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We have over 302 essays for "Alzheimers Disease"

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Alzhemier's Prevention Healthcare

Words: 1871 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Article Chart Paper #: 28350849

Research Article Chart
Criteria and Defining Characteristics
Article 1:
Abraham, R. P., Denton, D. A., Al?Assaf, A. S., Rutjes, A. W., Chong, L. Y., Malik, M. A., & Tabet, N. (2015). Vitamin and mineral supplementation for prevention of dementia or delaying cognitive decline in people with mild cognitive impairment. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (10).
Article 2:
Kwok, T. C. Y., Lam, L. C. W., Sea, M. M. M., Goggins, W., & Woo, J. (2012). A randomized controlled trial of dietetic interventions to prevent cognitive decline in old age hostel residents. European journal of clinical nutrition, 66(10), 1135.
Article 3:
Dangour, A. D., Whitehouse, P. J., Rafferty, K., Mitchell, S. A., Smith, L., Hawkesworth, S., & Vellas, B. (2010). B-vitamins and fatty acids in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and dementia: a systematic review. Journal of Alzheimer's disease, 22(1), 205-224.
Abstract
After reading the abstract what do you expect to learn from the…… [Read More]

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Alzheimer's Treatment Alzheimer Disease Is

Words: 1104 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19392244

Therefore the cognitive performance wasn't improved significantly by the use of DHEA though in the 3 months period only a fleeting effect might have been observed (Wolkowitz et al., 2003, p.1073.)

Vitamin E

Vitamin is often prescribed by doctors for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. A large study which was funded by the federal government showed that the reduced ability to do daily activities is delayed slightly by the intake of vitamin E The useful aspects of vitamin E can be attributed to its antioxidant nature which helps in the protection of nerve cells from chemical deterioration. The physician supervision is necessary when someone takes vitamin E as an Alzheimer treatment. There were high doses of vitamin E used in the federal study and vitamin E when used with other medications can interact negatively including the ones used for preventing the clotting of the blood (Khachaturian, 1992, P.73).

Neurotransmitters

The…… [Read More]

References

Wolkowitz, O., Kramer, J., Reus, V., Costa, M., Yaffe, K., Walton, P., et al. (2003). DHEA

treatment of Alzheimer's disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Neurology, 60(7): 1071-1076. Retrieved April 1, 2010, from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12682308 

Khachaturian, Z. (1992). Alzheimer's disease: new treatment strategies. New York: Wiley

Interscience.
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Alzheimer Disease

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19606698

Clinical Trial NCT01504854

The number of Americans with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias will grow as the U.S. population age 65 and older continues to increase. It is projected more than 3 million people aged 85 and older are likely to have Alzheimer's, when the first wave of baby boomers reach age 85 in the year 2031 (Alzheimer's Association, 2015). By 2025, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer's disease is estimated to reach 7.1 million -- a 40% increase from the 5 million who are age 65 and older currently affected (Alzheimer's Association, 2015). Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia and is projected to be one of the most prevalent illnesses with our older adult population in the future. Alzheimer's disease remains 100% fatal and there is no cure for the disease; however, there are medications that are believed to be able to…… [Read More]

References

Alzheimer's Association. (2015). www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_facts_and_figures.asp.

ClinicalTrials.gov. (2015). Resveratrol for Alzheimer's disease. Clinical trials identifier NCT01504854. Retrieved on March 14, 2015 from  https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01504854?term=memory&type=Intr&state1=NA%3AUS%3APA&Phase=1&rank=20 .
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Alzheimer's Healthcare Access in Saudia

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Methodology Chapter Paper #: 2979432



Research Design

he research was conducted in 40-day care centers located in Baltimore County. A total of 510 newly admitted Alzheimer patients agreed to participate in the study and filled out the questionnaire during their first visit to the day care center. A follow-up survey was conducted two months later using the same instrument.

Study participants also completed an instrument designed to identify barriers preventing community services from being utilized, from the perspective of patients and caregivers. he instrument also assessed whether access to community services impacted the patient's quality of life.

he research design was based on the rans-heoretical Model (M), which assumes that individuals will differ significantly in how motivated and ready they are to change their health-related behaviors (Prochaska, and Diclement, 1983). his research design has been used by a number of researchers to investigate the association between barriers to healthcare services and quality of life measures…… [Read More]

The research design was based on the Trans-Theoretical Model (TTM), which assumes that individuals will differ significantly in how motivated and ready they are to change their health-related behaviors (Prochaska, and Diclement, 1983). This research design has been used by a number of researchers to investigate the association between barriers to healthcare services and quality of life measures (e.g., Skevington, Day, Chisholm, and Trueman, 2005). The hypothesis proposed here is that TTM is a valid research model for understanding the barriers that are preventing minority AD patients and their caregivers from accessing community AD services, as well as understanding the impact these barriers have on the psychological and social status of patients.

There are six stages of behavior change viewable through the TTM lens: (1) pre-contemplation of change, (2) contemplating change, and (4) preparation for changing (engaging sporadically in change behavior), (5) action (regular, but recent change activity), and (6) maintenance (long-term commitment to change activity) (Prochaska, and Diclement, 1983). Most AD patients would be expected to fall into the categories between preparation and action

Individuals who met the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate in the study were asked to complete a
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Alzheimer's in a Healthy Community

Words: 2178 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 43997315

Alzheimer Healthy Community

PLANNED, PERSONALIZED CARE

Alzheimer's Healthy Community

Dog-Assisted Therapy for Older People with Dementia

A review of nine studies on the subject produced loose conclusions on the value of this type of therapy (Perkins et al., 2008). They, however, established a trend, indicating increased social behavior and decreased agitation when dogs were in the company of the respondents. This improvement in social behavior was unrelated with the severity of the respondents' dementia. Six of the 9 studies were conducted in the U.S.A., 2 in Japan and 1 in Australia on 28 respondents, all with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or dementia (Perkins et al.).

The behavioral and psychological symptoms of this ailment not only cause the afflicted individuals much pain but also put them at risk of physical harm (Perkins et al., 2008). Animal-assisted therapy, on the other hand, has shown positive effects over pro-social behavior and the…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Cevizci, S. et al. (2013). Animal-assisted therapy and activities in Alzheimer's Disease.

Chapter 12. "Understanding Alzheimer's Disease," InTech:Canakkale Onsekiz Mart

Hung, J, (2012). A study on the establishment and evaluation of adult day care service centers. Vol. 6 # 5, Global Journal of Business Research: Chao-yang University of Technology.

Iecovich, E. And Biderman, A. (2013). Attendance in adult day care centers of cognitively intact older persons: reasons for use and nonuse. Journal of Applied Gerontology:
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Constructing a Health Promotion Program for Alzheimer's

Words: 1456 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 63595502

Health Promotion Program for Alzheimer's Patients

The objective of this study is to construct a health promotion program for Alzheimer's Patients. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is "a form of dementia that interferes with a person's intellectual and social functioning." (NCPAD, 2012) One of the primary concerns for the individual with Alzheimer's is weight loss "due to eating problems such as poor-fitting dentures, problems in swallowing, and loss of appetite. Weight loss or loss of appetite may be caused by noise, odor, and/or conversation distractions while eating." (NCPAD, 2012) Caregivers are faced with many challenges in providing care for the Alzheimer's Patient. Findings in this study state that the primary components required for the health promotion program for the individual with Alzheimer's disease are those of: (1) nutrition; (2) physical activity; (3) mental activity; and (4) social activity and participation.

Health Promotion Program for Alzheimer's Patients

Introduction

The objective of this study…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adopt a Brain-Healthy Diet (2012) Alzheimer's Association. Retrieved from:  http://www.alz.org/we_can_help_adopt_a_brain_healthy_diet.asp 

Berkman, LF (1995) The Role of Social Relations in Health Promotion. Psychosomatic Medicine. Vo. 57, Issue 3. Retrieved from:  http://www.psychosomaticmedicine.org/content/57/3/245.short 

Gillett-Guyonnet, Sophie, et al. (2000) Weight Loss in Alzheimer Disease. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 71 no. 2. Retrieved from:  http://www.ajcn.org/content/71/2/637s.full 

Growing Stronger -- Strength Training for Older Adults (2011) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from:  http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/growingstronger/index.html
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history current theory and treatment of alzheimer's

Words: 964 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60567415

History
The disease first described and defined in 1906 by Alois Alzheimer and named after him in 1910 has led to tremendous breakthroughs in brain and neurological research, according to the Alzheimer’s Association (2018). Alzheimer, a German physician, analyzed the brains of patients with the characteristic symptoms of the disease including profound and debilitating memory loss, noticing “shrinkage,” as well as “abnormal deposits in and around nerve cells,” (Alzheimer’s Association, 2018, p. 1). Alzheimer also described the amyloid plaques now known to be linked to the symptoms of the disease, as well as neurofibrillary tangles (National Institute on Aging, 2018). Since Alzheimer’s early discoveries, subsequent researchers in psychiatry and neurobiology relied on increasingly sophisticated methods of studying the structure of the human brain.
Therefore, technology as well as human input has been instrumental in evolving research into the causes and treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to the development of…… [Read More]

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Alzheimer's and Dementia Health Care Structures

Words: 948 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55961169

Health Care Delivery Structure

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive brain disease and the most prevalent root cause of dementia. In the present day, more than five million people living in America are suffering from Alzheimer's disease. It is the 6th prominent cause of death in the United States and is the 5th causal factor of death for individuals older than the age of 65 years old. It is estimated that the number of individuals suffering from this disease might even triple up by mid of the century with this number being expected to rise to one million for the U.S. (Illinois Department of Public Health, 2014). Despite the fact that plenty of the states in America were engrossed and pensive with issues of budgeting in the past four years, state policymakers have went on to develop and offer refinement to regulations on assisted living or residential care for Alzheimer and…… [Read More]

References

Illinois Department of Public Health. (2014). Alzheimer's disease Illinois State Plan 2014-2017 Report and Recommendations. State of Illinois. Retrieved 20 August 2015 from:  http://www.idph.state.il.us/pdf/ADPlan_2014.pdf 

Polzer, (2011). Assisted Living State Regulatory Review. National Center for Assisted Living. Retrieved 20 August 2015 from:  http://www.ahcancal.org/ncal/resources/documents/2011assistedlivingregulatoryreview.pdf
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Barriers to Utilizing Adult Day Centers and Associated Factors on Alzheimer's Patients

Words: 1446 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 63463583

Alzheimer's

Adult Daycare for Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

Barriers to Daycare Utilization:

Fortinsky, Richard H., Kulldorff, Martin, Kleppinger, Alison, and Kenyon-Pesce, Lisa. (2009). Dementia care consultation for family caregivers: ollaborative model linking an Alzheimer's association chapter with primary care physicians. Aging & Mental Health, 13(2), 162-170.

The study by Fortinsky et al. (2009) discusses some of the obstacles standing between family caregivers and the admission of their patients to daycare nursing communities. The purpose of the research is to evaluate strategies that might improve the willingness of family caregivers to work with these community services. In a consultation with 84 family caregivers, the study aims to determine what strategies might raise confidence in the capabilities of such services. Additionally, the study seeks to evaluate the responses of primary caregivers to the outcomes produced by this type of intervention. A third objective of the study would be to determine how successfully…… [Read More]

Cantegreil-Kallen, Inge, Turbelin, Clement, Angel, Pierre, Flahault, Aantoine, and Rigaud, Anne-Sophie. (2006). Dementia management in France: Health care and support services in the community. Dementia, 5(3), 317-326.

As study of community-based Alzheimer's support services in France lends greater insight into the obstacles preventing the optimization of care. According to the study by Cantegreil-Kallen (2006) et al., France provides a state-administered network of community-based services available to individuals suffering from Alzheimer's or dementia related to aging. While this federal oversight provides regulatory consistency and quality control, it may also be impeding the fullest possible effectiveness of community-based service contexts. According to the study in question, "Although GPs acknowledged carers' need for emotional support, only minimal levels of other interventions such as day care (12%) and psychotherapeutic interventions (12%) were prescribed. Reasons for under-use included non-availability and carers' reluctance to undergo psychotherapy. Lack of integrated community care services, insufficient information on services, lack of collaboration between health professionals and the frequent absence of a reliable carer were considered the most important barriers to the effective support of people with dementia in primary health care settings." (p. 317)

This confirms the general observation drawn from the preset research that while there are clear benefits to the employment of any form of daycare, community agencies often lack the resources or protocol to ensure that patients are given the best opportunity for the improvement of faculties as well as the improvement of long-term health outcomes.
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Huntington's Disease Huntington's Chorea

Words: 2877 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 66784189

Huntington's disease, also known as HD, is an uncommon degenerative disorder that greatly impacts the central nervous system of the individual. It is often characterized by surplus and unneeded choreatic movements, unusual behavioral patterns, disturbances in the mental level and dementia. (Sheth 2013) As far as the Caucasian population is concerned, the Huntington's disease is prevalent in one out of ten thousand persons. The symptoms start to appear when the individual is thirty to fifty years of age. In a few cases, adolescents start to show symptoms of HD (known as JHD or Juvenile Huntington's disease) before the age of twenty by demonstrating behavioral disorders and learning difficulties at school. However, chorea is the major sign of the onset of HD that spreads to all muscles with the passage of time. The affected individual becomes severely retarded as the psychomotor processes are affected gradually. he/she also suffers decline of cognitive…… [Read More]

References

DiMaio MS, Fox JE, Mahoney MJ. 2010. Prenatal Diagnosis: Cases and Clinical Challenges [Internet]. 1. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell; [cited 2013 Nov 10] Available from:  http://books.google.com.pk/books?id=Qx2cWaAk2pEC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Prenatal+Diagnosis:+Cases+and+Clinical+Challenges&hl=en&sa=X&ei=9jCCUufnNZOrhQfh0YDACg&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Prenatal%20Diagnosis%3A%20Cases%20and%20Clinical%20Challenges&f=false 

Knowles J. 2007. Huntington's Disease [Internet]. 1. New York: Rosen Pub. Group; [cited 2013 Nov 11] Available from:  http://books.google.com.pk/books?id=RX2Er7NpMSUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Huntington 's+Disease&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ameBUqWBDYjBhAfy9YDQCQ&ved=0CEcQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Huntington's%20Disease&f=false

Lemiere J. 2004. Huntington's disease: Early Detection and Progression of Cognitive Changes in Patients and Asymptomatic Mutation Carriers [Internet]. Leuven: Leuven University Press; [cited 2013 Nov 11] Available from:  http://books.google.com.pk/books?id=vdhgGGgLQSIC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Huntington 's+Disease:+Early+Detection+and+Progression+of+Cognitive+Changes+in+Patients+and+Asymptomatic+Mutation+Carriers&hl=en&sa=X&ei=aGqBUqDzJ6XG7AbVz4CIDQ&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Huntington's%20Disease%3A%20Early%20Detection%20and%20Progression%20of%20Cognitive%20Changes%20in%20Patients%20and%20Asymptomatic%20Mutation%20Carriers&f=false

Roos R. 2010. Huntington's Disease: A Clinical Review. Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases [Internet]. [cited 2013 Nov 12] 5:40. Available from:  http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1750-1172-5-40.pdf
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Parkinson's Disease a Brief Description of Parkinson's

Words: 1464 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82724099

Parkinson's Disease

A Brief Description of Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder that occurs in middle-age to older adults. The disorder has a mean beginning of about 55 years of age. The incidence of Parkinson's disorder increases with age. PD affects about 0.15% percent of the population (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000). PD was first described in 1817 by James Parkinson's "Essay on the Shaking Palsy."

In 95% of PD cases diagnoses there is no genetic association (no one in the family has it) and these cases are designated as sporadic PD. In the small number of remaining cases the disorder is inherited (Dauer & Przedborski, 2003). A condition known as secondary Parkinsonism that resembles the physical presentation of PD can be brought on by a number of drugs or other conditions such as dopamine antagonist medications, hypoxia, and from brain tumors (APA, 2000).

The Cause…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

Disorders, IV- Text Revision. Washington, DC: Author.

Bear, M.F., Connors, B.W. & Paradiso, M.A. (2001). Neuroscience: Exploring the brain,

Second Edition. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
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Huntington's Disease and Laboratory Investigation

Words: 1975 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25460220

HD is extremely debilitating, and if the patient lives long enough, the symptoms can become extremely severe. It is not uncommon for patients who suffer from the disease to suffer extreme depression and sometimes suicide, so developing medications that could delay or slow the disease are extremely important, and laboratory testing should definitely continue in this area.

Laboratory work in the past decades has helped develop a much deeper understanding of the disease. A group of writers note, "Within the last 4 decades, great strides have been made that have furthered our understanding of the neural bases of HD" (Montoya, Price, Menear and Lepage 2006). This is also extremely important in the understanding and eventual eradication of the disease.

All of these results are extremely positive for families who know they suffer from the disease, and for hopefully preventing the disease in the future. Without laboratory testing and research, many…… [Read More]

References

Editors. 2010. Huntington's Disease. [Online] Available at:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/huntington/huntington.htm  [Accessed 18 May 2010].

Goolkasian, Virginia. 2001. Delving into Huntington's Disease. USA Today (Society for the Advancement of Education), September, 34.

Klager, Joseph, Ayana Duckett, Susan Sandler, and Carol Moskowitz. 2008. Huntington's Disease: a Caring Approach to the End of Life. Care Management Journals 9, no. 2: 75+.

Lechich, Anthony J., Deborah Lovecky, Carol Moskowitz, Sybil Montas, Ayana Duckett, Anne Pae, Kathy Knoblauch, David Saks, Dorothy Toliver, Eileen Fogarty, and James Pollard. 2008. Survey of Community-based Programs Serving U.S. Families with Huntington's Disease: Perceived Barriers and Facilitators in the Residential Placement Process. Care Management Journals 9, no. 2: 65+.
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Parkinson's Disease Family and Cultural

Words: 1214 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 5499037

" (Fleming et al., 1994)

B. Genetic Factors

hile environmental factors are shown to increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease there are also specific mutations linked to the development of PD in certain populations. For example it is reported that a study conducted on Parkinson's Disease and hereditary genetic risks of developing this disease states findings that researchers in the study "...found that ethnic Chinese individuals carrying a mutation they indentified in the LRRK2 gene are over two times more likely to develop the disease than non-carriers." (Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, 2004) the study was conducted at Mayo Clinic in 2004. The research team not only discovered the LRRK2 gene and the role it plays in Parkinson's disease but as well discovered "...a number of mutations in LRRK2 a gene that codes for poorly understood protein, leucine-rich repeat kinase." (Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, 2004)

One of the mutations 'G209S…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Wood-Kaczmar, a., Gandhi, S. And Wood, NW (2006) Understanding the molecular causes of Parkinson's disease Trends Mol Med. 2006 Nov;12(11):521-8. Epub 2006 Oct 5. Links

Understanding the molecular causes of Parkinson's disease.

Priyadarshi, a., Khuder, SA, Schaub, EA and Priyadarshi, SS (2001) Environmental risk factors and Parkinson's disease: a metaanalysis. Environe Res. 2001 Jun; 86(2):122-7.

How yeast is helping us to understand Parkinson's Disease (2009) Psysorg 27 Feb 2009. Online available at http://www.physorg.com/news154950981.html
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Counseling and Support for Alzheimer's

Words: 849 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 91785423

Longitudinal trajectories for individual participants were used at one level, while a second level included the effects of between-subjects predictors at the higher order. To construct the models, 4,193 observations were used over time, with 3,055 of these conducted ruing community caregiving and 1,148 in the nursing home.

Presentation of Data

Data are presented by means of two figures and three tables. The data appear to be very clearly explicated. The axes in the figures are all clearly marked, and the lines differentiated to indicate the data of concern. The tables clarify the information narrated in the document.

Limitations of Statistical Methods

Limitations include the lack of ethnic diversity in the sample population. Different cultures would respond differently to the burden of care and to counseling intervention. Furthermore, only spouse caregivers were targeted for the research, which limits the application of the data to households where children or other family…… [Read More]

What I found most interesting was the three measurements implemented as a basis for the study. These instruments help greatly towards establishing a sound basis for the study and to implement further statistical analyses of the results. In general, I was impressed with the study and I find it very relevant in a profession where the aim is to reduce suffering.

Source

Gaugler, J.E., Roth, D.L., Haley, W.E., & Mittleman, M.S. (2008). Can counseling and support reduce burden and depressive symptoms in caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease during the transition to institutionalization? Results from the New York University Caregiver Intervention Study. Journal of American Geriatric Society, 56(3), 421-428
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Sandwich Generation Caregiving and Alzheimer's

Words: 3114 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 88702489



A driver came to the house and picked Robert up five days a week at 7:30 and brought him home at around 4:00 P.M. The couple received a grant from United ay to fund the service they received from the Respite Center, which cost around $200 per week. The Respite Center had well-thought-out activities designed for seniors with dementia and Alzheimer's, and those activities "helped slow down his Alzheimer's" (Claunch). Those activities include arts and crafts, chair aerobics, games, socializing, breakfast, lunch and a snack, Claunch explains. On many days a special visitor or group comes to entertain the seniors; among those groups are the Gulf Coast omen's Club, the Garden Club, PAS Ministry, gospel groups, line dancers, pianists and sing-along singers.

hen an Alzheimer's patient is stimulated (by being entertained, walking, or engaging in a game of some kind that challenges the mind but does in minimally) the nerve…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Assist Guide Information Services. (2009). Caregiving. Retrieved November 10, 2009,

From  http://www.agis.com .

Claunch, Shannon. (2009). Council on Aging: Respite Center Cares for Community.

News Herald. Retrieved November 11, 2009, from  http://www.newsherald.com
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Social Work Internship Experience With Alzheimer Patients

Words: 1397 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19889572

Social Work Internship Experience With Alzheimer Patients

My service learning experience was a positive one. I had the opportunity to work at an Alzheimer's care facility, with patients exhibiting various stages of Alzheimer's disease. I learned through my interactions with older adults at the clinic that much like anyone else, Alzheimer's patients need stimulation, warmth, compassion and an environment that encourages interaction and relationship building.

My views of older adults have changed significantly since working with patients at the care center. Whereas in the past I might have assumed that all older adults were mentally less cognizant of their emotions and feelings and 'numb' to the world around them, I learned instead that many have a great compassion for caring, and many desire simply to enjoy much of the same things than anyone else would at their age. My experiences are described in greater detail below.

Summary of Experiences

My…… [Read More]

References:

Gebo, L. "Biological Systems and their Impacts on Later Adulthood." Chapter 14. New

York, Thompson Brooks Cole: 2004.
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Treatment Options for Alzheimer S

Words: 1577 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 37342892

Functional Assessment eport

Summarization of Case

Luther, 80 years of age, was admitted to a nursing hospital due to Alzheimer's disease complications. As a farmer, Luther spent most of his life moving freely unlike what he was experiencing in the nursing home. However, he had to adapt to the new life. Despite his impairment memory problem, Luther was psychically fit as he managed to walk around the nursing premises. Later, he started experienced a problem in that he walked alone. For safety reasons, he was not allowed to go outside alone. Despite the warnings, he managed to walk go outside alone, even during cold periods without a coat. Each time he went out, the nursing staff had to bring him back. The architecture of the nursing home depicts one main door at the station, another one near the business office, and three fire doors at the sides and back of…… [Read More]

References

Cooper, J. O., Heron, T. E., & Heward, W. L. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis (second Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall. ISBN: 9780131421134.

Lu, L. & Bludau, J. (2011). Alzheimer's Disease. New York: ABC-CLIO

Miltenberger, R. G. (2015). Behavior Modification: Principles and Procedures (Sixth Ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning. ISBN: 9781305109391.
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Older Adults the Connection of Depression With Diseases

Words: 2590 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 42903853

Depression, Disease, And Aging

Aging brings many changes in health, social relationships, work situation, and other dimensions of life, and old age has been examined as one aspect of life development, showing how earlier stages contribute to the coping mechanisms older people have and how they apply these to new situations. A number of the changes accompanying old age can create stress and depression, and in turn these psychological states can contribute to the onset of disease or to the course disease takes. Studies have also shown that untreated depression can contribute to a higher suicide rate for the elderly.

How the elderly person is affected may depend on his or her closest relationship. The aging process for many includes physical or mental deterioration which can place considerable strain on the life partner, who now has to contend not only with his or her own diminished function because of aging…… [Read More]

References

Causes of depression 2004, GlaxoSmithKline, retrieved August 23, 2005 from  http://www.depression.com/causes_of_depression.html .

Cox, H.G. (1988). Later life: the realities of aging. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Depner, C.E. & Ingersoll-Dayton, B. (1985). "Conjugal social support and patterns in later life." Journal of Gerontology, 40, No. 6, 761-766.

Ebersole, P. & Hess, P. (1998). Toward healthy aging: Human needs and nursing response. St. Louis, Missouri: Mosby.
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Important Factors in Treating Huntington's Disease Patients

Words: 6558 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 22789764

Huntington's disease (HD) was the first autonomic dominant disorder for which genetic prediction became possible" (Harper, et al., 2000, Journal of Medical Genetics, p. 567). HD is a disease that occurs due to an inherited disorder leading to the death of brain cells. A diagnosis of HD is accomplished through genetic testing which can be implemented at any age regardless of whether the symptoms manifest or not. Although, the specific symptoms vary between people, nevertheless, symptoms can start with people between 35 and 45 years of age and can also start in some individuals at even anearlier age. The disease may affect successive generations if health interventions are not implemented (Mandel, 2016).

Additionally, "the cause of HD is due to a dominant mutation of autosomal form of the gene called Huntington. This shows that a child born by an affected person has a 50% chance of developing or inheriting the…… [Read More]

References

Causes and risk factors. (2016). Health Communities. Retrieved from http://www. healthcommunities.com/huntingtons-disease/cause.shtml.

Denbo, S. M. (2013, January 1). Balancing the rights of children, parents and the state: The legal, ethical and psychological implications of genetic testing in children. Southern Journal of Business and Ethics, 5, 188-190.

Domaradzki, J. (2015, January 1). Lay constructions of genetic risk. A case-study of the Polish Society of Huntington's Disease. Polish Sociological Review, 189, 107-111.

Draper, B. (2004). Dealing with dementia: A Guide to Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
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Comparing Cognitive Changes

Words: 956 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83662529

Cognitive Changes

As people age, there are three main types of cognitive changes that can impair or alter cognitive functioning: mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's. All of these syndromes are more severe than the normal decline that is expected with aging, though they do not all reach the severity of dementia. Dementia refers to the "the loss of cognitive functioning- thinking, remembering, and reasoning- and behavior abilities, to such an extent that it interferes with a person's daily life and activities" (NIH, 2013). While there are some similarities between these three conditions, there are also significant differences between the three syndromes. These differences can impact treatment options and also help predict impact on the patient and the family.

MCI is an intermediate stage, which features a more significant cognitive decline than that expected with normal aging, but is not as severe as full-blown dementia. "It can involve problems…… [Read More]

References

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2012, August 21). Mild Cognitive Impairment. Retrieved October 21, 2013

from Mayo Clinic website:  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mild-cognitive-impairment/DS00553 

National Institutes on Health. (2013, October 17). Alzheimer's Fact Sheet. Retrieved October

21, 2013 from the National Institute on Aging website:  http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/alzheimers-disease-fact-sheet
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Christian Counseling

Words: 901 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 62497196

Mr. H

Korea

Mr. H case study

What is the client's most prominent presenting issues (that is, what seems to take priority as being wrong)?

Mr. H has shown a sharp decline in cognitive functioning. He has quit his job without warning and without consulting with his spouse (who is economically as well as emotionally affected by this decision), has shown difficulty remembering basic tasks and words that a man of his education and background should be able to retrieve easily, and is exhibiting signs of disorientation. Despite being an accomplished outdoorsman he has gotten lost while hiking; has difficulty reading; and although he was a science teacher has difficulty doing basic math. He also has trouble performing basic acts of self-care and memory exercises.

Q2. What else do you feel you need to know (or, what might be some areas you may ask about in order to determine what…… [Read More]

References

Alzheimer's disease: Treatment and drugs. (2013). Mayo Clinic. Retrieved from:

 http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/alzheimers-disease/DS00161/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs 

Diagnostic criteria for dementia of the Alzheimer's type. (2013). BehaveNet. Retrieved from:

 http://behavenet.com/node/21508
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Stem Cell Differentiation the Need to Restore

Words: 3613 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42462808

Stem Cell Differentiation

The need to restore the lives of the individuals calls for more of transplantation than that which is available. There are fewer organs, which can help in the transplantation process, which means that overdependence on the process makes it to be reliable. Further, the process may also end up endangering the life of the donator. Transplantation is the only available process that can for the individuals having kidney and lung problems. However, the numbers of individuals who are suffering from kidney and lung failure are always more than those who are ready to supply the needed organs. This calls for an alternative way, which can help in compensating the loss that the individuals face. One of the major alternatives for the process of translation is stem cell differentiation that may occur in any body cell. The stem cells differentiation offer the possibility of a renewable source of…… [Read More]

Reference

Wang, J., Collins, J. et al., (2012). Functional analysis of transcription factor binding sites in human promoters. Genome Biology, doi:10.1186/gb-2012-13-9-r50

Guillot PV, Cui W, Fisk NM, Polak DJ. (2007). Stem cell differentiation and expansion for clinical applications of tissue engineering. J Cell Mol Med. 11:935-944.

Gerrard L, Rodgers L, Cui W. (2005). Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells to Neural

Lineages in Adherent Culture by Blocking Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling. Stem Cells 23: 1234-1241.
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Prions Proteinaceous Infectious Particles Recent Cases of

Words: 2056 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79151408

Prions:

Proteinaceous Infectious Particles"

Recent cases of Mad Cow Disease have focused the public attention on prion diseases and the small proteins that are believed to cause them. The scientific community has been slow to recognize this mechanism of disease, since prion-caused encephalopathies can demonstrate diverse symptoms, and share characteristics with other disorders, such as dementia.

Prions, as the acronym (Proteinaceous Infectious Particles) suggests, are small proteins that are typically expressed in brain tissue, and may exist in a normal or abnormal shape. The prion protein is encoded by a gene found on the human chromosome 20. Usually, the prion protein is translated in neural tissue, folds into its normal conformation, carries out its cellular role, and is eventually degraded by enzymes. The abnormal prion, however, folds differently from its normal counterpart. This different shape makes it more difficult to degrade, and leads to the brain damage that is seen…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Inherited prion disease. (n.d.). Retrieved April 21, 2004, at  http://www.st - marys.nhs.uk/specialist/prion/factsheets/inheritedpd.htm

Kightly, R. (n.d.). Prion replication and spread at the cellular level. Retrieved April

21, 2004, from Mad Cow Disease Images & BSE Pictures

Web site:  http://www.rkm.com.au/BSE/index.html
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Flavonoids the Benefits of Flavonoids

Words: 3595 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 46849066



Another hypothesis that has just began to be explored by the academic community is the possibility that flavonoids may alter growth factor signaling, thus limiting the ability of the cell to initiate rapid growth 8). Study into this area are just beginning to emerge and more information will be available in the next several years.

Potential Health Benefits

The key to solving the riddle of why persons that consume large amounts of fruits and vegetables can expect to have certain health benefits depends on the ability to understand the mechanisms at play. Let us first examine current hypothesis regarding the mechanisms that are responsible for the anti-carcinogenic effects of flavonoids. Research into the mechanisms by which certain flavonoids demonstrate anti-carcinogenic effects can be grouped into five categories. Currently these studies are at the in vitro stage, with a few animal studies in the present group. Therefore, it is not known…… [Read More]

(25) U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Program 107, Human Nutrition, Health Promoting Properties of Plant and Animal Foods; usda.gov, NP-107-2006, pg 24-29.

(26) Prior, RL, Wu, X, Gu, L. (2006). Flavonoid Metabolism and Challenges to Understanding Mechanisms of Health Effects, Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. 86(15): 2487-2491

Flavonoids
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Music and Therapeutic Influence on

Words: 2089 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 66616166

As per Dr. Sacks, Alzheimer patients take advantage from listening to the familiar music. The music entails them memory stimulus, restoring the accessibility to personal history. It is said to have motivated the powers of speech and the thought process. However, his entire emotional as well as intellectual configuration, his life history, his identity, is greatly influenced by the music. The study of psycho-neuroimmunology narrates the influence of neuropeptides on human emotions. The beta-endorphins appear to be released and the body is permitted to perform its own healing work on physiological level, while the person is in a relaxed condition. The music therapy attempts to bring such state which is revealed to be 'audio analgesisa'. (Music Heals: Music for Healing and Transition)

5. What facilities practice this form of therapy and where and is it becoming more and more popular?

The Kaiser-Permanente Medical Center in Los Angeles was regarded to…… [Read More]

References

Alzheimer's and Other Dementias: Understanding the Differences. Retrieved at  http://www.helpguide.org/elder/alzheimers_dementias_types.htm . Accessed 6 June, 2006

Forgeron, Nicole. The Impact of Music Therapy on Alzheimer's Disease Patients. March, 1999. Retrieved at http://faculty.uccb.ns.ca/gcarre/courses/health/music.htm. Accessed 6 June, 2006

Gerosa, Cristina. M; Bonanomi, Claudio. Observation of the Alzheimer Patient and Music

Therapy. Retrieved from www.musictherapyworld.de/modules/mmmagazine/issues/20020801160643/20020801170306/Bonamifinal.htm. Accessed 6 June, 2006
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Cognition and Aging

Words: 4217 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31466565

Cognitive Aspects of the Aging Process

The purpose of this work is to define cognition and to explain the effects of aging on the brain in relation to memory, attention, metacognition, effects on languaging and the effects of aging on the executive function and finally cognitive function in very old age. This will be inclusive of primary cognitive diseases found in aging adults such as dementia and Alzheimer's.

Medical science continues to discover more about aging with each passing year. Cognitive effects of aging are one element that the aging individual must face as well as something that family and friends of the individual will cope with at some point. Cognition is defined as "the mental process of knowing, thinking, learning, and judging." (Online Medical Dictionary, 2005) Therefore the elderly experienced "cognitive dysfunction" is defined as "disturbance to the mental processes of knowing, thinking, learning and judging." Disturbances or dysfunctions…… [Read More]

Is there anything special about the aging of source memory?

Psychol Aging. 2005 Mar;20(1):19-32.

PMID: 15769211 [PubMed - in process]
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Genetic Counseling

Words: 2111 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79630310

Genetic counseling involves the sharing vital information and knowledge by experienced and well trained experts in the field of genetics for individuals with high risks of suffering some genetic disorders or transferring it to their children. It is the responsibility of a genetic counselor to provide relevant information concerning the hereditary nature of certain diseases and their risks of reoccurrence; addresses the concerns of patients, their health care providers and their families; and lends assistance to both the patients suffering these hereditary ailments and their families.

The first genetic counseling center was the Hereditary Clinic established at the University of Michigan in the United States in 1940. Since then, several such centers have been established in different parts of the world.

Through genetic counseling, information is made available to give the needed support to people who are dealing with any genetic disorder or at risk of developing one. When dealing…… [Read More]

References

Brickell, K., Steinbart, E., Rumbaugh, M., Payami, H., Schellenberg, G., Deerlin, V. V.,... Bird, T. (2006). Early-onset Alzheimer disease in families with late-onset Alzheimer disease: a potential important subtype of familial Alzheimer disease. Arch Neurol, 63(9), 1307-11.

Campion, D., Dumanchin, C., Hannequin, D., Dubois, B., Belliard, S., Puel, M.,... Frebourg, T. (1999). Early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease: prevalence, genetic heterogeneity, and mutation spectrum. Am J. Hum Genet, 65(3), 664-70.

CDC. (2015, March 3). Genetic Counselling. Retrieved from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services:  http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/genetics/genetic_counseling.html 

Goldman, J. S., MS, M., Hahn, S. E., Catania, J. W., Larusse-Eckert, S., Butson, M. B.,... Bird, T. (2011). Genetic counseling and testing for Alzheimer disease: Joint practice guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics and the National Society of Genetic Counselors. Genet Med, 13(6), 597 -- 605.
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Lit Review of Elderly Dementia

Words: 4779 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59487220

Cognitive Disorder in Elderly

Cognitive Disorders in Elderly

Sachiko Furuya

Cognitive Assessment & Lab

Kris Thomas, PhD

The research of this study is related to cognitive, dementia, Alzheimer disease, and depression issues with the elderly populations of the United States and in the world in general. Societies with a large number of elderly people such as the U.S.A. are increasingly focusing their efforts on improving the life standards of these people based on the types of services given to them. The well-being of those on palliative and hospice care is as important as the well-being of the family members of these patients. Although many health issues present themselves during the elder years of any patient, there is a lot of attention paid to cognitive and mood issues in this age group. The disorders and maladies that are relevant to this population include, among others, depression, dementia, mild cognitive impairment (MCI)…… [Read More]

References

American Psycholgical Association (APA) (2010). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. American Psychologists Association.

Abby C. (2010). Physical Activity for an Aging Population. Public Health Reviews, Vol. 32. Retrieved from:  http://www.publichealthreviews.eu/upload/pdf_files/8/PHR_32_2_King.pdf 

Aklin, W. M., & Turner, S. M. (2006). Toward understanding ethnic and cultural factors in the interviewing process. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 43(1), 50-64.

doi:10.1037/0033-3204.43.1.50
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Dlb and Patient KM

Words: 2028 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18937120

medication for patient named KM is Prothiaden. Prothiaden is used to treat depression as well as limit the feelings of anxiety in those taking it. The case file indicates a normal MI and no previous diagnosis of neurological disorders like Parkinson's disease. Patient KM has complained of depression and anxiety related to the passing of her mother. Progressive functional and cognitive decline has presented ever since mother died four years ago.

Although the patient worked until the age of 60 as an accountant, within the last 18 months patient has experienced fluctuations in mood, confusion, mild word finding difficulties and spatial disorientation. She also has visual hallucinations and violent dreams. She experienced recent falls and a slowing of motor skills. These symptoms extend to the inability to carry out motor sequences with either hand or double alternating hand movements. Although she can detect shapes well, she has poor ability in…… [Read More]

References

Armstrong, M., Litvan, I., Lang, A., Bak, T., Bhatia, K., Borroni, B., Boxer, A., Dickson, D., Grossman, M., Hallett, M., Josephs, K., Kertesz, A., Lee, S., Miller, B., Reich, S., Riley, D., Tolosa, E., Troster, A., Vidailhet, M. and Weiner, W. (2013). Criteria for the diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration. Neurology, 80(5), pp.496-503.

Ballard, C., Jacoby, R., Del Ser, T., Khan, M., Munoz, D., Holmes, C., Nagy, Z. and Perry, E. (2004). Neuropathological Substrates of Psychiatric Symptoms in Prospectively Studied Patients With Autopsy-Confirmed Dementia With Lewy Bodies: American Journal of Psychiatry: Vol 161, No 5. American Journal of Psychiatry, [online] 161(5), p.843. Available at:  http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.161.5.843  [Accessed 19 Sep. 2015].

Burke, A., Yaari, R., Tariot, P., Dougherty, J., Fleisher, A. and Brand, H. (2012). The Shadow People. The Primary Care Companion For CNS Disorders.

Ciro, C., Hershey, L. and Garrison, D. (2013). Enhanced Task-Oriented Training in a Person With Dementia With Lewy Bodies. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67(5), pp.556-563.
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Aging With a Billion Baby

Words: 1120 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 81510185

It often means interventions opening the doors of our lives to strangers, healthcare providers, whose job it is to assist the elderly in achieving and maintaining the highest quality of life possible until the individual crosses from this existence into the mystery of the next one.

Some of the physical conditions that are associated with aging are Alzheimers disease, which while associated with aging can manifest onset well before what many people might view as 'elderly." It is perhaps because it afflicts people at earlier ages that Alzheimers is one of the physical problems associated with aging that receives a lot of attention, and, therefore, more funding than some others areas of health problems associated with aging. Alzheimers is often diagnosed as dementia, an irreversible or reversible condition depending on the specific cause. It is, however, difficult to diagnose and treat because it has numerous potential causes, all of which…… [Read More]

References

Aging Gracefully: Lifespan vs. Healthspan. (2006, February). USA Today (Society for the Advancement of Education), 134, 1+. Retrieved February 1, 2009, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o& ;d=5015929981" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly

Words: 703 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74074241

Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly -- ACTIVE) was a randomized controlled, single-blind trial; the group design was with four groups, which included " ... 3 treatment groups and a control group" (illis, et al., 2006).

Participant selection: the researchers had recruited 2,832 elder persons (who lived independently, not in nursing homes, for example) that averaged 73.6 years of age; the researchers located the participants from community centers, senior housing, clinics and hospitals in 6 American cities (Birmingham; Detroit; Indianapolis; State College, PA; Boston; and Baltimore). These individuals were originally recruited in April 1998 and there was a follow-up in December 2004; 67% of the original sample participated in 2004.

Assignment to groups: those who were disqualified from the study included: younger than 65; or had serious cognitive decline; had other "substantial impairments"; had Alzheimer disease; were near death or in serious decline; nearly blind, nearly deaf or had…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Willis, S.L., Tennsdedt, S. L., Marsiske, M., Ball, K., Elias, J., Koepke, K.M., Morris, J.N.,

Rebok, G.W., Unverzagt, F.W., Stoddard, A.M., and Wright, E. (2006). Long-Term

Effects of Cognitive Training on Everyday Functional Outcomes in Older Adults.

Journal of the American Medical Association, 296(23). 2805-2014.
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Evaluating a Health Program

Words: 1732 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 94620351

Alzheimer’s Intervention Evaluation
Introduction
This paper provides a basic evaluation plan for evaluating a health program for elderly patients with Alzheimer’s. The health program focuses on designing and implementing an open space concept for the patient, having a social worker regularly meet with the patient and loved one or caretakers to ensure support, having family therapy sessions available for loved ones acting as caretakers if they should want it and providing a falls prevention initiative through training in an exercise routine to strengthen the balance and agility of the elderly person—all of which are considered vital aspects to improving the health status of an elderly person with Alzheimer’s (Canning et al., 2015; Hoof, Kort, Van Warde & Blom, 2010; Rubin, 2011). The overall question an intervention evaluation asks is: Was the intervention implemented as planned? (Harris, 2010). The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluation plan for the…… [Read More]

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Perceptions of Presidents With Disabilities

Words: 5791 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 1358067

He would sometimes be wheel chaired to the door through which he would enter to make a public appearance, but once at the door, his leg braces would be put on him, and he would rely on his son's arm for support and balance (43-48). Later, with his son's support, he was able to use a cane, and the extent of his disability was successfully downplayed by the force of his political platform and the attention he commanded with powerful words and the presentation of himself in a dignified way with strong posture (43-48).

"Deeply concerned that the image of a 'permanently crippled man' seeking to lead a crippled nation out of the Depression would be damaging to his campaign, oosevelt's aides every effort to portray the Democratic nominee as a man who had conquered polio and who could walk. As he traveled across the country, his leg braces, without…… [Read More]

Reference List

Bardes, Barbara A., Shelley, Mark C., Schmidt, Steffen W. (2008).

American Government and Politics Today: The Essentials,

Coates, Peter A. (2006). American Perceptions of Immigrant and Invasive

Species: Strangers on the Land,
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Security Consulting Firm

Words: 3345 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 26764992

Critical Pathway: Chronic enal Failure

Advanced Pathophysiology

egents Online Degree Program

Critical Pathway: Chronic renal failure

Chronic renal failure is often occasioned by chronic kidney disease, immune disorder, trauma among other conditions. It does not have any specific symptoms and might include feeling unwell generally and experiencing a reduced appetite. It is diagnosed following screening of individuals who are identified to be at risk of kidney problems, like individuals with diabetes or high blood pressure and others who have blood relative with chronic kidney disease. It always seems complex when trying to come up with the right diagnosis for a patient.

M.A. is a 60-year-old man who has a stage V chronic kidney disease mainly as a result of diabetic nephropathy and a 12-year of type 2 diabetes. He has symptomatic peripheral vascular insufficiency, and 3 years ago he had undergone coronary artery bypass 3. Within the ten months that…… [Read More]

References

Ahern J, Kruger DF, Gatcomb P, Petit W, Tamborlane W.,(1989). The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT): the trial coordinators perspective. Diabetes Educ 15:236 -- 281

Bassilios N, Launay-Vacher V, Khoury N, et al. (2001) Gabapentin neurotoxicity in a chronic haemodialysis patient. Nephrol Dial Transplant.

Blum RA, Comstock TJ, Sica DA, et al.(1994). Pharmacokinetics of gabapentin in subjects with various degrees of renal function. Clin Pharmacol Ther;56(2):154-159

Brawek B, Loffler M, Dooley DJ, Weyerbrock A, Feuerstein TJ.(2008) Differential modulation of K (+)-evoked (3)H-neurotransmitter release from human neocortex by gabapentin and pregabalin. Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol.:376(5):301-307
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National Institute of Nursing Research NINR History

Words: 1877 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63067891

National Institute of Nursing esearch (NIN)

History of the organization

The National Institute of Nursing esearch is a body mandated with the principal responsibility of carrying out research that relates to the nursing and medical field in general. The institution dedicates its effort to improving the health and health care of Americans through funding of nursing research and research training. The involvement of the federal government led to the formation of the research institute as early as 1946. The federal government established a division of nursing within the office of the Surgeon General, Public Health Service. The NIN commenced its activities in 1955 when the institute established a Nursing esearch Study section, which was within the Division of esearch Grants. The purpose of this Study Section was to conduct a scientific review of the growing volume of applications in the nursing sector.

In 1960, a consolidation of the public health…… [Read More]

References

Fitzpatrick, J.J & Kazer, M. (2011). Encyclopedia of Nursing Research. 3rd edition. New York:

Springer Publishing Company.

Miller, A.C. (2009). Nursing for Wellness in Older Adults. Printed in China: Lippincott Williams

and Wilkins.
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O'Connor Traditionally Nominations to the

Words: 1961 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38247193

" Her close attention to statutory detail (she once offered an amendment to a bill in order to insert an important missing comma) and complete mastery of facts is especially notable in light of her future judicial methodology. Anxious to return to law in 1974, O'Connor won a seat as a trial judge on the Maricopa Superior Court....In 1980 Babbit, who had been elected governor, appointed O'Connor to the Arizona Court of Appeals (an intermediate appellate court). (Friedman & Israel, 1997, p. 1761)

It is stated that when she was faced with particularly hard cases, she chose to seek out the most extreme views on each side and then find the moderate stand in the middle with the most logical demonstration of resolution. O'Connor is also said to have held that her nomination to the Supreme Court was "a classic example of being the right person in the right spot…… [Read More]

References

The Battle for the Court Begins; Democrats Warn Bush to Consult. (2005, July 2). The Washington Times, p. A01.

Friedman, L. & Israel, F.L. (Eds.). (1997). Their Lives and Major Opinions (Vol. 5). New York: Chelsea House.

Perry, B.A. (1991). A Representative Supreme Court? The Impact of Race, Religion, and Gender on Appointments. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Stevenson, R.W. Greenhouse L. (July 1, 2005) O'Connor, First Woman on High Court, Resigns After 24 Years New York Times Retrieved November 1, 2007 at  http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/01/politics/01cnd-court.html?ex=1277870400&en=7beaf086d8184bc3&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss
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Opportunity to Work at a Nursing Home

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7334185

opportunity to work at a nursing home, offering my support during physical, occupational, and speech therapy sessions. These sessions offered insight into diverse types of therapy. I worked with a range of different health care workers and specialists, lending insight into how each member of the health care team coordinates their efforts and communicates with each other as well as with patients and family. One of the types of therapy sessions that I supported at the nursing home was therapy with animals. We brought in several animals to assist with therapy, including dogs, cats, and exotic creatures. Therapy Dogs International (n.d.) provided the animals and sometimes the trainer.

The seniors responded well to these therapy sessions, and I intend to support such programs in the future by perhaps providing fund raising for organizations that offer animal therapy. I am also interested more in music and art therapy after performing and…… [Read More]

References

Brown, J.G. (1999). Physical and occupational therapy in nursing homes. Retrieved online: http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-09-97-00122.pdf

Therapy Dogs International (n.d.). Retrieved online:  http://www.tdi-dog.org/OurPrograms.aspx?Page=Nursing+Homes
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How Aging and Dying Are Depicted in Film

Words: 2104 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36462005

Aging in the Bucket List and Cocoon

Aging and its natural consequence -- death -- are subjects that raise diverse emotions among persons involved in these processes. Some embrace these pivotal moments in life, some attempt to avoid them. The two films The Bucket List and Cocoon give examples of how different people deal with the issue of aging and death. This paper will examine these films from the perspective of the characters' physical and mental health, their family and social issues, their economic status and social service usage, and cultural diversity issues.

The Bucket List is a 2007 comedy-drama about two strangers who meet in a hospital: Carter is an African-American blue-collar worker, a family man and an amateur historian but a mechanic by trade; Edward is a white, billionaire health care tycoon, who is estranged from his daughter. Forced to share a room in the hospital, the two…… [Read More]

References

Howard, R. Director. (1985). Cocoon. LA: 20th Century Fox.

Morgan, L., Kunkel, S. (2011). Aging, Society and the Life Course. NY: Springer.

Reiner, R. Director. (2007). The Bucket List. LA: Warner Bros.

Van Hoof, J., Kort, H., Van Waarde, H., Blom, M. (2010). Environmental interventions and the design of homes for older adults with dementia: an overview. American Journal of Alzheimers Disease and Other Dementia, 25(3): 202-32.
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The Benefit of Environmental Intervention for Dementia Patients

Words: 2695 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 48688369

Environmental Interventions for Patients With Dementia

Dementia is a neurocognitive disorder that has been treated in various ways throughout all history. The modern era has proposed pharmacological interventions in the past but these have proved dangerous and degrading to the quality of life that dementia patients and their loved ones prefer. For this reason, environmental interventions have emerged as an alternative method for treating elderly dementia patients. This intervention method consists of altering the environment in which the patient lives by accommodating for the needs of the patient with clearly identifiable pathways, open spaces for communication, naturalistic settings, adequate stimuli and private rooms for quiet. This paper discusses the fundamental principles of environmental interventions for patients with dementia and includes a justification for this approach as a suitable alternative to prevailing psychoactive drug interventions. It also includes a discussion of the historical context of the disorder, its current description according…… [Read More]

References

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2015). Non-pharmacologic Interventions

for Agitation and Aggression in Dementia. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from  http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/index.cfm/search-for-guides-reviews-and-reports/?productid=1999&pageaction=displayproduct 

Bupa. (2015). A dementia friendly society. Bupa. Retrieved from https://www.bupa.com/corporate/our-purpose/healthy-ageing-and-dementia/reports-and-publications/a-dementia-friendly-society

Fleming, R., Purandare, N. (2010). Long-term care for people with dementia:
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elderly'showing early'signs of dementia

Words: 1243 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94615915

Brain training with non-action video games and its effects on brain health among the elderly showing early signs of dementia

Specific Aims

Past researches have revealed the potential contribution of video game-playing to the improvement of certain cognitive functions among healthy aged individuals (Lampit, Hallock & Valenzuela, 2014; Jak, Seelye & Jurick, 2013). Drawn by the above results reached by scholars in the field, game-making firms have developed and released several kinds of games aimed at brain training (for instance, Brain Age, Brain Challenge and Big Brain Academy). Ever since their earliest releases into the gaming market, games of this sort have enjoyed immense popularity worldwide (Toril, Reales & Ballesteros, 2014; Nouchi et al., 2013). Among the anticipated advantages of such games is improved cognitive functions (for instance, recall, processing pace, executive function, and concentration), indicated often using the term 'transfer effect'.

This research project specifically aims at examining the…… [Read More]

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aged population'showing early'symptoms of dementia

Words: 1640 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88630435

Mental therapy using non-intense video games and how it affects brain health among the aged population showing early symptoms of dementia.

The deterioration of cognitive abilities and brain tissue due to age could have several adverse effects on mental systems and could even lead to dementia. Thus, researchers are trying to discover methods which could help keep brain function, independence, health and cognition among aged people in its best shape. Usually, with age, the white and gray matter of the brain shrivels with this action seen more in its prefrontal cortex than other regions. Other affected brain parts are the cerebellum, the prefrontal cortex on the side as well as the central temporal lobe structure which includes the hippocampus. Despite this, the occipital cortices and the entorhinal do not experience any form of shrinkage (Ballesteros et al., 2015). Common symptoms of this shrinkage include reduced memory strength, lower mental processing…… [Read More]

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Sundowning Syndrome Etiology and Treatment an Escalation

Words: 1277 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 309353

Sundowning Syndrome: Etiology and Treatment

An escalation in disruptive behaviors in the late afternoon and early evening among institutionalized patients suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's disease has been a recognized phenomenon for over 60 years (Bachman & Rabins, 2006). The timing of the onset of disruptive behaviors has led to calling this phenomenon sundowning, sundowning syndrome, and nocturnal delirium. Symptoms traditionally associated with sundowning include increased motor activity, confusion, yelling, aggression, wandering, agitation, and anxiety (Scarmeas et al., 2007). In spite of this long history, and a general consensus among clinicians and medical textbooks that sundowning is real, there is still a substantial amount of controversy among researchers whether it's more illusion than fact.

The controversy is due in part to the lack of a consensus definition for sundowning. Cohen-Mansfield (2007) cites three different definitions in order to highlight this lack of consensus: (1) "a syndrome of recurring confusion and…… [Read More]

4. Sterniczuk, R., Dyck, R.H., LaFerla, F.M., & Antle, M.C. (2010). Characterization of the 3 xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: Part 1. Circadian changes. Brain Research, 1348, 139-148

5. Scarmeas, N., Brandt, J., Blacker, D., Albert, M., Hadjigeorgiou, G., Dubois, B., . . . Stern, Y. (2007). Disruptive behavior as a predictor in Alzheimer's disease. Archives of Neurology, 64, 1755-1761

6. Vance, D.E. & Cowan, R.N. (2004). Activity therapy as a vehicle for resetting the biological rhythm in adults with Alzheimer's disease. Activities, Adaptation & Aging, 28, 1-16
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Brain Structures Systems Are Affected in

Words: 2651 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31587043

Alternatively, degeneration of the ascending cholinergic and catechola- minergic neuronal systems may contribute, at least in part, to the occurrence of this frontal-lobe-like symptomatology associated with Parkinson's disease. (Dubois & Pillon, 1996, pp.2-8)

The development of a greater understanding, over time of the causal factors as well as the manifestations and possible interventions for cognitive function in Parkinson's disease has continued since this time. Greater functional understanding of neurotransmitters and receptors as well as brain function in general have also significantly aided in the treatment Parkinson's Disease. esearch has even led to the conclusion that standards dopamine (pharmacological) treatments while they improve some cognitive function (switching between two tasks "thought to depend on circuitry connecting the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the posterior parietal cortex to the dorsal caudate nucleus) might impair others that are usually spared by PD (probabilistic reversal learning, which; "implicates orbitofrontal cortex -- ventral striatal circuitry." involvement)…… [Read More]

References

Aarsland, D. Laake, K. Larsen, J.P. & Janvin, C. (2002) Donepezil for cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled study. Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. 72 (6), 708-712.

Cools, R. Barker, R.A. Sahakian, B.J. & Robbins, T.W. (December 2001) Enhanced or Impaired Cognitive Function in Parkinson's Disease as a Function of Dopaminergic Medication and Task Demands. Cerebral Cortex, 11 (12), 1136-1143.

Drapier, D. Peron, J. Leray, E. Sauleau, P. Biseul, I. Drapier, S. Le Jeune, F. Travers, D. Bourguignon, a. Haegelen, C. Millet, B. & Verin, M. (September 2008) Emotion recognition impairment and apathy after subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease have separate neural substrates. Neuropsychologia 46 (11), 2796-2801.

Dubois, B. Pillon, B. (November 1996) Cognitive deficits in Parkinson's Disease. Journal of Nuerology. 244 (1), 2-8.
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Ground Breaking and Innovative Instances

Words: 2229 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 71397766

The exchange of the defective gene could be brought about by a process called homologous recombination. One of the first gene therapy experiments, though well intentioned, caused the death of the patient. esearchers at the University of Pennsylvania introduced a normal gene into a boy's body by using the rhino virus as a carrier. The body's immune system attacked this as a pathogen. This led to eventual organ failure and death. Gene therapy projects all over the world were largely abandoned. But more recently, gene therapy is beginning to make a comeback. (ONL, 2009)

Gene therapy has been tested in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. This is not a treatment that targets amyloid beta proteins or the tangles, but protects the brain cells from destruction. The regenerative properties of skin cells (stem cells) have been used to prevent the brain cells from "withering" away. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans reveal…… [Read More]

References

 http://www.alzforum.org/drg/drc/detail.asp?id=84Alzforum . (2009). Retrieved April 18, 2009, from BBC. (2003). Alzheimer's vaccine 'promising'. Retrieved April 18, 2009, from Alzheimer's vaccine 'promising'

ChemoCare. (2005). Taxol. Retrieved April 18, 2009, from  http://www.chemocare.com/bio/taxol.asp 

Elements4health. (2009). PET Scans Reveal Plaques and Tangles In Alzheimer's Retrieved April 18, 2009, from  http://www.elements4health.com/pet-scans-reveal-plaques-and-tangles-in-alzheimers.html 

Feng, J.A., Crasto, C.J., & Matsumoto, Y. (1998). Deoxyribose phosphate excision by the N-terminal domain of the polymerase beta: the mechanism revisited. Biochemistry, 37(27), 9605-9611.
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Healthcare the Exelon Patch and

Words: 1370 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 53451640

.

4. What is the advantage of a "patch"?

Evidently, the drug rivastigmine causes gastrointestinal side effects, but the patch allows only a small amount to be steadily absorbed into the bloodstream and thus creates fewer negative reactions to the drug. The Novartis website makes the case for a patch over a pill by saying "On average, an older American takes 5 prescription medicines. These medicines may need to be taken at different times and managing them all may seem overwhelming" (Novartis, para. 1). In this case, a patch eliminates having to remember several doses each day of one of the medications.

5. What is "moderate" dementia? What is dementia?

Dementia affects brain function. There is no known cure for dementia. It refers to several illnesses (Alzheimer's disease, Lewy or DLB) involving behavior, memory, communication and learning problems. There are other conditions in the brain which damage nerves or blood…… [Read More]

References

Activa. (2008). Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease. Activa Deep Brain Stimulation. Retrieved January 20, 2008 from website:  http://www.activadbs.com/symptoms.asp .

Medications and treatment. (2008). Parkinson's Disease Foundation Retrieved January 20, 2008 from website:  http://www.pdf.org/AboutPD/med_treatment.cfm .

NHS. (2005). Holding Statement. National Institute for Clinical Excellence. Retrieved January 20, 2008 from website:  http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/pdf/Alzheimer_holdingstatement.pdf .

NHS. (2007). Final appraisal determination: Donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine (review) and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Centre Director Report for Guidance Executive. National Institute for Clinical Excellence. Retrieved January 20, 2008 from Website:  http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/pdf/GE050705AlzFADSignoffReport.pdf .
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Health Care Administration

Words: 820 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3347041

Organ transplant recipients are more susceptible to cancer due to oncogenic viral infections and immunosuppression. What is the overall pattern of cancer following an organ transplantation?

Cancer is a major adverse outcome of solid organ transplantation.2 Previous studies have demonstrated an overall 2- to 4-fold elevated risk of cancer.3- 11 Excess risk is largely due to immunosuppression, with a spectrum of cancer resembling that seen with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, another immunosuppressing condition.11 isks are especially high for malignancies caused by viral infections, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma (both due to Epstein-Barr virus [EBV]), Kaposi sarcoma (human herpesvirus 8), anogenital cancers (human papillomavirus), and liver cancer (hepatitis C and B viruses). Certain other malignancies such as cancers of the lung, kidney, skin, and thyroid also are increased in transplant recipients. Linkage of population-based transplant and cancer registries from the same geographic region can allow for systematic ascertainment of…… [Read More]

References

Engels, E.A., Pfeiffer, R.M., Fraumeni, J.F., Kasiske, B.L., Israni, A.K., & Snyder, J.J. (2011). Spectrum of Cancer Risk among U.S. Solid Organ Transplant Recipients. JAMA, 306(17), 1891-1901. doi:10.1001/jama.2011.1592

Saaristo, T., Moilanen, L., Korpi-Hyovalti, E., Vanhala, M., Saltevo, J., Niskanen, L. . . . Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, S. (2010). Lifestyle intervention for prevention of type 2 diabetes in primary health care: one-year follow-up of the Finnish national diabetes prevention program (FIND2D). Diabetes Care, 33(10), 2146-2151. Doi:10.2337/dc10-0410

Sperling, R.A., Aisen, P.S., Beckett, L.A., Bennett, D.A., Craft, S., Fagan, A.M., . . . Phelps, C.H. (2011). Toward defining the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease: Recommendations from the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association workgroups on diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's & Dementia,7(3), 280 -- 292. doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2011.03.003
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Neurotransmitters Are Chemicals Endogenously Produced in the

Words: 664 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94018370

Neurotransmitters are chemicals endogenously produced in the body for the purpose of sending stimulus across from one neuron to the other through the synapse. Neurotransmitters, packaged in synaptic vessels, are clustered beneath the inner membrane of the axon terminal of the presynaptic membrane. The neurotransmitters upon stimulus are released into the synaptic cleft where they diffuse and attach to their particular receptors on the post synaptic membrane. The flow of action potential is the main stimulus to the release of the neurotransmitters. The main function of the neurotransmitters is to excite or inhibit certain kinds of receptors. Thereby the behavioral effect of the neurotransmitters depends on the kinds of receptors on the post synapse. Noradrenaline, an important neurotransmitter is involved in arousal and dopamine controls motor movements and cognition (Webster, 2001, p. 55).

Synapse consists of dendrites of one neuron and terminus of the other neuron. No physical connection is…… [Read More]

References

Jankovic, J. (2008). Parkinson's disease: clinical features and diagnosis. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 79:368 -- 376.

Neve, A.K. (2009). The Dopamine Receptors, The Receptors. Edition 2. Springer.

Webster, R. (2001). Neurotransmitters, Drugs and Brain Function. John Wiley and Sons.