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American Ethnic Literature There Are'so Many

Words: 2099 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52693344

American Ethnic Literature

There are so many different voices within the context of the United States. This country is one which is built on cultural differences. Yet, for generations the only voices expressed in literature or from the white majority. Contemporary American ethnic literature is important in that it reflects the multifaceted nature of life in the United States. It is not pressured by the white majority anymore, but is rather influenced by the extremely varying experiences of vastly different individuals, as seen in the works of alph Ellison's Invisible Man, Gloria Anzaldua's "How to Tame a Wild Tongue," and Cathy Song's poem "Lost Sister." American ethnic literature speaks for minority voices, which have long been excluded in earlier generations of American society.

American ethnic literature has developed enormously over the last few centuries, and especially within the context of just the last few decades. In today's literary world, it…… [Read More]

References

Anzaldua, Gloria. "How to Tame a Wild Tongue." Borderland / La Frontera. Web. http://wolfweb.unr.edu/homepage/calabj/282/how%20to%20tame%20wild%20tongue.pdf

Ellison, Ralph. Invisible Man. Vintage International. 1995.

Franco, Dean J. Ethnic American Literature: Comparing Chicano, Jewish, and African-American Writing. University of Virginia Press. 2006.

Lee, Robert A. Multicultural American Literature: Comparative Black, Native, Latino/a and Asian-American Fictions. University Press of Mississippi. 2003.
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American In J Hector St John De

Words: 711 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14575997

American?

In J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur's letter "hat is an American?," the author attempts to familiarize the reader with the general lifestyle and character of a settler inhabiting the British North American colonies in an effort to demonstrate the concept of a uniquely American identity, formed out of the disparate influences which informed the culture of the time and region. De Crevecoeur describes the terrain, climate, religious attitudes, and occupations found on the newly colonized continent, and in doing so he illustrates the set of conditions which had helped transform the colonies' diverse European population into a unique, new culture known as American.

According to de Crevecoeur, the essence of the American identity is its multicultural heritage, or more specifically, its diverse European background. Because of the intermarriage of many European settlers since the early days of colonization, the American "is either an European, or the descendant of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Crevecoeur, J.H.S.J. (1904). Letters from an american farmer. New York, NY: Fox, Duffield & Company.
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American Novel

Words: 652 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 81639860

American Novel

On the Road with Sharon Creech's Walk Two Moons

The romance of the open road. The dusty highway. The screech of brakes and the roar of the gas pedal. All of these images come straight from Jack Kerouac's seminal novel On the Road, a tale of the American 1950's Beatnik experience, a tale of America viewed through travel and the window of a car. According to Kerouac, one is most American and yet most away from the pressures of one's family and American society when one is traveling. Yet Sharon Creech's book Walk Two Moons could also, in its own fashion, also be classified as a novel of the American road, very much along the lines of the Beatnik Kerouac.

Given that Jack Kerouac was telling a tale of deviancy and dropouts, rather than of familial connection and harmony, this thesis may sound strange to the ears, at…… [Read More]

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American Sports of NFL and NBA and Their Influence in Popular Culture

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 70386722

ports and popular culture (NFL/NBA)

Prelude

Pop Culture

Popular culture entails all forms of mass communication such as:

Newspapers

Radio

Magazines

Music

Books and Cartoons and comics

Advertising

It is somewhat different compared to higher forms of cultural art such as:

Classical music

Artworks

Conventional theatre

In terms of mass communication, popular culture means messages which are intellectually and artistically limited primarily designed to entertain and humor the viewers (Hollander, 2014). Following the industrial revolution, the people had a lot of time to spare which led to a huge demand for entertainment and amusement and gave height to media. The increasing supply of goods also made it necessary for the advertisers to attract the consumers and mass media could reach a large number of audiences at the same time (Hollander, 2014).

ports

The physical activities have always been in the life of human beings in the form of different leisure…… [Read More]

Sports have played a huge role in the American society on the whole as they have become a necessary part of the popular culture. American football is quite a popular game which brings NFL (National Football League) in limelight. NFL is same to same as other sports have an off season too when they are on a season break. Leagues such as NBA (National Basketball Association), MLB (Major League Baseball) and NHL (National Hockey League) follow the same pattern which builds the hype for them (Lee, 2012). It enables the public to forget all about sports for a while until it swings back in action again. The off season usually consists of training sessions, gym, trading players, NFL Combine and NFL Draft. These activities are heavily kept watch of by loyal fans followed by intense discussions (House, 2012).

Super Bowl is intensely popular in United States. Even the non-followers are somehow influenced by it as they hear news about it or by viewing it. The news channels mention regularly and social media is definitely on fire with news and updates. A famous band plays during halftime while a draw exists for watching the advertisements during the game and halftime (Lee, 2012). Companies are compelled to dish out loads of cash to display advertise themselves as the Super Bowl progresses. These ads are usually creative and funny and sometimes mixed. People for the sake of fun choose a particular team and cheer it till the end or otherwise friends pick a team and contend that it will win the title. It's sort of a public gathering event where food is enjoyed and drinks are taken in huge quantities. Tostitos and Doritos are chips found mostly at super Bowl parties while in case of drinks Coke, Pepsi and Budweiser. For the sports fans, it's their day off as they spend the entire day in front of a TV or mocking the opponent's team for fun. TV shows often give reference to Super Bowl just as Christmas and Halloween. Betting on a high level is also involved for the winning team, people are cut some slack from office, schools and colleges as it's the biggest event of the year (Hollander, 2014).

In 'Popular culture and the rituals of American Football' by Mark Axelrod, several cultural practices in America regarding football are mentioned. Before the ports went global, there were a lot of rituals and myths
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American At a Time When

Words: 654 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65972075

The author attributes the apparent lack of clarity about the issue to the fact that American's debates about nationality are a reflection of huge contradiction in the estern tradition. In this case, American scholars state that the United States is similar to the France because its nationality has been based on universal principles rather than parochial since independence. Therefore, for an individual to be an American, he/she had to commit to an ideology of equality, democracy, and liberty (Foner, p. 152).

The second aspect used by the author in support of his argument is slavery that helped in shaping American identity. Through slavery, the value of American citizenship was forced to partially rest on its denial of others. Since it made up the most impenetrable limit of American citizenship, slavery made all blacks invisible to the people who were imagining or crafting the American community. The third aspect that seemingly…… [Read More]

Work Cited:

Forner. "Chapter Seven - Who Is an American?" Who Owns History? n.d. 149-66. Print.
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american literature identity what it means to be

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13916152

The Evolution of American Identity Through Literature
The diversity within the American experience, and as well within the canon of American literature, precludes the possibility of singling out two or even ten of the novels, poems, or short stories that best encapsulate what it means to be American. From the colonial and early national era and the fledgling formation of national identity through the struggles of emancipation from slavery and transcendentalism, onwards to the industrial and capitalist eras, American literature has provided an accurate reflection of the lives of individuals and communities that comprise life in different regions of the country. Geographic and cultural differentiations also help to expand what it means to be American, taking into account race, class, gender, and generation. Threads that tie together Americans throughout time and in spite of radical differences in worldview include staunch independence and self-reliance, coupled with a profound optimism. Trust in…… [Read More]

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recent american history and pedagogy

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93203665

American history is an exercise in country branding and national identity construction. Through a careful editorializing and curating of historical documents, events, and places, historians contribute to the shaping of American identity, ideology, and culture. Revisiting the process of history making shows how historians and history educators can encourage critical thought, shifting away from the use of historiography as propaganda toward a discursive process. Historians can define and interpret evidence in different ways based on their own historical and cultural context, and the influences of prevailing social norms.

American history has long been a myth-making process, rather than a discursive exercise. Westad (2007), Dudziak (2004) and Manela all points out how the United States has cultivated and crafted an identity based on the tenets of liberty, justice, and freedom. Yet in practice, the nation has been an exercise in exploitation, imperialism, and racism. "From its inception the United States was…… [Read More]

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What Is the Difference Between American Literature and European Literature

Words: 1898 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 52100477

American and European Literature

Suggesting that there is a fundamental difference between American and European literature means much more than acknowledging that the culture produced by geographically distinct regions is similarly distinct, because it suggests that there are much deeper underlying symbols and tropes which mark these cultural productions as distinctly American or European regardless of the wide variety of genres and themes present in the literature of either region. hile the claim of an identifiable distinction between American and European literature feels accurate due to the clear differences between American and European culture, this claim requires critical examination because of the potential for stereotype and condescension inherent in it. Examining some of the more important factors which might produce a recognizable difference between these two canons, as well as the processes responsible for the formation of literary canons in the first place, reveals that the differences between American and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Guillory, John. Cultural capital: the problem of literary canon formation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993.

Kronick, Joseph. "Writing American: Between Canon and Literature." CR: The New Centennial

Review. 1.3 (2001): 37-66. Print.

Messent, Peter, and Louis Budd. A companion to Mark Twain. Malden: Blackwell, 2005.
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American Indian Movement

Words: 2030 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 81369738

American Indian Movement

The poorest people in America are the American Indians and it is also a fact that Indian reservations have unique laws that has made it a nation by itself within the United States. The modern movements focus on the American Indian reservations being empowered by self-determination. This is important for the economic, social and cultural improvement of the American Indians. It was with the Nixon administration that the welfare of the tribes became the focus of the government. The subsequent administrations encouraged the Indians to adapt to a policy of political and economic self-determination. Today many reservations have become economic hubs with tax and regulation havens for investment. Thus as of now the Mescalero and White Mountain Apaches "have become premier private managers of multiple-use forest resource economies." (Legters; Lyden, 1994)

However it must be stated that only during the eagan administration that there were major reports…… [Read More]

References

Bolt, Christine. (1990) "American Indian Policy and American Reform: Case Studies of the Campaign to Assimilate the American Indians" Routledge. Pages: 250, 298

 http://books.google.co.in/books?id=75UVAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA298&dq=american+indian+movement&hl=en&sa=X&ei=nj2IT92qCsWJrAeW-anrCg&ved=0CDMQ6AEwADge#v=onepage&q=american%20indian%20movement&f=false 

Fritz, Henry E. (1963) "The Movement for Indian Assimilation, 1860-1890." University of Pennsylvania Press: Philadelphia. Page Number: 15, 34, 56,138

 http://www.questia.com/ PM.qst?a=o&d=3054897" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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American Loyalists the American Revolution

Words: 1107 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55756428

Therefore, for instance, the Stamp Act was justified through "granting and applying (of) certain stamp duties, and other duties, in the British colonies and plantations in America, towards further defraying the expenses of defending, protecting, and securing the same; and for amending such parts of the several acts of parliament relating to the trade and revenues of the said colonies and plantations, as direct the manner of determining and recovering the penalties and forfeitures therein mentioned"(the Stamp Act, 1765).

Taking these legislative manners into consideration, the opponents of the Loyalists considered that the issue of trade as a reason for maintaining the British rule was by no means a viable solution. More precisely, they argued that the lack of representation in the British Parliament should not allow the British to impose taxes they do not agree or vote upon. From this perspective, it can be said that the Loyalists had…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Borden, Morton, and Penn Borden. The American Tory. Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 1972.

Jenkins, P. (1997). A history of the United States. New York: Palgrave.

The New World. An ocean away...Trade in the American colonies. N.d. 5 May 2008.  http://courses.wcupa.edu/wanko/LIT400/NewWorld/trade_in_the_american_colonies.htm 

The Stamp Act, Great Britain: Parliament, 1765. The Avalon Project at Yale Law School. 2005. 5 May 2008  http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/amerrev/parliament/stamp_act_1765.htm
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American Ethnic Literature Analyzing the Nature of

Words: 1600 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 351419

American Ethnic Literature

Analyzing the Nature of American Ethnic Literature

America has a distinct history: like ancient ome, its inhabitants have come from all over and few of them can truly say to be natives of the place. This fact alone makes American Literature a compelling label: what makes American Literature American? This paper will attempt to answer the question by showing how many ethnicities have converged in one nation allowing various writers with different ethnic, social, political, economical, and social perspectives to define and/or illustrate a time and place.

As Morris Dickstein states, "When America was merely a remote province of world culture, its educated elites were Anglophile, Francophile, or broadly cosmopolitan. Education was grounded in classical learning, a respect for the ancients over the moderns, and a deeply ingrained respect for old Europe's artistic heritage" (p. 155). This type of background made American letters similar to European. What…… [Read More]

Reference List

African-American Literature. (n.d.). Introduction, pp. 1-11.

Asian-American Lliterature. (n.d.). Introduction, pp. 2-12.

Casey, J.G. (n.d.). Canon Issues and Class Contexts. Radical Teacher 86, pp. 18-27.

Dickstein, M. (n.d.). Going Native. The American Scholar.
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American Influence Abroad

Words: 1017 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50243552

American Culture

riters such as Pico Iyer, Richard Pells, and Joseph Nye are in fact correct that the world culture has not and will not be Americanized. These writers are correct in asserting that American culture is ever forceful, but still America remains just one influence in a multicultural world: a manifestation of globalization. ith such a supreme focus on America, it can seem like America is the dominant force; however, this is just a result of a skewed perspective. It is true that other cultures have also spread outwards and that local cultures cannot and will not be destroyed.

The phenomenon of culture shock is direct evidence of the fact that American culture is not as pervasive as many people would like to assert that it is. As centers for study abroad programs in various universities explain, culture shock is a logical reaction to the body and mind in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Balko, R. (2014). Globalization & Culture. Retrieved from globalpolicy.org:  http://www.globalpolicy.org/component/content/article/162/27607.html 

Chapman.edu. (2013). Culture Shock. Retrieved from Chapman.edu:  http://www.chapman.edu/international-studies/center-for-global-education/study-abroad-programs/accepted-students/culture-shock.aspx 

Kitamura, H. (2010). Screening Enlightenment. NewYork: Cornell University Press.
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American Express in Asia Assessing

Words: 1812 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 59555675

The biggest challenge however over the long-tern is the lack of acceptance of foreign cards by Chinese merchants. There are an estimated 20 million businesses in China, and of these, 414,000 accept credit cards, and of those, 150,000 accept foreign credit cards (Worthington, 2003). At the infrastructure level this fact illustrates how pervasive the sociological factors that limit debt continue to influence the Chinese culture specifically and the Asian culture overall. As with every Asian culture, there is tremendous pride in not losing "face" or stature in ones' community. As a result, cash is king in the more conservative cities and regions of the country. The generation of 25 to 40-year-olds will change this, however it may take a generation or more to significantly increase American Express credit card use in Asia and China as a result.

eferences

Bayot, J (2004, March 30). American Express to Issue Cards in China.…… [Read More]

References

Bayot, J (2004, March 30). American Express to Issue Cards in China. New York Times,

Retrieved June 8, 2009, from  http://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/30/business/american-express-to-issue-cards-in-china.html 

Owen Brown. (2004, December 9). China Banks Add Credit Cards With Help From AmEx and Visa. Wall Street Journal (Eastern Edition), p. C.2.

David A Von Emloh, Emmanuel V Pitsilis, Jeffrey Wong. (2003). Credit cards come to China. The McKinsey Quarterly: Special Edition,20-23.
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American Religious History Both Laurence

Words: 1564 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 14673434

He also observes the poignant problem of racism that arises here, which is also his reason for calling the new cult "white" Buddhism: in spite of the fact that the hite Buddhists may adopt all the traditional Asian customs- from their name to the food they eat or to the rituals as such, they will still be part of the "mainstream of the white culture." (Allitt 1999, 459). That is to say, the racial differences, still linger no matter what, and are emphasized by the American racism, which is the dark side of American culture.

Finally, Eldin Villafane analyzes the way in which the Catholicism of Spain was imposed to the Native Americans in Mexico, emphasizing the great religiosity of the Hispanic people. The author discusses the differences between Christendom and Christianity, the first being the powerful and complete assimilation of all life-matters into the religious frame.

Thus, all these…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Allitt, Patrick. Major Problems in American Religious History: Documents and Essays. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999

Moore, Laurence R. Touchstone Jesus. The Mixing of Sacred and Secular in American History. Westminster: John Knox, 2003
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American Revolution Slavery in the United Stated

Words: 1499 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59313942

American Revolution

Slavery in the United Stated lasted as an endorsed organization until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1865. In 1619 twenty Africans were brought by a Dutch soldier and sold to the English colony of Jamestown, Virginia as indentured servants.

This would be the first of many visits up and down the American eastern seaboard. At this time, most slaves were being purchased by white men, though some Native Americans and free blacks were also detained. Slavery was spread to the areas where there was a high-quality soil for large plantations of important crops, such as cotton, sugar, coffee and most prominently tobacco. Even though the endorsed practice of enslaving blacks occurred in all of the original thirteen colonies, more than half of all African-Americans lived in Virginia and Maryland. The three highest-ranking North American zones of importation throughout most of the…… [Read More]

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American Moderns Fashioning a New National Culture

Words: 1613 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67791376

American Moderns: Fashioning a New National Culture

Literature and historians alike look to the past to define the present. In many ways, one can look at the defining moments in American history to understand the foundation in which today's culture exists. This paper asks one to examine the specific period of time after the Civil ar and how the men and women born of these decades until the First orld ar created a new American culture. This involves looking at the work of historians like Christine Stansell in order to gain a better understanding of the pillars and forces that shaped American culture at the time.

It is apparent that times were changing drastically from the Victorian era to the Modern era. People's morals and values were changing as writers and artists pushed the envelope and introduced new ideas into the mainstream. It can also be assumed that these "new…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"American Moderns." The Journal of American History 88, 3 (2001): 79.

Anderson, Sherwood. Winesburg, Ohio. Free Books Online.



Cohen, Patricia Cline. "Village Voices." The New York Times Online Book Review
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American Gypsy A Stranger in

Words: 947 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Film Review Paper #: 58345034



When taking into account the fact that the gypsies in the film managed to maintain their traditions, it becomes obvious that they one of the most essential values in their lives is their culture. In spite of the fact that they manage to be assimilated through the fact that they employ a behavior similar to the people neighboring them, gypsies manage to keep their personal identity. Core anthropologic concepts such as culture and society can thus easily apply to gypsies in the state of Washington. While gypsies are generally hesitant about sharing their problems with the world (and thus making it difficult for the general public to understand them), Jimmy Marks demonstrates that they too can be an active part of society and that they are willing to ask for their rights if the situation arises.

3. People in the U.S. are generally accustomed to living in a multicultural environment,…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Dir. Jasmine Dellal, American Gypsy: A Stanger in Everybody's Land
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American Splendor

Words: 1735 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 44092092

American Splendor

How does an artist communicate? In the paintings of the great classical artists, the colors, expressions of their subject's faces, and the surrounding activities all contributed to a mood and content of the times in which they wrote, as well as their own emotional connection to their painting. During the time of Michelangelo, when the human body was considered an art form his paintings and sculptured were created in fine detail, of beauty and specific realism. At the turn of the 20th century, Artists had a new idea, a new flavor to express in their work. The European art world had been dominated by the Michelangelo, his contemporaries, and his imitators for so long that public sentiment in the art world moved in new directions. In response to, or more aptly in reaction against, Claude Monet shoes a unique style, which communicated the beauty of the content, but…… [Read More]

Resources

Pekar, H. Off the Streets of Cleveland comes American Splendor: The life and times of Harvey Pekar. New York: Doubleday and co. 1986.

Pekar, H. American Splendor #2, Harvey Pekar. 1977

Pekar, H. American Splendor #17, Oregon: Dark Horse Comics. 1993
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American Experience With War

Words: 2615 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85444445

American Experience With War

Which historian - David M. Kennedy, or John Shy - best represents the American experience with war?

While reading Kennedy's - and Shy's - essay discussions, it's necessary to put their writings in the context of time. Kennedy penned his essay in 1975, and Shy wrote his in 1971. In terms of world events subsequent to both essays - in particular the advent of terrorism on a colossal and destructive scale, (9/11/01) - veritable light years of military and political change has emerged.

But notwithstanding the tumultuous global changes since the 1970s, the assigned essays are timeless in their intelligent analysis, very important in terms of their forthright accuracy of U.S. history and war, and hence, provide valuable reading for any and all students of the times. However, the essay by Kennedy, in this writer's opinion, best reflects the big picture view of America, its peoples,…… [Read More]

References

Coser, Lewis A. Sociological Theory: A Book of Readings. Toronto: The

MacMillan Company, 1969.

Kennedy, David M. "War and the American Character." The Nation (1976),

Shy, John. A People Numerous and Armed: Reflections on the Military Struggle for American Independence. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976.
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American Lit Definition of Modernism and Three

Words: 3585 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58544512

American Lit

Definition of Modernism and Three Examples

Indeed, creating a true and solid definition of modernism is exceptionally difficult, and even most of the more scholarly critical accounts of the so-called modernist movement tend to divide the category into more or less two different movements, being what is known as "high modernism," which reflected the erudition and scholarly experimentalism of Eliot, Joyce, and Pound, and the so-called "low modernism" of later American practitioners, such as William Carlos Williams. Nonetheless, despite the problems of reification involved with such a task, I will attempt to invoke a definitions of at least some traits of modernism, as culled from the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics:

First, [in modernism] "realization" had to replace description, so that instead of copying the external world the work could render it in an image insisting on its own forms of reality... [and] Second, the poets develop…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Preminger, Alex and Brogan T.V.F. The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1993.
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American Modernism and the Endemic Themes

Words: 1636 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 21908862

American Modernism and the Edenic Themes

Langston Hughes and Jay Gatsby: Different Strokes for Different Folks in the Search for an Edenic orld

The search for Eden has always had an eternal quality since the development of primordial man. At times, this search has manifested itself as a quest for a promised land full of natural resources, while at others, it has taken the form of a journey seeking social acceptance and harmony. Either which way, man's search for Eden has always been motivated by a desire to secure material and emotional well-being. Though this search is not unique to the people of America, the promise held out by a vast, virgin continent and new beginnings led to the belief that a life in the pursuit of wealth and happiness was possible here. This great 'American Dream,' however, soon proved as susceptible to human greed, bigotry, and the struggle for…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baldwin, J. et.al. "The Eternal Adam and the New World Garden: The Central Myth in the American Novel since 1830." New York: Braziller, 1968.

Daly, P.E.M. & Mayhew, P.H. "Envisioning the New Adam: Empathic Portraits of Men by American Women Writers." Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997.

Dickinson, D.C. "A Bio-Bibliography of Langston Hughes, 1902-1967." Hamden, Conn:

Archon Books, 1967.
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American Landscape

Words: 2041 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57185420

American Landscape and Social Attitudes and Values

The relationship between American society and its natural environment has not only been one of rapid social change, it has also been subjected to radical and complex changes in attitudes towards nature. The extent of the this evolutionary change emanates from an earlier view of nature as a Garden of Eden to the contemporary view of nature as a servant of human technological growth

In the comparatively short span of our civilization the cycle of primitivism to industrialism has been compressed and laid bare for study. Less than a century divides the era when America was looked upon as a Garden of Eden or savage wilderness and the time when it took first place as the world's industrial giant. Probably no people have ever so quickly subdued their natural environment. www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77844365" (Ekirch 6)

American attitudes towards nature have undergone a complex change in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Angus, Ian. "Free Nature." Alternatives Journal Summer 1997: 18+.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000498362" "American Literature." The Columbia Encyclopedia. 6th ed. 2000.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8134619"

Ekirch, Arthur A. Man and Nature in America. New York: Columbia University Press, 1963.
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American Horror if There Was

Words: 1314 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17907623

On their way the group picks up a hitchhiker who seems to be visibly sick from the heat and possibly crazy. However, the hitchhiker goes on to torment and violently threaten the group, so they leave him on the side of the road.

Once the group finally reaches the house, Kirk and Pam go and search for an old childhood swimming hole. When they reach the location, they find that its dried up but, hearing the sound of a nearby generator, the two go to a nearby farmhouse to see who is around. Kirk goes inside where he encounters Leatherface and becomes the villains first victim by way of a sledgehammer. Pam goes in to see what is taking Kirk so long and she too is killed by Leatherface by being hung onto a meathook.

Night soon approaches and the remaining friends begin to worry about Pam and Kirk. Jerry…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Hooper, Tobe. Texas Chainsaw Massacre. 1974.

Marx, Carl. Communist Manifesto. New York: Signet Classics, 1998.

Marx, Carl. Das Kapital. New York: Signet Classics, 1999.
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American Demographics The Next 25

Words: 810 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18837119

" Every town now has Thai, Japanese, and Indian restaurants to complement the Chinese and Italian fare. Consider the supermarket shelves that carry multicultural products such as Campbell Hispanic-style Fiesta soup, sushi platters, wasabi and seven different taco salsas. Burger King and McDonald's sell their millions of burritos to somebody!

EXAMPLE OF NEW MAKETING TENDS

In July 2001, Campbell's Soup Company announced a program to recreate the company and restore its growth track. In practice this included introduction of new ethnic product lines. Campbell's new Select Harvest () Mexican-Style Chicken Tortilla Soup was the principal new introduction that followed this reinvention.

It was a smart move. Select Harvest () soups were ranked the top new food and beverage product of 2009, according to a report released by Information esources Inc. (II). II's annual New Product Pacesetters (TM) report showcases the most innovative and successful new products of the year in…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Poverty Status of People by Family Relationship, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 1959 to 2006. U.S.

Census Bureau Web site. www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/histpov/hstpov2.html. Accessed March 26, 2010.

Toosi M. Labor force projections to 2016: more workers in their golden years. Mon Labor Rev.

2007; 130(11).
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American Born Chinese by Gene

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61012324

Essentially, with Chin-Kee, Yang's saying that the immigrant should not be embarrassed of their heritage. Many immigrants to the United States have shown some degree of embarrassment in regards to their heritage, as in the case of Danny who seems to want to loose his ethnic heritage altogether and become more like the white majority around him.

Yet, the novel also has a darker side to this sojourner image. Not only does the immigrant sojourner desire to still hold ties with their traditional ethnic identity, they are often not even allowed to participate in the majority identity experience, making them even more of an isolated outsider and thus not a permanent resident of the environment. The Monkey King is a good example in Yang's novel. He is not allowed into the gates of heaven for a dinner party with the other deities. Rather, he is excluded because he looks like…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Yang, Gene Luen. American Born Chinese. Macmillan. 2005.
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American History X Suggests That

Words: 1000 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Film Review Paper #: 58418181



Derek's racist beliefs are cemented, and became the springboard to his activism and leadership of the skinheads when his father is killed by a black man, fighting a fire in a crack house in an inner-city neighborhood. hen two young African-Americans try to steal his car, Derek is determined that he, unlike his beloved father, will emerge the winner. The film makes it clear that Derek has been waiting for this to happen. Again, the film does not excuse the theft of his vehicle, but indicates that the world is filled with potential justifications for racism, and Derek is looking for such 'reasons' to engage in hateful action. Derek is both a product of his environment and his simmering male adolescent rage.

Derek sent to prison for three years. His younger brother tries to assume Derek's role by harassing immigrants and other non-whites. He also finds himself, like Derek, of…… [Read More]

Work Cited

American History X. Directed by Tony Kaye. 1998.
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American and Japanese Early Childhood

Words: 14069 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63412707

Generally, it works by either giving a reward for an encouraged behavior, or taking something away for an undesirable behavior. y doing this, the patient often increases the good behaviors and uses the bad behaviors less often, although this conditioning may take awhile if the rewards and removals are not sufficient to entice the patient into doing better.

Existentialism is important to discuss here as well, and is often seen to be a very drastic way to examine human behavior. There are two types of existentialism. One is Atheistic Existentialism, and the other is Theistic Existentialism.

Atheistic existentialism has its basis in the statement that the entire cosmos is composed only of matter, and human beings see reality in two forms. Those forms are subjective and objective. People who believe in Atheistic Existentialism do not believe that anyone or anything specific made the world. They do not know whether it…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adams, M.J., Treiman, R., & Pressley, M. (1998). Reading, writing, and literacy. In W. Damon (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology: Child psychology in practice, 4, 275-355. New York: Wiley.

Albertson, L., & Kagan, D. (1988). Dispositional stress, family environment, and class climate among college teachers. Journal of Research and Development in Education, 21(2), 55-61.

Amidon, E. (1980). Personal Teaching Style Questionnaire. Philadelphia: Temple University, College of Education.

Allison, Anne. (1996). Producing mothers. In Anne E. Imamura (Ed.), Re-imaging Japanese women (pp. 135-155). Berkeley: University of California Press.
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American History the Radicalism of

Words: 1813 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65030947

" Indeed, in the "marriage bed of the beautiful Bertrande things now went well," presumably in sexual cohesion, but also, in reproduction as two daughters were born to them." key part of the Davis story was the trial, in which Arnaud was accused of being the imposter that indeed he was. This is in effect a sidebar to the story, and a sidebar to the issue of "different historians...using different types of evidence..." talk about the same things. On page 67, some 150 people had come to testify, but "forty-five people or more said that the prisoner was Arnaud...[and] about thirty to forty people said that the defendant was surely Martin Guerre." So, people who had seen history (the real Martin) had different views of whether this man on trial was him or not. Time casts shadows on the truth, just as it does on how the history of the…… [Read More]

References

Davis, Natalie Zemon. (1983). The Return of Martin Guerre. Cambridge: Harvard

Finlay, Robert. (1988). The Refashioning of Martin Guerre. The American Historical

Review, 93, 553-603.

Wood, Gordon S. (1991). The Radicalization of the American Revolution. New York:
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Identity Development Among Ethnic Minority

Words: 1202 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 40446836



Especially in major centers, the majority of at-risk adolescents are Latino and African-American youth (Yanvey, 1992). Yancey (1992) examined identity development among ethnic minority adolescents in the foster care system. This researcher explained how the occurrence of societal problems, such as unintentional pregnancy, childbearing, substance abuse, underachievement, discontinuation of education at an early point, homelessness, and dependency on social service and mental health resources was disproportionately pronounced among ethnic minorities. In regards to ethnic minority youth in the foster care system, Yancey (1992; p.819) "postulated that their social maladaptation is reflective of identity disturbances created by the negative images of African-Americans and Latinos perpetuated by the dominant society and unfiltered by optimal parental racial socialization." This statement expresses the profound influence that society's attitudes can have on the identity development of ethnic adolescents, and indicates a direction in which interventions could improve the racial socialization practices among parents.

The effect…… [Read More]

Reference

Allison, B. (2001). Interpersonal identity formation during early adolescence. Adolescence, 36, 509-23.

Greig, R. (2003). Ethnic identity development: implications for mental health in African-American and Hispanic adolescents. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 24(3), 317-31.

Hughes, D. (2003). Correlates of African-American and Latino parents' messages to children about ethnicity and race: a comparative study of racial socialization. American Journal of community Psychology, 31(1-2), 15-33.

James, W., Kim, G., Armijo, E. (2000). The influence of ethnic identityon drug use among ethnic minority adolescents. Journal of Drug Education, 30(3), 265-80.
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Identity Theft First of All

Words: 1334 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1153439

The system that Networks Update critiques is IMAG ("Identity Managed Access Gateway") by Apere, Inc.

The way it works is by an innovative way of permitting or denying access to applications that are critical to a business; the IMAG systems knows who should and who should not have access to those critical files and applications because it has "auto discovery capabilities" that immediately click into place when any attempt is made to enter into privileged files.

But what makes this system unique - in an IT world that already has firewalls and other seemingly effective preventative measures - is that, according to the Mark Rhodes-Ousley, author of the book Network Security, The Complete Reference, IMAG automatically creates and manages "...access policies based on all sources of identity information in the network," and avoids wasteful use of IT resources "for manual network access provisioning and policy management."

hile the future success…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Congress Daily. (2006). Reid Becomes Victim Of Identity Theft. Retrieved 29 August, 2006 from http://www.congressdaily.com.

Foust, Dean; & Ryst, Sonja. (2006). ID Theft: More Hype Than Harm. Business Week, Issue

3991, p. 34-36.

Kiernan, Vincent. (2006). New Center at Utica College will Study Identity Theft. Chronicle of Higher Education, 52(45).
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Identity Investigation

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50020443

Identity Investigation

According to David Scott (2009) traditionally, White men, as well as other men, are socialized to equate self-worth with economic terms. They are taught to function at all costs and to be in control. These power issues are linked to the salience of their race and gender. In American culture people are ranked on their proximity to the normal referents of society: White, male, middle-class, Christian, heterosexual, and able-bodied persons. The current economic conditions, along with the constant pressure to live up to the masculine stereotype, such as no emotions and family provider continue to be ripe for ongoing oppression and racism by White men in the work place. As unemployment rises, White men are losing jobs and finding it harder to secure employment. These conditions can lead to frustration and anger by White men who are becoming disillusioned by the American dream. This paper will be an…… [Read More]

References

Howard, J.A. (2000). Social psychology of identities. Annual review of sociology, Vol. 26, Issue 1, 367- 393. Retrieved September 5, 2011, from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=9d41e83e-4e0b-4b27-8fe3-a0aa7ed2dc5c%40sessionmgr111&vid=4&hid=127

Newman, D.M. (2005) Identities and inequalities: Exploring the intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality, 7th ed. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Scott, D.A. (2009) White male identity development and the world of work: Using the key model. In G.R. Walz, J.C. Bleuer, & R.K. Yep (Eds.), Compelling counseling interventions. VISTAS 2009. 21-29. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association. Retrieved September 5, 2011, from http://counselingoutfitters.com/vistas/vistas09/Article_3_Scott.pdf
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Identity Formation as Multidimensional Concept

Words: 2625 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8259079



The practices significantly support the development of the immigrant children. The research indicates of the children experiencing interactions that are complex. This is with the respective peers when engaging in creative activities inclusive of gross motor and language arts (Donald et al., 2007). The creative activities reflect on open-ended aspects with the resultant stratification in shaping the initial academic progress of the immigrant children possibility. The application of the developmentally suitable practices in the primary setting of the immigrant children society positively influences the outcomes of the children (Donald et al., 2007).

The challenge faced in defining the developmentally fit strategies emphasizes on the child-centered approaches. The approaches relate to the developmental theory with the society directed instructions originating from the behaviorist perspective of the immigrant children. As a result of the theoretical course from which the child-centered practices derives, they reflects on the synonymous view with the appropriate practices.…… [Read More]

References

Bornstein, Marc H. And Cote, Linda R. (2004). Mothers' Parenting Cognitions in Cultures of Origin, Acculturating Cultures, and Cultures of Destination. Child Development,

January/February 2004, Volume 75, Number 1, Pages 221 -- 235. Retrieved from  http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/pp/01650254.html 

Capps, R., Kenny, G., & Fix, M. (2003). Health insurance coverage of children in mixedstatus immigrant families (Snapshots of America's Children, No. 12).

Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.
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American Terrorism for Many People

Words: 14357 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 86656733



The USA Patriot Act: This was a law that was passed after September 11th. It is giving the police and intelligence officials the power to go after terrorists organizations easier. As it lifted various Constitutional protections when investigating these offenses.

Counter Terrorism: These are the activities that: federal, state and local officials are taking to prevent future terrorist attacks.

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD): These are weapons designed to inflict large amounts of casualties. These include: chemical, radiological, biological and nuclear.

These different terms are important, because they will help to avoid confusion and will focus the reader on understanding the overall scope of the problem.

Limitations of the Study

The limitations of the study are that the information we are presenting, could be pointing out a number of different problems. Yet, beneath the surface they are failing to identify possible changes that could have already been implemented by federal…… [Read More]

Bibliography

39% Say Government. (2011). Rasmussen Reports. Retrieved from:  http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_politics/march_2011/39_say_government_not_focusing_enough_on_threat_of_domestic_islamic_terrorism 

Al Shabaab American Recruits. (2010). ADL. Retrieved from:  http://www.adl.org/main_Terrorism/al_shabaab_american_recruits.htm 

Comparative Analysis. (2011). Business Dictionary. Retrieved from:  http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/comparative-analysis.html 

Jose Padilla. (2009). New York Times. Retrieved from:  http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/jose_padilla/index.html
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American Revolution American Victory and

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2051246

In the Continental Army was not just a force that was motivated by its service to a united cause, but by the democratic impulses that differentiated this from the British system of nobility and military rank. As a result, the dedication to cause elicited from the Continental Army solider was inherently more driven by the theoretical opportunities to follow victory. Certainly, for those who took part in the struggle to remove the British from American soil, there would also be an adoption of the view of this as a personal homeland now imposed upon by occupation.

To an extent, this motive may be said to be a greater assurance of eventual victory than military might. In the case of the American war for Independence, the better armed and more resource-wealthy British Imperial forces would be worn down by a commitment to what the Continental Army and militias alike saw as…… [Read More]

Such alliances suggested the more widespread implications of an American victory. While we may stop short of arguing that Britain lost a war -- particularly because many conditions suggest its defeat was inevitable regardless of military tactic -- it may be reasonable to argue that this signaled the beginning of the end of a colonial system which had sustained all European monarchies to this juncture. The power of the British Crown had been tarnished, but the initiation of the Industrial Revolution in both the United States and throughout Europe during the next century was fully dismantle its structural relevance. The type of wholesale occupation through which it had conducted its international presence would no longer be possible for Great Britain on the scale that had been achieved prior to American Independence.

Ultimately though, it seems appropriate to acknowledge these events first and foremost as a victory for the aristocratic leaders of the American rebellion and the working class enlisted men alongside whom they fought. Without too greatly idealizing this relationship, it may be acknowledged as a root to Americas socioeconomic identity today.

Martin, J.K. & Lender, M.E. (2006). A Respectable Army: The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789. Harlan Davidson, Inc.
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American Government the American Governing

Words: 1244 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 82232346



The contact between the two groups is not always straight forward, and is often fought officially, through judicial practices, and unofficially, through dubious backstage arrangements and activities. However, there is also a legal manner through which interest groups have been given the right to influence political decisions and the laws voted upon. Lobbying is one such activity.

Although lobbyists are the subject of heated debate, as many citizens consider them to be just "wheeler-dealers continually wining and dining public officials in order to secure political favors at the expense of the general public" (Volkomer 282), their main function is to supply "information about their specialized interests to a few select public officials, communicating with members and others who are concerned with their problem" (283). However their role is rather interpretable. On the one hand, they represent the interests of a certain segment of the population, such as farmers, or railway…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Janda, Kenneth, Jeffrey Berry, and Jerry Goldman. The challenge of democracy: government in America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1989.

Jewell Malcolm E, and David M. Olson. American state political parties and elections. Homewoo: The Dorsey Press, 1982.

Volkomer, Walter E.. American government. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts,1972.
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American Education America Is Facing

Words: 736 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94130418

According to the book, studies have shown non-native speaking students or students who have special needs physical or behavioral struggle depression because they are in a different country and away from family. "Psychologist David Pillemer has analyzed memories of school, and suggests that such memories have much to tell us about students' perception of success or failure. When I talk to people about their education, from factory workers to physicians, from middle-school to doctoral students, it is telling how many of them call up resonant and emotional memories of events in school that, they claim, have had a potent effect on so many things: their sense of their intelligence, their social competence, their bearing in public spaces" (p. 244 -- 245). Scholars argue whether this is the implication of the alienation to students who form the mainstream population or just one of the effects of being drenched in a multicultural…… [Read More]

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Identity Is This Explanation Sufficient

Words: 321 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 52085751

Aspects of identity that might have been denied or denigrated because of colonial mentalities can resurface and be admired. Discourse on gender and social class has also deepened and enabled identity constructions to flourish outside the confines of proscribed gender roles. Culture changes, and so too does identity. The values placed on identity aspects like religion have shifted too, making religion a less salient part of people's identity. On the other hand, sexual orientation and gender identity have both become more important. Gender roles have changed to such a great degree as to transform the definition and meaning of family, love, or sex.

Therefore, a number of issues affect the way we understand and create identities. Academia reflects broader changes in social values and norms. In some cases, academia inspires those social and political transformations. Regardless of the directions of the relationship between academia and social values, the two interact…… [Read More]

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American Economy After September 11

Words: 2140 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 35892483



Another trend that makes the American economy seem weak after September 11th is a change in spending habits. Many economists attribute a change in retail spending to the aftermath of September 11th when really it mostly reflects an evolution in the retail industry. Over time the American consumer's needs have changed and so have the demographics. For instance, "women are the driving force behind retail purchases" (Six Months, 2002) as more of them are head household now. According to BIGresearch, "consumers say they have changed and become more practical and realistic when making a purchase and 52.2% of them say this change is long-term" (Six Months, 2002). In this respect, September 11th did have a direct influence on the American consumer in that their retail spending tastes changed. Because of the attacks and fear, Americans spent more time with their families in the months after the attacks. This resulted in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Delong, Bradford. "Wal-Mart dumps cold water on U.S. economic bulls. Strange Third Quarter News From Wal-Mart." Forbes.com 13 Nov 2003. 27 May 2005 ht tp:/ / www.j-bradford-delong.net/movable_type/2003_archives/002718.html. Accessed 2005 Jan 7.

Hubbard, Glen, R. "Huh? A Surprising Success! First Came the Bursting of the Clinton Bubble,

Then 9/11 the Accounting Scandals and All the Other Shocks to the System. Who Would

Have Predicted Such a Vigorous U.S. Recovery?" The International Economy 18, 2 (2004):
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American Jewess the Jewish-American Woman

Words: 2848 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74502117



1897-1898

1896 saw the expansion of the American Jewess with the opening of a New York office, though the content of the magazine appeared largely unchanged at the beginning of 1897. The January issue of the publication contains many articles that were themed similarly to the previous issues of the magazine, though there is a decidedly more practical nature to many of the articles included in the issue. "Household hints" and similar sections had been regular appearances in the magazine since its inception, but this issue contains articles on creating happiness in the home and on the history of the shoe -- with a definite feminist-Jewish perspective. hile still engaging in abstract, intellectual and scholarly pursuits, the content of the magazine is also shifting towards direct daily usefulness.

The issues began to shorten noticeably as 1897 progressed, and as the number of articles depleted the ratio of directly targeted articles…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jewish Women's Archive. "This Week in History - "The American Jewess" begins publication." Accessed 6 March 2010.  http://jwa.org/thisweek/apr/01/1895/american-jewess 

Rothstein, Jane H.. "Rosa Sonneschein." Jewish Women: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia. 20 March 2009. Jewish Women's Archive. Accessed 6 March 2010.  http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/sonneschein-rosa .

Sarna, Jonathan and Golden, Jonathan. "The American Jewish Experience in the Twentieth Century: Anti-Semitism and Assimilation." National Humanities Center. Accessed 6 March 2010.  http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/tserve/twenty/tkeyinfo/jewishexp.htm 

The American Jewess, 1895-1899. Accessed 6 March 2010.  http://quod.lib.umich.edu/a/amjewess/
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American Women's History There Were

Words: 1529 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: A-Level Coursework Paper #: 48783405

Boycotting British goods meant that American women were going to have to make sacrifices, and stop consuming goods that were imported from Britain. The cartoon of the women of Edenton, NC signing a non-consumption agreement represent American women involving themselves in the political and economic boycott of Britain by the American colonies. ("A Society of Patriotic Ladies") However, it is actually a criticism of women's involvement in political affairs by representing the women who signed as silly women engaging in silly activities. The entire cartoon is designed to give the impression that women are not able to take on political issues seriously and deal with them effectively. Instead, the women in the cartoon are engaging in sex, playing, drinking, and are generally distracted from the important issue at hand.

orks Cited

"A Society of Patriotic Ladies- North Carolina Digital History." LEARN NC. eb. 14

Oct. 2011. http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/nchist-revolution/4305

2000. Print.

"Laws…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"A Society of Patriotic Ladies- North Carolina Digital History." LEARN NC. Web. 14

Oct. 2011.  http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/nchist-revolution/4305 

2000. Print.

"Laws on Indentured Servants." Virtual Jamestown. Web. 14 Oct. 2011.
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American and Chinese Business Cultures

Words: 4337 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 18240788

American and Chinese Business Cultures

Though there is no universally accepted definition, culture denotes a set of values, beliefs, traditions, practices, attitudes, and behaviors shared by a given group of people (odrigues, 2009). Culture defines a people's way of life -- how they do things, communicate, behave, relate with one another, and so forth. Culture theory, especially Geert Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory, illustrates that cultures tend to vary from country to country or region to region (Hofstede, 2001). These differences imply that norms, behaviors, attitudes, and other elements of culture differ across countries or regions. For instance, the culture of Americans tends to differ from that of the Chinese, Africans, or Arabs.

Culture permeates every aspect of society -- from organization and social relationships to communication and business. Business is especially influenced by culture. Culture affects how organizations are structured and managed, how employers relate with employees, how decisions are…… [Read More]

References

Alon, I. (2003). Chinese culture, organizational behavior, and international business management. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing.

Althen, G. (2003). American ways: A guide for foreigners in the United States. 2nd edition. US: Intercultural Press.

Cook, G. (2012). The influence of national culture on American business people -- managerial implications for central Europe. Central European Business Review, 1(2), 46-51.

Geert-hofstede.com. (n.d.). Country comparison. Retrieved from https://geert- hofstede.com/united-states.html
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Identity Theft Is Something That

Words: 1500 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47945154

Of course, most people will call their banks, credit card companies, and other institution at the first sign that identity theft has occurred, but what happens to those victims who do not realize it immediately?

People need to be aware of what identity theft is, how it is committed, what can happen when such information is stolen, and what should be done when identity theft has occurred. It is not a bunch of hype and it does cause a lot of harm, not only to the victims, but also to the victim's family. Evidently, Foust is trying to calm the reader by saying that most information that is stolen is never used. Rather it is used or not, the fact that someone has or can be a victim of identity theft is cause for concern.

Dean Foust is correct in saying that most information is not ever turned into financial…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Foust, Dean. (7/3/2006). ID Theft: More Hype than Harm. Business Week Magazine.
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American Jewish Writers Have Come

Words: 1771 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 21811646



Catherine Rainwaterhand finds in the writer Ozick, along with Hazzard and Redmon a common ground in that their work is witnessing some of their deepest concerns. "Each of these writers contemplates the "welling together" of "impressions" and experiences in a "flow of time" that sweeps humans along toward apparently predestined ends. Caught up in this flow, the characters of these three contemporary authors find only tentative meaning and design in an indefinite, incomplete past" (Rainwaterhand, 69). Rainwaterhand points out that the characters of these three authors are haunted by their own past, just as their creators must be hunted not only by their own personal past, but also by that of their people and the whole world. And when you are born in New York, living with your Jewish family in Bronx and growing up in the 1930s in a country that was going through a Great Depression, amid anti-Semitic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. Cynthia Ozick. Chelsea House, 1986

Lowin, Joseph. Cynthia Ozick. Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved: Nov 11, 2008. Available at  http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/Ozick.html 

The Many Faces of Cynthia Ozick. 1997. Retrieved: Nov. 11, 2008. Available at  http://www.theatlantic.com/unbound/factfict/ozick.htm
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American History America's Puritan History

Words: 377 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51894822

. . Even puritanical John Adams thought that the argument for Christ's divinity was an 'awful blasphemy' in this new enlightened age." (Wolf, 160)

And yet, Wolf goes on to discuss the manner in which religious values remain such a prominent part of the political process. n spite of the effort to which our founding fathers went to prevent such manipulation, the puritanical roots of American culture and values is now suffieiently entrenched to the point that presidential candidates must declare their faith to expect any chance of victory. To the point, Wolf recalls the manner in which recent elections, included those of Bush and Obama thereafter, have called religion into the public discourse as a way of identifying the candidates and their resonance with American culture at large. The degree to which Obama, Wolf's text denotes, would work to articulate his faith in Christ as a response to politically…… [Read More]

Indeed, in a fledgling nation with no small number of illiterate rural constituencies, the proctoring of religious piety in concert with the imposition of political ideals would be a defining characteristic in the nation's cultural development. Indeed, it would revealed to be a political device in many ways, used to manipulate a constitutional system founding on an explicitly stated separation of church and state. To this point, the founding fathers appear to have been largely driven by the desire to preserve this idea. As our text indicates, "at best, most of the revolutionary gentry only passively believed in organized Christianity and, at worst, privately scorned and ridiculed it . . . Even puritanical John Adams thought that the argument for Christ's divinity was an 'awful blasphemy' in this new enlightened age." (Wolf, 160)

And yet, Wolf goes on to discuss the manner in which religious values remain such a prominent part of the political process. In spite of the effort to which our founding fathers went to prevent such manipulation, the puritanical roots of American culture and values is now suffieiently entrenched to the point that presidential candidates must declare their faith to expect any chance of victory. To the point, Wolf recalls the manner in which recent elections, included those of Bush and Obama thereafter, have called religion into the public discourse as a way of identifying the candidates and their resonance with American culture at large. The degree to which Obama, Wolf's text denotes, would work to articulate his faith in Christ as a response to politically conjured allegations of his being Moslem, demonstrated how inextricably linked faith and politics are as a result of the devoutness in our history. (Wolf, 161)

Wolf, N. (2008). Give Me Liberty: A Handbook for American Revolutionaries. Simon & Schuster.
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Internment of Japanese Americans in WWII

Words: 1529 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92346889

Internment of Japanese-Americans in orld ar II

hen the national interests are threatened, history has shown that American presidents will take extraordinary measures to protect them, even if this means violating the U.S. Constitution. For example, the U.S.A. PATRIOT Act enacted immediately following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, watered down civil liberties for American citizens. Likewise, President Abraham Lincoln suspended the writ of habeas corpus during the Civil ar just as President Franklin D. Roosevelt did during the outset of orld ar II following the Japanese sneak attack on American forces at Pearl Harbor when tens of thousands of Japanese-American citizens were interred for the duration of the war. Despite the compelling circumstances that were involved, this paper will show that the internment of Japanese-Americans during orld ar II was not only unconscionable, it was also a fragrant violation of the U.S. Constitution and should not have taken…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Crockett, Rosemary F. (2002). "America's Invisible Gulag: A Biography of German-American

Internment and Exclusion in World War II." The Oral History Review 29(2): 191-193.

Flamiano, Dolores. (2010). "Japanese-American Internment in Popular Magazines: Race,

Citizenship, and Gender in World War II Photojournalism." Journalism History 36(1):
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Nature of American Views About

Words: 2042 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42248460



It is impossible in six short pages to fully comprehend the attitudes that hite Americans had to Native Indians and black Americans in the early centuries of our nation's founding. That was m not my intent. My goal rather, was to illustrate first that although we are often presented a dominant narrative as the narrative, the truth is that in surveying American attitudes towards American Indians and Blacks a single cohesive narrative does not exist. If such a narrative did exist the Native American Seminole tribe of Florida would not exist. The Seminoles were a tri-racial tribe composed of Creek Indians, remainders of smaller tribes, runaway slaves and whites who preferred to live in Indian society (Loewen). The First and Second Seminole wars (1816-18, 1835-42) in which the Seminoles fought against invading hites who demanded that they surrender their African-American members, were fought not for economic value but to eliminate…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jordan, Winthrop D. White Over Black:American Attitudes Toward the Negro, 1550-1812. University of North Carolina Press., 1995.

Loewen, James. Lies My Teacher Told Me. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

Miller, Eric. George Washington and the Indians. 1994. 25 March 2010 .

Root, Maria. Love's Revolution: Interracial Marriage. Temple University Press, 2001.
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Reducing Risky Behavior for African-American Teens an

Words: 4795 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 64204545

EDUCING ISKY BEHAVIO FO African-American TEENS

An Intervention for educing isky Behavior Among African-American Female Adolescents: Provider Cultural Competency Training

The Office of Minority Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2013) quotes Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. As a way to introduce the topic of updating and enhancing the National CLAS (Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services) Standards. The quote is "Of all forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane" (p. 14). Long recognized as a significant problem in the United States, health inequity along social, economic, racial, and ethnic boundaries has become a central focus of health care policy in this country. Although health care providers have little control over the historical determinants of discrimination in the U.S. they can work towards eliminating health disparities that exist through cultural competency. In addition to the ethical and moral rationale for attaining…… [Read More]

References

Aronowitz, T. & Agbeshie, E. (2012). Nature of communication: Voices of 11- to 14-year-old African-American girls and their mothers in regard to talking about sex. Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing, 35(2), 75-89.

Aronowitz, T. & Eche, I. (2013). Parenting strategies African-American mothers employ to decrease sexual risk behaviors in their early adolescent daughters. Public Health Nursing, 30(4), 279-87.

CDC. (2012). HIV and AIDS among African-American youth. Retrieved 2 Feb. 2014 from: .

CDC. (2013). HIV among African-Americans: Fast facts. Retrieved 2 Feb. 2014 from: .
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Segregation in the American Society Has Been

Words: 2295 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 82757470

segregation in the American society has been a subject for debate for decades now, especially since the second part of the 20th century when the African-American community in particular gained equal rights in the society, from the right to vote to the right to learn in the same schools, high schools, and universities. However, this equality has been fought for hardly and included constant pressures on the political and civil societies. Even so, despite these rights gained through decades of struggle, to this day, there is still the perception that segregation is visible in different walks of life. One of the most important environments where segregation is still visible is in schools (Cooper 4). This is not to say that only African-Americans are subject to indirect segregation. According to recent reports, "In spite of declining residential segregation for black families and large-scale movement to the suburbs in most parts of…… [Read More]

References

Cooper, Paul. Effective Schools for Disaffected Students: Segregation & Integration.

Routledge, NY, 1993.

Cross, W. Shades of Black: Diversity in African-American Identity. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1992.

Orazem, Peter F. "Black -- White Differences in Schooling Investment and Human Capital Production in Segregated Schools." The Economic Review, 77(4), 714 -- 723, 2003.
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Hispanic-American Diversity An Overview Soy

Words: 1331 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84577545



As with other Hispanic groups, there may be a greater reluctance to seek professional help in dealing with psychological issues because of a belief that the church, rather than Western psychological medicine, should address such problems. The greater economic security of middle-class Cuban immigrants and their children thus has not meant an entirely uncomplicated relationship with the new American homeland.

Puerto ican-Americans

Although it is a small island, the history of Puerto ico has been marked by many influences, spanning from Africa to Spain to Latin America. "There is an essential dichotomy [in] Puerto ico's relationship with the United States. Within American jurisdiction, as reflected by common citizenship, flag, currency and numerous applicable Federal laws, Puerto ico might seem in everything but name a State of the Union. But on the other side you will find a culture and society profoundly different from that in the mainland. It is a…… [Read More]

References

Bachay, Judith & Rafael Montes. (2010). Article 14: The Cuban-American grieving process

Counseling.org. Retrieved September 17, 2010 at  http://www.counseling.org/Resources/Library/VISTAS/vistas04/14.pdf 

The declining economic status of Puerto Ricans. Health Affairs. Retrieved September 17,

2010 at  http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/focus/pdfs/foc102d.pdf
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Decentering of Culture in Native American Groups

Words: 1089 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50053993

Decentering of Culture in Native American Groups in the Later Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries

While Westernization has created tremendous problems for a wide variety of indigenous cultural traditions, there is little question that the introduction of Westerners to the Americas resulted in some of the most massive destruction of an indigenous culture ever seen in history. The vast majority of this destruction occurred prior to the 19th century. When Europeans first came to the Americas, they decimated native populations with disease and violence. Later, Native Americans were forced off of their land. The infamous Trail of Tears in which many Native American groups were forced from their traditional lands and onto reservations occurred in the early 19th century. Therefore, by the end of the 19th century, it is fair to say that Native American culture had already been indelibly impacted by the Western expansion. However, it is important to…… [Read More]

References

Bear, C. (2008, May 12). American Indian boarding schools haunt many. Retrieved May 20,

2011 from NPR website:  http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=16516865 

Grant, U. (1871, December 4). State of the Union Address. Retrieved May 20, 2011 from Infoplease website:  http://www.infoplease.com/t/hist/state-of-the-union/83.html 

Johansen, B. (1998, September). Reprise / forced sterilizations: Sterilizations of Native
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Progress of African-Americans Historical Progress

Words: 3045 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 9188025

e. The lack of a collective intellectual voice. In response to this and in part as a result of new affluence gained by some as well as a growing exposure to education, albeit mostly segregated, many began to develop what is known as the Harlem enaissance.

The 1920s in American history were marked by a sociocultural awakening among Afro-Americans. More blacks participated in the arts than ever before, and their number increased steadily throughout the decade. This florescence of creative activity extended to many areas -- music, poetry, drama, fiction. In literature, the few Negro novels published between 1905 and 1923 were presented mainly by small firms unable to give their authors a national hearing. However, in the succeeding decade, over two dozen novels by blacks appeared, and most of them were issued by major American publishers. (Singh, 1976, p. 1)

The Harlem enaissance came about for many reasons not…… [Read More]

References

Golay, M. (1999). A Ruined Land: The End of the Civil War. New York: Wiley

Jonas, G. (2005). Freedom's Sword: The NAACP and the Struggle against Racism in America, 1909-1969. New York: Routledge.

Jim Crow Laws. (2004). In The Columbia Encyclopedia (6th ed.). New York: Columbia

Kivel, Paul. (1995) Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice.
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Asian Pacific American Experiences

Words: 1941 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27251595

Korean-American

ith this dramatic increase in population and the racial unrest that resulted in the destruction of Korean businesses during the Los Angeles civil unrest, Korean-Americans have emerged as one of the visible ethnic groups in the country. However, aside from the Los Angeles riots, most Americans continue to define people of Korean ethnicity with a bevy of stereotypes - kimchee, churches and grocery stores.

For many Korean-Americans, however, being "Korean," "Korean-American" or "Asian-American" remains a fluid category, with constantly shifting meanings. Some locate the definitions in the places where they were born or where they grew up. Others define the categories by the way they look.

Still others, like the Park family, define being Korean through language.

This paper uses a series of interviews to evaluate the Park family's perceptions of their ethnicity. It compares and contrasts how Father Park and Mother Park's definitions differ from the experiences of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hurh, Won Moo. "Majority Americans' perception of Koreans in the United States: Implications of Ethnic Images and Stereotypes." In Ho-Young Kwon, ed. Korean-Americans: Conflict and Harmony. Chicago: Covenant Publications, 1994.

Jenkins, Richard. Rethinking Ethnicity: Arguments and Explorations. London: SAGE Publications, 1997.

Jenkins, Richard. Social Identity. London and New York: Routledge, 1996.

Jo, Hye-Young. "Locating Ethnic Identity and Language Among Second Generation Korean-Americans." The Review of Korean Studies. 3(2), December 2000. available online at http://review.aks.ac.kr/review3_2.htm. March 26, 2003.
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Muslim Youth Identity in biculturalism america

Words: 1369 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51982004

Identity and Identity Construction

Identity is socially constructed, a process that begins at an early age. Child rearing practices at home and school and community socialization begin the process of identity construction (Rogoff, 2003). As the individual constructs his or her own identity, exogenous forces also shape that individual's identity such as reactions to the way a person's appearance. For visible minorities, belonging to closely-knit communities in small groups can greatly enhance the process of identity construction, particularly for minority youth (Bratt, 2015). This remains true throughout the young person's life, including the person's transition from adolescence into young adulthood. Adolescence remains the critical point of identity construction, holding "a special role in virtually all cultures as a time of transition between childhood and adulthood," (Cauce, Cruz, Corona, & Conger n.d., p. 14). Therefore, it makes sense to focus on adolescence and young adulthood when investigating biculturality among Muslim American…… [Read More]

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biculturalism and how to create multiple Identities

Words: 2014 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53421669

A number of studies have been done in recent years to explore the unique effects of a bicultural identity, how a bicultural identity is formed, and what forms a bicultural identity will take. Research integrates assimilation theories as well as social constructionism. The reasons for the emerging literature include improving psychological health and well-being, improving social and cultural health, and also reducing or eliminating racism and negative stereotyping. Elashi, Mills & Grant (2009) point out "83% of Muslim individuals reported an increase in implicit racism and discrimination following September 11th," making the Muslim-American cultural, ethnic, and religious cohort one of the most important populations in America to understand through sociological data (Elashi, Mills & Grant, 2009, p. 379). Discrimination may be related to the dominant or white culture's fear of non-integration of existing or new immigrants and perceived threats to an imaginary cohesiveness of the dominant culture -- something that…… [Read More]