Alfred Hitchcock Essays (Examples)

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Style of Hitchcock in His British Period

Words: 1713 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12745472

Alfred Hitchcock's fascination with psychology and the manipulation of the human mind greatly influenced early spy-thriller masterpieces. During his British sound film period, Hitchcock explored the effect of being unwillingly pulled into a psychologically complex environment has on an individual and the consequences that he or she must deal with. These concepts can be found in The 39 Steps (1935) and in The Lady Vanishes (1938), both spy-thrillers that highlight the dangers of espionage and serve as a warning of the impending social and political threat posed by spies. Hitchcock's infusion of psychoanalytic concepts, and the influence thereof, emerge through The 39 Steps's and The Lady Vanishes's narratives, characters, and film structure and style.

Thriller films aim to "promote intense excitement, suspense, a high level of anticipation, ultra-heightened expectation, uncertainty, anxiety, and nerve wracking tension" (Dirks). The 39 Steps, a tale of an innocent man, Richard Hanney (Robert Donat), is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The 39 Steps. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock. United Kingdom: Gaumont British, 1935. DVD.

Dirks, Tim. "Thriller-Suspense Films." AMC Filmsite. Web. 24 September 2012.

"Hitchcock and Psychoanalysis, 1." Catholic University of America. Web. 24 September 2012.

The Lady Vanishes. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock. United Kingdom: United Artists, 1938. DVD.
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Psycho Alfred Hitchcok's Psycho Was Released in

Words: 1661 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38515978

Psycho

Alfred Hitchcok's Psycho was released in 1960, and encapsulates the social, psychological, and political tensions of the Cold ar era. As Raubicheck and Serebnick point out, Psycho could have been a bridge to the 1960s but the film is "less linked to and reflective of the so-called radical sixties than they are of the more controlled fifties and possess more cultural texture of this earlier era," (17). The issues related to gender, sexuality, and sexual repression in the film are likewise reflective of the interest in Freudian psychoanalysis that prevailed during the 1950s. Rebello points out that the popularity of Freudian psychology and theories like the Oedipus complex are played out on the screen in Psycho. Anthony Perkins's character Norman Bates is "connected with a much larger discussion, in the early Cold ar, of political and sexual deviance," (Genter 134). In Psycho, Bates becomes the archetype of the psychopath,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Genter, Robert. "We All Go a Little Mad Sometimes': Alfred Hitchcock, American Psychoanalysis, and the Construction of the Cold War Psychopath." Canadian Review of American Studies. Vol 40, No. 2, 2010.

Hitchcock, Alfred. Psycho. Feature Film.1960.

Raubicheck, Walter and Srebnick, Walter. Scripting Hitchcock. University of Illinois Press.

Rebello, Stephen. Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho. Open Road Media.
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Films and Life of Alfred

Words: 1793 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80885244

He consistently uses the technique of lifting the curtain to introduce scenes and essential actions. This kept his films rooted in the early traditions of theater but in a covert manner. Many of these theatrical illusions were portrayed using modern interpretations, such as his use of the curtain effect with the image of an opening door into a new environment. These traditions were at the very root of his style, and he continued to use such dramatizations throughout his career as director.

5. Hitchcockian films represent a sharp and dynamic style which relied on suspense and anticipation. Many of Alfred Hitchcock's most infamous works never showed any real gore on screen. Instead, he placed his emphasis on the film score and visuals in order to build suspense for the act which was occurring slightly of camera. This was one of the major defining aspects of Hitchcock's suspense thrillers, such as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Rothman, William. (1984). Hitchcock: Murderous Gaze. Harvard University Press.

Wennerberg, E. (2003). "The Women of Hitchcock." University of California San

Diego. 16 June. 2008. http://history.sandiego.edu/GEN/st/~emily2/women_of_hitchcock.html.
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Postwar America in Hitchcock Films Post-War America

Words: 1573 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38788334

Postwar America in Hitchcock Films

Post-War America in Film

In the postwar America, expectations for men and women diverged from those that prevailed during the war years. The exigencies of World War II interrupted the evolution of social progress for Americans, substituting a "fast forward" that could better serve the national initiatives. From positions where everyone became focused on the war effort and their roles in supporting it, the postwar period saw a return to the traditional values that had dominated in the past. Supported by the G.I. Bill, men sought education at unprecedented levels and located themselves in business, resuming the positions and leadership they felt were their due. Homemaking and childrearing returned to center for women in postwar America. If women were engaged in business, it was considered to be secondary to their gender-based roles as mothers, wives, and daughters. Some effects of the wartime patterns were resistant…… [Read More]

References

Hitchcock A (Director) John Michael Hayes (Writer). 1956. The Man Who Knew Too Much [Motion picture]. Perf. James Stewart, Doris Day. Paramount Studies. Based on a story by Charles Bennett and D.B. Wyndham-Lewis.

Hitchcock A (Director) Raymond Chandler (Writer). Czendi Ormonde (Writer). 1951. Strangers on a Train [Motion picture]. Perf. Farley Grander, Robert Walker, Ruth Roman. Leo G. Carroll, Patricia Hitchcock, Marion Lorne. Warner Brothers Studies. Adapted by Whitfield Cook from the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

Friedan B "The Feminine Mystique." New York, NY W.W. Norton, 1963.

MacGilligan P "Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light." New York: Harper Perennial 2004. ISBN 978-0-06-098827-2.
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The Noir Hitchcock Tendencies of

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43168254


Hitchcock's universe is also, perhaps more than anything else, common
throughout in its worldview. The uniqueness of Hitchcock's films as
thrillers, suspense dramas or dark comedies goes beyond simple genre
representation. To some extent, "directors' statements of intent guide
comprehension of the film, while a body of work linked by an authorial
signature encourages viewers to read each film as a chapter of an oeuvre."
(Lewis, 41)
This perhaps above anything else, helps to reinforce the basic
presumption of this discussion, which is that there is a knowing
relationship between audience and filmmaker-often based on a history
between the two-in which certain conceits of the genre or personnel tend to
reinforce the presence of a stylized illusion, in this case the machismo of
a Mafioso community. This approach is at the heart of filmmaking for
audience and filmmaker alike, with both parties desiring an end product
that sufficiently removes the…… [Read More]

Works Cited
Lewis, Jon. (1998). The New American Cinema. Duke University Press.
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Studies in Film

Words: 1142 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76581848

ALFRED HITCHCOCK: A Master of Duality

For many, the name Alfred Hitchcock conjures hazy and disconnected memories of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman in Rio, Tippi Hedren being chased by killer birds, or Jimmy Stewart in a wheelchair; but for others -- those that are somewhat more experienced with the work of Hitchcock -- the utterance of his moniker means much more. Indeed, many consider Hitchcock to be not only one of the most prolific and entertaining filmmakers, but also one of the most profound. A recurring -- and certainly intriguing -- motif that holds together his body of work is his incessant interest and portrayal of duality: the conflicting, yet in some ways similar, nature of life. That is to say, Hitchcock (and no other, on as prestigious a level) was able to brilliantly compare, reduce, and then reevaluate polar opposites that every human encounters. Love or hate, man…… [Read More]

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Alex Cross Evinces the Fact

Words: 1313 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56227871

This part of the movie has little intrinsic value for the movie as a whole, yet is responsible for setting the events in motion that result in Cross's character's subversion. In fact, Cross's jailhouse visits actually aid him in his subversive attempts to destroy Picasso by illicit means when the former breaks into his own police department and steals the one piece of evidence that can free the imprisoned girl and dispel any criminal wrongdoing on the part of her uncle in exchange for her uncle's help in locating Picasso. The fact that the girl's uncle is a criminal, and that Cross is working to both help free him from any wrongdoing as well as to illicitly kill Picasso, demonstrates just how profound his subversion is.

Virtually all of Hitchcock's masterful thriller's end fairly abruptly with a degree of ambiguity that leaves audiences unsure how to feel about the character…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alex Cross. Dir. Rob. Cohen. Perf. Tyler Perry, Matthew Fox, Edward Burns. 2012. Film.

Lowe, Nick. "The Well Tempered Plot Device." Ansible. (46). 1986. Web.

Sharkey, Betsy. "Review: 'Alex Cross' and Tyler Perry are Armed with Silly Lines." Los Angeles Times. 2012. Web.

Truffaut, Francois, Hitchcock, Alfred, Scott, Helen. Hitchcock. New York: Simon & Schuster. 1985. Print.
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Five Stages of Group Development

Words: 1382 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57672690

Group Development in Alfred Hitchcock's Lifeboat

The development of groups is divided into five stages. These stages are used to describe the evolutionary process of a group from its formation to its dissolution. These stages represent milestones in this process, such as establishment of leadership or authority or determination of the group's goals. The five stages, in order, are the group formation stage, the intra-group conflict stage, the group cohesion stage, the task orientation stage, and the termination stage. These stages are also identified by a series of easily remembered descriptive names that are indicative of the stage's characteristics. The respective names of the stages are Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing, and Adjourning.

Lifeboat was a movie produced by Alfred Hitchcock in 1944. It is an adaptation of a John Steinbeck novel. The movie opens with a view of a sinking ship, a lifeboat with a lone woman comes into view.…… [Read More]

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Hitchcockian Style in Rear Window

Words: 923 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93512835



Hitchcock was especially concerned about scenes where he could employ three-cornered arrangements involving sight, sound, and observers. This can be seen at the time when the protagonist in Rear indow, L.B. "Jeff" Jeffries (James Stewart), speaks over the phone with a detective friend and watches the antagonist, Lars Thorwald (Raymond Burr).

Rear indow had a strong effect on film communities at the time when it appeared, considering that it presented them with matters that were virtually amazing. The fact that the film was produced at a moment when Hitchcock was experiencing his apogee most likely contributed to its overall character. One of the surprising facts regarding the film is that it puts across a feeling of warmth uncharacteristic to Hitchcock. This is because of the motion picture's screenwriter, John Michael Hayes, who managed to introduce a series of elements meant to compensate for the depressing feelings that Hitchcock apparently wanted…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Fawell, John, Hitchcock's Rear Window: The Well-Made Film (Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2001)

Fawell, John, "Fashion Dreams: Hitchcock, Women, and Lisa Fremont," Literature/Film Quarterly28.4 (2000)

Mcelhaney, Joe, "Chapter 4 The Object and the Face," Hitchcock: Past and Future, ed. Richard Allen and Sam Ishii-Gonzales (London: Routledge, 2004)

Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, Rear Window. Paramount Pictures
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Production Gaumont-British Producer Michael Balcon Screenplay and

Words: 3346 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3443954

Production: Gaumont-British; Producer: Michael Balcon; Screenplay and Adaptation: Charles Bennett and Alma Reville from the novel by John Buchan; Principal Actors: Madeleine Carroll, Robert Donat, Lucie Mannheim and Godfrey Tearle

The 39 Steps was based on the John Buchan novel, written in 1915. Hitchcock freely adapted and changed the premise of the novel that very little of the original plot remained. Buchan, who was also the British Governor General in Canada at that time, was initially upset; but, after he saw the final product, he admitted that the film was much better than his novel.

This was the first time that Hitchcock used the now often-repeated theme of sympathy for the man unjustly framed and on the run, all the while attempting to clear his besmirched name and find the real culprit. Hitchcock also used the techniques of combining two scenes unrelated visually but by sound. The director relied more…… [Read More]

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Films Psycho and the Birds

Words: 719 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11041052

When his dead mother appears in the wheelchair and the viewer realizes he has been recreating her voice himself, and the sheriff confirms this as he relates Norman's story. While "The Birds" ends relatively happily, at least the main characters survive; "Psycho" ends with Norman in a jail cell. All the loose ends are wrapped up, but in one, the end is dark and disturbing, while in the other, there is hope.

Psycho," made in 1960, is shot in stark black and white, which somehow seems to enhance the feeling of terror, because Hitchcock is a master of setting, mood, and lighting, as well. "The Birds," made in 1963, is shot in color, making it seem more modern, and all the more terrifying because the blood from the bird attacks seems more real and menacing, somehow. Hitchcock uses actors who can seem like normal, everyday people with normal everyday feelings…… [Read More]

References

Psycho. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock. Perf. Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh. Paramount Pictures, 1960.

The Birds. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock. Perf. Rod Taylor, Jessica Tandy, Suzanne Pleshette and Tippi Hedren. Universal Pictures, 1963.
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Strangers on a Train When

Words: 2819 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70630922

In contrast to vertical slats and bars that signify guilt, round signifies innocence in this film (as in the double, round collars that Babs wears), plus, Hitchcock uses light to make Guy's wrist buttons shine brightly. We know by this that Guy's hands are good. They are not the hands of a murderer. He is the innocent man, wrongfully accused and working to clear himself.

At a party at Senator Morton's house, during a discussion about murder, Bruno coaxes Mrs. Cunningham, an older woman, to allow him to put his hands around her throat. She is foolishly flattered by his attention and actually lets him. Ann's younger sister Babs happens to come near and when Bruno sees her, we see Babs through Bruno's eyes. She wears glasses like Miriam did (double lenses) and in the lenses of her glasses two flames appear -- the flame of the cigarette lighter, doubled.…… [Read More]

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Bride of Frankenstein This Is

Words: 1441 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81513844

It shows that children, who we expect to be innocent and trusting, can have a very dark side, and that can be horrifying, although I wouldn't really call this a "horror" film, either. I would call this a psychological thriller with a twisted ending. This film doesn't have a lot of the elements of many horror films, although Rhoda could certainly be seen as a monster stalking her prey, anyone who has something she wants. The real focus of the film is her mother, Christine, who can't face what her daughter has done, or do the right thing, such as turning her in to the authorities. Instead, she blames herself, tries to kill her daughter with sleeping pills, and then tries to commit suicide. No wonder the daughter has problems!

Like the other films, this film has a message, too, and it has to do with children and what they're…… [Read More]

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Movies Rear Window Stewart v

Words: 2011 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24978484

Even if it successfully brings back to life a story forgotten by the public and distinguishes itself from today's typical films, Disturbia is no match for Rear indow.

It is not certain if Disturbia is homage or a remake to Rear indow, since the two movies are not exactly the same, but they are not very different either. hile some might consider Disturbia to be a rip-off to Rear indow (ilonsky 66), it is not the case here, since copying an idea as long as one does not copy its expression is not illegal. The reaction of the masses to Disturbia regarding the plagiarism involved in it is most probably owed to the film's success, since it is very probable for this condition to have been inexistent if the film were to make little to no money.

Caruso was right in bringing back the story present in Rear indow, considering…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Fawell, John Hitchcock's Rear Window: The Well-Made Film (Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2001).

2. Verevis, Constantine Film Remakes (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006).

3. Wilonsky, Robert "Peeping Bomb," The Village Voice 11 Apr. 2007: 66.

4. Disturbia. Dir D.J. Caruso. With Shia Leboeuf and David Morse. DreamWorks, 2007.
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Rear Window Creating Suspense in

Words: 790 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21495182

Jeff becomes an investigator with his camera. He is the one in the shadows at first, not the murderer. The murderer is exposed, out in the open. However, the plot evolves in such a way that Jeff becomes from the follower, the one being followed. He becomes the one exposed, as he is the one trapped in his apartment, the murderer passes now into shadow.

We hold our breath in expectation as Franz Waxman's score contributes to the tension sustaining the action and pin pointing to the most intense moments. The introspective, almost intimate, image of the film, the darkness of the movie theatre and the expressive score appeal to our senses and to our curious nature. It is not fear that the viewer feels, it is something more, like anxiousness, which is played upon so well by Hitchcock that you end up feeling disappointed together with the main characters…… [Read More]

References

Rear Window, Approaches to Film, Retrieved on the 20th of October, Available online at http://course1.winona.edu/pjohnson/h140/rear.htm

Rear Window, IMDB, Retrieved on the 20th of October, Available online at  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047396/ 

Dirks, Tim, Rear Window, Top 100 Greatest Films, Retrieved on the 20th of October, Available online at  http://www.filmsite.org/rear.html 

Rear Window, Approaches to Film, Retrieved on the 20th of October, Available online at http://course1.winona.edu/pjohnson/h140/rear.htm
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Norman Bates Psychological Analysis of

Words: 1586 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59392149

He completely looses himself in the image of his mother. He is so dissociated that he does not even know he is the one conducting the action of murder. Norman is "horrified to discover that his mother (actually his sub-personality) has stabbed a woman to death in the shower," (Comer 2003:224). To him, it was his mother, whom he has no control over. When he slips into that state Norman Bates disappears; he dissociates himself from a potentially harmful situation and allows the dominant personality of his mother take over completely. In the end, after all the trauma, Norman completely recedes into himself; "You see, when the mind houses two personalities, there's always a conflict, a battle. In Norman's case, the battle is over…and the dominant personality has won," (Hitchcock 160). His mother, who serves as his safety net, completely takes over when his psychosis is discovered.

His story is…… [Read More]

References

Comer, Ronald J. (2003). Abnormal Psychology. 5th ed. Worth Publishers

Freud, Sigmund. (1989). Civilization and its Discontents W.W. Norton & Co.

Hitchcock, Alfred. (1960). Psycho. Shamley Productions.

LeDrew, Stephen. (2009). Freedom and determinism: the uncanny in Psychoanalysis and existentialism. Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. Retrieved November 7, 2009 at  http://www.psychoanalysis-and-therapy.com/articles/ledrew.html
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Historical Impact of Melodrama Film

Words: 1951 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62307682

Film: The Historical Impact of Melodrama

In the first half of the 19th century, classical cinema was the norm in the American film industry, and filmmakers had become accustomed to uniform styles for creating visuals and sounds used in making motion pictures. Due to the dominance of this distinctive cinematic style, viewers had come to anticipate certain stylistic choices for certain narratives. However, by the second half of the century, melodrama had become the most popular kind of theatrical entertainment, and according to illiams, it successfully tested the boundaries set by the classical Hollywood style (353). By definition, melodrama is a genre in film designed to appeal to the emotions of the audience. The style derives its name from the music it uses to create tension, accompany action, and generate mood; and it is characterized by moral polarization, pathos, heightened emotions and extravagant theatricality. Its popularity in the 19th century…… [Read More]

Works cited

Hadley, Elaine. Melodramatic Tactics: Theatricalized Dissent in the English Marketplace 1800-1885. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. 1995. Print

Maslin, Janet. "Titanic (1997)Film Review; A Spectacle As Sweeping As the Sea." The New York Times. 1997. Web. 9 May 2015 < http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9B0DE7DB113FF93AA25751C1A961958260>

Mercer, John, and Shingler, Martin. Melodrama:Genre, Style, Sensibility. London: Wallflower Press. 2004. Print

Williams, Linda. "Discipline and Fun: Psycho and Post Modern Cinema," 2004. Web. 9 May 2015 < http://academic.uprm.edu/mleonard/theorydocs/readings/Williams-Psycho.pdf>
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Formalism the Subject of Films Is a

Words: 1971 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78943050

Formalism

The subject of films is a matter of dreams for many persons though the attraction has come down after the new medium of video has come in. Yet, for some it is still the medium to dream in.

To get into the concept of formalist film theory, one has to talk about the film in terms of the formal or technical elements within the film. These are in terms of its lighting, sound and set design, scoring, color usage, composition of shots and editing. This is the most prevalent method of studying films today. Thus when the theory is considered, it will take into account the synthesis or lack of synthesis of the different elements of film production and the total effects that are produced by the individual elements of the film. One of the common examples of this is to consider the effects of editing and when a…… [Read More]

References

Baker, Elizabeth. 2003. Hitchcock. Retrieved from http://www.sprocketguild.org/pdf/essay-hitchcock.pdf Accessed 14 August, 2005

Film Reviews: Great Expectations. Retrieved from http://www.timeout.com/film/70513.html Accessed 14 August, 2005

Formalist film theory. Retrieved from http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/encyclopedia/F/Fo/Formalist_film_theory.htm Accessed 14 August, 2005

Spotlight of the Month: The Night of the Hunter. Retrieved from http://www.turnerclassicmovies.com/ThisMonth/Article/0,,99305%7C911%7C29975,00.html Accessed 14 August, 2005
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Proposition the Contention That Psycho Is a

Words: 550 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84653875

Proposition

The contention that Psycho is a comedy, as claimed by its director Alfred Hitchcock is contrary to how the film is usually interpreted by audiences.

Because Psycho was based upon a real-life case, many people have not taken Hitchcock's claim seriously.

The essay on Psycho examines both sides of the argument

It is possible to contend that Psycho is a serious film, given its subject matter of murder

However, Hitchcock's deliberate use of wordplay and irony suggests that a purely realistic, surface interpretation of Norman Bates' murder is not warranted

Both interpretations of the film are necessary to understand to fully appreciate Psycho as a work of art

The goal of the author is to explicate to the audience two different interpretations of Psycho, first separately, and then together.

B. Psycho is at once a very serious film, with real-life parallels but also a film imbued with Hitchcock's classic…… [Read More]

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What Ads Say Without Using Words

Words: 1894 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47346993

childhood obesity advertising. First, there is the issue of why a young child is overweight. Of course, it can be bad habits and examples portrayed by the parents or guardians or it can be a health issue such as a gland or metabolism problem. Either way, the potential health problems for that child immediately and down the road are hard to miss. The other issue would be the bullying/social side of things. One can take one look at this girl and know that she will be bullied and made fun of for her weight. This picture of her and the implications thereof clearly focus on the former of the two points of analysis listed above rather than the latter. Some might say that the focus on the bullies and their negative actions. However, the root reason for the child being overweight is the cause of everything else and that needs…… [Read More]

References

Corcoran, D. (2013). New controversial ads combat teen pregnancy. WPTV. Retrieved 24 April

2016, from http://www.wptv.com/news/region-c-palm-beach-county/new-controversial-

ads-combat-teen-pregnancy

Creative Bloq. (2013). 10 controversial ad campaigns of 2013. Creative Bloq. Retrieved 24
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Film Is a Comprehensive Work

Words: 2389 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9052026

There is a direct correlation with, say, Henry Hill's cocaine abuse and the increasingly rapid cuts between shots. Faster-paced narrative parallels quicker-moving shots. When viewers finally see the film in the theater, the finished product reads like a cohesive narrative when in fact the filmmakers strung together disparate shots and cuts and combined them later after thousands of hours of painstaking labor. Analyzing a movie must therefore include respect for the editorial prowess of the post-production crew.

Editors must be intimately familiar with the screenplay they work with, especially in films that do not have a linear narrative. For instance, Christopher Nolan's 2000 film Memento describes one man's struggle with memory degradation. elying on a non-linear plot, the filmmaker depended on the post-production crew to adequately convey the disjointedness of amnesia. Other elements like dramatic irony, in which the audience is privy to information that protagonists do not have access…… [Read More]

References

Bellour, R. (2000). The Analysis of Film. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Bertolucci, B. (1993). Little Buddha. Feature film.

Brown, B. (2002). Cinematography: Theory and Practice. USA: Elsevier Science.

Cameron, J. (2009). Avatar. Feature film.
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Plots in Stanley Kubrick's 1987

Words: 1935 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30487671

Everything is perfect…who knew that life was this easy? Lester and Angela agree that people in the contemporary society live in a lie and that they are unable to see the truth because they are actually in love with the imagined world and they hold on to it regardless of the costs. Lester thinks about how he was about to commit suicide just a day before, but he stopped because he realized that there was more to life than that.

As the couple get closer to a gas station they are about to rob, they become less enthusiastic about their condition, but they proceed with their plan. Angela needs to get the cashier's attention and influence him in abandoning the cash register while Lester moves in and silently steals the money -- they believe that it is easier for them to get money without using their guns. The plan works…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Hasford, Gustav. "The Short-Timers." Harper and Row, 1979.

Woolrich, Cornell. "It Had to Be Murder." Retrieved December 14, 2011, from the Miette Website:  http://www.miettecast.com/woolrich.pdf 

Dir. Alfred Hitchcock. Rear Window. Paramount Pictures, 1954.

Dir. Clint Eastwood. Unforgiven. Warner Bros., 1992.
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Faulkner Tarantino and Inarritu Globalization

Words: 2874 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49112086



In 21 Grams, the narrative darkens and is localized. Inarritu deepens his exploration of class differences, but this time on the U.S. side of the New orld Order that has been brought about by the North American Free Trade Agreement. According to Ohchi, 21 Grams consists of three narratives whose protagonists differ from each other, but are interconnected (ibid. 3-4)

Babel is just really Amores Perros and 21 Grams written on an international canvas and echoes much of the social commentary in Inarritu's 2000 maiden film. According to Soelistyo and Setiawan, another term for this type of film is hyperlink cinema. hile in many films, this methodology can result in a film where the interlocking stories spin out of control, in Babel Inarritu is fully in command and retains full control of the stories and plot lines (Soelistyo and Setiawan 176). As the name implies, seemingly disparate story lines are…… [Read More]

Works Cited

D'Lugo, Marvin D. "Amores Perros Love's a Bitch." From the Cinema of Latin

America ed. Alberto Elena & Marina Diaz Lopez. London: Wallflower Press. 2003.

Durham, Carolyn a. "Is Film a Universal Language? Educating Students as Global

Citizens." ADFL Bulletin. 40.1 (2008): 27-29.
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Combat Movies

Words: 2621 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43020702

ar Films

Taking Jeanine Basinger at her word would leave us with far fewer war films than we think we have. Basinger is a 'strict constructionist,' accepting as war films only those that have actual scenes of warfare (Curley and etta, 1992. p. 8; Kinney, 2001, p. 21). That means that the four films that will be considered here, and especially the two orld ar II films, are not war films. By Basinger's yardstick, neither Casablanca nor Notorious, neither Born on the Fourth of July nor Coming Home would qualify as war films.

On the other hand, films such as hite Christmas, a lightweight Bing Crosby-Danny Kaye-Rosemary Clooney-Vera Ellen comedy about the aftermath of war for an old soldier might well be a 'war' movie. The opening scene is one in which the old soldier, Dean Jagger, is reviewing his troops when, somewhere in Italy during the Christmas lull, bombs…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Canby, Vincent. Review/Film; How an All-American Boy Went to War and Lost His Faith. (1989, December 20). Online.

http://movies2.nytimes.com/mem/movies/review.html?title1=& title2=BORN%20ON%20THE%20FOURTH%20OF%20JULY%20%28MOVIE%29& reviewer=Vincent%20Canby& pdate=19891220& v_id=6747& oref=login

Coming Home (1978). Online.  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0077362/ 

Dirks, Tim. Casablanca, 2005. Online. www.filmsite.org and www.greatestfilms.org)
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Cold War Era Films

Words: 3422 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67696982

Cold War Era

Many films about the cold war era, especially the early films, speak out against its ideals, while others support these ideals. elow is a consideration of selected Cold War era films, and how these were influenced by the Cold War.

Dr. Strangelove

Dr. Strangelove is subtitled "How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the omb." Its producer/director is Stanley Kubrick and the film was released during 1964. The film is a satire with the aim of exposing Cold War politics that could result in absurd accidents such as a nuclear attack. The more serious film Fail-Safe, released during the same year, has often been compared with Dr. Strangelove. This is discussed in more detail later.

Part of Dr. Strangelove's theme is the evils of technology. This is the culprit causing the disastrous accident. It is interesting that a disclaimer had to accompany the film's release shortly…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dirks, T. "Fail-Safe." 1996-2002.  http://www.destgulch.com/movies/fsafe/ 

North by Northwest." 1996-2002.  http://www.filmsite.org/nort.html 

Heise, H. "Dr. Strangelove." Hannover, 1996-2000.  http://www.filmsite.org/drst.html 

Hinson, H. "The Russia House" film review. The Washington Post, December 12, 1990.
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1950's Cinema

Words: 2695 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64317266

Cinema 1950s

1950s was a decade of change for the U.S. - cinema was no exception, as it modeled itself to accommodate the social changes U.S. society was going through. Films not only provide entertainment to masses but are also believed to express the general outlook of society by the way it sets and adopts trends. 50s was marked by postwar prosperity, rising consumerism, loosening up of stereotype families, baby boom and growing middle-class. It was the time of reaction to the aging cinema, especially by the freedom loving youth who were keyed up with fast food (Mc Donald's franchised in '54), credit card (first in 1950) and drive-in theaters (Filmsite.org). Young people were fed-up with the conventional illustration of men and women. With growing interest in ock-n-oll and break-free attitude prevailing, a social revolution was very much in the offering, and that was to transfer the cinema as well…… [Read More]

References

Smith, Geoffrey Nowell. (1996). The Oxford History of World Cinema. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

Rafter, Nicole. (2000). Shots in the Mirror: Crime Films and Society. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

Byars, Jackie. (1991). All That Hollywood Allows: Re-Reading Gender in 1950s Melodrama. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press.

Wilinsky, Barbara. (1997). First and Finest: British Films on U.S. Television in the Late 1940s. Velvet Light Trap. Issue: 40. Pg 18.
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Illustrators Influenced U S Society 1910

Words: 3049 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1665979

Vebell was interested in art from a very early age and he attended the Harrison Art School at the age of 14 where he excelled at life drawings. When he graduated from high school, Vebell won three art scholarships and he attended all three schools -- moving from each throughout the day. He launched his professional illustration career in a busy Chicago agency and then enlisted in World War II. It was not long after this that he was recruited to create images for the Stars and Stripes, a military publication that had also featured Norman ockwell's drawings during World War I. In 1945, he participated in the Nuremberg War Crimes Trial as a courtroom artists, capturing the likenesses of Goering, Hess, Speer, and ibbentrop (now in the collections of the Museum of the Holocaust in Washington, D.C.). He created paintings and drawings for mass circulation magazines like eaders Digest,…… [Read More]

References:

Arisman, Marshall. "Wilson McLean: 2010 Hall of Fame Inductee." Society of Illustrators. Accessed on November 17, 2010:

http://www.societyillustrators.org/Awards-and-Competitions/Hall-of-

Fame/Current-Inductees/2010 -- Wilson-McLean.aspx

ArtNet. "Francis Livingston." 2010. Accessed on November 17, 2010:
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Parody Is a Comical Spoof

Words: 343 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39171717

When Stephen Colbert or Jon Stewart use parodies in their shows, the humor delivers an underlying social or political message. When The Simpsons parodies Psycho, the effect is purely playful.

However, even when parody is playful it still has artistic merit. The parody is in some ways like a band covering a song. Only with a parody the idea is to make people laugh. In fact, music is sometimes the object of a parody such as when The Simpsons made fun of the Iron Butterfly song "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" or when South Park ridiculed the Christian rock phenomena.

Often to parody something means to respect and redeliver the original. The object of ridicule may still have meaning to a modern audience, but in many cases the original item has lost relevance through several generations. Its validity may be best understood through parody. From a postmodern perspective, a parody is essential for preventing…… [Read More]

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Communication in the Media Specifically

Words: 2616 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16924345

The "Halloween" films that continue to be so popular are prime examples, but just about any horror film made within the past three decades follows basically the same formula, they have just gotten increasingly sexual and violent, as society has continued to embrace the genre. There are literally hundreds of other graphic examples, such as "Saw," an extremely violent film that has spawned six other films, and the examples of so many films being released in 2009. These films do not celebrate the woman, they demean her, and the fact that they are celebrated by society is troubling and agonizing at the same time.

Some of the films that empower women into the hero roles include "Terminator 2," the "Alien" series, "Misery," and other films glorify or at least acknowledge the female predator or warrior, offering up a different view of women as successful anti-heroes. However, most of these films…… [Read More]

Bibliography

England, Marcia. "Breached Bodies and Home Invasions: Horrific Representations of the Feminized Body and Home." Gender, Place & Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography; Apr2006, Vol. 13 Issue 4, p353-363.

Graser, Marc. "Production Houses Pump Out the Horror." Variety. 2008. 10 March 2009. http://www.variety.com/article/VR1117994266.html?categoryid=1019&cs=1&query=horror+films.

Iaccino, James F. Psychological Reflections on Cinematic Terror: Jungian Archetypes in Horror Films. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 1994.

Lally, Kevin. "For the Love of the Movies." Film Journal International. 1999. 10 March 2009. http://www.filmjournal.com/filmjournal/esearch/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000692252.
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Unity and Disunity Singin' in

Words: 858 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31895276

She has killed the modern wordsmith Joe, the representation of young Hollywood, and resurrected her reputation, but in an ugly, negative way.

Psycho," like "Sunset Boulevard," ends with an image of the character that has thoroughly unraveled. hile the image of the young Joe Gillis opens "Sunset Boulevard," the image of the insane, older Norma closes the tale, and in "Psycho," the image of the sane Marion Crane opens the film, while the image of her murderer, Norman Bates, closes the film. Even more so than the domineering Norma, Norman Bates takes over the narrative of "Psycho," transforming it into what should have been Marion's tale of liberation and escape into a story of her murder. Likewise, what should have been a story of Joe's success in Hollywood instead becomes a story about Norma, even though Joe is a professional screenwriter.

The idea of 'rewriting' and 'retelling' reoccurs in all…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Psycho." Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 1960.

Singin' in the Rain." Directed by Stanley Donan and Gene Kelley. 1952.

Sunset Boulevard." Directed by Billy Wilder. 1950.
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Tey Josephine Tey's 1951 Novel the Daughter

Words: 1555 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96892592

Tey

Josephine Tey's 1951 novel The Daughter of Time is a mystery novel. Alan Grant is a Scotland Yard inspector who undertakes an ambitious project of solving the mystery of who King Richard III really was and why he had been disparaged by the Crown. Like the lead character in Alfred Hitchcock's movie Rear indow, Alan Grant becomes obsessed with the mystery because his leg is broken and he is off-duty. Grant finds a portrait of King Richard III and muses that the man's visage appears kindly, in stark contrast to Richard's characterization by Shakespeare. Shakespeare in fact called King Richard III "this poisonous bunch-backed toad," "that foul defacer of God's handiwork," and "this carnal cur," (cited by Yardley). As Remick points out, Richard III was viewed as a "wicked uncle and murderer!" Alan Grant takes it upon himself to clear Richard III's image and reputation. The title of Josephine…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Remick, Lynne. "Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey: A Book Review." Retrieved online: http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/romance_through_the_ages/31254

Tey, Josephine. The Daughter of Time. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

Yardley, Jonathan. Josephine Tey, Sleuthing Into The Mystery of History." The Washington Post. March 12, 2003; Page C01. Retrieved online:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A13181-2003Mar11.html
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Film History

Words: 8657 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24941469

movie industry in America has been controlled by some of the monolithic companies which not only provided a place for making the movies, but also made the movies themselves and then distributed it throughout the entire country. These are movie companies and their entire image revolved around the number of participants of their films. People who wanted to see the movies being made had to go to the studios in order to see them. They made movies in a profitable manner for the sake of the studios, but placed the entire industry under their control and dominated over it. The discussion here is about some of those famous studios inclusive of that of names like Metro Goldwyn Mayer, Culver, RKO, Paramount Studios, Warner Bros, 20th Century Fox, Walt Disney Studios, Universal Studios, Raleigh Studio, Hollywood Center Studio, Sunset Gower Studio, Ren-Mar Studios, Charlie Chaplin Studios and now, Manhattan Beach Studio.…… [Read More]

"What better way to annoy the Hollywood liberals than to remind them every single day that

George W. Bush is STILL the President?" Retrieved from https://www.donationreport.com/init/controller/ProcessEntryCmd?key=O8S0T5C8U2 Accessed 15 September, 2005

"What's interesting about the business is that it's no longer the movie business" Retrieved from  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/hollywood/picture/corptown.html  Accessed 14 September, 2005
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Talented Mr Ripley That Patricia

Words: 2723 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10796891

Faced with a social system that has no place for him, Tom does not rebel or repress himself, but merely creates a place for himself by dissolving into the background, becoming part of the hidden (and criminal) world that is a de facto product of any inequitable social system.

As mentioned above, Highsmith wrote for a number of comic books in the 1940s, and almost all of them were concerned with white male superheroes who had been given extraordinary powers or technology. There is a subtle joke about this fact early on, when Tom notes that his most recent victim "was a comic-book artist. He probably didn't know whether he was coming or going" (Highsmith 14). Thus, almost from the beginning Highsmith has made a connection between Tom and the world of comic books, a connection that helps explain Tom's eventual narrative journey.

hen looking at Tom's story in broad…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Haggerty, George. Queer Gothic. Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2006. Print.

Highsmith, Patricia. The Talented Mr. Ripley. New York: Vintage Books, 1992. Print.

Tuss, Alex. "Masculine Identity and Success: A Critical Analysis of Patricia Highsmith's the Talented Mr. Ripley and Chuck Palahniuk's Fight Club." Journal of Men's Studies 12.2

(2004): 93-.
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Wes Anderson's Royal Tenenbaums and F W Murnau's Nosferatu

Words: 2272 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18978354

Royal Tenenbaums/Nosferatu

The Royal Tenenbaums is a 2001 film directed by Wes Anderson that explores the factors that drove the Tenenbaum family apart and the factors that lead to a reconciliation between the family members. As The Royal Tenenbaums centers on the issues of the Tenenbaum family, it is important to understand the relationship that each member has with each other and how their individual personalities affect their relationships. In The Royal Tenenbaums, these characters, the film's structure, and various turning points contribute to the film's narrative construction and development.

The Royal Tenenbaums revolves around the Tenenbaum family. At the head of the family is Royal Tenenbaum.[footnoteRef:1] Royal is a former attorney whose disbarment was influenced by his son Chas. Throughout much of the film, Royal demonstrates that he has been less than an ideal father and husband. For instance, not only did Royal steal bonds from Chas's safety deposit…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"German Expressionism in Film." PDF. University of Washington,

 http://courses.washington.edu/crmscns/FilmExpressionismHandout.pdf 

Mast, Gerald and Bruce F. Kawin. A Short History of the Movies. 8th Edition. New York: AB

Longman, 2003.
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Dreamed of Creating Magic - And He

Words: 1956 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40462341

Dreamed of Creating Magic - and He Does

One of my dreams was to grow up and become a magician. ell, that's what happened. I'm not a science fiction writer. I'm a magician. I can use words to make you believe anything." -Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury is one of the classic authors of our day- one of the fathers of science fiction. At nearly 82 years old, and over 500 works later, he is still going strong. He is still writing, creating and producing.

Ray Douglas Bradbury was born in aukegan, Illinois on August 22, 1920. He was the third son of Leonard Spaulding Bradbury, a telephone line worker, and Esther Marie Bradbury, a Swedish immigrant. Bradbury credits his mother, with jump-starting his love of fantasy and the supernatural. His mother was fascinated with the new motion pictures. She would sneak Bradbury in with her when he was only two…… [Read More]

Works Cited

About Ray Bradbury." June 18, 2002.  http://www.raybradbury.com 

Biography of Ray Bradbury." June 18,2002. http://www.gradesaver.com/ClassicNotes/Authors/about_ray_bradbury.html

Eyman, Scott. "Q&A with Ray Bradbury." Palm Beach Post. Sunday March 10, 2002.

Fat Chucks Index." May 21, 2002. June 18, 2002. http://www.fatchucks.com/z4.bb.html
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Auteurism in Cinema

Words: 2217 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84032221

Howard Hawks, Auteur

Giving Howard Hawks the label of film auteur was a bit of revisionist history initiated by the New ave Cinema of France during the late 1940s into the 50s. Championed by directors Jean Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut, the French directors were seeking to justify their own individualism as an answer to the lifting of the quota on American Films after orld ar II, which led to a flood of big budget Hollywood films into French movie houses. The French directors unable to compete with the flash and panache of Hollywood, pointed out that individualism made their films stronger. The French anointed John Ford, Alfred Hitchcock and Hawks as the patron saints of the auteurs. Said Godard,

The great filmmakers always tie themselves down by complying with the rules of the game. I have not done so because I am just a minor filmmaker. Take, for example,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cohan, Steven. Masked Men: Masculinity and the Movies in the Fifties. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997.

Gehring, Wes D., ed. Handbook of American Film Genres. New York: Greenwood Press, 1988.

Gehring and Largent. American Dark Comedy: Beyond Satire. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1996.

Jasto (2002). "Howard Hawks "Online at Books and Writers. Available:
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Colorization Technique and Film

Words: 1646 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38921233

filmmakers have quite a few options. They may choose to place a character in a realistic spaceship; they may choose to shoot their film from dynamic angles which push the limits of filmmaking; they may choose to have a dinosaur wander through the city or they may choose to shoot the movements of micro-bacteria. They may also make the choice as to whether they wish to shoot their film in black and white, in color, or in a combination of the mediums.

Films such as Schindler's List and Pleasantville are excellent examples of films wherein the filmmakers understood that the juxtaposition of color and black and white have an effect on the audience. In Schindler's List, the audience watches a small girl in a bright red jacket flee Nazis during a raid. She draws the eye and as a result has a profound effect on the audience.

In Pleasantville, black…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Taradji, Nima. Colorization and the "Moral Rights" of the Artist. 1998.  http://www.taradji.com/color.html 

Creative Rights Statement. 1987. Cinema Studies. http://www.cinemastudies.org/creat.htm
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Rodney Graham

Words: 1349 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22711136

Rodney Graham -- ho ill he become next?

Rodney Graham is a Canadian artist, born in Vancouver in 1949. But he could be anyone -- or so his art suggests. In Fishing on the Jetty, 2000, the Rodney Graham renders himself into his on text as a filmed subject. In this film/performance art piece, the vieer is itness to the sight of Graham playing Cary Grant in his on nautical version of Alfred Hitchcock's 'To Catch a Thief.' Graham, ithin the context of the piece is himself, is the character of Grant, and is also the persona portrayed by 'Cary Grant,' the sublimely artificial romantic lead of the 1930's classical film in a ho-done-it about mistaken identity, a film here the actor portrays a constantly misleading man ith a shape-shifting identity.

In much of his ork, hich straddles the line beteen film and photography, Graham is both creator and subject,…… [Read More]

works cited in paper.

Hickey, Dave. "Rodney Graham." From About place: recent art of the Americas Edited by Madeleine Grynztejn, 2003.

Parkett. 2004 Edition for Rodney Graham Exhibition at MOCA, 2004.

Spira, Anthony. "Interview with the artist: Rodney Graham." 2003.

http://www.whitechapel.org/content461.html
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Gravity's Rainbow and Other Cold War Literature and Film

Words: 2703 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77425512

Cold War dominated American culture, consciousness, politics and policy for most of the 20th century. Even after the fall of the Berlin Wall, which symbolized the fall of the Iron Curtain and therefore finale of the Cold War, Cold War rhetoric and politics continued especially in the War on Terror. Depictions of the Cold War in American literature and film parallel the changes that took place in American ways of thinking about its own domestic policies as well as American perceptions of the alien enemy or "Other." Tracing the evolution of American film and literature from the end of World War Two until the 1980s reveals trends in thought. Early depictions of the Cold War were modernist in their approach, with clear distinctions between good and evil and no moral ambiguity whatsoever. Clear delineations between right/wrong and good/evil prevailed, a form of political propaganda and even brainwashing that prepped the…… [Read More]

References

Booker, K.M. (2001). Monsters, Mushroom Clouds, and the Cold War. Westport, CT: Greenwood.

Comyn, J. (2014). "V2 to Bomarc: Reading Gravity's Rainbow in Context." Orbit 2(2). Retrieved online: https://www.pynchon.net/owap/article/view/62/174

Hamill, J. (1999). Confronting the Monolith: Authority and the Cold War in Gravity's Rainbow. Journal of American Studies 33(3): 417-436.

Jarvis, C. (n.d.). The Vietnamization of World War II in Slaughterhouse Five and Gravity's Rainbow. Retrieved online: http://www.wlajournal.com/15_1-2/jarvis%2095-117.pdf
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Redundant and Does Not Really

Words: 338 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25788664

You are too repetitive, but do not say anything. You talk about mystery, but do not explain what mystery is or how it portrayed in the film. I am surprised that throughout your paper and attempted explanations, you do not reference the scene where Lily is in the Bates house and is about to be attacked by Norman dressed up as his mother and how the swinging light makes this scene more terrifying and suspenseful. Finally, your conclusion is as confusing and unsubstantiated as your introduction. After finishing the paper, it is still unclear exactly how lighting is used strategically -- although I really think you mean stylistically. Overall, I think you need to work on your word choices, your transitions, your explanations, and your organization. You also need to provide evidence to support your claims and do some research into Hitchcock and horror cinema. Your claims on these matters…… [Read More]

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The Russian Empire Through the Eyes of the West

Words: 2091 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36898135

Fellowship Proposal: ussian Studies, Sovietology, and Orientalism

The motivation for this proposal is based on personal interest in the former ussian Empire. The proposed dissertation that will result from this research will consist of an introduction that will discuss the importance of this study, followed by three main chapters, and a conclusion that provides a summary of the research and important findings concerning the issues of interest. Each of the chapters will cover a specific historical period characterized by a different set of American views, studies, and assumptions about Central Asia prior to the end of the Cold War period. Ending the proposed dissertation with the early Cold War era is also apt because it was a pivotal moment in the formal establishment of Central Asian Studies, albeit as a sub-discipline within ussian and Soviet studies.

Prior to the collapse of the Soviet Union, Central Asia was comprised of five…… [Read More]

References

Baldwin, Kate A., Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain: Reading Encounters between Black and Red, 1922-1963. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2002.

Bookwalter, John, Siberia and Central Asia. New York: Frederick A. Stokes Co., 1899.

Carew, Joy Gleason, Blacks, Reds, and Russians Sojourners in Search of the Soviet Promise. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2008.

Davis, Raymond and Andrew Steiger, Soviet Asia, Democracy's First Line of Defense. New York: the Dial Press, 1942.
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Pierre Schaeffer's Musique Concrete Pierre

Words: 8641 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59947516

The basic materials might include tin cans, fragments of speech, a cough, canal boats chugging or natural snatches of Tibetan chant (all these are in a work called Etude Pathetique).

Musical instruments are not taboo: one piece used a flute that was both played and struck. Differences in balance or performance can also be used to extend the range of materials. All of this is very similar to the way that the sample integrated into popular music have included news actuality, political statements and fragments of other people's compositions." (2003) Nisbett additionally relates that the "preliminary concrete recording was described analytically in terms of a variety of sound qualities" as follows:

Instantaneous content - frequency spectrum or timbre (which might contain separate harmonics, bands of noise or a mixture of the two);

The melodic sequence of successive sound structure; and Its dynamics or envelope (the way sound intensity varies in…… [Read More]

Bibliography of Electronic Music." Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1966.

Darter, Tom. Greg Armbruster, ed. "The Art of Electronic Music." New York: Quill, 1984.

Davies, Hugh, ed. "International Electronic Music Catalogue." Cambridge: M.I.T Press, 1967.

Dennis, Brian. "Experimental Music in Schools." London: Oxford University Press, 1970.

Deutsch, Herbert a. "Synthesis: An Introduction to the History, Theory, and Practice of Electronic Music." New York: Alfred Publishing Company, Inc., 1976.
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Clueless Movie vs Emma Novel

Words: 1483 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76163583

Because of the differences in their social status to Robert/Travis', they cannot conceive of Harriet/Tai's attraction to and ultimate love for him, the one due to his wealth and the other due to his habits. This change is necessary for the sympathies of the audience to remain intact. Had Cher objected to Travis simply on the grounds of his financial standing, the audience would not have any sympathy for her. But because he is a stoner and somewhat stupid, her desire to find Tai someone better makes some sense. In Austen's time, class and money were everything; people could be cut off for marrying beneath them, so such a seemingly shallow stance on Emma's part would have been not only understood, but expected.

Character is by no means the only -- or even the most important -- adjustment that Heckerling made in adapting Emma into the movie Clueless. The entire…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Emma. New Milford: Toby Press, 2003.

Green, Lindsay. Emma, by Jane Austen, and Clueless, Directed by Amy Heckerling. Sydney: Pascal Press, 2001.

Guney, Ajda and Yavuz, Mehmet Ertug. "The Nineteenth Century Literature and Feminist Motives in Jane Austen's Novels." New World Sciences Academy, Vol 3, Iss. 3 (2008). 523-31. Accessed via Ebsco Host 9 November 2008. http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?vid=11&hid=6&sid=49eaeb54-778c-4498-ba7a-4cd389bb44d2%40sessionmgr104&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=a9h&an=33019184

Macdonald, Gina and Macdonald, Andrew. Jane Austen on Screen. Boston: Cambridge University Press, 2003.