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American History War of 1812
Words: 335 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48973688
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There was another group of Americans who felt that all of America, including British Canada, should have been conquered during the Revolutionary War and then ceded to the Americans, so they felt the War of 1812, which began with Americans attempting to conquer Canada, should not have had to take place at all.

Finally, New England residents openly opposed the war, and did not support anything connected with it. They would not offer funds for the war, and they would not allow their militia to fight in the war. They were angry about the economy, but they were also angry because they felt they had been mislead by the government, and the war was really being fought to gain territory in Canada, which they did not agree with. Ultimately, the war ended in 1814, but much of American did not support or condone the…

In addition, before the war, British naval power was the superior naval power in the world, and the French, after a defeat at British hands, stopped trading with Britain, and asked most other European countries to stop, as well. Thus, the majority of Great Britain's trade was with the United States before the war, and there were few other avenues open to the U.S., with European ports blockaded. So, when the British blockaded American ports, there was nowhere else to trade, and trade fell even more than it had before the war.

There was another group of Americans who felt that all of America, including British Canada, should have been conquered during the Revolutionary War and then ceded to the Americans, so they felt the War of 1812, which began with Americans attempting to conquer Canada, should not have had to take place at all.

Finally, New England residents openly opposed the war, and did not support anything connected with it. They would not offer funds for the war, and they would not allow their militia to fight in the war. They were angry about the economy, but they were also angry because they felt they had been mislead by the government, and the war was really being fought to gain territory in Canada, which they did not agree with. Ultimately, the war ended in 1814, but much of American did not support or condone the war.

American Labor Movement History of Labor Movement
Words: 1431 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83699111
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American Labor Movement

The "labor question," its origins, components, and whether or not it is still relevant.

The "labor question" is the foundation of the American Labor Movement. Drawing from our classwork and paraphrasing Rosanne Currarino's modern restatement of the "labor question(s)": "hat should constitute full participation in American society? hat standard of living should citizens expect and demand?" (Currarino 112). Concerned with the ideal of an industrial democracy, including a more equitable society with social and financial betterment of working class people, the "labor question" arose during and in response to America's 19th Century (Second) Industrial Revolution. America's Industrial Revolution occurred within the "Gilded Age," named by Mark Twain (Mintz), and lasting roughly from the end of the U.S. Civil ar until the beginning of orld ar I (D.C. Shouter and RAKEN Services). Fueled in part by refined coal and steam power, the American Industrial Revolution transformed America from…

Works Cited

AFL-CIO. Samuel Gompers (1850-1924). 2012. Web. 7 February 2012.

Currarino, Rosanne. The Labor Question in America: Economic Democracy in the Gilded Age. Urbana, Chicago and Springfield, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2011. Print.

D.C. Shouter and RAKEN Services. "The Gilded Age - Industrial Revolution in America." 2011. Raken.com Web site. Web. 7 February 2012.

Dictionary.com, LLC. Xenophobia. 2012. Web. 7 February 2012.

American Cities Just as American
Words: 1368 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 413236
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The development of the American automobile industry is one of the best examples of this interplay: "Unlike European manufacturers, who concentrated on expensive motorcars for the rich, American entrepreneurs early turned to economical vehicles that could be mass-produced," (Jackson 159). The fact that so many Americans then became capable of purchasing a car both fed the notion of the American dream, and also served to expand American cities and suburbs; people who could afford to commute were not forced to live in the stifling and often impoverished inner-city. This trend tended to make inner cities in America decreasingly desirable places to live. Yet, in places like New York, with the creation of central park, wealthy neighborhoods came to crowd around such desirable locations and push the impoverished sects of society away: "By the time the park's founding generation passed away, the political, aesthetic, and cultural unity they valued had already…

References

Cronon, William. 1991. Nature's metropolis: Chicago and the great West. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Kenneth M. Jackson. 1985. Crabgrass Frontier: The suburbanization of the United States. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Rosenzweig, Roy and Elizabeth Blackmar. 1992. The park and the people: A history of Central Park. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.

American Primacy Good for America
Words: 1769 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59838589
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The quest for primacy is likely to lead to the formation of adversarial alliances and greater distrust of American intentions, endangering international stability and peace. In the domestic sphere, quest for primacy will lead to greater abuse of power and the expansion of the military, threatening the health of American democracy. Democracy may be eroded and the U.S. economy may be drained before advocates of American primacy may achieve their dream of American primacy.

orks Cited

Allison, Graham and Philip Zelikow. Essence of Decision: Explaining Cuban Missile Crisis. New York: Longman, 1999.

Bacevich, Andrew. The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by ar. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Blainey, Geoffrey. The Causes of ar. New York: Free Press, 1973.

Jervis, Robert. "Cooperation Under the Security Dilemma," orld Politics 30.2 (1978): 167-214. JSTOR. eb 14 Oct. 2011.

Jervis, Robert. System Effects: Complexity in Political and Social Life. Princeton, NJ:…

Works Cited

Allison, Graham and Philip Zelikow. Essence of Decision: Explaining Cuban Missile Crisis. New York: Longman, 1999.

Bacevich, Andrew. The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Blainey, Geoffrey. The Causes of War. New York: Free Press, 1973.

Jervis, Robert. "Cooperation Under the Security Dilemma," World Politics 30.2 (1978): 167-214. JSTOR. Web 14 Oct. 2011.

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
Words: 2853 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74745009
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Investment Sections - 2009 Recovery and Reinvestment Act:

Source: Wikimedia Commons.

The largest grouping in the Act is for tax cuts. As an example of how money in one grouping gets divided, the following shows what is being allotted for tax relief:

$116 billion: Payroll tax credit of $400 per worker and $800 per couple in both 2009 and 2010 (American, 2010).

$70 billion: Alternative minimum tax: a one year increase in AMT floor to $70,950 for joint filers for 2009 (American, 2010).

$15 billion: Expansion of the child tax credit: A $1,000 credit to a larger number of families (including those that do not make enough money to pay taxes) (American, 2010).

$14 billion: Expanded college credit to provide a $2,500 tax credit for college tuition and related expenses for 2009 and 2010 (American, 2010).

$6.6 billion: Homebuyer tax credit: $8,000 refundable credit for all homes bought between 1/1/2009…

Bibliography

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. 2010. Recovery.gov. http://www.recovery.gov/Pages/home.aspx

Dems power stimulus bill through Congress. February 14, 2009. Associated Press.  http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29179041/ .

Economists say stimulus won't work. January 29, 2009. St. Louis Post-Dispatch. http://www.stltoday.com/blogzone/mound-city-money/us-economy/2009/01/economists-say-stimulus-wont-work. Retrieved 1 February 2010.

Gross, D. 12 October 2009. The $800 Billion Deception: Conservatives claim the stimulus has already failed. But it has barely started. Slate.  http://www.slate.com/id/2232185/ .

American Economic Culture There Is
Words: 727 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44194193
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Meanwhile, the government's budget deficit has become so large that credit rating agencies have actually lowered the nation's credit ratings. The effect has caused concerns throughout the world that America's economy was in decline.

The overall policy of the United States is still geared toward growth but despite efforts by the government to stimulate the economy there has been little to indicate that economy is recovering. Unemployment remains high and the housing market remains stagnant. Addressing these concerns is of paramount importance in order to increase the ordinary families' spending power and to cut the consuming public's reliance of debt. Culturally, the United States needs to discover the qualities and work ethic that once made it great. Only then can some of its other economic problems be overcome and the road to recovery begun.

The problems facing the American economy are serious ones. The world has changed dramatically in the…

Works Cited

Antle, W.J. Is America in Decline, the American Spectator, pp. 30-35 (2011).

Issa, Darrell. Unaffordable Housing and Political Kickbacks Rocked the American Economy, Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy. pp: 407-419 (2010).

Izzo, Phil. Some 15% of U.S. Uses Food Stamps, the Wall Street Journal.  http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2011/11/01/some-15-of-u-s-uses-food-stamps  / (November 2, 2011).

Jorgenson, Dale and Ho, Mun. Potential Growth of the U.S. Economy: Will the Productivity Resurgence Continue?, Business Economics. pp: 7-16 (2006).

American History
Words: 1626 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19013391
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American History

The underside of affluence

The period is in the early years of the twentieth century. America is now experiencing economic and political expansion as it became the model of an imperial superpower for all nations, both in the Western and Eastern regions. Economic growth spurred as a result of the industrial revolution, while political structures strengthened due to the numerous successful conquests of the Americans to colonize nations in the Asian and southern American regions.

However, despite the affluence that American society had experienced during this period, a considerable half of the American population is suffering from poverty. With the rise of urbanization, many people flocked to the cities in search of a high-paying job and steady source of income as factory workers. However, the rapid incidence of migration to the cities made them crowded with people, hence, living conditions began to deteriorate, which includes the lack of…

American Response to Vietnamese War Twenty Five
Words: 1247 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95573037
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American esponse to Vietnamese War

Twenty five years and more have passed since the United States officially withdrew its forces and involvement in Vietnam. Not since the civil war had the country been so divided and separated in the political and social opinions. Almost every family in America was in some way affected, losing husbands, sons, friends and daughters. More than 100,000 American soldiers were killed and those who made it back to the homeland suffered extreme mental and physical trauma and someone them still do. A lot of the war veterans were so traumatized and treated with disrespect in their own country that they ended up taking their own lives, while most of them ended up on streets begging for a loose change.

American esponse to the Vietnamese War

However the effect of the war on the Vietnamese people was even more drastic, by the time Saigon was lost…

References

Anderson, David L. (2002). Columbia Guide to the Vietnam War.

Cable, Larry. (1991). Unholy Grail: The U.S. And the Wars in Vietnam.

Duiker, William J. (1996). The Communist Road to Power in Vietnam.

Mitchell K. Hall. (2007). The Vietnam War; short survey. Pages168.

American Experience With War
Words: 2615 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85444445
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American Experience With War

Which historian - David M. Kennedy, or John Shy - best represents the American experience with war?

While reading Kennedy's - and Shy's - essay discussions, it's necessary to put their writings in the context of time. Kennedy penned his essay in 1975, and Shy wrote his in 1971. In terms of world events subsequent to both essays - in particular the advent of terrorism on a colossal and destructive scale, (9/11/01) - veritable light years of military and political change has emerged.

But notwithstanding the tumultuous global changes since the 1970s, the assigned essays are timeless in their intelligent analysis, very important in terms of their forthright accuracy of U.S. history and war, and hence, provide valuable reading for any and all students of the times. However, the essay by Kennedy, in this writer's opinion, best reflects the big picture view of America, its peoples,…

References

Coser, Lewis A. Sociological Theory: A Book of Readings. Toronto: The

MacMillan Company, 1969.

Kennedy, David M. "War and the American Character." The Nation (1976),

Shy, John. A People Numerous and Armed: Reflections on the Military Struggle for American Independence. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976.

American Revolution and the 19th Century
Words: 1315 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 28007248
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witchcraft scares in the Chesapeake colonies and no uprising like Bacon's Rebellion in New England. Consider the possible social, economic, and religious causes of both phenomena.

The colonies of New England were based on patriarchal religious social orders that were fundamentally misogynistic. The Protestant systems in New England fomented the fear of witchcraft, a parallel for a fear of feminist power. On the other hand, New England lacked the cash-crop ready system that had been emerging in the Chesapeake region. Bacon's rebellion was a labor issue related to economic power, whereas witch hunts were related to gender issues and social power.

What made Native American peoples vulnerable to conquest by European adventurers?

Native American peoples did not have the same disease resistances that Europeans had developed over several generations. They did not develop the types of sophisticated weapons using gunpowder that he Europeans had, and also, Native Americans were used…

american history civil war'slavery
Words: 2008 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 19070419
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The Civil War was one of the most defining events in the nation’s history, and at the time was the most important event since the American Revolution. Whereas the Revolution embodied the ideals, values, and principles of the new nation, setting it apart from the British Crown and forever altering the geopolitical landscape, the Civil War revealed the persistent hypocrisy that continues to plague American society. Unresolved conflicts left brewing in the American psyche led to built-up tensions, exposing fissures in the society along the lines of culture, ethnicity, religion, race, gender, and socioeconomic class. The causes of the Civil War can be traced in fact to the inability of the original framers to take a firm stance on slavery, and to divest too much of the federal government’s power to the states. At the same time, protecting states’ rights was critical in the late eighteenth century when the nation…

American Families and the Nostalgia
Words: 2864 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3117015
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Families these days are "in crisis" because all of us have lost a lot of values that used to keep a family together (Kim, 2000).

In addition, Coontz very analytically eliminated all the myths about what families used to be, how & what they are in the current time, and what they should be (Kim, 2000). However, as a reader one might notice just little discrepancy in her dispute and statistics, which may remind that all of these socio-cultural examinations have been basically constructions that tell the story in a better way or worse than each other, but not flawless (Kim, 2000).

Thus, this is just too big an issue to get the whole thing completely balanced and organized. However, her logic has been well-developed and with given facts and statistics, it derived some very outstanding conclusions. For example, in the last two chapters, she tied up the analysis and…

Works Cited

Sheri & Bob Stritof. "Your Guide to Marriage: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap"  http://www.marriage.about.com/ 

Kim Allen. "Review: The Way We Never Were by Stephanie Coontz." 2000

 http://kimallen.sheepdogdesign.net/Reviews 

Amazon.com. "The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap: by Stephanie Coontz"  http://www.amazon.com/

Economy Status in 12 Months
Words: 1257 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 20457047
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Economy Status in 12 Months

In each economic system, entrepreneurs and managers combine together natural resources, labor, and technology to create and supply goods and services. Nations' political principles and civilization is replicated by the way in which these different elements categorize themselves. Karl Marx, the 19th century German economist and social theorist invented the term capitalist economy, by which United States is often referred to and this term depicts a system in which a small group of people manage large quantities of money or capital and make the most significant economic verdicts. Natural resources are the first elements of a nation's economic system. The second element is effort, which changes natural resources into goods. As both privately owned businesses and government play major roles, United States is said to have mixed economy. In fact, some of the most continuing discussions of American economic history concentrate on the virtual tasks…

References

Continuity and Change. U.S. Department of State's Bureau of International Information Programs. Retrieved from http://usinfo.state.gov/products/pubs/oecon/chap1.htm Accessed on 12 March, 2005

Fed official sees 2005 economy to grow 4%. 9 March, 2005. Retrieved from  http://english.sina.com/business/1/2005/0309/23950.html  Accessed on 12 March, 2005

How the U.S. Economy Works. U.S. Department of State's Bureau of International Information Programs. Retrieved from http://usinfo.state.gov/products/pubs/oecon/chap2.htm Accessed on 12 March, 2005

Kane, Tim; Hederman, Rea. Past. Present! Future? Economic growth in America. October 29, 2004. Retrieved from  http://www.heritage.org/Research/Economy/wm601.cfm?renderforprint=1  Accessed on 12 March, 2005

American Interventionism
Words: 1146 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73706635
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U.S. FOEIGN POLICY

American Foreign Policy from 1890 to 1930

From neutrality to intervention

Early on in American history, President George Washington advised Americans not be become embroiled in foreign conflicts. However, at the end of the 19th century, it became increasingly difficult for America to remain isolated from the issues affecting its neighbors abroad. The period from 1890-1930 was characterized by a far more expansionist American foreign policy than had been the case before. Although this policy was often defended by the notion that the U.S. was making the world safe for democracy, self-interest rather than idealism was usually the real motivating force.

A good, early example of this in Latin America can be found in the form of the Spanish-American War (1898) which eventually resulted in the U.S. acquiring territories in the western Pacific and Latin America. Spain's repression of the Cuban pro-independence movement combined with the sinking…

References

Spanish-American War. (2015). History.com. Retrieved from:

 http://www.history.com/topics/spanish-american-war 

U.S. foreign policy in Asia. (2015). KQED. Retrieved from:

 http://www.kqed.org/w/pacificlink/history/usforeignpol/

American Indian Movement
Words: 2030 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 81369738
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American Indian Movement

The poorest people in America are the American Indians and it is also a fact that Indian reservations have unique laws that has made it a nation by itself within the United States. The modern movements focus on the American Indian reservations being empowered by self-determination. This is important for the economic, social and cultural improvement of the American Indians. It was with the Nixon administration that the welfare of the tribes became the focus of the government. The subsequent administrations encouraged the Indians to adapt to a policy of political and economic self-determination. Today many reservations have become economic hubs with tax and regulation havens for investment. Thus as of now the Mescalero and White Mountain Apaches "have become premier private managers of multiple-use forest resource economies." (Legters; Lyden, 1994)

However it must be stated that only during the eagan administration that there were major reports…

References

Bolt, Christine. (1990) "American Indian Policy and American Reform: Case Studies of the Campaign to Assimilate the American Indians" Routledge. Pages: 250, 298

 http://books.google.co.in/books?id=75UVAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA298&dq=american+indian+movement&hl=en&sa=X&ei=nj2IT92qCsWJrAeW-anrCg&ved=0CDMQ6AEwADge#v=onepage&q=american%20indian%20movement&f=false 

Fritz, Henry E. (1963) "The Movement for Indian Assimilation, 1860-1890." University of Pennsylvania Press: Philadelphia. Page Number: 15, 34, 56,138

 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=3054897

American West United States Became One of
Words: 3016 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 96829384
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American est

United States became one of the most industrialized nations and sought to grow its industries at an alarming rate. For this purpose, the western part of United States, which had not yet been discovered, was subjected to massive development, economic growth, formation of industries and allowing settlers to move towards the west. Railroads played a significant role in contributing towards the development and urbanization of America's est. The goal of this paper is to analyze the impact of railroads on America's est in the lights of broad and diverse academic resources.

Railroads in America est

Railroads had been developed in United States during the nineteenth century and start of twentieth century. They owe their existence to Industrial Revolution. During the nineteenth century, Industrial Revolution promoted technological and industrial development and thus, laid down the foundations of railroads in United States. During this time, United States became one of…

Work Cited

Bain, David Haward. Empire Express; Building the first Transcontinental Railroad. Viking Penguin. 1999.

Banerjee, A.E.D. a. N.Q. "The Railroad to Success: The Effect of Infrastructureon Economic Growth," Providence, Brown University. 2006.

Beebe, Lucius. The Central Pacific & The Southern Pacific Railroads: Centennial Edition. Howell-North. 1999.

Bianculli, A.J. The American Railroad in the 19th Century: Locomotives. University of Delaware, Newark. 2001.

American System Henry Clay Gave His Famous
Words: 711 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68304687
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American System

Henry Clay gave his famous speech in support of the American System to the House of Representatives in 1824, although Alexander Hamilton had used the same term decades before. It rested "on the idea of harmonizing all the segments of the economy for their mutual benefit and of doing so by active support from an intervening national government" (Baxter 27). Clay's conversion to this policy was surprising since Hamilton had been a member of the Federalist Party while Henry Clay was supposedly a Democratic Republican and a Jeffersonian, opposed to Federal plans for government aid to industry, a national bank, protective tariffs and federal funding for highways, canals, railroads and other internal improvements. After the ar of 1812, however, the first political party system had come to an end and the Federalists were discredited by their opposition to the war and threats of secession in New England. During…

WORKS CITED

Baxter, Maurice G. Henry Clay and the American System. University Press of Kentucky, 2004.

Hounshell, David A. From the American System to Mass Production, 1800-1932. Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.

American Loyalists the American Revolution
Words: 1107 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55756428
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Therefore, for instance, the Stamp Act was justified through "granting and applying (of) certain stamp duties, and other duties, in the British colonies and plantations in America, towards further defraying the expenses of defending, protecting, and securing the same; and for amending such parts of the several acts of parliament relating to the trade and revenues of the said colonies and plantations, as direct the manner of determining and recovering the penalties and forfeitures therein mentioned"(the Stamp Act, 1765).

Taking these legislative manners into consideration, the opponents of the Loyalists considered that the issue of trade as a reason for maintaining the British rule was by no means a viable solution. More precisely, they argued that the lack of representation in the British Parliament should not allow the British to impose taxes they do not agree or vote upon. From this perspective, it can be said that the Loyalists had…

Works Cited

Borden, Morton, and Penn Borden. The American Tory. Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 1972.

Jenkins, P. (1997). A history of the United States. New York: Palgrave.

The New World. An ocean away...Trade in the American colonies. N.d. 5 May 2008.  http://courses.wcupa.edu/wanko/LIT400/NewWorld/trade_in_the_american_colonies.htm 

The Stamp Act, Great Britain: Parliament, 1765. The Avalon Project at Yale Law School. 2005. 5 May 2008  http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/amerrev/parliament/stamp_act_1765.htm

American Studies Environment and Native
Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79499063
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With the advent of Colombo on the American soil, things began to change as Philip J. Deloria asserts in her book Playing Indian (1999): "[T]he self-defining pairing of American truth with American freedom rests on the ability to wield power against Indians... while simultaneously drawing power from them." This is also the basic idea of Shari M. Huhndorf's Going Native: Indians in the American Cultural Imagination. "As white Americans became disenchanted with how American society was developing, they began to reference Indian people and culture as an answer to such problems of a modernizing America as capitalistic greed; alienating, sedentary life-style of the office worker; imperialistic aggressiveness; and racial and gender challenges to white male hegemony" (Barak, 2005).

The Indians progress was challenged by the so-called American School of ethnology. Therein Christianity became a tool in the American colonial project. The development of an ideology based in religion was made…

American Investment Recovery Act Throughout American History
Words: 2438 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98187978
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American Investment ecovery Act

Throughout American history there has been an emphasis on maintaining a balance of power between different branches of government. This is from the belief that concentrating too much authority in one area will lead to inevitable abuses in others. To prevent this, the federal government and states have always practiced these basic principles. As a result, there are varying interpretations as to the overall scope of power given to particular branch. (McNeese, 2001)

In 2009, these issues were continually being brought to forefront with the American ecovery Act and einvestment Act of 2009. This law was designed to provide the economy with additional amounts of stimulus to address the lingering challenges from the financial crisis. However, the process of enacting this legislation, there were increased amounts of controversy surrounding the balance of power between the President and Congress. This is because the Democrats had an overwhelming…

References

The American Investment and Recovery Act. (2009). Fiscal Accountability. Retrieved from: http://www.fiscalaccountability.org/index.php?content=cog09-13#

The American Investment and Recovery Act. (2009). GPO. Retrieved from:  http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-111hr1enr/pdf/BILLS-111hr1enr.pdf 

Estimated Impact of American Investment and Recovery Act. (2012). CBO. Retrieved from:  http://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/cbofiles/attachments/05-25-Impact_of_ARRA.pdf 

Wickard v. Filburn. (2012). Case Briefs. Retrieved from:  http://www.casebriefs.com/blog/law/constitutional-law/constitutional-law-keyed-to-stone/the-powers-of-congress/wickard-v-filburn-2/

Economies Planned and Unplanned Economies
Words: 647 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Discussion Chapter Paper #: 70557501
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These convergences lead to mixed economies.

Globalization and the U.S. Economy

Outsourcing is a result of the current globalization rate, due to rise of internet users and communication through broadband. In actual sense, outsourcing is inevitable, and no one is going to eliminate it any time soon, including the United States. However, outsourcing will mean loss of jobs in the United States, leading to a position where these jobs need to be replaced. This is because outsourcing results into competitive businesses, leading to profit and export increase and also increases the opportunities for investments in other countries, different from the source country such as the U.S. In the last decade manufacturing jobs have been moving out of the United States, and this can hardly be prevented. In fact, outsourcing of manufacturing jobs has greatly destroyed the middle class Americans, hence undermining the performance of their economy in general. Competition is…

American Psycho in His Seminal Work American
Words: 2804 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44198717
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American Psycho

In his seminal work American Psycho, Bret Easton Ellis uses the character of the yuppie serial killer Patrick Bateman in order to criticize American consumer culture while simultaneously challenging the reader to confront his or her own responses to that culture, responses that Ellis seems to suggest are only removed from the sociopathic actions of Bateman in a manner of degree, rather than kind. To see how Ellis uses the character of Patrick Bateman to explore the dual role of the serial killer as liberated individual and microcosmic representation of society, one may compare Bateman to the real life serial killer John ayne Gacy, who managed to keep his multiple murders a secret for the better part of the 1970s. Examining Bateman's characterization alongside the history of Gacy's murders and seemingly normal civilian life will help to demonstrate how the fascination with the two-faced killer ultimately stems from…

Works Cited

Campbell, John W. "Professional Wrestling: Why the Bad Guy Wins." The Journal of American

Culture 19.2 (1996): 127-32.

Ellis, Bret Easton. American Psycho. New York: Vintage Books, 1991.

Hantke, Steffen. "the Kingdom of the Unimaginable": The Construction of Social Space and the Fantasy of Privacy in Serial Killer Narratives." Literature/Film Quarterly 26.3 (1998):

American Association of Advertising Agencies Was Founded
Words: 938 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60492179
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American Association of Advertising Agencies was founded in 1917 as national trade association in the United States that represents advertising agency business the American Association of Advertising Agencies, 2013a ()

The association is management-oriented, and it offers expertise, broad services, and information to its members in regards to advertising agency business. Its members contribute an approximate of 80% in the total advertising agencies revenue worldwide. Not all the larger multinational advertising agencies are members of the 4A, but their members have a billing of less than $10 million per year. Since it is a national trade association, it is bound by its own by-laws and constitution, which strengthen the association. The association has been credited with been one of the associations that helped in regulating advertising in the United States. The association has its headquarters in New York City.

Membership to the association is by election after interested members fill…

References

 

American Association of Advertising Agencies
Words: 998 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90933600
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American Association of Advertising Agencies (AAAA) is a management-oriented business that provides a number of important services for its members. It was founded in 1917 and is actually the "national trade association" that is the most visible advocate for and representative of the advertising business in the United States. This paper delves into what the organization does, its mission, its services, and why it is important in the field of advertising.

The Association's Mission and Purpose

The AAAA members produce an estimated 80% of all the advertising that is placed in the United States, which is an enormous amount of advertising. That said, there is evidence that the majority of members are not huge agencies at all; "…more than 60% of our membership bills less than $10 million per year" (AAAA). It is apparent that AAAA members are loyal and receive worthy services because on average, an AAAA member has…

Works Cited

American Association of Advertising Agencies. (2013). Leadership / Advocacy / Community

Retrieved July 1, 2013, from  http://www.aaaa.org .

Elliott, Stuart. (2012). Stars of Hollywood and Madison Avenue. New York Times. Retrieved July 1, 2013, from  http://www.nytimes.com .

American History Slave Revolts Although
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Alexander Hamilton carried on an affair with the wife of "a notorious political schemer," Maria Reynolds. Andrew Jackson married Rachel Jackson before her divorce from Lewis Robards was finalized and therefore was accused of marrying a married woman. Jackson's opponent in 1828, John Quincy Adams, was in turn accused of "corrupt bargaining" during his term. Jackson also championed Margaret O'Neill Timberlake, who married his secretary of war, John Eaton. "Peggy O'Neill" was considered a woman of "questionable virtue," and as a result Martin Van Buren became Jackson's successor in the presidency. After the death of Jackson and Eaton, Peggy married a 19-year-old dance teacher (which raised eyebrows, as she was 59), who embezzled her money and ran off to Europe with her 17-year-old granddaughter.

Other scandals concerned Richard Mentor Johnson, who ran for vice president in 1836 with Martin Van Buren. He supposedly shot Tecumseh during the ar of 1812,…

Works Cited

Ferling, John. Adams vs. Jefferson: the tumultuous election of 1800. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.

American Express in Asia Assessing
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The biggest challenge however over the long-tern is the lack of acceptance of foreign cards by Chinese merchants. There are an estimated 20 million businesses in China, and of these, 414,000 accept credit cards, and of those, 150,000 accept foreign credit cards (Worthington, 2003). At the infrastructure level this fact illustrates how pervasive the sociological factors that limit debt continue to influence the Chinese culture specifically and the Asian culture overall. As with every Asian culture, there is tremendous pride in not losing "face" or stature in ones' community. As a result, cash is king in the more conservative cities and regions of the country. The generation of 25 to 40-year-olds will change this, however it may take a generation or more to significantly increase American Express credit card use in Asia and China as a result.

eferences

Bayot, J (2004, March 30). American Express to Issue Cards in China.…

References

Bayot, J (2004, March 30). American Express to Issue Cards in China. New York Times,

Retrieved June 8, 2009, from  http://www.nytimes.com /2004/03/30/business/american-express-to-issue-cards-in-china.html

Owen Brown. (2004, December 9). China Banks Add Credit Cards With Help From AmEx and Visa. Wall Street Journal (Eastern Edition), p. C.2.

David A Von Emloh, Emmanuel V Pitsilis, Jeffrey Wong. (2003). Credit cards come to China. The McKinsey Quarterly: Special Edition,20-23.

American Express the First Surprise
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Why Did American Express succeed in the U.S.A. And Internationally?

It succeeded because the company established an outstanding reputation in its core businesses very early in its lifetime. It also took advantage of the competition during both World Wars to support its customers with financial assistance when they needed it. Its business decisions, all told, were solid. It divested itself of non-profitable segments when necessary, and put the emphasis always on its core businesses -- travelers' checks, its travel business, and credit cards. AmEx has maintained flexibility as well in adapting to consumer's demands and the needs of its business, such as issuing the revolving credit card when that segment might have failed.

oday it is one of Forbes Magazine's top 100 companies.

How is American Express surviving the 2008-2009 Economic Crisis?

Diversification of its business. he American Express credit card business in the U.S. dropped 96% from early 2007…

Though, because of the poor economic times, AmEx has had to sell a significant quantity of its stock in one of China's main banks, there is no discussion of its pulling back from China. The layoffs, budget cuts and gathering together of cash is just something most smart companies do in times like these, according to American Express management.

In March, 2009, American Express reaffirmed its intent to expand its business in China and the Asian continent, and to build an even stronger credit card presence in that region.

Only the length and depth of the current worldwide economic crisis will determine when (if) that will happen. It is American Express' desire and the Chinese financial institutions support the AmEx' efforts there. However, in the end, business is business, and the financial bottom line will determine the scope of the AmEx presence in the most populous continent in the world.

Economies Economic Growth in East
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"Both the U.S. side and the Mexican side replicate the political, economic, social, and cultural systems of their respective nation-states. At the same time, borderlanders have blended the structures, institutions, and life expressions of the two societies to create something novel and entirely theirs -- the ambiente fronterizo, or borderlands milieu. Today the area stands as a prime example of binational interdependence, providing striking evidence of the trend toward closer ties among the world's nations and societies" (Martinez, 1994)

eferences

Coleman, M., 2005, U.S. Statecraft and the U.S. - Mexico Border as Security/Economy Nexus, Political Geography, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp. 185-209

Hackenberg, ., 1997, the U.S.-Mexico Borderland in Century XXI, Culture and Agriculture, Volume 19, Number 3

Longley, ., December 2004, Illegal Immigration Costs California Over Ten Billion Annually, About U.S. Government Info

Martinez, O.J., 1994, Human Interaction in the Texas - Mexico Borderlands, University of Arizona, http://www.humanities-interactive.org/borderstudies/text/essay.html. Ast…

References

Coleman, M., 2005, U.S. Statecraft and the U.S. - Mexico Border as Security/Economy Nexus, Political Geography, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp. 185-209

Hackenberg, R., 1997, the U.S.-Mexico Borderland in Century XXI, Culture and Agriculture, Volume 19, Number 3

Longley, R., December 2004, Illegal Immigration Costs California Over Ten Billion Annually, About U.S. Government Info

Martinez, O.J., 1994, Human Interaction in the Texas - Mexico Borderlands, University of Arizona, http://www.humanities-interactive.org/borderstudies/text/essay.html. Ast accessed on March 28, 2008

American Government Course American Government
Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 6448180
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It was during the same period that hostilities with the communist leadership culminated into the bombing of Libya, loggerheads with the Soviet Union and a stiff arms race with the U.S.S.R.

It is also significant to note that it was during the same time that he successfully engaged Mikhail Gorbachev who was then the Soviet General secretary and culminated into the signing of Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty that signaled the end in arms race and both countries agreed to decrease in nuclear weapons in their custody.

Upon ascending to presidency, Reagan was bent on introducing new political as well as economic dispensations radically. He advocated more for supply-side economics which saw him push for reduction of tax rates to speed up economic growth, money supply control to check inflation, reduction of regulation on the economy particularly business to encourage competitive and free-market free for all which as a matter…

American Industrialization Urban Systems the
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Individuals could not grow their own food, given the space and land constraints and therefore were dependant upon the city infrastructure to provide it. This then creates additional industry, and the story goes on to build whole insular and expansive systems within the city to meet the needs of labor and industry. Agricultural support systems, in outlying areas, transportation systems to make logistics of such provision possible as well as markets to bring the goods to consumers and of course the restaurant industry all grew with the population.

Housing, is another example. Housing in newly forming cities is often substandard, as it was in most U.S. cities, and where it existed in this manner, city planning, codes and standards had to be created to respond to concerns regarding safety and other issues. This became substantially more important as industry introduced thinks like electricity, running water and waste removal systems to…

Works Cited

Hommann, Mary. City Planning in America: Between Promise and Despair. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 1993.

Kantor, Paul, and Stephen David. The Changing Political Economy of Urban America. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman and Company, 1988.

Walton, John. "Urban Sociology: The Contribution and Limits of Political Economy." Annual Review of Sociology (1993): 301.

Watts, Sheldon. "The Deadly Truth: A History of Disease in America." Journal of Social History 38.1 (2004): 267.

American History in Their Considerations
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Webster appears to be in agreement with Calhoun regarding the North's part in damaging the relationship between the North and the South. According to Webster however, the main culprit in this dynamic is the rhetoric of the abolition societies. While the author acknowledges that these societies include mostly honorable and just people who believe in their cause, he also holds that their rhetoric has become unacceptably emotional and their tactics, such as spreading anti-slavery literature to the South, essentially dishonorable. According to the author, such tactics ironically lead only to strengthen the Southern cause and increase enmity and violence.

Resolution

William Henry Seward believes that the abolishment of slavery is inevitable as the economy and humanitarian institutions grow. According to this author, the institution is simply an "accidental" institution that came into being as a result of a combination of certain factors at a certain time. As times are changing,…

American Education America Is Facing
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According to the book, studies have shown non-native speaking students or students who have special needs physical or behavioral struggle depression because they are in a different country and away from family. "Psychologist David Pillemer has analyzed memories of school, and suggests that such memories have much to tell us about students' perception of success or failure. When I talk to people about their education, from factory workers to physicians, from middle-school to doctoral students, it is telling how many of them call up resonant and emotional memories of events in school that, they claim, have had a potent effect on so many things: their sense of their intelligence, their social competence, their bearing in public spaces" (p. 244 -- 245). Scholars argue whether this is the implication of the alienation to students who form the mainstream population or just one of the effects of being drenched in a multicultural…

American Education Current State of American Education
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American Education

Current state of American education

In the United States of America, both the public and private schools are liable for the provision of education within the entire nation. In accordance with funding and the full control by the local, state, and federal government, there is universal availability of public schools across the whole nation (Orland, 2011). Empowered by the jurisdictions over school districts, the locally elected school boards are responsible for setting the education policies, funding, employment, teaching, and the formulation of the public schools' curriculum (Frank, 2012). Additionally, the state governments control the standardized tests and educational standards for public school systems. On the other hand, private schools are free to determine their own staffing policies, as well as their curriculum via voluntary accreditation available with the regional independent accreditation authority. Educational statistics reveal that approximately 85% of school age children go to public schools, 10% attend…

References

David, B.S. (2008). College affordability about future. Burlington: Burlington Free Press.

David, L. (2011). The American education system is in crisis. Retrieved on 30th Sept, 2013 from https://dlshowonline.com/the-american-education-system-is-in-crisis/

Frank, D. (2012). The current state of the U.S. higher education. Top to bottom. The American

Education Journal, 7(3), 45-48.

American Government Branches of the
Words: 1437 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31066207
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To become a senator, a person has to be at least 30 years of age and should have been a citizen of the U.S. For a minimum period of nine years at the time of election. Also, he or she has to be a resident of the state from which he or she is elected so that the state can be well-represented. In the case of representative, he or she should be at least 25 years old and must be a citizen of the U.S. For at least seven years at the time of election. Also, he or she has to be a resident of the state, but there is no mandatory rule that the representative should be a resident of the district that he or she represents.

Major steps in the process of a bill becoming a law

The first step is a member of the congress should introduce…

American Hotel Lodging Association Management Carriers Under
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American Hotel Lodging Association

Management Carriers under the Hotel and estaurant Industries

Hotel, lodging and restaurant industries are one of the fastest growing career areas in the world today. These industries have very high potential for job creation because they are diverse and dynamic. This sector grows every day in all parts of the world and absorbs many people ranging from the skilled, semi-skilled and unskilled. There is a high demand for services offered by these industries in America and beyond. This high demand forces the operators in this sector to expand and grow in all ways in order to meet their customers' expectations. esearch in the hospitality industry which include hotels and restaurant shows that, this sector grows at a high rate than any other sector. Statistics shows that more than one out of ten jobs in the world today relates to this sector directly or indirectly.

Hotel, lodging…

References

U.S Bureau of Labor and Statistics. (2006).Career Guide to Industries 2006-2007.Washington:

Washington D.C

David, K.H. And Jack, D.N. ( 2009). Human Resource Management in the Hospitality Industry.

New Jersey: John Willy and sons.

American & God's Dream the
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Marx's interpretation of Twentieth-Century Capitalism, as described by Miller, describes the changes in the American dream. The American dream was initially one linked to the idea of land ownership. Immigrants came from Europe, where land ownership had been a privilege of the wealthy. However, when America was relatively unsettled, almost anyone could theoretically come to America and claim land, and many people did just that. Of course, some of these early Americans did so in a grand way, traveling westward from the cities and establishing homesteads in the wilderness. The idea of home ownership, however, was not limited to those frontiersmen. Instead, only 100 years ago, someone could come to America and, because of the cheap price of land, afford to build his own home if he worked hard enough to do so. However, the nature of the home, itself, was different. Those homes were centers of production: at the…

Works Cited

Medaille, John. The Vocation of Business: Social Justice in the Marketplace. New York:

Continuum International Publishing Group, 2007

Miller, Vincent Jude. Consuming Religion: Christian Faith and Practice in a Consumer Culture.

New York: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2004.

American History and Culture Contributes
Words: 2472 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 36047997
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Nevertheless, there have been many decisions over the years that have tended to weaken the intent of the Framers. In 2001, in Zelman v. Simmons Harris the Supreme Court ruled that school voucher programs did not violate the establishment clause of the First Amendment. The decision represented a blow to the essentially secular nature of the American state and system. By allowing public money to be given to religious schools, the Supreme Court was permitting the violation of a more than two hundred year old principle. In reaching its decision, the Supreme Court chose to accept the argument that giving money to schools was not a case of advancing religion but rather one of who should have power over education - the state or individual parents.

Personal freedom was now being re-defined as something that included the right to government assistance if the government provided assistance in similar situations. Persons…

Works Cited

Bolick, Clint. "School Choice: Sunshine Replaces the Cloud." Cato Supreme Court Review 2001-2002. Ed. Robert a. Levy, James L. Swanson, and Timothy Lynch. Washington, DC: Cato Institute, 2002. 149-169.

Censer, Jack. "7 France, 1750-89." Press, Politics and the Public Sphere in Europe and North America, 1760-1820. Ed. Hannah Barker and Simon Burrows. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 159-178.

Champlin, Dell P., and Janet T. Knoedler. "American Prosperity and the "Race to the Bottom: " Why Won't the Media Ask the Right Questions?" Journal of Economic Issues 42.1 (2008): 133+.

Milner, Murray. Freaks, Geeks, and Cool Kids: American Teenagers, Schools, and the Culture of Consumption. New York: Routledge, 2004.

American Military Security The Dangers
Words: 1879 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 51015703
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In the future, though, the influence the U.S. must wield over nations such as Pakistan that are Muslim yet strive to be part of the international community, is likely to be contingent upon the U.S.' recapitulation perceived moral authority as well as its ability to use economic and military carrots and sticks. American influence is also dependant upon the international population's own perceptions of the U.S. As well as these nation's national leaders' rhetorical compliance with U.S. demands for the curtailment and monitoring of terrorist activities. Thus to generate loyalty in the hearts of the people in nations such Pakistan, the U.S. must use soft, rather than hard power. And use this soft power more effectively and seem more morally upstanding a more judicious rather than aggressive use of national force seems essential.

orks Cited

Hess, Charles. "American Foreign Policy," Human Rights and Human elfare. Durham: Duke

University Press, 2004.…

Works Cited

Hess, Charles. "American Foreign Policy," Human Rights and Human Welfare. Durham: Duke

University Press, 2004.

Nye, Joseph S. Soft Power, the Means to Success in World Politics. London: PublicAffairs, Ltd.,

Nye, Joseph, "Soft Power and American Foreign Policy," Political Science Quarterly. 19. 2

American Pragmatism in the 20th
Words: 1778 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64171687
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Neo-liberal policy theories are best understood when delineating Williamson's (1990) "Washington's Consensus" that first introduced and pioneered the concept.

Williamson sought to transfer control of the economy from the public to the private sector believing that this would improve the economic health of the nation and make for a more efficient government. His 10 points included the recommendations that: tax reform would encourage innovation and efficiency; that by governments running large deficits they were, potentially, ruining themselves; that public spending should be redirected to more humane systems such as pro-growth and pro-poor services; that there should b trade liberalization policies as well as encouraging opportunities for investment in foreign projects; privatization of state enterprises; fianncialiaziton of capital; deregulation of restrictions that hamper competition; and privation of state enterprises.

Whilst on first blush, neoliberalism seems to cohere precisely with pragmatism in that it encourages private competition and seeks to transfer power…

References

Felkins, L. (1997) Introduction to Public Choice Theory,

 http://perspicuity.net/sd/pub-choice.html 

James, W. 1907. Pragmatism: A New Name for some Old Ways of Thinking, Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1975.

-- -- 1909. The Meaning of Truth, Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1975.

American Express
Words: 1958 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55965844
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American Express

This report is an analysis of the American Express company.

Company Background

Founder, date incorporated -- "Established in 1850 in New York, American Express Company was among the first and most successful express delivery businesses to arise during the rapid westward expansion of the United States." (American Express)

Initial source of Capital -- "Although in its early years American Express was not itself a financial services company, its largest and most consistent clients were banks. Delivering the banks' typically small parcels -- stock certificates, notes, currency and other financial instruments -- was considerably more profitable than transporting larger freight. Soon the company would scale down its parcel and freight delivery business in favor of creating and selling its own financial products." (American Express)

Key innovations -- "In 1882, American Express launched the money order business, which proved an almost instant success. The company introduced the world's first traveler's…

Works Cited

6-Month Forecasts. Ed. financial forecaster. neatidea.com. Retrieved on 12/17/2004, from .

American Express. History. American Express. Retrieved on 12/17/2004, from .

Yahoo Finance. American Express. Retrieved on 12/17/2004, from Yahoo Finance at .

American Moderns Fashioning a New National Culture
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American Moderns: Fashioning a New National Culture

Literature and historians alike look to the past to define the present. In many ways, one can look at the defining moments in American history to understand the foundation in which today's culture exists. This paper asks one to examine the specific period of time after the Civil ar and how the men and women born of these decades until the First orld ar created a new American culture. This involves looking at the work of historians like Christine Stansell in order to gain a better understanding of the pillars and forces that shaped American culture at the time.

It is apparent that times were changing drastically from the Victorian era to the Modern era. People's morals and values were changing as writers and artists pushed the envelope and introduced new ideas into the mainstream. It can also be assumed that these "new…

Works Cited

"American Moderns." The Journal of American History 88, 3 (2001): 79.

Anderson, Sherwood. Winesburg, Ohio. Free Books Online.



Cohen, Patricia Cline. "Village Voices." The New York Times Online Book Review

American Social Thought on Women's Rights
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American Social hought on Women's Rights

his paper compares and contrasts the arguments in favor of women's rights made by three pioneering American feminists: Judith Sargent Murray, Sarah Grimke, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. his analysis reveals the centrality of religious argumentation to the feminism of all three. Murray and Grimke were both converts to varieties of evangelical Protestantism who drew considerable intellectual and emotional nourishment from strands of Christianity, which encouraged, or at least did not discourage, their personal development. Unlike Murray and Grimke, however, Stanton did not convert to evangelicalism. Instead, she launched upon a secularizing trajectory that took her beyond Christianity to Comtean Positivism and rationalism. Unlike Murray and Grimke, moreover, she acknowledged the problems inherent in any attempt to square Christianity with feminism. However, she never rejected the Bible completely, and she is appropriately viewed with respect today as a pioneer of feminist biblical criticism. he paper…

This was a striking argument that made the development of female intellectual potential inseparable from the worship of God. But while this is certainly useful as an argument for elevating the standard of female education, it falls far short of a cry for female emancipation.

Religion's relationship to feminism is more thoroughly explored in Sarah Moore Grimke's more ambitious Letters on the Equality of the Sexes, and the Condition of Woman (1838). What had changed in the fifty years since Murray's entitled "On the Equality of the Sexes" was published was that the battle for the liberation of women's intellectual abilities appeared to have been won. By the 1830s, well-educated women existed. But the shift that was occurring at the time - precipitated by the antislavery movement - was toward the use of female abilities to intervene in debates of social importance. Like other feminist antislavery advocates, Sarah Grimke gained notoriety as an outspoken female advocate of the antislavery cause. In 1838, Grimke, who had converted to Quakerism around 1818 - apparently because it was compatible with her passionate commitment to antislavery (Lerner 8) - found herself vilified by the press and rebuked by the Congregationalist ministerial association of Massachusetts for her participation in an abolitionist lecture tour of New England in 1837-38.

What was controversial, however, was not so much her antipathy to slavery - although the Congregationalist clergy had long sought to stifle criticism of slavery - than the idea that a woman should dare to speak out publicly on a matter of such importance (Behnke 20; Lerner 19). Grimke responded to her critics by publishing a work, which forcefully defended her right to speak. Addressed to Mary S. Parker, president of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, Grimke's Letters dwelt at length on the Bible, which was the ultimately source of the conservative view that women were commanded by God to restrict their endeavors to the domestic sphere. Grimke shared Murray's conviction that the meaning of scripture had been 'perverted' in the interests of men. Almost everything that has been written about 'the sphere of woman,' she argued, 'has been the result of a misconception of the simple truths revealed in the Scriptures.' She cited, in particular, erroneous translations, and professed a low opinion of the 1611 King James Bible (221). In an examination of the creation narrative, she discerned no grounds to believe that God had created woman as an inferior creature. Both genders

American Federalism Pol 319 State & Local
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American Federalism

POL 319 State & Local Governments

Brian Kimminau

emocracy in America has evolved from the concept of federalism allowing citizens at all levels to develop their own governance system. Since the founding of the United States in 1776 different governmental structures both on the state and local level developed. My paper takes a closer look at three different faces of state and local government in the United States of today: irect emocracy Government, Police Jury Government and Mayor-Council Government. While California and Louisiana are showcase examples for the irect emocracy and Policy Jury Government system, New York City stands exemplary for a strong Mayor Council governmental system. The goal of the paper is to point out the distinctive features of the three models, their historic background, and various impacts for citizens in the three geographic surroundings.

Case Study # 1 -- Examination of irect emocracy in California

What…

Does the legislature or the governor have more power in Louisiana based on your analysis? The governor has more power than the legislature because the legislature can completely overpower the governor. There is not one bill he can stop if they chose this veto and there is not an expense he can block for the same reason. The legislature can organize the executive branch anyway it chooses subject to the constitutional imperative of the presence of certain constitutional officers. Furthermore it can get rid of any regulatory authority in it, and propose any constitutional amendment it likes regardless of the governor's opinion on the matter

(Sadow, J.D. (23 May 2011, p.2).

How is the provision of funds to local and state efforts affected or optimized by Louisiana's French-based system? The state of Louisiana faces a severe decline in revenues through fiscal year 2012 which, if no corrective action is taken, will leave a significant funding gap in the state government expenditures and will create serious sustainability issues in financing of state obligations. It is essential that the state act now to reduce the cost of state government, through all means available, including efficiencies, economies, greater effectiveness, and other means to streamline government in order to overcome the projected severe revenue reductions occurring through 2012 . Louisiana also created the Commission on Streamlining Government (CSG) to examine each agency's constitutional and legal duties to gain efficiency and lower costs by reducing the size of state government. This commission is charged with making real reforms to reduce the size of government by finding and getting rid of a ballooning bureaucracy and duplicative services and low-performing programs both on the state and local government level (Streamlining Louisiana: Driving Government Reform in an Era of Fiscal Crisis (29 January 2010, p. 2). Proposers of the reform i.a. request the issuance of annual public reports online of all state grants by funding source, agency, parish and

Americans in Poverty Level and
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Heritage scholars obert ector and ea Hederman found that only a little more than one quarter worked for 2,000 hours or more. They suggested that poverty in America was less of a material deprivation and more of emotional and spiritual loss, the awareness or knowledge of one's dependence on state and federal bureaucrats and a loss of self-esteem resulting from the knowledge of self-insufficiency. The working poor, on the other hand, are capable of facing their future with optimism and confidence, no matter how little they earned. It was the control they had over their lives, which translated into their contribution to the economy (Kersey).

An opposing view was suggested, wherein an increase in the minimum wage would benefit low-income workers, in general, and those below the official poverty line, in particular (Economy Policy Institute 2006). If and when the proposed minimum wage increase was approved, the wages of approximately…

References

1. Economy Policy Institute.2006. Minimum Wage Facts at a Glance.  http://www.epinet.org /content.cfm/issueguides_minwage_minwagefacts

2. Kersey, Paul. 2004. The Economic Effects of the Minimum Wage. The Heritage Foundation.  http://www.heritage.org/research/labor/tst042904a,cfm?tenderforprint=1 

3. Morris, David. 2004. The American Voice 2004. The American Voice. http://www.americanoice2004.org/minimumwage/index.html

4. Office for Social Justice St. Paul and Minneapolis. 2006. Facts about Poverty. 101 Economic Facts that Every American Should Know. http://www.osjspm.org/101_poverty.htm