempt to ground his Argentinean art career among German-speaking "pure" Argentineans.

Welch, David. Hitler: Profile of a Dictator (London and New York: Routledge, 1998), 79.

Victor, George. 1998. Hitler: The Pathology of Evil (Dulles, Virginia:…… [Read More]

Welch, David. Hitler: Profile of a Dictator (London and New York: Routledge, 1998), 79.

Victor, George. 1998. Hitler: The Pathology of Evil (Dulles, Virginia: Brassey's), 13-20.

Victor 1988, 62.
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Wax Likeness of Hitler Art

Words: 2161 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53450097



Hitler was a good leader who sacrificed his life for the German people.

Open answer: negative assessment only.

Open answer: not only a negative assessment.

Israeli and German Students' Reactions to a Dictatorial Regime

Israeli

German

Reaction

Support the dictatorial regime

Indifferent to the dictatorial regime

Resist the dictatorial regime

Israeli and German Students' Views on the Frequency of Discussions About the Holocaust

Israeli

German

There are too many discussions.

There are sufficient discussions.

There are not enough discussions.

There is no/hardly any discussion.

Israeli and German Students' Views on the Possible Rise of Nazism in Germany

Israeli

German

There is no chance that someone like Hitler

41% will rise to power again in Germany. The Germans have learned a lesson from their history.

I do not believe that someone like Hitler

41% will take power again in Germany; the Germans have learned from their history, but I cannot be sure about this.

There is a chance that someone like Hitler

15% will take power again in Germany, but I cannot be sure about this. The Germans have not learned from their history.

I am sure that someone like Hitler will take

3% power again in Germany and that the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5006600449

Ezell, Elizabeth D., Martin Seeleib-Kaiser, and Edward a. Tiryakian. "National Identity Issues in the New German Elites: A Study of German University Students." International Journal of Comparative Sociology 44.4 (2003): 280+. Questia. 1 Dec. 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5006600449.

Marzynski, Marian. A Jew Among Germans. Film documentary, 2005. PBS: online at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/germans/view/,retrieved 1 Dec. 2008. www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5008550817

Shamai, Shmuel, Eran Yardeni, and Benjamin Klages. "Multicultural Education: Israeli and German Adolescents' Knowledge and Views regarding the Holocaust." Adolescence 39.156 (2004): 765+. Questia. 1 Dec. 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5008550817.
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Childhoods of Guevara and Hitler

Words: 365 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25309177

He was a member of the middle-class, but his father was from the lower class. There were hints of incest in the family, and some have even suggested that Hitler's father was also his mother's natural father. Furthermore, it is widely reported that Hitler's father beat him. Therefore, the two men had very different private lives as children.… [Read More]

However, the men shared common elements in their childhood. For example, Hitler suffered from lung problems as a child. Guevara had asthma. As a result, both men had to avoid some aspects of physical activity during their childhoods, which may have fueled their intellectual pursuits. Guevara was a voracious reader, while Hitler turned his attention to the arts.

Porter, Dan. 2002. The Revolutionary Cult of Che Guevara. PilotGuides.com. Online. Available from Internet, http://www.pilotguides.com/destination_guide/central_america_and_caribbean/cuba_and_haiti/che_guevara.php, accessed 18 September, 2007.

Coetzee, J.M. 2007. Portrait of the Monster as a Young Artist. New York: The New York Review of Books. Online. Available from Internet, http://www.nybooks.com/articles/19851,accessed 18 September, 2007.
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Popularity That Adolph Hitler Enjoyed

Words: 1129 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68706134

Nevertheless, Hitler was also perceptive enough to accept full credit for the economic turnaround and the German people readily considered Hitler to be the source.

The political success of Hitler in the years leading up to the beginning of the Second World War was unprecedented. He acquired territory after territory through the appeasement efforts of the leaders from the other European nations. Germany entered the 1930's a defeated and demoralized nation suffering from the effects of a major economic depression and within a few short years was transformed into a nation enjoying full employment, welcoming family and friends from the Sudetenland, Austria, and Czechoslovakia, and a renewed sense of national pride. For a people who had suffered through two decades of uncertainty and economic depravity, Hitler took upon a mythological image (Ascher).

One of the other areas that contributed heavily to the popularity of Hitler was his ability to restore social order within Germany. During the years of the Weimar Republic there had developed a sense among the German people that crime, decadence, and violence had grown out of control. The perception was the Weimar Republic had not assigned enough importance so such issues and Hitler promised that he would…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abel, Theodore. "The Pattern of a Successful Political Movement." American Sociological Review (1937): 347-352.

Ascher, Abraham. "Was Hitler a Riddle?" The Journal of the Historical Society (2009): 1-21.

Klemperer, Victor. I Will Bear Witness: A Diary of the Nazi Years: 1933-1941. New York: Modern Library, 1999.

Myerson, Roger B. "Political Economics and the Weimar Disaster." Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (2004): 187-209.
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Dinner With Leaders Set the

Words: 429 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24798557

They each impacted the world in unique yet powerful ways and therefore I chose to invite these three leaders to dinner.

Hitler was of course one of the most nefarious men in history. I did not invite him to dinner to hear him rant about enemies to the Aryan people. Rather, I wanted to understand who Hitler was, to recognize what qualities could turn a human being into such a monster. Hitler was enormously successful at his military campaigns too, and I thought it would be interesting to pit him and his foe, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, together. Both impacted the course of World War Two. To Roosevelt I would like to ask more about his disability and about how he felt about the current state of affairs in America.

Similarly, I would like to ask Dr. King what he thought about America today. He would probably be proud of his legacy but would also be dismayed to learn that African-Americans still suffered from poverty and discrimination. He might not have much to say to Roosevelt and Hitler, who would likely be arguing with each other enough so that I could spend more time with the eminent Dr. King.… [Read More]

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Political Philosophy I Pick a Political Leader

Words: 1368 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36788641

Political Philosophy I pick a political leader (dead alive). Once pick leader, apply a philosopher's ideas a philosophy reveal leaders strengths / weaknesses. You a philosopher's ideas directly influenced a leader ( Machiavelli's influence Mussolini Hitler).

Leadership in the history of political thought has always been identified in the broader lines of certain political paradigms and lines of judgment and characterized by philosophical rules and guidelines. Leaders such as Adolf Hitler, Josef Stalin, Charles de Gaulle, Ronald Reagan, Mikhail Gorbachev, to name just a few of the second part of the 20th century leaders that marked the political history of the world, have all been defined in their actions by particular elements of political and philosophical thought. Whether these examples point out a sense of extremism in terms of actions or moderation in their approaches, they are all representatives of social application of social philosophy and political undertaking.

One of the most significant leaders of the 20th century can be considered to have been China's Mao Zedong. His importance for world history does not lie only in the position Mao had, as the leader of the most populous communist country during the Cold War era, but also through the way…… [Read More]

References

Calvocoressi, Peter. World politics since 1945. Budapest: Open Society Institute, 1996.

Hertzler J.O. "The Typical Life Cycle of Dictatorships." Social Forces, Vol. 17, No. 3, (Mar., 1939), pp. 303-309

Levenson, Joseph R. "The Place of Confucius in Communist China." The China Quarterly. No. 12. Oct. - Dec., 1962, pp. 1-18.

Tsou, Tang. The Cultural Revolution and post Mao reforms: a historical perspective. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986.
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Mein Kampf Is a Chilling

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78908189



The ban on Mein Kampf has become less effective because of the Internet. The Internet allows German citizens to access copies of Mein Kampf online. More importantly, the legal rights to Mein Kampf are controlled by the state of Bavaria. Those rights expire in 2015, at which point the book becomes public domain and may be republished at will. The German government currently faces a controversial decision: whether or not to republish Mein Kampf.

The strongest argument in favor of republishing Mein Kampf is that the book has historical and educational import. Scholars hope to publish annotated copies that clarify key facts and illustrate context. The online copies do not contain any scholastic notes that inform the reader of the false data contained in Hitler's autobiography. Just as Hitler inflated his hatred of the Jews, the autobiographical data is often "inaccurate," ("Mein Kampf: Nazi Germany"). Hitler painted a positive image of himself in the book, and many believe that readers might believe the contents to be factual. Scholars could release copies that cannot be misinterpreted except by those who already hold anti-Semitic values.

Interestingly, some German Jews support the republication of Mein Kampf. The book may serve as a reminder…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Mein Kampf: Nazi Germany." Spartacus International. Retrieved 13 Nov 2009 from http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/GERmein.htm

Paterson, Tony. "German Jews want 'Mein Kampf' Reprinted.'" The Independent. 10 Aug 2009. Retrieved 13 Nov 2009 from  http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/german-jews-want-mein-kampf-reprinted-1769960.html 

Sautter, Ursula. "Should Mein Kampf be Un-Banned?" Time. 13 Aug 2008. Retrieved 13 Nov 2009 from http://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1831786,00.html

Smith, David Gordon. "Should Germany Republish 'Mein Kampf'?" Spiegel Online. 17 Jul 2007. Retrieved Nov 13, 2009 from http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/0,1518,494891,00.html
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Interdisciplinary Methods

Words: 3167 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7402417

Interdisciplinary Methods

One weakness of Robert G.L. Waite's classic work of psychobiography and psychohistory, The Psychopathic God: Adolf Hitler (1993) is that no written evidence exists today from any psychologist or psychiatrist who actually examined Hitler, although his political opponents in Germany allegedly had reports from military psychiatrists in the First World War that Hitler was no promoted above private first class because of mental and emotional instability. In spite of the lacunae of evidence, Waite offered a convincing medical and psychological portrait of Hitler, and he has gathered considerable evidence to demonstrate the irrationality of his subject, who he diagnosed as a borderline psychotic. George Victor asserted in Hitler: The Pathology of Evil (2007) claimed that he had a depressive nervous breakdown in 1909 and a schizophrenic breakdown in 1918, when he was in the Pasewalk military hospital in Berlin. In A First-Rate Madness, Nassir Ghaemi found that Hitler suffered from a bipolar disorder or manic-depression, as did his alcoholic father Alois, and even though Adolf did not drink, his mental illness was exacerbated by chronic use of amphetamines, steroids and opiates like Oxy-Contin.

From a medical point-of-view, Martin Housden (2000) found evidence that Hitler suffered from moderate Parkinson's…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Ghaemi, N. (2011). A First-Rate Madness: Uncovering the Links between Leadership and Mental Illness. Penguin Press.

Housden, M. (2000). Hitler: Study of a Revolutionary? Routledge.

Kershaw, I. (2008). Hitler: A Biography. NY: Norton.

Rosenbaum, R. (1998). Explaining Hitler: The Search for the Origins of His Evil. NY: HarperCollins.
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Germany Research Project Germany Is a Prominent

Words: 4788 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95123284

Germany Research Project

Germany

Germany is a prominent country in Europe as it stands as the second most crowded nation and the biggest economy in Europe. Seeing how it has the largest economy, it does alter the links between the prominent nations in the world. German history is filled with social and political movements. Adolf Hitler and the era of Nazism is an unfortunate and prominent part of the History of the nation. It was after both the world wars that Germany was destabilized and broken into two pieces. Following the Second World War, in 1945 the country was taken hold by the Allied powers which included United Kingdom, America, France and the Soviet Union. (CIA)

After the invasion, Germany was torn into two nations with the Berlin wall in between. In 1949, just near the beginning of the cold war, two states were created. One was the Western Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the other one was Eastern German Democratic Republic (GDR). The two states were basically created on the differences of the governing system. It was in those days that the spread of democracy and communism was making its move. The two major players in the Cold…… [Read More]

References

Aroneanu, E. (1996). Inside the concentration camps: Eyewitness accounts of life in Hitler's death camps. Westport, Conn: Praeger.

Bideleux, R., & Taylor, R. (1996). European integration and disintegration: East and west. London: Routledge.

Brady, J. And Wiliarty, S. (2002). How Culture Matters: Culture and Social Change in the Federal Republic of Germany . German Politics and Society, 20 (2).

Cia.gov (n.d.). CIA - The World Factbook. [online] Retrieved from:  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/gm.html  [Accessed: 1 Dec 2012].
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Western Civ V The Philosophes

Words: 1913 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57432668

) and towards the more practical needs for Aryan survival.

c. Why did a growing number of Germans support Hitler and the Nazi Party in the years leading up to his appointment as chancellor?

There are many arguments to this question, but one that surfaces more often than others focuses on economics and self-preservation. The German people were humiliated by the Treaty of Versailles -- their military and economic system had been stripped away, their debt unbearable, and their economy was being controlled by other countries. The ideas of National Socialism were attractive to many: unification of the German Volk, reestablishing the German lands as a country dedicated to certain ideals, focusing on ethnic and linguistic similarities, the overthrow of Versailles, the idea of German self-determination, lebensraum (room for Germans to live, grow and prosper), and an improvement over the crippling inflation and economic woes of the Weimar Government, seen by many as simply a tool for the English and French. Many middle-class Germans were also worried about the communist revolution in Russia and the idea of exporting that revolution to Germany, which was frankly popular at the time. As the economy continued to spiral downward in the 1920s, more…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burke, Edmund. Reflections on the Revolution in France. Primary Source

Documents, History 100.

Hitler, a. Mein Kampf. Primary Source Documents, History 100.

Marx, Karl and F. Engels. The Communist Manifesto. Primary Source
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Holocaust Is a Catastrophe Orchestrated by Nazi

Words: 2261 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75711094

Holocaust is a catastrophe orchestrated by Nazi Germany under the leadership of Adolf Hitler. It was an organized and systematic murder with the outcome being the brutal killing of approximately six million innocent Jews during the Word War II (Longerich 2007 p. 29). State involvement in the murder complicates the whole affair as it was contrary to expectations. This was in deep contrast by all standards given the reality among different states that it is the only institution that come to the rescue of the Jews living within the Germany territory. Apart from sponsoring the murder, the state through the leader Adolf Hitler, initiated certain bureaucratic systems that ensure they accomplish the main agenda (murder).

Holocaust means sacrifice by fire and symbolizes the physical and psychological trauma that most families of Jews origin faced. In their quest to execute the common agenda of brutal murder of non-Germans, the Nazi Germany dream emerged as their source of motivation. After ascending to power, Adolf Hitler and his Nazi allies drafted a scheme in January 1933 with a view to wipe out all the Non-Germans living within the German territories. The Jews recorded the highest number of casualties after losing approximately six million…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bialas, W. (2012). Remembering the holocaust: A debate. German Studies Review, 35(1), 209-

Bruhn, J.G. (2011). The Sociology of Community Connections. Dordrecht: Springer

Science+Business Media B.V. p. 113

Gitlin, M. (2011). The Holocaust. Edina, Minn: ABDO Pub. Co. p. 6
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Dinner With 3 Leaders the

Words: 419 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97196325

King might be one of the only persons in history with the rhetoric powerful enough to chip away at Hitler's cold heart, to find out why Hitler believed what he did and just possibly persuade him to think differently. Even if King could not get through to Hitler, it would be a fascinating conversation. The only direct question I might ask to Hitler might be about his interest in the occult. I have heard rumors that his dabbling in the occult led to his distorted ideas about the Aryan race.

Over dessert, I would try to find some common ground between the four of us. That common ground, if anything, would be a defining feature of human nature. Dr. King helped awaken America to the reality of racism. President Roosevelt introduced New Deal legislation that left a long legacy of social services in America. Hitler left a trail of blood, but his murderous campaigns resulted in the eventual creation of a homeland for the Jewish people and a backlash against the Antisemitism that had prevailed throughout Europe. Whether we argued or not, this would make for a memorable…… [Read More]

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Nazi Policies Following Their Dramatic Loss in

Words: 1165 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76794981

Nazi Policies

Following their dramatic loss in the First World War, the people of Germany were suffering greatly, both emotionally and physically during the period of the 1920s and into the 1930s. The harsh stipulations of the Treaty of Paris forced the German government into a fragile and fragmented institution which was ripe for the abuse of power-hungry would-be tyrants. The people, eager for a strong figure to look up to, would have accepted almost anyone with perhaps any political agenda so long as the person said the right things and gave the people hope. Enter onto the world stage one Adolph Hitler. Between 1932 and 1933, Adolph Hitler was able to rise from the position of relative insubordinate in the government, to fuehrer and leader of the entire country of Germany. The only way that one man could have achieved such political success in so quick a time has to be because of the support he received from the populous for his rhetoric and aggrandizement of Germany. Seeing how well the people received Hitler, other members of the political elite were pressured into giving him further support, lest they go out of favor with the people themselves. Hitler's rise…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bergen, Doris L. War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust. New York: Barnes & Noble, 2007. Print.

Bessel, Richard. Life in the Third Reich. New York: Oxford University, 1989. Print.

Fichte, Johann Gottlieb. "To the German Nation." Modern History Sourcebook. 1806. Print.

Goebbels, Joseph. "Our Hitler: a Radio Speech to the German People in Honor of the Fuhrer's
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Mass Politics in Europe at the End

Words: 1470 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37859780

Mass politics in Europe at the end of the 19th Century had turned away from the liberalism of the intellectual and capitalist elites in the direction of populist movements that described themselves as socialist, social democratic or nationalist. Frequently they rejected liberal rationalism and science as well in favor of emotion, mystical symbols, charismatic leaders and demagogues. Among these were the Christian Social Party of Karl Lueger in Austria, which Adolf Hitler admired as a young man and later imitated, and the Action Francaise in France, led by Charles Maurras, Maurice Barras and Eduard Drumont. This early fascist movement thrived in after a Jewish officer in the French Army, Alfred Dreyfus, was falsely convicted of espionage and sentenced to prison on Devil's Island. For Emile Zola and the French Left, overturning this unjust conviction was the most important cause of the era, but for the nationalist and anti-Semitic Right it was yet more evidence of an alleged Jewish 'conspiracy' to enslave the Christian people of France. In reaction to the upsurge of racism and anti-Semitism he observed in Austria, Theodor Herzl abandoned liberalism and Jewish assimilation in favor of his own type of nationalist mass movement -- Zionism. Given the…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Burns, Michael. France and the Dreyfus Affair: A Documentary History. Bedford/St. Martin's, 1999.

Schorske, Carl E. Fin-de-Siecle Vienna: Politics and Culture. NY: Vintage Books, 1981.
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Nazi Party Taking Its Basic

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 696680

Hitler defined Das Volk (The Nation) as the highest creation of a race, and therefore any polluting of that race was an act of betrayal. For many Germans during Weimar, the Jews controlled industry, banking, and suffered less in many ways due to their connections with international finance. Of course, this was just a small portion of Jews, but it became a mythos that many could believe in since it absolved Germany of fault and pointed it at a vast conspiracy. This was really the central core of the message delivered in schools, newspapers, over the radio and, after hearing it again and again, some accepted it as fact. Hitler went as far as declaring that racial conflict against Judaism was vital in order to save Germany: "We may be inhumane, but if we rescue Germany we have achieved the greatest deed in the world. We may work injustice, but if we rescue Germany then we have removed the greatest injustice in the world. We may be immoral, but if our people are rescued we have opened the way for morality" (Hitler in: Koenigsberg, 2007, 21).

This fervent hatred was quite unbelievable to many Jews who considered themselves to be…… [Read More]

Nazism needed a scapegoat in order to lay blame for Germany's loss in World War I, the inefficiency of the fiscal system under the Weimar government, and the economic crisis that confronted them throughout the 1920s. The Nazis claimed that the Jews were the greatest threat to the German nation and the Aryan race. Their doctrine, so elaborated in Hitler's Mein Kampf, considered Jews a race of parasites that, throughout history, attached itself to various cultures and ideologies in order to preserve itself. Examples of this were wide and varied, for the Nazis could legitimately find Jews in numerous countries at numerous historical times espousing liberalism, democracy, capitalism, industrialism, Marxism, socialism, and even trade unionism (Ibid., 24; Dawidowicz, 1975).

One very seminal question often arises regarding this vast paranoid conspiracy. How did the Nazi Party manage to convince the German people of its veracity? The idea of a master-race was certainly not something new, there was plenty of literature to support that theory, and anti-Semitism in the form of pogroms existed all over Europe. Hitler defined Das Volk (The Nation) as the highest creation of a race, and therefore any polluting of that race was an act of betrayal. For many Germans during Weimar, the Jews controlled industry, banking, and suffered less in many ways due to their connections with international finance. Of course, this was just a small portion of Jews, but it became a mythos that many could believe in since it absolved Germany of fault and pointed it at a vast conspiracy. This was really the central core of the message delivered in schools, newspapers, over the radio and, after hearing it again and again, some accepted it as fact. Hitler went as far as declaring that racial conflict against Judaism was vital in order to save Germany: "We may be inhumane, but if we rescue Germany we have achieved the greatest deed in the world. We may work injustice, but if we rescue Germany then we have removed the greatest injustice in the world. We may be immoral, but if our people are rescued we have opened the way for morality" (Hitler in: Koenigsberg, 2007, 21).

This fervent hatred was quite unbelievable to many Jews who considered themselves to be "good Germans," who were doctors, lawyers, and professors -- some even in governmental service. Hertha Nathroff, Albert Einstein's niece, wrote in her diary on the Jewish boycott and mounting tensions, "This day is engraved in my heart in flames. To think that such things are still possible in the twentieth century" (Nathroff, 2000, 179). Explaining that even the kindnest gentiles who had been friends and colleagues prior to the 1933 Jewish boycott, Marta Apple, wife of a rabbi in the city
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Leadership Comparing Characteristics of Leaders and Managers

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98627222

Leadership

Comparing Characteristics of Leaders and Managers

The term leader and manager is often used in an interchangeable manner and it is likely that at some point most leaders have undertaken a management role. However, when looking at leaders and managers there are some distinct differences. These can be considered in terms of their characteristics and the way these characteristics manifest. A common theme in much literature is the way in which leaders may be identified as they have followers and inspire others

This refers to the concept of leaders having charisma. In this context there are many examples of leaders both good and bad. Leaders which fit in with this context include, John F. Kennedy former U.S. President, Nelson Mandela the South African leader, Richard Branson founder of the Virgin empire and Howard Schultz the CEO and inspiration behind Starbucks. These are all examples of charismatic leaders

. They have been able to inspire and gain support, but the subject of leadership is not limited to only those who have used the power they gain for positive ends. Other examples of charismatic leaders include Adolf Hitler whose political regime lead to the deaths of millions in Nazi Germany, David…… [Read More]

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Night of Long Knives Summary

Words: 1672 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22004571

The Germany Army also condoned what had happened in the purging of the Night of the Long Knives, showing that their side was with Hitler and thus they began their association with him that would nearly lead them to a world conquest (1996). The two-hour, highly emotional speech that Hitler gave at the Reichstag explaining his behavior to the German people as well as to the disbelieving foreign press would be one of the most important speeches of his career (1996). The "brownshirts" were either brought into Hitler's army or they just simply disappeared while the SS would become Hitler's main tools of mass murder that would go on for another eleven years (1996).

Section E: Conclusion.

The Night of the Long Knives was absolutely vital in Hitler's consolidation of power. Before the purge, Hitler had opposition in the SA party who were still interested in some of the original ideas of the Nazis -- a socialist revolution mainly. Ernst Rohm was a man that Hitler was wary of because of his leadership over the SA. Rohm had plans for the SA such as wanting them to become the new German Army, with him as the leader. This type of…… [Read More]

Sources.

Evans, Richard J. The Third Reich in Power. New York, NY: Penguin, 2006.

History Place. The Night of the Long Knives. World War II in Europe, 1996. Retrieved on October 28, 2010, from the Website,

 http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/timeline/roehm.htm 

Maracin, Paul R. The Night of the Long Knives: Forty-Eight Hours That Changed the History of the World. Guilford, CT: First Lyons Press Paperback Edition, 2007.
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Body Language Summarize Your Impressions

Words: 312 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9381720

Hitler gestures are emotional and unpredictable, rather than designed to hit home certain intellectual or even rhetorical points.

This excess of emotion found in Hitler's body language, combined with his total conviction in his words that is underlined in his gesture, is the most striking clue of what was to come in Germany. There is no rationality evident even in the physical dramatization of his speech. However, this is not to say that the entire National Socialist legacy is evident in Hitler's body language, because there is also something 'weak' about his lack of commanding stasis. He gyrates in front of the podium, virtually frothing at the mouth. He begs the audience to listen to him as he calls to them, making far-flung gestures, rather than has confidence they will listen to his words on their merit, and his merit as a leader alone.… [Read More]

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Jewish Women's Response to the

Words: 2820 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97565872

52).

The eyes of the women... showed how cruelly one was once again torn from the illusion of a normal middleclass existence.... That more and more each day the Jew was becoming fair game was the devastating realization that underscored every experience of this kind (Kaplan, 1998, p. 52)."

The look of the German woman, on the other hand, became one of increasing masculinity with their sense of superiority, which could not have been achieved without denigrating all things Jewish, including Jewish women. Irene Guenther (2004) writes"

On May 10, 1933, Propaganda Chief Goebbels met with Bella Fromm to discuss a fashion show that was being planned at the racetrack club in Berlin. Fromm, the social columnist for the Vossische Zeitung, one of several newspapers published by Ullstein Verlag, had been staging these shows for quite some time. At their meeting, Goebbels informed Fromm that he was satisfied with her work on past fashion presentations, but then issued the following order: "From now on, I want the French fashion to be omitted. Have it replaced by German models. " Later that evening, Fromm wrote in her diary, "I could not help but smiling. It was too wonderful to imagine -…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=29226652

Cosner, Shaaron, and Victoria Cosner. Women under the Third Reich: A Biographical Dictionary. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1998. Questia. 7 Apr. 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=29226652.

A www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102309121

Fox, Jo. Filming Women in the Third Reich / . Oxford: Berg, 2000. Questia. 7 Apr. 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102309122.
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Black Films as a Reflection

Words: 4019 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90025348

"

The Aftermath

Uncle Tom characters were common in both white and black productions of the time, yet no director before Micheaux had so much as dared to shine a light on the psychology that ravages such characters. By essentially bowing to the two white men, Micheaux implied that Old Ned was less than a man; an individual whittled down to nothing more than yes-man and wholly deprived of self-worth. At this point in the history of black films, with some of the most flagrant sufferings of blacks exposed to the American public, the only logical path forward that African-Americans could take was to begin making cogent demands to improve their collective social situation.

Slowly, black characters in film took on greater and more significant roles in film. Sidney Poitier was one of the most powerful film stars of the mid twentieth century. In roles like the 1950 film by director Joseph L. Markiewicz, No Way Out. In this film, Poitier is cast in the role of an emergency room physician. Poitier's character, as a black physician, was unusual, even in the 1950s, more than eighty years after the Civil War, and in the emerging Civil Rights era. However, it…… [Read More]

Reference List

Finlayson, R. (2003). We Shall Overcome: The History of the American Civil Rights

Movement. Lerner Publications Company, Minneapolis, MN.

King, Jr., M. And Jackson, J. (1963). Why We Can't Wait. Signet Classic, New York,

NY.
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Nazi Youth

Words: 3919 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96595491

Nazi Youth

Prelude

Mein Kompf was regarded as the "Bible" of the Hitlerjugend. On entering the Jungvolk at the age of 10, children took the following oath: In the presence of this blood-banner which represents our Fuehrer I swear to devote all my energies, and my strength to the Savior of our Country, Adolf Hitler. I am willing and ready to give up my life for him, so help me God. One People, one Reich, one Fuehrer." (Nazi Conspiracy & Aggression)

Becker)

Nazi Youth formal agreement between the Wehrmacht and the Hitlerjugend was published 11 August 1939. It recites that whereas 30,000 Hitlerjugend leaders had been trained annually in shooting and field exercises, the number would be doubled; that 60,000,000 shots had been fired in Hitler Youth training courses in 1938 and that a considerable increase in the figure was expected. The agreement recognized the close cooperation that existed between the Hitlerjugend and the Wehrmacht in the military training of youth and provided for a far more extensive program." (Nazi Conspiracy & Aggression)

Introduction

Whenever we think of the Nazi party, we usually think of Adolf Hitler and his boisterous speeches, the holocaust, the storming of Moscow by the Panzer…… [Read More]

Works Cited continued

Simpson, Christopher. "Elisabeth Noelle-Neumann's "Spiral of Silence" and the Historical Context of Communication Theory." Journal of Communication Vol. 46 (1996).

Stein, Howard F. "Disposable Youth: The 1999 Columbine High School Massacre as American Metaphor." Journal for the Psychoanalysis of Culture & Society Vol. 5 (2000).

The Adolf Hitler Historical Archives. 2003. 29 Apr. 2004 http://www.adolfhitler.ws/.

Williamson, David. "Was Hitler a Weak Dictator? David Williamson Examines Two Seemingly Irreconcilable Schools of Thought." History Review. (2002).
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Jews in the German Army

Words: 2407 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1263422



Meanwhile, Adolf Hitler took advantage of the people's dissatisfaction with the treaty and in the hands of the Nazis, this issue was used to rationalize brutal persecution of entire ethnic minorities and political groups. This effort against previous international settlements enabled a junction of their political programs, war aims, and racist ideologies.

Hitler has also decreed that the SS were to be treated as "organizations in the service of the State," and thus, achieved a very high status in the society. The special position of the SS man meant that he must be dealt with in a special way. With that, no state court, nor even a Nazi Party court, had the right to judge an SS man. If so, this was to be the sole privilege and responsibility of SS judges and high ranking officers.

It was so obvious that because of the privileges that were granted to the SS, there rose a conflict between them and the German Army. The latter felt that they were deliberately opposed.

Given the above information, we have noticed that there were a lot of roles that Jews have played in fighting for the German military. The Mischlinge fought in the German Army…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Hofer, Walther (ed.). Der Nationalsozialismus Dokumente 1933-1945 (Frankfurt (I am Main: Fischer Bucherei KG, 1957), p. 71.

Oath of Loyalty." Taken at http://ddickerson.igc.org/oath-of-loyalty.html, Retrieved on November 15, 2006

Snyder, Louis L. Encyclopedia of the Third Reich (New York: Paragon House, 1989), pp.

156 and 257.
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Intelligence Profiling There Were Numerous

Words: 762 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27170450

Those who are not familiar with such conditions can hardly imagine the results, especially when the mutual differences express themselves in the form of brutal attacks on the part of the father towards the mother or to assaults due to drunkenness." (Langer, "Mind of Adolf Hitler"). He also seems ha have been his mother's favorite and the beneficiary of generous flows of love from her part, contrary to his father's severity. Langer also draws the conclusion that Hitler was influenced in a very serious degree by his father's personality and often confusing way of behaving. His father's deeds seem to contradict themselves in his attempt to present an entirely different image to the society than what he really was at home: an unreliable drunk who physically and verbally abused all the members of his family.

As Langer also points out in his study, Hitler looked in his first adult years as a soldier to the prominent male figures to replace his father authority, just as many Germans looked at him, later.

His sentimental involvements are also casting some light on the roots of his neurotic mind. His sexual life is impossible to be described because the reliable sources are claiming…… [Read More]

Reference List

Kershaw, I.(2000). Hitler. 1936-1945: Nemesis. London, England. Penguin Books.

Langer, W.C.(ca. 1934) a Psychological Analysis of Adolphe Hitler. His Life and Legend.. Retrieved: September 5, 2007. from the Nizkor Project 1991-2005. Web site:  http://www.nizkor.org/hweb/people/h/hitler-adolf/oss-papers/text/profile-index.html 

Waite, R.G.L.(Winter 1971). Adolf Hitler's Guilt Feelings: A Problem in History and Psychology. Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp 229-249 from Jstor. The Scholarly Journal Archive.
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World War II Happen The

Words: 1724 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15911546

" Military History. [online]

available: http://militaryhistory.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/wwiieurcauses.htm.

Shevin-Coetzee, M. & Coetzee, F. (2010). The World in Flames: A World War II Sourcebook.

Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Snell, J.L. (1962). The Outbreak of the Second World War: Design or Blunder? Boston D.C.

Heath.

Carr, F.M. (2005, January 1). "World War I to World War IV: A Democratic-Economic Perspective." Journal of Economics and Economic Education Research, 6(1), p. 117.

Carr, p. 117.

Shevin-Coetzee, M. & Coetzee, F. (2010). The World in Flames: A World War II Sourcebook. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hickman, K. (2012). "World War II Europe: The Road to War." Military History. [online] available: http://militaryhistory.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/wwiieurcauses.htm.

Hickman, p. 1.

Corum, J.S. (2004, Summer). "The Luftwaffe and Its Allied Air Forces in World War II: Parallel War and the Failure of Strategic and Economic Cooperation." Air Power History, 51(2), p. 4.

Corum, p. 4.

Corum, p. 5.

Bassett, R.L. (2009, Fall). "Sacred Causes: The Clash of Religion and Politics, from the Great War to the War on Terror." Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 28(3), p. 281.

Divine, R.A. (1969). Causes and Consequences of World War II. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, p. 9.

deMause, L. (2008, Summer). "The Childhood Origins of World War II and…… [Read More]

References

Bassett, R.L. (2009, Fall). "Sacred Causes: The Clash of Religion and Politics, from the Great

War to the War on Terror." Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 28(3), 281-289.

Carr, F.M. (2005, January 1). "World War I to World War IV: A Democratic-Economic

Perspective." Journal of Economics and Economic Education Research, 6(1), 117-121.
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Joining the Nazi Stormtroopers Despite

Words: 1089 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56521597

Friends of mine were killed for their beliefs. Of course, by that time I had distanced myself from them because our beliefs no longer matched, and talking with them about the great country that Hitler was going to create had become uncomfortable. So I put on the brown uniform of the SA and joined fellow Germans in doing everything we could to ensure that Hitler's dream of what Germany could be would become a reality in the near future.

One of the reasons that I and the rest of the SA admired Hitler so much was because of his childhood. He was frequently whipped by his father and mistreated, but he did not become defeated because of it; he instead grew stronger and more determined (Nardo, 2002). With that being the case, it was easy to see how the adversity that he would face as a leader would also help him to become stronger, making the country stronger as well. People who did not understand Hitler's philosophy like the SA often thought that he was cruel, but he was trying to help his beloved country recover from the loss in WWI, and from political and economic instability that had made…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dufner, a. (2003). Rise of Adolf Hitler. Greenhaven Press

Gogerly, L. (2003). Adolf Hitler. Heinemann/Raintree.

Nardo, D. (2002). Adolf Hitler. Lucent Books.
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Leni Riefenstahl Ethics

Words: 2111 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14726905

Leni Riefenstahl. The writer explores the topic of Riefenstahl and her unethical art. The writer examines the catastrophic consequences and her lack of integrity that lead to horror for millions. There were nine sources used to complete this paper.

Leni Riefenstahl: Her Unethical Art and The Catastrophic Consequences

The reign of Adolf Hitler is one that history will never forget. Under his terrorist reign of terror millions of people died. Those who did not die suffered from the loss of loved ones, loss of privacy and loss of financial stability. It was a time in which the world was introduced to the dangerous side of charismatic politics. While there were many who were fooled in the beginning by Hitler's manipulation tactics they soon learned his true motivations and spent the rest of their lives working to unseat the inhumane dictator. There is one person however, who admired him from the beginning and never wavered in her devotion. She was a woman of substantial power who used that power to further Hitler's agenda. One female film actor/director's lack of integrity allowed her art to unleash evil upon the world in the form of Nazi propaganda. Leni Riefenstahl's choices literally meant the…… [Read More]

JANE SUMNER / Staff Critic, The Riefenstahl riddle: At age 100, famed Germanfilmmaker Leni Riefenstahl still stirs an enigmatic cocktail of emotions., The Dallas Morning News, 08-18-2002, pp 1C.

John Anderson, Leni Riefenstahl, Film's Queen of Denial., Newsday, 03-16-1994, pp 65.

Author not available, THE WONDERFUL HORRIBLE LIFE OF LENI RIEFENSTAHL; DIE MACHT DER BILDER., Magill's Survey of Cinema, 06-15-1995.
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Paranoia in Psychology Paranoia Is Defined as

Words: 1678 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51113441

Paranoia

In Psychology, paranoia is defined as 'a mental illness in which somebody wrongly believes that they are hated or badly treated by others'. In this context, Adolph Hitler and Osama bin Laden do not have commonality of thought. Although leaders of their respective groups or nations, both the men, were poles apart. Adolph Hitler and Osama bin Laden belonged to two stark opposite backgrounds, performed differently, were brought up in absolutely opposite environments and functioned in this transitory world thereby spending their lives with a cause. However, the motives behind their actions were as different in the two cases as their actions were. In short, Hitler and Osama bin Laden have little comparison; our thesis statement that will be backed with sufficient evidence in the following passages of our research paper.

Adolf Hitler was the head of the state and he brought much anguish as well as created extreme chaos in the lives of all Jews of his times. Evidence suggests that Hitler's personality problems also resulted partly due to religious influence; however, he received much of his inspiration for the heinous crime that he committed from his political environment as well as from his economic deprivation as a…… [Read More]

References

The psychology and development of Adolf Hitler. Retrieved September 22, 2003 at http://www.abelard.org/hitler/hitler.html

Bernhardt (2001). Osama Bin Ladin, Anthrax and the Psychology of Terrorism.

Lauryssens S (1999). The Man Who Invented the Third Reich.

Speech at Kulmbach on 5 February 1928, quoted in Hitler, A Study in Tyranny
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Spot a Liar a Presentation Given by

Words: 1083 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99872201

Spot a Liar, a presentation given by Pamela Meyer (2011) as part of the TedTalks series, Meyer provides a lecture on the different types of lies individuals are exposed to everyday and the signals that present when an individual is not telling the truth. Meyer presents her lecture in an easy to follow format and provides examples and visuals that allow the viewer to better understand lying and how to spot it.

In "How to Spot a Liar," Meyer (2011) argues that there are two truths about lying: lying is a cooperative act and although people are against lying, they are "covertly" for it. The first truth about lying, that it is a cooperative act, argues that a lie is effective because the person that is being lied to is willing to accept what the liar is telling them. Furthermore, Meyer (2011) argues that not all lies are harmful and that these types of lies are often told in order to maintain a level of social dignity. On the other hand, Meyer (2011) also explains that there are lies that are forced upon individuals and transforms them into unwilling victims. These types of lies often result in monumental and disastrous…… [Read More]

References

Hall, A. (2009, Dec 20). Adolf Hitler's hatred of Jews 'stemmed from First World War.' The

Telegraph. Retrieved 9 April 2013, from  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/6852245/Adolf-Hitlers-hatred-of-Jews-stemmed-from-First-World-War.html 

Meyers, P. (2011). How to spot a liar. TEDtalks. YouTube. Uploaded 13 October 2011.

Retrieved 9 April 2013, from http://youtu.be/P_6vDLq64gE
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Nazis' Rise to Power One

Words: 3165 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76659854

In his study of the camp doctors, he noted,

The willingness to blame Jews for Germany's troubles, making them "arch enemies of Germany." The nation was itself reduced to an abstract essence, threatened by its enemies and in need of sacred renewal and purification, through blood sacrifice if necessary. One's identity as a German, as the Nazis defined it, crowded out other possible roles. As the embodiment of this "holy, divine Reich," the Fuhrer, and not the doctors, was responsible for all that happened in the camps. Yet "even the Fuhrer could be painted as 'helpless': because the Jew's evil forced the Fuhrer to act or make war on him."

So nefarious was this hidden enemy - the Jew - that he or she was quickly seen to be responsible for every conceivable social ill, real or imagined. "Jews -- or the concept of 'the Jew' -- were equated with every form of death-associated degeneracy and decomposition, including homosexuality, urban confusion, liberalism, capitalism, and Marxism." The demonization of the Jews was complete. Armed with such an ideology, the German malefactors - both before and after the War - could justify anything. This genocidal attitude toward Germany's perceived enemies was an…… [Read More]

Bibliography

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=65194469

Bailer-galanda, Brigitte. "8." In Antisemitism and Xenophobia in Germany after Unification, edited by Kurthen, Hermann, Werner Bergmann, and Rainer Erb, 174-188. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=103409458

Bosworth, R.J.B. Explaining Auschwitz and Hiroshima: History Writing and the Second World War 1945-1990. New York: Routledge, 1994. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=103664388

Crew, David F. Nazism and German Society, 1933-1945. London: Routledge, 1994. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=33602574