Arthur Miller Essays (Examples)

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Miller and Eliot on Beauty Comparing and

Words: 3310 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73887617

Miller and Eliot on Beauty

Comparing and Contrasting "Beauty" in Miller and Eliot

Arthur Miller and T.S. Eliot are two 20th century American playwrights. hile the latter is more commonly noted for expatriating to Britain and writing some of the most memorable poetry of the early 20th century, the former is noted for his famous depiction of the common man's struggle to find meaning and fulfillment in Death of a Salesman. As distinct as the two writers may seem, they both conceive of and treat the theme of beauty -- Miller analyzing its absence in Salesman, and Eliot analyzing its abandonment in several poems like "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" and "The asteland." This paper will compare and contrast both writers and show how they deal with the theme of beauty in their works.

The Absence of Beauty in Salesman and "Prufrock"

Beauty is missing from illy Loman's…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aristotle. "Poetics." Internet Classics Archive. Web. 12 Oct 2011.

Barstow, Marjorie. "Oedipus Rex as the Ideal Tragic Hero of Aristotle." The Classical

Weekly 6.1 (1912): 2-4. Print.

Blasing, Mutlu Konuk. American Poetry: The Rhetoric of Its Forms. New Haven: Yale
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Miller's Death of a Salesman

Words: 817 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77573295

Biff deliberately gives up all chances of graduating from high school, and leaves his college dreams behind.

For a long time, Biff feels some anxiety about his chosen lifestyle out est. He enjoys the freedom of his rootless life, but feels somewhat guilty that he has given up so much, after so much was expected of the early promise he showed. His cousin Bernard, less athletic but more studious, has distinguished himself as a lawyer. His Uncle Ben, illy's idol, found diamonds while wandering in the wilderness, while Biff has only, in his view, wasted his time doing very little, and making very little money.

hen he comes back to see his parents, Biff contemplates going into business with his unethical brother Happy, who is very much like a younger version of illy. But after a certain point, Biff realizes that this would simply be, in his words, "trying to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Miller, Arthur. "Death of a Salesman." The Portable Arthur Miller. New York, Penguin, 1995.
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Arhtur Miller S The Crucible

Words: 1664 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31934885

Arthur Miller, notable playwright, wrote the 1953 play, The Crucible that focused on the partially fictionalized and dramatized story of the Salem witch trials that occurred between 1692 and 1693 in the Province of Massachusetts Bay. The play was written as an allegory of McCarthyism due to the American government blacklisting of accused communists. Even Miller was questioned by the House of Representatives' Committee on what can be labeled as "Un-American Activities" during the late 1950's and was convicted in 1956 of contempt of Congress for the refusal of identification of others that were present during the meetings Miller had attended. Miller's drama was then translated into his play through themes of intolerance, hysteria, and reputation.

The first theme that The Crucible describes in the beginning of the play is intolerance. ith the play's setting in a theocratic society, where the church and state serve as one, the government uses…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. Arthur Miller's The Crucible. New York: Bloom's Literary Criticism, 2010. Print.

Miller, Arthur. The Crucible. New York, N.Y.: Penguin Books, 2003. Print.
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The Use of Fear Tactics in Miller Crucible

Words: 1715 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99094203

Arthur Miller penned the play The Crucible in the context of McCarthy-era rhetoric and anti-communist propaganda in the United States. Although it has a literal and direct historical reference and application to the Salem witch trials, the play serves as an overarching metaphor for public persecution and the dangers a police state poses to the general public. Through The Crucible, Miller critiques American society and indirectly accuses patriarchy of dismantling some of the core norms and values upon which the nation was built. Moreover, Miller deftly draws analogies between Salem's persecution of women during the witch-hunts and ashington's persecution of all Americans during the Cold ar. hereas women were the only real targets during the witch trials of the late 17th century, all Americans had fallen under the indiscriminate policies of political discrimination. Miller therefore presents patriarchy within a Marxist as well as a postmodernist framework. As a Marxist, Miller…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adler, Thomas P. "Conscience and Community in An Enemy of the People and The Crucible." In Harold Bloom. Arthur Miller's The Crucible.

Ardolino, Frank. "Babylonian Confusion and Biblical Inversion in Miller's The Crucible." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology

Martin, Robert A. "Arthur Miller's The Crucible: The Background and Sources." Modern Drama, Vol 20, Issue 3, DOI: 10.3138/md.20.3.279

Miller, Arthur. "Why I Wrote The Crucible." The New Yorker. Oct 21, 1996. Retrieved online: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1996/10/21/why-i-wrote-the-crucible
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Death of a Dream Arthur

Words: 1256 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28429052

Throughout the play, Willy longs for the wealth, privilege, and equality the America was alleged to have been built upon until he can no longer deny that the promises of the American dream are just an illusion. While this is without a doubt a scathing critique of capitalism, at the same time, the play seems to be trying to show that nothing is truly real and once you remove all of the 'bells and whistles.' In other words, 'real' people, just like the American dream, are a myth. No one is immune to putting on a 'front' for other people, but when the opinions of others dictate your life and your decisions, this is when the human soul begins to deteriorate. Willy Loman is the characterization of this corrosion.

The death of the American Dream portrayed in the play, as well as the constant comparisons between the rich and the…… [Read More]

References

Bloom, H. (1991) Willy Loman. New York: Chelsea House

Miller, a. (1998), Death of a salesman, New York: Penguin Books

Novick, J. (2003) Death of a salesman: Deracination and its discontents. American Jewish History 91(1), 97-107
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Three Essays Critiquing Miller S Crucible

Words: 2895 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87738223

Crucible and hat I Have Learned

Arthur Miller's The Crucible is a dramatic, engaging work that challenges the reader/viewer to see beneath the "black and white" dichotomy by which the world is simplistically characterized via such "venerable" institutions in America as the "right" and the "left," the "conservative" and the "liberal" establishment, and the "patriot" and the "traitor" conception. In this play, Miller brings to the fore the fact that there can be and often are conflicting motives within every single human heart, a phenomenon that colors the way people act, interact, think, speak, and -- yes -- betray. At the heart of The Crucible is a drama of sexual tension and spite -- a girlish revenge twisted into something much more heinous by the cruel paroxysms of a community going mad with suspicion, condemnation, and holier-than-thou syndrome. It is a play that reflects one of the sinister secrets of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Murray, Edward. "The Crucible." In, Arthur Miller's The Crucible. Ed. by Harold

Bloom. NY: Bloom's Literary Criticism.

Popkin, Henry. "Arthur Miller's The Crucible." College English vol. 26, no. 2 (Nov.

1964): 139-46.
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Tituba Comparing and Contrasting Arthur

Words: 1642 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27280834

Miller focuses a created, heterosexual alliance in his fictional retelling, but I, Tituba concentrates on the outcasts, which formed the actual, majority of the accused.

This alliance between marginal categories of persons is humorously underlined with Tituba meets a famous fictional outcast from Puritan society, Hester Prynne, while in jail. Conde creates a jailhouse meeting between the two women, since who knows what transpired while Tituba awaited her fate? Marginal women do not abandon Tituba, even though her Christian owner, the girls she helped, and her beloved John Indian abandon her to her execution. Hester Prynne helps Tituba say the right things to be released. Confession in Miller is shown as weakness and capitulation to the mad witch hunters, but Conde sees this as careful and clever planning, a just action because of the injustice of Tituba's captors. Finally, the alliance of 'others' is shown when Tituba, is freed from…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Conde, Maryse. I, Tituba. New York: Ballantine Books, 1994.

Ebert, Roger. "The Crucible." 1996. Film Review. Chicago Sun Times. 7 Jul 2007. http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19961220/REVIEWS/612200302/1023

Linder, Douglas. "The Crucible by Arthur Miller (1952)." Salem Homepage. Famous American Trials. Last Update 2007. http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/salem/SAL_CRU.htm

Miller, Arthur. "The Crucible." 1996. Starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Wynona Ryder.
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Life Truth or Power Arthur

Words: 1079 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96549216

Whether this actually takes place is not the topic of this discussion, however. It is only important here in the sense that if it is taking place, it would fall into the discussion of whether it is right to use the power that these individuals have and keep that power instead of telling the truth, even if the truth may diminish the power that they previously enjoyed.

The most important Arthur Miller quote for this discussion, however, would be "...the strongest man in the world is the man who stands most alone." This quote is very important when looking at whether truth or power is more important, because it indicates that the man who tells the truth is the one that is often shunned and ignored, while the powerful people continue to use (and abuse) that power in order to stay ahead of others. It is unfortunate that individuals feel…… [Read More]

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Real Tragedy of Miller's Death

Words: 1542 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50060320

He continued to repeat the same behavior without at least trying to do something different. His dream probably kept him alive a little longer than he might have lived otherwise. As pathetic as his dream was, he owned it and believed he could reach it on some level. illy's tragic flaw begins with a delusion. He chooses to foster that delusion instead of moving in another direction. He takes the lazy way out of the situation because anything else would take him out of his comfort zone and he might actually develop into something successful. illy lies to himself and to those around him because that is easy as well. illy is a fictional character but he is far more real than many would like to admit. His humanity makes him worth studying because many people live in this kind of complacent, unfulfilled state. illy is his own obstacle and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ardolino, Frank. "I'm not a dime a dozen! I am Willy Loman!': The Significance of Names and Numbers in Death of a Salesman." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology. (2002) 174.11.

Phelps, H.C. "Miller's Death of a Salesman." Explicator. 53.4. (1995) p239-41.

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. An Introduction to Literature. Sylvan Barnet, ed. Boston:

Little, Brown and Company. 1985. 1030-1114.
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Death of a Sales Man

Words: 1695 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8221680

Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman" and the death of the American Dream:

The play "Death of a Salesman" by Arthur Miller shows the falseness of the American dream, namely that by obtaining material security for one's self and one's family, one finds true happiness. illy, even during his lifetime expresses dismay he has worked a lifetime to pay for his house, only to not have his favored elder son live in it. He takes his life, feeling that he is better off dead, rather than living and working on commission, and his wife's final outcry at his grave that the family now owns the home and is free and clear seems hollow -- clearly she would rather have a living husband and debt, than a dead husband, an empty life, and a full bank account. Happy states to Linda, "he had no right to do that. There was no…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abrams, Nathan. "Arthur Miller." St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. Last Updated January, 29, 2002. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_g1epc/is_bio/ai_2419200838. November 26, 2004.

Ardolino, Frank. "Like Father Like Sons." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology. Vol. 25,. 2004.

Bentley, Eric. Modern Drama. Prentice Hall. New York. 1951.

Bloom, Harold. Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman. New York: Chelsea House, 1988.
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Death of a Salesman

Words: 1642 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74266638

Arthur Miller's Play Death Of A Salesman (1949)

Thematic Analysis

One of the central themes in the Author Miller's play, Death of a Salesman, is the concept of the American Dream. The concept of the American Dream has been one of the fundamental beliefs of the American community since the country's inception. The basic concept is fairly egalitarian in nature and states something to the effect that if an individual truly devotes themselves to improving themselves and their situation, then they will ultimately find prosperity through their hard work. This prosperity is possible because there are few truly limiting factors that can prevent someone from reaching their goals in the U.S. of lore and whatever obstacles that are present can be overcome through dedication and resourcefulness.

James Truslow Adams was among the first to explicitly refer to the American Dream in his book The Epic of America, which was written…… [Read More]

References

Adams, J. The Epic of America. Simon Publications, 1933. EBook.

Fitzgerald, F. The Great Gatsby. E-artnow, 2015. Complete Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Miller, A. Death of a Salesman. Persons Education, 2007.
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Death of a Salesman

Words: 675 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84384276

Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman"

Perhaps no other play in American history has captured the essence of the nation's collective consciousness during a particular era than Arthur Miller's 1949 drama Death of a Salesman. Presented predominately from the perspective of aging salesman illy Loman, this contribution to dramatic literature is at once absurd and tragic, with Miller employing several distinct authorial styles to tell the story of an increasingly senile Loman, who wavers between states of lucidity and fantasy throughout the narrative. Several members of Loman's family play central roles in Death of a Salesman, including illy's loyal wife Linda, his failed sons Biff and Happy, and each character is an extension of the protagonist himself, representing the overall ordinary nature of his life despite delusions to the contrary (Koon 31). The reason that this play has come to encapsulate the prevailing American identity during the era in which…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Goodman, Walter. "Death of a Salesman: Review." New York Times 28 Apr 1999, E1. Print.

Koon, Helene, ed. Twentieth century interpretations of Death of a salesman: a collection of critical essays. Simon & Schuster, 1983.

Miller, Arthur. "Death of a Salesman. 1949." The Portable Arthur Miller (1976): 3-133.
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Death of a Salesman by

Words: 1681 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35817863



Biff, by no means, was him a lazy bum, he had many different jobs before, but did not stay long at any of them, so he was not a dependent user who would wait for others to provide for him, he actually worked. The perception of Willy on Beff's job is evident when he speaks about Biff's recent job as a farm hand with disdain. He demeans the job without caring that it was a means where he would make an honest living. It indicates that no matter the job he would have picked for himself, Willy would not have supported him unless it was the one that brought the glory and reverence to the Lamon family name (Magil 1365-1368).

Thematic issues like father-son relationships that the author pursues in his writing: Biff and Will's relationship is not only representative of how fathers plan and map out their child's life,…… [Read More]

References

Bender, David, "Arthur Miller," San Diego CA: Greenhaven Press 1997, 5-6

Corrigan, Robert, "A Collection of Critical Esays" Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice hall, 1969 98-107

Miller, Arthur "Death of a salesman" New York, Penguins 1949, 10-13

Magil, Frank "Death of a Salesman: Master plots" Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Salem, 1976. 1365-1368
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Zeroing in on Seven Iconic Plays

Words: 3745 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95015358

Pygmalion -- George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw -- one of the most well regarded playwrights -- wrote this comedy and first presented it to the public in 1912. He took some of the substance of the original Greek myth of Pygmalion and turned it into a popular play. In Greek mythology Pygmalion actually came to fall in love with one of his sculptures, and the sculpture suddenly became a living human. But in this play two older gentlemen, Professor Higgins (who is a scientist studying the art of phonetics) and Colonel Pickering (a linguist who specializes in Indian dialects) meet in the rain at the start of this play.

Higgins makes a bet with Pickering that because of his great understanding of phonetics, he will be able to take the Covent Garden flower girl -- who speaks "cockney" which is not considered very high brow in England -- and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bennett, A. (2008). The History Boys. London, UK: Farber & Farber.

Glaspell, S. (1921). Inheritors: A Play in Three Acts. Berkeley, CA: University of California.

Glaspell, S. (2008). Trifles. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan

Hellman, L. (2013). The Children's Hour. Whitefish, MT: Literary Licensing, LLC.
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Play Death of a Salesman

Words: 1339 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61527706

Willy knew if he accepts his wife support, he would have to move on and change for the better, which did not fit his idea of being happy because he could not live in the past.

From a counselor point-of-view, it seems that Willy's emotions affected his rational decisions because he did not want ton accept the changes that were occurring in his life. The chances that emotionality would affect rational decision-making are very high since people who blame others for their problems usually live by their emotions, which does not include rational thinking. Furthermore, at times like these, it would not hurt for the counselor to interject their values in the session so that rational decision-making can have a chance to calm the client. This is true even though there are times where the counselor should not share their values with the client especially when he or she is…… [Read More]

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American Explored Depicted in Death

Words: 885 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9525131

To make matters worse, he never even considers that he might not be as good as he thinks so he never seriously considers doing anything else. illy does not know when to cut his losses and let go. Charley gives us an accurate description of illy when he says, "For a salesman, there's no rock bottom to the life. He don't put a bolt to a nut, he don't tell you the law or give you medicine. He's a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back -- that's an earthquake" (1113). Charley's words capture the dreamy illy. He understood illy's blind nature and though he tried to help him, he knew it was worthless.

illy is also an example of what not to do when pursuing the American Dream because he cannot accept responsibility for his life…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. An Introduction to Literature. Sylvan Barnet, ed. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. 1985. pp. 1030-1114.
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Death of a Salesman by

Words: 1938 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26588042

Critic Heyen says, "There is no question but that the play is elusive. As Miller himself has said, 'Death of a Salesman is a slippery play to categorize because nobody in it stops to make a speech objectively stating the great issues which I believe it embodies'" (Heyen 47). Therefore, many critics look at the play in different ways, attempting to categorize it and reference it according to their literary and dramatic experience. Heyen, on the other hand, tries to give his own personal reaction to the play, which is that Willy dies happy because he thinks what he is doing is right. He says, "Willy Loman, and this is his new and peculiar dimension, ends up dying happily, ecstatically, because he holds to the dream of meaning, holds to his sort of spiritual Franklinism" (Heyen 56). Willy dies happy, believing he is doing the right thing, and in the…… [Read More]

References

Clurman, Harold. "Willy Loman and the American Dream." Readings on Arthur Miller. Ed. Tomas Siebold. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 1997. 132-136.

Heyen, William. "Authur Miller's Death of a Salesman and the American Dream." Arthur Miller Death of a Salesman. Ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House,1988. 47-57.

Jacobson, Irving. "Family Dreams in Death of a Salesman." Critical Essays on Arthur Miller. Ed. James J. Martine. Boston G.K. Hall & Co., 1979. 44-52

Miller, Arthur. "Death of a Salesman." Masters of Modern Drama. Ed. Haskell M. Block and Robert G. Shedd. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1962. 1020-1054.
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Oedipus the King by and

Words: 1446 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96090190

Sophocles writes, "Tiresias: That's your truth? Now hear mine: honor the curse your own mouth spoke. From this day on, don't speak to me or to your people here. You are the plague. You poison your own land" (Sophocles, 2004, p. 47). Each of these men has positive qualities, but their tragic flaw outweighs these qualities, and leads to pity and their downfall in the end. In addition, their tragic ends have tragic consequences on those around them, which is another element these two works have in common.

It is interesting to see the similarities in the plotting of these dramas as well. Essentially, they follow the tragic character from a turning point in their lives to the culmination of their problems and how they choose to face them. Their families and loved ones are left behind to sort out their lives without them, while they take the "easy" way…… [Read More]

References

Miller, Arthur. (1962). Death of a salesman. Masters of Modern Drama. Haskell M. Block and Robert G. Shedd, ed. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Miller, Arthur. (2005). Tragedy and the common man. Retrieved from the Virginia Community College System Web site: http://vccslitonline.cc.va.us/tragedy/milleressay.htm24 Feb. 2007.

Palmer, R.H. (1992). Tragedy and tragic theory: An analytical guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Sophocles. (2004). The Oedipus plays of Sophocles: Oedipus the king, Oedipus at Kolonos, and Antigone (Bagg, R., Trans.). Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press.
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Father and Son Relationships

Words: 1585 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78698786

Father and Son Relationships

Though written from very different perspectives, "Death of a Salesman" and the Namesake share a number of important similarities, particularly with regard to similar messages about fathers and sons. The conflicts and complexities of father/son relationships are explored by both Arthur Miller and Jhumpa Lahiri in their characters Willy, iff, and Happy Loman in "Death of a Salesman" and Ashoke and Gogol Ganguli in the Namesake. Yet, it is important to recognize that, while both iff and Gogol travel similar paths, and for similar reasons, their journeys take them down wildly divergent paths.

Unlike the characters in "Death of a Salesman," the characters in the Namesake must deal with issues of conflicting national and cultural identities. The clash of cultures is a recurrent theme throughout the Namesake, and drives much of the plot. For instance, while giving birth, Ashima reflects on the differences between engali and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barringer, Fitz E. "Book Review: Jhumpa Lahiri's "The Namesake" Carolina Review.

University of North Carolina, 20 May 2006. Web. 01 Dec. 2010. .

Lahiri, Jumpa. The Namesake. New York: Marine, 2003. Print.

Lawrence, Stephen a. "The Right Dream in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman." College
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Girls in Bikinis From A& p

Words: 1911 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31770274

This skilled use of ironic prose is also observable in "A Jury of her Peers" by Susan Glaspell, as when the woman who has just committed murder tells the investigators: "after a minute...'I sleep sound.'" the tale depicts how a group of women gradually deduce, through small and simple clues, how Mrs. right killed her husband, and why. The women's observations are more astute than the male investigator's analysis, according to police protocols. The point of the story is not murder, but the fact that the murder's quiet wifely desperation has gone ignored for so long, and that only fellow female sufferers can see this sorrow after the fact. Likewise, the point of O'Connor's story, more than the lurid aspects, are the ways that families and human beings fail to connect and communicate with one another, before it is too late.

A naysayer might sniff and ask why use murder…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Glaspell, Susan. "A Jury of her Peers." 6 May 2007. http://www.learner.org/exhibits/literature/story/fulltext.html

Faulkner, William. "A Rose for Emily." 6 May 2007.  http://www.ariyam.com/docs/lit/wf_rose.html 

O'Connor, Flannery. "A Good Man is Hard to Find." 6 May 2007. http://pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~surette/goodman.html
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Truth Behind the American Dream

Words: 1286 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36560027

He blames his father his personal failure because he, "blew me so full of hot air I could never stand taking orders from anybody! That's whose fault it is!" (1108). illy's failure extends beyond the workplace and spills over into his family life. This should come as no surprise since the two are closely connected when we think of the American Dream.

illy does not want to change and this proves to be detrimental to his job, his life, and his family. At the age of 63, illy decides not to think about change or failure. It is easier to find excuses. For example, he tells Linda, "The trouble was that three of the stores were half-closed for inventory in Boston. Otherwise, I woulda broke records" (Miller 1046). He admits "people don't seem to take to me" (1047) and he is often overlooked and "not noticed" (1047) at work. He…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beatty, Mary Lou. "Arthur Miller." Humanities. (22)2. (2001) 2. Site Accessed April 13, 2010.

Web.

Gassner, John. Modern American Literature. New York: Frederick Ungar Publishing. 1969.

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. An Introduction to Literature. Sylvan Barnet, ed. Boston:
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Self-criticism I Once Heard Cornel

Words: 1398 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31791053

hat you do in life, good, bad, otherwise, comes back to haunt you. And the suicide of Robert X is an embodiment of that lesson.

In reading about this book, in preparation for this essay, I came across a conversation the author had with John Lowe concerning the tight narrative quality of the book, and I think in commenting about it, Gaines underscores one of the book's major themes:

P: There's nothing wasted in that book. It's totally honest and almost foreordained from the beginning, from the first page.

Gaines: A great man falls, and what he's going to do when he gets up. He feels that even God had failed him. He could not even please God any more (Lowe 184).

This theme, or question rather, of how does one deal with failure is an important one, on the individual level as well as on the group level. How…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gaines, Earnest J. In My Father's House. New York: Vintage, 1992. Print.

Lowe, John. Conversations With Earnest Gaines. Mississippi: University Press, 2008.

Print.

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. New York: Penguin, 1996. Print.
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Making the Familiar Unfamiliar

Words: 2199 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73046565

Familiar-Unfamiliar

Part of the process of staging a play is to make the familiar unfamiliar, to isolate elements so as to suggest reality, the familiar, in an unfamiliar way. Plays do not take place in the real world but in a created world, a world set in one isolated spot (the stage) with several specific individuals isolated from real life (characters) interacting in a manner that conveys thematic issues and concerns to the audience. Such communication is controlled in a way that real life is not. Issues are isolated from the extraneous and conveyed in a way that has been shaped by the playwright for maximum impact. In the play Conduct of Life by Maria Irene Fornes, the familiar is made unfamiliar first in the setting, which is suggested as a set of four horizontal planes selectively illuminated and selectively populated as characters move from one area to another, evoking…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Drukman, Steven. "Notes on Fornes (with apologies to Susan Sontag)." American Theatre 17(7)(September 2000), 36.

Fornes, Maria Irene. "The Conduct of Life." In Plays, Fornes, 65-88. New York: PAJ Publications, 1986.

Griffiths, Trevor R. And Carole Woddis. The Backstage Theater Guide. New York: Back Stage Books, 1991.

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. In 50 Best Plays of the American Theatre, Clive Barnes (ed.), 425-472. New York: Crown, 1969.
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Resisted Embraced How Explored Prescribed Text The

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80759890

Resisted Embraced

How explored prescribed text "The Crucible" Arthur Miller related text "oolvs in the Sitee" Anne Spudvilas?

Societal insiders and outsiders in Arthur Miller's The Crucible

In Arthur Miller's The Crucible, the existence of outsiders in the tight-knit, homogeneous society of Salem, Massachusetts gives rise to a witch hunt that eventually results in the death of the protagonist John Proctor. Proctor is a plainspoken, honest farmer who refuses to condone the hysteria of the town, which he knows is at least partially stirred up by his former lover Abigail to enhance her social status and to separate him from his wife. Proctor also does not go to church on Sundays, out of guilt for his sin against Abigail. This makes him a pariah in a society where open professions of religion are required to be deemed 'normal.'

hile Proctor, a respected farmer, holds himself back from Salem society, Abigail…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Miller, Arthur. The Crucible. New York: Penguin Classics, 2003.

Wild, Margaret. Woolvs in the Sitee. Boyds Mills Press, 1997.
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Carl Sandburg Ambrose Bierce Stephen

Words: 2254 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87953629

In a fighting scene, we see how he is filled with an "intense hate" (111) and when he "was firing, when all those near him had ceased. He was so engrossed in his occupation that he was not aware of a lull" (111). After this incident, Henry throws himself down "like a man who had been thrashed" (111). Those around him saw him as "a war devil" (112).

Here we see how Henry has an animal instinct to fighting and it makes him look like a madman. Here we get an example of how we are aware of Henry's thoughts and feelings as well as what is going on around him. Crane also allows us to see the reactions of those around him to emphasize what it is that Henry is experiencing. By leaving the narrative to Henry's experiences alone, we are more apt to believe that it really happened…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bierce, Ambrose. "An Occurrence at Owl Creek." The Norton Introduction to Literature. Bain, Carl, ed. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1991.

Crane, Stephen. The Red Badge of Courage. New York: Aerie Books Ltd. 1986.

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. An Introduction to Literature. Sylvan Barnet, ed. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. 1985. 1030-1114.

Sandburg, Carl. "Prairie Waters by Night." Bartleby Online. Site Accessed November 5, 2004.  http://www.bartleby.com/134/3.html
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Death of a Salesman by

Words: 1128 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51558379



Finally, there is a sense of release or uplifting at the end of the play. Linda's comment, "We're free" (Miller 1054) seems to encapsulate the family's struggles and inner turmoil. Willy has died in a blaze of glory, utterly convinced he is doing the right thing, and perhaps that has made his last moments happier than they have been in years. He will never know he failed again, and failed his family in the most permanent way. However, there was so much argument, turmoil, and strife in the family, perhaps removing himself was really the thing the family needed. There is a feeling, even though it may be implied, that the family will come together as a result of Willy's death, and that they will survive. There is also a feeling that the two sons will have some impetus to make something of themselves, even if it is because they…… [Read More]

References

Miller, Arthur. "Death of a Salesman." Masters of Modern Drama. Haskell M. Block and Robert G. Shedd, ed. New York: McGraw-Hill. 1962. 1020-1054.
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Decent Man in Death of

Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30746211

The writer's intention was most probably to emphasize how certain behavior can lead to a terrible outcome. This is obvious through harley, considering that he too is a business man, but that his self-control assistes him in understanding the difference between right or wrong. Surely, it would be absurd to claim that harley is not interested in becoming more successful than he is. However, this does not mean that he is willing to risk everything he has in order to have that happen. The fact that harley was satisfied with his position whereas Willy considered his best friend's success to be nothing in comparison to Dave Singleman's illustrates what each of the characters wanted from life. Through giving J.P. Morgan as an example, harley actually demonstrates that one does not necessary has to be well-liked in order for the whole world to appreciate him.

harley is decent enough to let…… [Read More]

Charley is decent enough to let those around him do as they please, considering his behavior toward his wife and his son. In contrast, Willy insists that his sons do as he wants them to, as he believes that this is the only chance for them to achieve something. Willy does not understand Charley's role in his life until his last moments, when he takes time to think about everyone he knows, only then recognizing who his best friend was. Charley's support comes even though he knows Willy does not actually care about him, given that he sees the best of Willy and does not pause from doing everything in his power to help his friend. He does this in spite of the fact that he is aware that it is very likely for Wiley not to return his benevolent acts.

Brandt, George W. (1998). "Modern theories of drama: a selection of writings on drama and theatre 1850-1990." Oxford University Press.

Miller, Arthur. (1952). "Death of a salesman: play in two acts." Dramatists Play Service.
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Role Playing vs Reality in

Words: 1074 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45248496

All along, Miller's salesman was creating a tableau vivant, in his work and in his family. If you put the right characters on stage, you create the right image.

In illy Loman's mind, Dave Singleman, that "single" salesman, no doubt created the proper image. Even Singleman's death was that of a salesman, "hen he died -- and by the way he died the death of a salesman, in his green velvet slippers in the smoker of the New York, New Haven and Hartford, going into Boston -- when he died, hundreds of salesmen and buyers were at his funeral." A traveling salesman should die on the road, as Dave Singleman obviously did. hat greater tribute to a way of life than to die in the course of one's duty? Appropriately, as well, Loman's hero received the adulation of his peers - the ultimate complement in the eyes of a man…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=28520584

Boehm, Christopher. Hierarchy in the Forest: The Evolution of Egalitarian Behavior. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1999.

From the Tour: Titian and the Late Renaissance in Venice." The Collection, National Gallery of Art. Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art, 2006. URL:  http://www.nga.gov/collection/gallery/gg23/gg23-1226.0.html .
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Death of a Salesman the

Words: 998 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76243596



And this is perhaps the most important underlying notion of Miller's play. The American Dream, which can perhaps be seen as the principle at the heart of the work, is also the ambition which pushes Loman through his life of artifice and vain pursuit. In a flashback, illy is shown to be a man of aspiration, who wishes to transform his diligence and respect for authorities into a life of comfort and reputation. Even wishing eventually to start his own business, illy Loman is a startling figure insofar as his decline does not occur without a background of optimism and forward momentum. This is the crux of Miller's point though, that there is an illusory nature to the expectations of the American Dream. orking for somebody else's ideals and to line some other rich man's pockets his whole life, we find that illy has been exploited by the false promises…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Miller, a. (1949). Death of a Salesman.
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Tragedy and the Common Man He Contemplates

Words: 459 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6014917

Tragedy and the Common Man," he contemplates the idea that only the wealthy, noble characters can fully understand tragedy, and therefore appreciate it. That thought is not a reflection of his own opinion, as Miller argues the case of tragedy and the common, working class man - for tragedy knows no income boundaries, but rather that this person would "lay down his life...to secure one thing - his sense of personal dignity." To that end, Willy Loman epitomizes what Miller is speaking about.

Willy Loman is most certainly a tragic hero, according to the modern-day, Arthur Miller type definitions. Loman is hardworking and relentless in his pursuit of his American dream. His tragic flaw is that he cannot recognize how desperately his family wants to love him, yet Willy loves his family deeply enough to sacrifice self in order to give Biff the American dream that he could not obtain…… [Read More]

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Generation Conflict and the American Dream

Words: 777 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49855165

Death of a Salesman" by Arthur Miller, and "The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts" by Maxine Hong Kingston. Specifically, it will discuss conflict between generations and the "American Dream" in the two works. Both of these works clearly show the conflict between generations that often results from differing views of the "American Dream," the dream that is so elusive to so many of us.

Author Kingston's story is fact, rather than fiction, but the generational differences between her and her mother are still apparent. She remembers, "We'd have to face four- and five-day-old leftovers until we ate it all. The squid eye would keep appearing at breakfast and dinner until eaten. Sometimes brown masses sat on every dish. I have seen revulsion on the faces of visitors who've caught us at meals" Kingston 108). Her life is far different from her mother's, and she is firmly entrenched…… [Read More]

References

Kingston, Maxine Hong. The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts. New York: Vintage International, 1976.

Miller, Arthur. "Death of a Salesman." Masters of Modern Drama. Haskell M. Block and Robert G. Shedd, ed. New York: McGraw-Hill. 1962.
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Flight to Canada Death of a Salesman Flight

Words: 747 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43572705

Flight to Canada/Death of a Salesman

Flight to Canada, written in 1976 by Ishmael Reed, is sort of an atypical slave narrative taking place in the antebellum south (however, this is an antebellum south where airplanes already exists and Lincoln's assassination is seen on television) and depicting Raven Quickskill's and his fellow fugitive's escape from their master Arthur Swille. The entire plot revolves around the relentless search for Raven who is on his way to "Camelot" (i.e, Canada) while his fellow fugitives, Stray Leechfield and 40's go to whatever lengths possible in order to find their own freedom. However, what Reed illustrates in the story is that one cannot so easily escape slavery because slavery exists everywhere and some forms are harder to escape than others, but some bring on slavery themselves. In Arthur Miller's play, Death of a Salesman, Willie Loman also believes in a sort of Camelot --…… [Read More]

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Elia Kazan Compliance vs Defiance

Words: 668 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99048015

Since the 30s people have been politically inclined towards left in Hollywood. Kazan was also known for his left-wing views that eventually led him to the appearance before HUAC. However, with the inquiries of the House Un-American Affairs Committee problems for the supporters of left came up. Demand for anticommunist films required more writers with right-wing inclinations. The demand for anti-fascist films in late 30s through mid-40s could not match the demand for anticommunist films. Even though many blacklisted liberals fled to other countries to support their careers. Many people expressed different views regarding people who supported HUAC. For example Lillian Hellman's view of Elia Kazan's friendly testimony is that he simply couldn't do otherwise because he valued his own

American success story too much. Arthur Miller also mentioned in his autobiography that if he did not come out clean he would not be able to make another movie in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Mccain, R. (1999). New Book Defends Kazan in Saga of 'Hollywood 10'. The Washington Times. Publication Date: March 17.
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Death of a Salesman as a Tragedy as Defined by Aristotle

Words: 2818 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76605001

drama is tragic not only because of Willy Loman's suicide, but because he has left his family with nothing, and his sons with no hopes and abilities of their own.

Brief overview of the play

Miller's work

Story

Characters

Obstacles

Argument for tragedy

Aristotle's definition

Pro argument for tragedy

Con argument against tragedy

Own conclusions

What the critics say

Death of a Salesman as Tragedy

This paper analyzes the play Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller. Specifically, it discusses the definition of tragedy by Aristotle, and research if it is correct to label the play as a tragedy.

Death of a Salesman is indeed a tragedy of epic proportions. The drama is tragic not only because of Willy Loman's suicide, but because he has left his family with nothing, and his sons with no hopes and abilities of their own.

Arthur Miller wrote Death of a Salesman in 1948,…… [Read More]

References

Adamczewski, Zygmunt. The Tragic Protest. The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1963.

Amsden, Robert. "Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy." Ripon College. 2002. 29 Aug. 2005.

< http://www.ripon.edu/Faculty/Amsdenr/THE231/GreekTheatreFolder/AristotlePage.html#3

Bloom, Harold. Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman. Ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House, 1988.
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Death of a Salesman by

Words: 2390 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82653537

Though he hated his father's beliefs and principles, iff inevitable became the victim of these misguided ideals, and like Willy, eventually became a failure.

iff was not able to achieve his desire to satisfy his father's expectations about him to be economically successful -- that is, to subsist also to his father's 'American dream' kind of life. iff's resentment to his father resulted to his current state of poverty, with no permanent job to provide him with financial support and immaturity in dealing with his problems in life. He also lacks self-confidence because of his father's constant criticisms about his life and lack of ambition, which made him indecisive and resigned in the kind of life that he leads: " ... I realized something about myself and I tried to explain it to you ... I think I'm just not smart enough to make sense out of it for you"…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Miller, A. (1976). Death of a Salesman. NY: Penguin Books.

Otten, T. (2002). The Temptation of Innocence in the Dramas of Arthur Miller. Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

Shamir, M. (2002). Boys don't cry? Rethinking the narratives of masculinity and emotion in the U.S. NY: Columbia UP.

Thompson, T. (2002). "Miller's Death of a Salesman." Explicator, Vol. 60, Issue 3.
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Structure of Ancient and Modern Dramas to

Words: 816 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36161336

structure of ancient and modern dramas to highlight their differences and similarities. The paper also shows how drama evolved over the centuries with references to Greek, Elizabethan and Modern plays.

MODEN AND ANCIENT DAMA: A COMPAISON

Drama has an inherent ability to adapt itself to the thinking and wishes of the society in which it takes birth. Therefore modern drama with all its intensity, relevance and eloquence is certainly more popular among modern audiences than its ancient counterpart. Still we cannot deny the importance of ancient dramatic concepts, models and devices in the development and evolution of modern drama. While ancient plays are mostly remembered for their grandeur and myths, close analysis reveals that there is more to them than meets the eye. All ancient Greek tragedies contain some similar elements, which set them apart from tragedies of later eras. While they basically concentrated on highlighting the significance of myths,…… [Read More]

References

Aristotle The POETICS Book XIII: 350 BCE Translated by S.H. Butcher Online version:

            http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/poetics.html            

Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman, 1949 Penguin USA, 1 edition, October 6, 1998

Arthur Miller, "Tragedy and the Common Man," from The Theater Essays of Arthur Miller (Viking Press, 1978)
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Failed American Life Depicted in

Words: 1177 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8997107

Even when has the opportunity to make things better, he does not act. He refuses Charley's job offer because it seems easier to ask for money than it is to do something other than sell. He would rather see the family suffer than try to work at something else for a little while. After he is gone, she tells the kids, "First time in thirty-five years we were just about free and clear" (Requiem 1112). This statement illustrates just how disconnected to two were. She knew enough to know that they were almost at a place where they could stop and breathe but illy does not see things that way. He does not look at retirement as a way of beginning something refreshing with Linda. He fails her because he is not the strong, dependable man she deserves.

illy also fails his children. hile he does not beat his children…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. An Introduction to Literature. Sylvan Barnet, ed. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. 1985. 1030-1114.
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Learn How the Law Works by Memorizing

Words: 2253 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43280079

learn how the law works by memorizing a set of rules or theorems. A misconception lies in the commonly asked question, "What is the law?" -- since it presupposes that it's all laid out somewhere on great stone tablets. The truth is that the answer often is, "It depends." As you'll soon discover the legal system basically is a method of applying abstract rules or social policy to concrete situations. To comprehend its workings, you have to get involved in the process -- it's a little like learning to swim in that you've got to jump in and splash around a bit. It's not an unpleasant sensation, but it may seem little strange until you get used to it and learn to keep your head above water. You'll discover it's a bit like peeling an onion in that as you strip away one layer of complexity you find another one…… [Read More]

References

Carter, L.H. (1979) Reason in Law.

New York: Little Brown & Co.

Dershowitz, A.M. (2002) Shouting Fire: Civil Liberties in a Turbulent Age.

New York: Little Brown & Co.
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Father Doesn't Know Best A

Words: 565 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33262269

He realizes that he has no direction and instead of facing it and doing something about it, he lashes out at his father. Fred Ribkoff asserts that Biff inherited a "sense of inadequacy and inferiority" (Ribkoff" and a "sense of shame" (Ribkoff) from his father. Domina suggests that Biff is the "clearest failure" (Domina) of the Loman clan, "unable as an adult to succeed or even persevere at any professional challenge" (Domina). Because illy never took the tie to prepare Biff for the real world, Biff emerged from high school unprepared and ill-equipped.

Biff Loman becomes what every parent should avoid creating in a child. illy enables Biff to be so many things but none of these things actually builds his character and causes him to be a productive member of society. Instead, he is a fledgling with no hope of ever achieving anything. This is not to say that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

L.M. Domina, "An Overview of Death of a Salesman for Drama for Students." 1997. GALE

Resource Database. Site Accessed April 22, 2009.

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. An Introduction to Literature. Sylvan Barnet, ed. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. 1985. 1030-1114.

Ribkoff, Fred. "Shame, Guilt, Empathy, and the Search for Identity in Arthur Miller's Death of A
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Kidnapped Wife and the Dream

Words: 1222 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32405089



Miller's play is very similar with respect to its main theme. Joe Keller also makes an economical decision at one point in his life: being in charge of the military equipment of the Air Force planes during the Second orld ar he provides the army with 121 defective cracked cylinder heads. As a result, twenty one of the planes crash and all the pilots die. Thus, faithful to the American Dream of prosperity and wary of his family's finances, Joe knowingly ignores the possible consequences of his act. Years after this tragedy, Joe is still in denial, refusing to acknowledge any personal responsibility or guilt. Thus, the structure of the play is almost identical with that of the short story previously discussed. Joe refuses to take responsibility in two situations, not just one: first for the pilots, and then for the death of his own son, Larry who commits suicide…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hammond, Susan Hazen. The Kidnapped Wife and the Dream Helper.

Gibson, P.J. Long Time Since Yesterday. New York: Samuel French, 1985.

Miller, Arthur. All My Sons. New York: The Modern Library, 1987.
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Dichotomy and Struggle Between Authority

Words: 585 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2343696

This type of certainty only signifies authority, but it shows Danforth to be truly powerless over his convictions or any sort of lasting truth. Like Proctor, he is also described upon his first appearance, with Miller commenting that he was of "some humor and sophistication that does not, however, interfere with an exact loyalty to his position and his cause" (Miller 73). Though Danforth has authority over life and death in Salem, he has no real power because he has already completely given himself over to his position as a Judge and his cause of seeking out witches. When the truth and all things eternal cease to matter, all power is gone, and though John Proctor and many others meet death essentially at Danforth's hands, they retain power over themselves in their refusal to give in to Danforth's authority.

Nowhere is the difference between power and authority made more clear…… [Read More]

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Tragedy as a Form of

Words: 1047 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56672245

As a king in ancient Greek literature, Oedipus was required to have a dramatically catastrophic fall, while modern literature needs a tragic hero who is an "everyman." But both suffered greatly in their own ways, and in ways that the audience both expected and regarded as essential. But while these two characters were both the central, tragic figure in their respective stories, their differences were a reflection of the role of dramatic tragedy in their societies.

The subject of ancient Greek literature was often the magnificent deeds of the gods and heroes, while everyday life was more often forgotten. As a result, the tragedies presented often had as their main character a great person, sometimes with a major personality flaw, who suffers extreme torments and a mighty plunge from an exalted position. Nothing exemplified this excessive amount of suffering than Oedipus, a man who became a king only to later…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aristotle, S.H. Butcher. "Poetics." The Internet Classic Archive. Web. 8 April 2012.

            http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/poetics.html            

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. London: York, 1998. Print.

Sophocles. "Oedipus the King." The Internet Classic Archive. Web. 9 April 2012.
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Linda in Death of a

Words: 390 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1153392

She says, "It seems to me that you're just on another trip. I keep expecting you. Willy dear, I can't cry" (Miller 1054). She cannot cry because she has cried it all out before, and she has nothing left to cry over. Living with Willy was obviously difficult, and it seems living without him may actually be easier in some ways.

Many people might see Linda as unsympathetic or manipulating because of the way she treats Willy and does not understand him. However, she seems to be uncomplicated and a bit simple, and tries to do the best with the resources she has. She has raised a dysfunctional family with Willy's help (or lack of it), but she has a good heart and she is a decent, caring woman who has had to deal with a lot in her life. That makes her a sympathetic character, as opposed to Willy,…… [Read More]

References

Miller, Arthur. "Death of a Salesman." Masters of Modern Drama. Haskell M. Block and Robert G. Shedd, ed. New York: McGraw-Hill. 1962.
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Alienation in Different Works of Literature Alienation

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58166952

Alienation in Different orks of Literature

Alienation is a common theme in many works of literature -- in many genres, across many periods, and of many different forms. The idea that one individual cannot truly know or understand another, or that the rules of society necessarily force those that question those rules to somehow be outside of that society, has been around since the time of Homer and certain of his characters. It can also be seen in more modern works of poetry, short stories, and dramatic texts, from a variety of authors writing in different times and with very different perspectives.

illiam Blake's poem late eighteenth century poem "The Tyger" does not deal with humanity's alienation from itself, or individuals' alienation from each other, but rather addresses the alienation of humanity from the divine. Describing the tiger as "fearful" and asking what "distant deeps or skies" the tiger's maker…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blake, William. The Tyger. 1794. Accessed 6 May 2012.  http://www.eecs.harvard.edu/~keith/poems/tyger.html 

Chopin, Kate. The Story of an Hour. 1894. Accessed 6 May 2012. http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/webtexts/hour/

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesmen. New York: Penguin, 1976.
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Death of a Salesman Truth and Lies

Words: 1059 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28732326

masterful aspects of Death of a Salesman is the extent to which playwright Arthur Miller leaves it ambiguous regarding Willy Loman's culpability for his own condition. On one hand, he is part of a capitalist system which values people solely upon the extent to which they can demonstrate a profit for their superiors and how well-liked they are by their colleagues. Loman is not well-liked enough, and as soon as his sales figures begin to slip he is ostracized by his business colleagues. According to Willy, he has "gotta be at it ten, twelve hours a day. Other men -- I don't know -- they do it easier. I don't know why -- I can't stop myself -- I talk too much" (Miller 24).

Act I makes it clear that Willy's idealistic version of how to achieve success within capitalism involves get-rich-quick schemes rather than actual effort as well as…… [Read More]

Q3. The only character who gives complete and unwavering support to Willy throughout the play is his wife Linda. When his sons show disrespect to him or Willy doubts his abilities as a provider and a father, Linda always steps in to protect him. Of course, to some extent she unintentionally acts against him because she enables him in his delusional behaviors and even defends him against his sons: "Get out of here, both of you, and don't come back! I don't want you tormenting him anymore. Go on now, get your things together!" (Miller 90-91).

Biff is the most honest character regarding his father but that also causes his father to be enraged at his son, given that Biff often tells his father uncomfortable truths. "I am not a leader of men, Willy, and neither are you. You were never anything but a hard-working drummer who landed in the ash can like all the rest of them! I'm one dollar an hour" (Miller 98). Willy clearly wants his son's love and affection but he cannot accept Biff as he is and constantly tries to impose his dreams of success on Biff even though Biff is clearly unhappy working in an office. Happy, in contrast, never tells the truth to his father and seems to buy into the same lies about easy success with no effort, as represented by the shadowy figure of Ben in the play, whom Willy envisions as fabulously wealthy as a result of his willingness to go boldly into the wilderness. Of all of Willy's friends only Charley combines compassion and truth -- he acknowledges Willy's weaknesses but also states "Nobody dast blame this man. A salesman is got to dream, boy. It comes with the territory" (Miller 2014).

Other significant figures in the play include Bernard, who works hard in school and becomes a famous attorney. This character represents the difficult path to success that Willy shuns. Howard, the man at his company who fires Willy, represents the cruel and unfeeling nature of the capitalist system Willy buys into for most of his life.
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Messages of the Book the

Words: 2748 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97920525



Assessing Temptation #3: Choosing Certainty over Clarity

Choosing certainty can paralyze a company and slow its progress to a grinding halt. The tendency to be very thorough and analytical to alleviate risk can actually backfire and lead to even worse results. The book makes the point through examples of how certainty being pursued never actually leads to closure; there is always the one last element of information to be gained before a decision is made. In the name of certainty a CEO can procrastinate and kill the momentum their company has towards it goals (Clapp-Smith, Vogelgesang, Avey, 2009). Certainty begets analysis paralysis, which can in turn lead to companies having to pass on opportunities that go by them very quickly.

This temptation of certainty over clarity also robs a business of being agile and able to react extremely quickly to market demands. CEOs, fearing that they will be seen as…… [Read More]

References

Bernoff, J., & Li, C.. (2008). Harnessing the Power of the Oh-So-Social Web. MIT Sloan Management Review, 49(3), 36-42.

Shelley Bird. (2005). Communicating through changes in leadership at NCR. Strategic Communication Management, 10(1), 30-33.

Clapp-Smith, R., Vogelgesang, G., & Avey, J. (2009). Authentic Leadership and Positive Psychological Capital: The Mediating Role of Trust at the Group Level of Analysis. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 15(3), 227.

Eisenbeiss, S., & Boerner, S.. (2010). Transformational Leadership and R&D Innovation: Taking a Curvilinear Approach. Creativity and Innovation Management, 19(4), 364-372.
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Willie Lowman and Oedipus as

Words: 1487 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22158794

His failure at both appears to perpetuate each other: his failure as provider translates to his failure as business and family man, and indeed to his failure as American success. In this way, the American Dream is representative of ultimate success. By failing at this, Willy represents the doubts and fears of many Americans; he fails in all the ways feared by society.

Oedipus' failure occurs on a much larger scale. His success relates to his status as the person of highest importance in society. He however reacts differently from Willy, who first lies to himself and then crumbles under the pressure of the increasingly obvious truth. As the truth becomes increasingly obvious for Oedipus, he still refuses to turn away from his search. When all is finally revealed, Oedipus displays his true character by taking responsibility for his actions. Although the king can hardly be blamed for what happened,…… [Read More]

Sources

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman Penguin, 1976

Johnston Ian. Fate, Freedom, and the Tragic Experience: An Introductory Letter on Sophocles's Oedipus the King. 2007. http://www.mala.bc.ca/~johnstoi/introser/oedipus.htm

Sophocles. Oedipus the King.

A classics.mit.edu/Sophocles/oedipus.html
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Significance of Music in the Death of a Salesman

Words: 790 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97172280

Death of a Salesman

The Death of Salesman is about an individual who in pursuit of the great American Dream, miserably fails, as he is addicted to his false illusions, which finally lead him and his family to utter chaos and dispersion. This paper will focus the musical element in the story and briefly the discuss it's significance.

From the first the flute is used to create a mood or an atmosphere. Even though Willy is a heavy-set, aging man, lumbering in with weighty valises, he is also an individual forever pursuing an elusive vision or dream. And the light music of the flute, never pronounced or intrusive, keeps this side of Willy before the audience. The flute is used to smooth over the frequent shifts and to help set successive scenes. [1]

The flute music derived the theme by playing it to creates a mood and soothing effect in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Daniel, Helen. "The Liar's Lump', Or, 'A Salesman's Sense of History': Peter Carey's Illywhacker." Southerly 47 (1986): 157-167.

Arthur Miller on 'The Nature of Tragedy'," New York Herald-Tribune, March 27, 1949.

The Family in Modern Drama," Atlantic Monthly, April 1956.

The Theater Essays of Arthur Miller (New York: Viking, 1978).
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Willy and Linda S Relationship Death of a Salesman

Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13396274

Death of a Salesman: The Relationship Between Linda and Willy

The marriage between Linda and Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman is typical of the early 20th century in many respects. The wife does not work and the husband acts as the provider for the family, despite the fact that the Loman family is struggling. Linda tries to economize by darning her stockings but she is forced to accept Willy as he is, no matter how imperfect. She often makes excuses for him, including when his sons question his authority. Although Linda is a kind woman, she is also very much an emotional enabler of Willy's many faults.

Throughout Willy's life, Linda acted as his cheerleader, no matter how much money he made. She often validated his sense of being persecuted by the world, even when this perspective was suspect: "Few men are idolized by their children…… [Read More]

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Compare and Contrast for the Death of a Salesman

Words: 920 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33790356

Death of a Salesman

The three principle ways that one can experience a drama are through reading it, watching it on stage, and watching film adaptations. All three of these media present a unique experience for the reader or viewer. Reading a play in a book, for instance, offers no visual elements. Watching a play on stage provides a lot of visual elements, while watching a play in a movie provides even more visual elements. Still, it largely appears that there is an inverse relationship between a drama's visual elements and its main focus -- words. In some ways, the plentitude of visuals can detract from the simplicity and power of the words of a drama. In Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, it greatly appears as though the focus of visuals and other elements provided by the film and the onstage version detract from the focus of the very…… [Read More]

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Medicinal Marijuana Argument Natural Herbs

Words: 741 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28651862

Paternalistic legislation, even when warranted, must be logically consistent both in theory and in practical application, in the case of marijuana, prohibitions against its medicinal use, even if still unproven in clinical trials, is logically and ethically inconsistent with the legal status of substances like tobacco which are devoid of any possible beneficial use and which, unlike marijuana, have actually been proven to cause disease and premature death.

Governmental paternalism is appropriate in many instances, including ensuring the safety and efficacy of substances used for medicinal purposes. However, the application of paternalistic legislation must, if nothing else, be logically consistent.

Federal prohibition criminalizing marijuana, even for medicinal purposes, is completely unjustified, particularly in light of the legal status of tobacco, which has absolutely no beneficial medical use and whose recreational use accounts for tremendous human harm.

References

The American Medical Marijuana Association website, (2007)

Retrieved November 21, 2007, at http://americanmarijuana.org/…… [Read More]

Critical literary work on constitutional law, civil rights, and the moral justification for paternalistic legislation authored by attorney and Harvard University law professor, Arthur Miller.

Taylor, R. (1982) Freedom, Anarchy, and the Law: An Introduction to Political Philosphy. Buffalo: Prometheus

Critical literary work on the logical basis for social norms, laws, civil rights, and the morality of ethical principles in human life authored by renowned ethicist, and Cornell philosophy professor Richard Taylor.
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Marilyn Monroe the Life Story

Words: 1770 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18090072

(FAQ: How did Marilyn die?)

Whatever may be reason death occurred at her age of thirty six. Some opined she left a legacy of beauty while to some she left a legacy of sadness. However, even after forty two years of her death she is considered to be the most recognized women in the world. The legend of Marilyn acclaimed several images all of which are divergent and distinguishable. In the words of Andy Warhol, Marilyn was 'star for all ages'. (Marilyn Monroe: The Exhibit)

eferences

Classic Movie Star's Marilyn Monroe Tribute" etrieved at http://www.angelfire.com/ri2/rebeccastjames/Monroe.html. Accessed on 18 February, 2005

FAQ: How did Marilyn die?" etrieved at http://www.marilyncollector.com/legend/faq.html. Accessed on 18 February, 2005

Hollywood's Leading Sex Symbol" Court Tv's Crime Library. etrieved at http://www.crimelibrary.com/notorious_murders/celebrity/marilyn_monroe/4.html?sect=26. Accessed on 18 February, 2005

Marilyn Monroe biography: A short biography of world famous movie star, Marilyn

Monroe" (2002) Page Wise. etrieved at http://mtmt.essortment.com/marilynmonroeb_rrot.htm. Accessed on…… [Read More]

References

Classic Movie Star's Marilyn Monroe Tribute" Retrieved at http://www.angelfire.com/ri2/rebeccastjames/Monroe.html. Accessed on 18 February, 2005

FAQ: How did Marilyn die?" Retrieved at  http://www.marilyncollector.com/legend/faq.html . Accessed on 18 February, 2005

Hollywood's Leading Sex Symbol" Court Tv's Crime Library. Retrieved at http://www.crimelibrary.com/notorious_murders/celebrity/marilyn_monroe/4.html?sect=26. Accessed on 18 February, 2005

Marilyn Monroe biography: A short biography of world famous movie star, Marilyn
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Economic Crash Through the Works of Wessel Lewis and Sorkin

Words: 2728 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61217064



Sorkin's book does a good job of giving the details on what happened among Lehman Brothers, Barclays, JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs, the Fed, and Big Gov following the collapse. Essentially, everyone had egg on his face -- but some of the bigger powers had the muscle to save face -- and sink competitors at the same time: which is exactly what Goldman Sachs did to Lehman. Goldman had been placing its cronies in the hite House for years -- and it would now go through the hite House to see who got bailed out and who did not. AIG got one -- because it owed a large chunk to Goldman (who had figured out the game ahead of time and started betting against itself by buying insurance through AIG). Sorkin's work is a work full of the kind of details that other writer's like Taibbi and Lewis do not take…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lewis, Michael M. The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine. New York, NY: W.

W. Norton & Company, 2010. Print.

Sorkin, Andrew. Too Big to Fail: the inside story of how Wall Street and Washington

fought save the financial system -- and themselves. New York, NY: Penguin, 2010. Print.
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Merchant Parents Child Parent Models in

Words: 1658 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5905049



The parallels between these situations and Frye's basic assessment of the plot of New Comedies are not, perhaps, immediately apparent, but they have the same effect by the end of the play, where "the audience witnesses the birth of a renewed sense of social integration" (Frye 94). The parent/child relationships have been largely done away with in favor of te romantic ties that seem to be favored by the play. It is disingenuous, however, to dismiss the issue of class in this play outright. In many ways, the relationships between the various fathers and their children can be een to be indicative of class lines. Launcelot's position and its possible implications in his treatment of his father have already been discussed, but both his and Jessica's treatment of Shylock still deserved comment. Jessica is somewhat exonerated for her actions towards her father (again, the degree depends on the particular choices…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Frye, Northrop. "The Argument of Comedy." Shakespeare, Russ McDonald, ed. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.

Shakespeare, William. The Merchant of Venice. New York: Folger, 1997.
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Willie the Piano Lesson

Words: 643 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23093217

Death of a Salesman and the Piano Lesson

Comparison and Contrast of Willy Loman and Charley and Boy Willie and Berniece

Some individuals are under the impression that physical appearance and the way that they look are more important than education and the things that they know. In the play Death of a Salesman by Author Miller, the author paints a picture that illustrates why some people may feel this way. For example, Willy rates the value of appearance, of himself and those people in which he knows, much as a quality that is valued in a higher regard than other values and feels personally that the education his family receives is of little value comparatively. However, most individuals would argue that the importance of appearance is not equal to Willy's impression of it. For example, many people feel that education definitely more important, on many different levels, than physical…… [Read More]

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Death of a Salesman Doll's

Words: 1203 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16586974

The reality of this truth is that is Nora does not know herself, her husband cannot possible know who she is. Nora experiences the pain of a blind love that has finally seen the truth. In a moment of enlightenment, she tells her husband, "You don't understand me, and I have never understood you either -- before tonight" (194).

For years, Nora lived safely behind the lie that she called a marriage but after Torvald found out about the loan, the happy marriage was gone and both partners saw the lies of one another. Nora's difficulty with love is different in that she makes a positive discovery in addition to the terrible truth she has learned. In short, not all is in vain. Nora can walk away a more informed, educated, and independent woman as a result of what she went through with Torvald. She can also look forward to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chekhov, Anton. "The Lady with the Pet Dog." The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction R.V. Cassill, ed. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1981.

Ibsen, Henrik. A Doll's House. Three Plays by Ibsen. New York: Dell Publishing Company, Inc. 1963.