Cerebral Palsy Essays (Examples)

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Cerebral Intraventricular Hemorrhage Ivh Can

Words: 718 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83947559

ecause the germinal matrix is so very primitive and thin, there is a much higher chance that it could rupture. How primitive the glial and mesenchymal tissues are have a great deal to do with the extent of the hemorrhage (www.emedicine.com).

Within the United States, the number of babies that have IVH is related to how old they are gestationally when they are born and what type of birthweight they have. Perinatal care and obstetric care have increased greatly in recent years, and more mothers are becoming aware of how important this kind of care is. Due to this, there are more babies that are carried to term, and more premature infants are able to survive the problems that they are often faced with. Since this is the case, the incidence of IVH, which was as high as 50% in 1977, has come down to between 8-56%. Most nurseries have…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Pediatrics.aappublications.org. (1980). Mitchell, W., and O'Tuama, L. Cerebral intraventricular hemorrhages in infants: a widening age spectrum. Pediatrics. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/65/1/35.

A www.emedicine.com.(2004). Leung, A. MD. Germinal Matrix Hemorrhage. Emedicine. http://www.emedicine.com/radio/topic305.htm
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Bell's Palsy Patient Intake Form

Words: 1050 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97683198

Patient Intake ecord

Case eport

Patient's Name: Perez, B

Gender: Female

Date of Birth: 06/XX/1985

Occupation: egistered Nurse

Marital Status: Single

Private

Phone [HIDDEN] Private

Chief Complaint: Bell's palsy

History of Present Illness:

The patient states she first felt numbness on her tongue 10 days ago. When she woke up in the morning and was cleaning her teeth, the water was dripping from her mouth. Her right eye was not able to close completely, and she felt numbness on the right side of her face.

Medical History:

The patient consulted with her doctor who confirmed the diagnosis as Bell's palsy; her doctor prescribed prednisone for 14 days. The patient came to see me on 8/29/2013. The patient states she has pain and numbness on the right side of her face, drooling, loss of the ability to taste, and her right eye cannot fully open or close and has excessive tearing.…… [Read More]

References

[1] Deng, T (1999)."Abdominal pain," in Practical Diagnosis in Traditional Chinese Medicine, K. Ergil, Ed: Churchill Livingstone, London, UK, 1999, pg. 464 -- 472.

[2] Wolfe, H (2003). "Joining Needling for Facial Paralysis." Blue Poppy Press. Accessed 10 June 2005.

[3] Bell's Facial Paralysis, Clinic of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Vol. II (1990), Practical English Chinese Library of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Shanghai College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, pg. 964.

[4] Suk, YM (2008). Understanding the Jin Gui Yao Lue, A Practical Textbook, Peoples' Medical Publishing House, pg. 110.
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Authors Communicate There Are a Number of

Words: 950 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45112597

Authors Communicate

There are a number of points of interest regarding "Massage therapy in post-operative rehabilitation of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy - a pilot study." On the whole this is an extremely well-organized article, which is one of its primary strengths. The different sections and phases of the research are well documented. There are a variety of tables that elucidate several components related to the literature review, the results, and the particulars of the subjects considered in the research. However, there is more than one area of the study in which the researchers could have benefited from the use of more substantial effort and a more thorough methodology, which is certainly reflected in the results and the conclusion.

The central weakness of this study is the fact that all of the results were based on research performed on just six subjects. To the credit of the researchers they…… [Read More]

References

O'Conner, P. (2003). Woe is I: The grammarphobe's guide to better English in plain English. New York: Riverhead Books
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Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Developmental Delays

Words: 4060 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97756280



Other Medical Issues

While neurological issues delays are primarily responsible for the functional developmental delays in children other complications can also affect the development of a preterm child. These problems include: cardiovascular complications; respiratory problems such as respiratory distress syndrome or chronic lung disease; a number of severe metabolic and gastrointestinal problems that can result in delayed growth and other problems; immune system problems, such as susceptibility to infections or diseases like pneumonia; and hematologic complications (Saigal & Doyle, 2008).

Neurodevelopmental Sequelae

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is a heterogeneous group of neurologically-related disorders that can involve central nervous system functions as well as other functions such as leaning, movement, vision, hearing, and cognitive speed (Saigal & Doyle, 2008). As a result there are several variations of cerebral palsy including dyskinetic (mixed tone in the muscles that leads to difficulties with posture and movement), spastic (increased muscle tone leading to stiff…… [Read More]

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Children Child Abuse and Neglect

Words: 369 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10365146

Describe how teachers may use assistive technology effectively with students with cerebral palsy or other physical disabilities.

Children with cerebral palsy can be aided with assistive technology that allows them to communicate more effectively, such as manual communication boards. This form of technology allows the student to speak in class and participate, just like his or her peers.

Question 3: Describe some of the possible effects of substance abuse by the mother during pregnancy. How do these effects impact the child's development?

Fetal alcohol syndrome can cause delayed intellectual development, as well as many other physical health problems that affect the child's appearance and social functioning. It has been hypothesized that drug addiction can cause children to be more hyperactive, and have attention-deficit problems. Although this correlation is not certain, it is noteworthy that substance abuse is often linked to premature and low-weight births, which in and of itself can…… [Read More]

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Inclusion Has Long Been a

Words: 2760 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92334531

It can be used to establish language dominance, to determine whether a student is performing at grade level in academic subjects in his native language, and to distinguish whether or not a student's weaknesses are due to limited English proficiency or to a specific learning disability. The test has the following sections: 1) eadiness; 2) Speech; 3) Functional Word ecognition; 4) Oral eading; 5) eading Comprehension; 6) Word Analysis; 7) Listening; 8) Writing and Alphabetizing; 9) Numbers and Computation; and 10) Measurement. Not all parts of the test are administered to every student because the teacher/test administrator is encouraged to check off skills that she knows the student has mastered (Brigance Diagnostic Assessment of Basic Skills).

Obstacles Associated with the research

As it relates to conducting and carrying out the aforementioned research there are certain potential obstacles that exist. The first of which has to do with receiving the appropriate…… [Read More]

References

Brigance Diagnostic Assessment of Basic Skills. http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/databases/EAC/EAC0056.htm

Lombardi, T.P. (Ed.). (1999). Policy and Practice. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation.

Odom S.L. (2000) Preschool Inclusion: What We Know and Where We Go from Here. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education. Volume: 20 (1). Pg. 20.

Snyder, R.F. (1999). INCLUSION: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF INSERVlCE GENERAL EDUCATION TEACHERS' ATTITUDES AND CONCERNS. Education, 120(1), 173..
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Beyond High School

Words: 1001 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7993953

Beyond High School

I started at Essex Community College immediately after completing my high school. I joined the college seeking a degree in nursing and was also advised by my advisor to start college before going into any university. Before joining Essex Community College, I joined Coppin State University, but because of initial difficulties in adjusting in a university fresh out of high school and on the advice of my mentor, I joined the college so as to get used to the environment of colleges and then adjust in the university.

My troubles started when I became pregnant during my nursing classes in the Essex Community College, and because of severe illness, I had to leave my studies midway. After leaving I started my career as a Certified Geriatric Assistant and continued my personal life as a single mother. Managing career and personal duties as a single mother of young…… [Read More]

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Working With a Small Group of Children

Words: 792 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70780443

working with a small group of children from years 4 doing a reading activity sheet set by the teacher. One child is being disruptive and "off task."

It is possible the child is off-task because he or she is not quite developmentally ready either for pre-reading tasks or tasks that include worksheets. The child might be feeling somewhat insecure. Like the child who is given a toy too advanced for him and plays with the box instead of the boy, the child might be in a little too deep. I would sit by the child and encourage him, simplifying the task for him if necessary, providing moral support and using his paper as an example so he would have the help he needs. Probably proximity alone would calm his behavior but he might need more than that.

A couple of older preschoolers are teasing a child with cerebral palsy by…… [Read More]

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Social and Sexual Relationships of

Words: 807 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58899843

S.A., Canada, the UK, Australia, and Finland.

To begin, the age range of study populations can be problematic, as the social experiences and social environment of an 85-year-old may be wildly divergent than an 11-year-old, for example. Further, the recollections (after the fact) of an adult may be greatly different than those of someone in the throes of puberty and new social and sexual experiences. Similarly, diagnoses, and location between the papers could lead to a great divergence in the study populations. Differences in IQ assessment between the papers may also have created a disparity of IQs. Essentially, the authors may have cast their net a bit too wide in their analysis.

Overall, Wiegerink et al.'s (2006) analysis provides a useful overview of the problems faced by adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy. Further research, however, should attempt to more painstakingly describe how the many factors influencing social and…… [Read More]

References

Wiegerink DJ, Roebroeck ME, Donkervoort M, Stam HJ, and Cohen-Kettenis PT. 2006. Social and Sexual Relationships of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy: A Review. Clin Rehabil. Dec;20(12):1023-31.
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Assistive Medical Devices Computerized Assistive

Words: 661 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96323378

An advance in terms of speech synthesis aimed at patients with Cerebral Palsy and similar diseases has been developed by the University of Virginia. While in the past speech synthesis devices for the disabled have been somewhat erratic in operation and produced a harsh "metallic' voice, the research at the University of Virginia has improved on these. The new envisaged device is specifically designed "... To electronically reproduce sounds of the human voice and allow speech-impaired people to speak with fluidity and inflection" (Thomasson L.).

This device operates in relation to an individual's range of movement. These movements are 'tracked' on a computer by a programmer or a trained therapist and "...Once the movement, such as swinging the arm or wiggling the foot, is recorded, it is overlaid onto a sound grid. The vowel and consonant sounds are produced as the user moves a tracking device through the grid" (Thomasson…… [Read More]

References

Jones P.E. Computer-Assisted Remote Control for the User with Motor

Impairment. Retrieved June 4, 2007, at http://people.csse.uwa.edu.au/peterj/personal/PDFs/HCI97-paper.pdf.

Communication. Retrieved June 7, 2007, at  http://www.computers-technology-cerebralpalsy.com/cerebral-palsy-communication.html 

Thomasson L. Speech Device Could Assist Palsy Victims. Retrieved June 7, 2007 at http://www.cs.virginia.edu/csnews/show.php?artID=217
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Application of a Pedagogic Model to the Teaching of Technology to Special Education Students

Words: 60754 Length: 230 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60817292

Pedagogic Model to the Teaching of Technology to Special Education Students

Almost thirty years ago, the American federal government passed an act mandating the availability of a free and appropriate public education for all handicapped children. In 1990, this act was updated and reformed as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which itself was reformed in 1997. At each step, the goal was to make education more equitable and more accessible to those with special educational needs. During the last presidential term, the "No Child Left Behind" Act attempted to assure that individuals with disabilities were increasingly mainstreamed and assured of high educational results. All of these legislative mandates were aimed at insuring that children with disabilities were not defrauded of the public education which has become the birthright of all American children. The latest reforms to IDEA, for example, provided sweeping reforms which not only expanded the classification of…… [Read More]

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Looking Into Early Childhood Special Education

Words: 819 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96451037

Children's Books On Development Of Children's Self-Concept, Dealing With Life's Challenges and/or Have Characters With Disabilities

This list has been sorted by the books' readability levels;

AC = Adult ead to Children. Books for Pre-K to Grade 3, ranging from 10 to 30 pages, with illustrations; typically designed for parents to read to their children (Teacher Vision, 2000-2016).

JE = Juvenile Easy eader. For children who are beginning to read on their own, such as those in Grades 1-2; ranging from 30 to 80 pages; illustrations are included to break up the text (Teacher Vision, 2000-2016).

JF = Juvenile Fiction. Children's fiction or chapter books; for children in Grades 2-6; ranging from 60 to 200 pages, the books are generally divided into chapters, contain fewer illustrations, and have more complicated plots or concepts than either AC or JE books (Teacher Vision, 2000-2016).

Andy and His Yellow Frisbee

Publisher: Woodbine House,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Teacher Vision. (2000-2016). Children's Books About Disabilities. Retrieved May 2, 2016, from Teacher Vision: https://www.teachervision.com
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Hippotherapy and the Benefits to

Words: 1352 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81299759

.." And talking "with a walker or holding someone's hands." (Scott, 2006) the benefits to the child were not only physical but were also related to cognitive development as following the second session the child while sitting on his shower stool upon beginning to sway grabbed hold of the shower seat and informed his mother "I hold on." (Scott, 2006)

This is important because as explained by Scott (2006) during the therapy session the child is given reins to hold and while the child is not actually controlling the horse, the child believes that they are in control of the horse and the theoretical framework upon which the use of Hippotherapy as a therapeutic tool is that "making a huge magnificent animal do his bidding gives the rider a feeling of control which may be lacking in other aspects of his life." (Scott, 2006)

II. INDICATIONS & IMPLICATIONS

The study…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gonzalez, Patricia (nd) Hippotherapy Offers Tremendous Benefits to Kids with Special Needs. American Hippotherapy Association. Online available at http://www.steppingstonestocommunication.com/docs/CPM.pdf

McGraw, Eliza (2007) More Than Just Horseplay. Washington Post, 17 July 2007. Online available at  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/13/AR2007071301839.html 

Denton, Scott N. (2006) Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding. University of Texas Press. in: Review of Books, Software and Multimedia. Physical Therapy Journal Vol. 86, No. 4.

Scott, Naomi (2005) Special Needs, Special Horses: A Guide to the Benefits of Therapeutic Riding. University of North Texas Press 2005.
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ER Practices in Atlanta

Words: 28237 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57056934

Economic Motivators for Employers on Employment ates for People With Disabilities in Atlanta

Qualitative esearch

Quantitative esearch

Definition of Disability

Statistics for Individuals with Disabilities

Effects Of ADA On Persons With Disabilities

Economic Motivators for Employers Hiring People with Disabilities

Factors Affecting Economic Motivators for Employers

Lack of Information and Knowledge egarding Economic Motivators

Misconception about Individuals with Disabilities

Inaccessible Hiring Strategies

Conflicts with Existing Programs

Lack of Appropriate Planning and Difficulties in implementations Economic Incentive Programs

Unemployment Among People with Disabilities

Summary

Conclusion

CHAPTE III: METHODOLOGY

Introduction

Qualitative esearch

Quantitative esearch

esearch Design

Variables

Selection of Participants

Complete description of the esearch Participants

Type of Sampling

Instrumentation 52

eliability 54

Validity 55

Appropriateness/rationale for use in the study 55

Ethical Consideration 56

Data Analysis 57

Qualitative esearch Analysis 57

Quantitative esearch Analysis 59

The esearcher's ole 60

Credibility 60

Dependability 60

Transferability 60

Conformability 61

Conclusion 61

CHAPTE IV:…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Andrew, D. P. S., Pedersen, P. M., & McEvoy, C. D. (2011). Research Methods and Design In Sport Management. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Arthur, S., A. Corden, A. Green, J. Lewis, J. Loumidis, R. Sainsbury, B. Stafford, P. Thornton, & R. Walker, R .(1999). New Deal for disabled people: Early implementation, Research Report No 106, (UK) Department of Work and Pensions, Corporate Document Services, Leeds.

Ashworth, K., Hartfree, Y & Stephenson, A. (2001). Well, enough to work? Research Report No. 145, (UK) Department of Work and Pensions, Corporate Document Services, Leeds.

Baker, M. & Tippin, D. (2003). More than just another obstacle: Health, Domestic Purposes Beneficiaries, and the transition to paid work, paper presented at the Social Policy, Research and Evaluation conference Connecting Policy, Research and Practice, 29-30 April, Wellington.
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Equal Employment for the Physically Challenged Employees in Atlanta

Words: 27052 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77003855

Economic Motivators for Employers on Employment ates for People With Disabilities in Atlanta

Qualitative esearch

Quantitative esearch

Definition of Disability

Statistics for Individuals with Disabilities

Effects Of ADA On Persons With Disabilities

Economic Motivators for Employers Hiring People with Disabilities

Factors Affecting Economic Motivators for Employers

Lack of Information and Knowledge egarding Economic Motivators

Misconception about Individuals with Disabilities

Inaccessible Hiring Strategies

Conflicts with Existing Programs

Lack of Appropriate Planning and Difficulties in implementations Economic Incentive Programs

Unemployment Among People with Disabilities

Summary

Conclusion

CHAPTE III: METHODOLOGY

Introduction

Qualitative esearch

Quantitative esearch

esearch Design

Variables

Selection of Participants

Complete description of the esearch Participants

Type of Sampling

Instrumentation 50

eliability 52

Validity 53

Appropriateness/rationale for use in the study 53

Ethical Consideration 54

Data Analysis 55

Qualitative esearch Analysis 55

Quantitative esearch Analysis 57

The esearcher's ole 58

Credibility 58

Dependability 58

Transferability 58

Conformability 59

Conclusion 59

CHAPTE IV:…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Andrew, D. P. S., Pedersen, P. M., & McEvoy, C. D. (2011). Research Methods and Design In Sport Management. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Arthur, S., A. Corden, A. Green, J. Lewis, J. Loumidis, R. Sainsbury, B. Stafford, P. Thornton, & R. Walker, R .(1999). New Deal for disabled people: Early implementation, Research Report No 106, (UK) Department of Work and Pensions, Corporate Document Services, Leeds.

Ashworth, K., Hartfree, Y & Stephenson, A. (2001). Well, enough to work? Research Report No. 145, (UK) Department of Work and Pensions, Corporate Document Services, Leeds.

Baker, M. & Tippin, D. (2003). More than just another obstacle: Health, Domestic Purposes Beneficiaries, and the transition to paid work, paper presented at the Social Policy, Research and Evaluation conference Connecting Policy, Research and Practice, 29-30 April, Wellington.
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Psychology & Nbsp general Taumatic Brain

Words: 5753 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54980300

The accident occurred while the actress was taking a skiing lesson. She initial experienced no symptoms from her fall, but later complained of a headache and was taken to a local hospital. Reports indicate that her fall was not very spectacular and occurred at a low speed on a beginner run. She was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident. (Quinn, 2009)

However, while it is true that sometimes there are no immediately obvious signs of a severe brain injury, at other times there are.

Severe Traumatic Brain njury

The symptoms of a severe traumatic brain injury (which can result in permanent neurological damage) include a number of cognitive problems including inability to concentrate, problems with memory, problems in focusing and paying attention, ability to process new information at a normal rate, a high level of confusion, and perseveration, which is the action of doing something over…… [Read More]

In describing the course of their patients, experienced clinicians who use HBOT to treat patients with brain injury, cerebral palsy, and stroke refer to improvements that may be ignored in standardized measures of motor and neuro-cognitive dysfunction. These measures do not seem to capture the impact of the changes that clinicians and parents perceive. Caregivers' perceptions should be given more weight in evaluating the significance of objective improvements in a patient's function. Unfortunately, studies have not consistently measured caregiver burden, or have assessed it only by self-report. Studies in which the caregivers' burden was directly observed would provide much stronger evidence than is currently available about treatment outcome. (AHRQ Publication Number 03-E049, 2003)

In other words, this somewhat alternative treatment produces results that are more meaningful to the injured person and his or her caregivers.

I have focused here primarily on the biochemical end of treatments for those with traumatic brain injury because it is this level of treatment that offers the long-term possibility of the greatest level of treatment. Such treatments as are described here have the chance to cure traumatic brain injury. But until these are perfected, every other kind of treatment and therapy -- from drug treatments to speech therapy to the love of friends -- will remain priceless.
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Ethics According to the Most

Words: 1401 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23412765

Yet Ana and her family also sought the intervention of traditional doctors or curanderos. The curandero provides services that a Western doctor cannot: the cleansing ceremony referred to in the case study is a perfect example of differences in attitudes toward health care. A healing ceremony performed by a curandero is not likely to harm the infant and in fact may prove beneficial at least to the parents' and family's peace of mind.

There can be no absolute ethical guidelines in health care except for the fact that health care workers are obliged always to treat patients with respect. espect entails sensitivity to cultural difference and to the norms that define attitudes towards health care. Health care workers may find that some patients require privacy and do not express emotions; whereas other patients are emotionally expressive to the point where they shock or disturb those around them. These issues should…… [Read More]

References

"Ethical Relativism." (2011). Retrieved online:   http://www.allaboutphilosophy.org/ethical-relativism-faq.htm  

"Ethical Relativism," (n.d.). Retrieved online:   http://philosophy.lander.edu/ethics/relativism.html  

Macklin, R. (1998). Ethical relativism in a multicultural society. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8, Number 1.

"Neonatal encephalopathy," (2011). Newborn Services Clinical Guideline. Retrieved online:   http://www.adhb.govt.nz/newborn/guidelines/neurology/NE.htm
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Conflicting Studies on the Attitude

Words: 2155 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86004724



Another concern is the lengthiness of the survey -- 35 items -- that may have fatigued some of the respondents and may have resulted in rushed and insufficient care in answering the questions.

Furthermore, attributions may have been incorrectly placed. The participant, too, may have erred due to subjective bias (i.e. A 'falling out' with the principal may have led her to incorrectly accusing administrator of reluctance to integrate); furthermore, few teachers would readily admit to negative attitudes in integrating children, teachers may over-rate or under-rate their abilities (as, for instance, with the question: "I find that my knowledge about teaching pupils with physical disabilities in PE class is satisfactory"), and teachers may have deliberately or unwittingly deviated in order to protect their identity and their identity of the school.

Finally, although the survey was built on earlier studies of inclusion, it would be interesting to know amongst which population…… [Read More]

References

Jerlinder, K., Danermark, B., & Gil, P. (2010). Swedish primary-school teachers' attitudes to inclusion - the case of PE and pupils with physical disabilities, European Journal of Special Needs Education, 25, 45 -- 57

Pruitt, D. (2000). Your adolescent: Emotional, behavioral, and cognitive development from early adolescence through the teen years. Washington, DC: American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Spencer-Cavaliere, N. & Watkinson, E.J. (2010). Inclusion Understood From the Perspectives of Children With Disability, Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 27, 275-293

The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) (2007). Promoting the Rights of Children with Disabilities Innocenti Digest No. 13
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Speech and Language Impediments

Words: 3115 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54826038

educationists and teachers in the classroom today is identifying and dealing with children who have a speech, language or communication impairment, which negatively impacts on learning.. Many children find it difficult to understand how conversation works or don't make use of language at all. There are different terms used to describe specific speech and language difficulties, including "phonological difficulties, articulation difficulties, verbal dyspraxia, dysarthria, semantic pragmatic disorder, Asperger Syndrome and selective mutism." (Speech Impairments)

These specific speech and language difficulties can impact severely on the development and natural psychological and social growth of the child. Furthermore, it can also lead to further and more complicated problems - as will be discussed in this paper. "Children with a variety of speech and language impediments are increasing at risk as their language abilities fall behind those of their peers." (Children and Mental Health)

Emphasis must also be placed on recognizing the speech…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bradford, J. Using multisensory teaching methods. Retrieved February 6, 2005, from Dyslexia magazine Com. Web site: http://www.dyslexia-parent.com/mag30.html

Bredenkamp, S. (1990) Protecting Children from Inappropriate Practices. ERIC Digest. Retrieved December 21, 2000 from ERIC Digest. Web site:  http://www.ericdigests.org/pre-9218/children.htm 

Children and Mental Health. Retrieved February 6, 2005, from Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/mentalhealth/chapter3/sec1.html

DeBord, K. (1997) Developmentally appropriate 4-h experiences for the 5- to 8-year-old. Retrieved December 20, 2004, from NC State University. Web site: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/fcs/human/pubs/develop_appropriate.html
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Electronics Aiding Humanity Technology and

Words: 2750 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6252345



The truth that electronics aid humanity may be a subject for debate. However, it must be noted that nothing else may beat your doubt on electronics but the fact that we can derive from others' experiences that the technological advances in electronics really assist man in sustaining his life and surviving from the weaknesses of our physical body. More so, we may derive such information from our relatives and friends who may have experienced recovering from diseases with the aid of advanced biomedic machines. or, you can also ask this question to yourself to provide a view on how effective do you really believe can technology that is applied in electronics help, assist, and aid humanity -- "Would you rather go for the old method and practices of medicine than how medicine is practice these days?"

Technology in Electronics - Aiding Other Defects of Humanity

If the advances in electronics…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Electronics and Biomedical Engineering. http://www.city.ac.uk/sems/undergraduate/elecbiomed/

Taylor, John. "Serving Blind Readers in Digital Age."

American Libraries, 35.11 (2005): 49-51.

Jarvis, Jessica. "Opening Doors to Learning."
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Ethnography of Special Needs Preschool Children

Words: 1806 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78853558

LABB School

I chose the LABB School because it seems so innovative. They have a preschool program designed for children with special needs, but they also enroll children with no difficulties. Because of this, preschoolers who attend The LABB School get both specialized services and the normality of attending preschool with children who have no disabilities. I was very curious to see how The LABB School makes this concept work.

When I went in I expected to see the children with disabilities separated in some way from the children without disabilities. I also wanted to know how well both groups progressed. I observed in detail and interviewed a teacher, an occupational therapist and a teacher aid to gather information. I did not ask to interview a parent.

The LABB School is spacious and set against woods. The rooms are airy and bright. They have a playground that is brightly colored…… [Read More]

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Individual Differences in Mental Abilities Cognition

Words: 2720 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38941016

Nature of Cognition

Ever since Simon and inet developed the first intelligence test in 1905, the field of psychology has maintained a strong interest in the nature of intelligence. How do we think? Why are some people better problem solvers than others? What is cognition, the ability to think about our environment? Why are some people consistently more able to use their brains to think, to remember, and to problem-solve than others?

The first IQ tests were devised to determine which children were mentally retarded. These children were pulled away from mainstream education. However, the tests did an effective job of predicting school success for all students, and their use was broadened (Sternberg, 1999). Multiple tests were developed to measure cognition, which might be defined as the ability to think abstractly. Markman (2001) described it in this way:

Cognition depends on the ability to imagine or represent objects and events…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Academy of Pediatrics. August, 2000. "Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorders." Pediatrics.

Baker, O. Oct. 1999. "Faulty control gene underlies retardation (Rett Syndrome)." Science News.

Bower, B. Nov 20, 1999. "DNA furnishes tips to mental retardation." Science News.

Eliez, Stephan. Feb, 2000. "Genetics of Childhood Disorders: XI. Fragile X Syndrome." Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
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Chronic Sorrow

Words: 1631 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67060671

Chronic sorrow is a continuous, pervasive sadness and also permanent and intermittently intense. An individual often encounters loss experience because of their disability, relative or chronic illness (Isaksson, 2007, p. 18). Chronic sorrow as a concept was introduced by Olshansky (1962) while he was dealing with children with disability of various kinds and their parents or relatives. He noted that the children's parents showed what he referred to as a pervasive reaction of psychological nature to the predicament of parenting mentally defective children (Monsson, 2010, p.16).

Such grief, he observed, was not dissimilar to the type shown by parents that have lost a child. The parents of mentally defective children have it worse because their pain is a continuous one. This is why he referred to the concept as chronic sorrow (Monsson, 2010, p. 16). It has been thought that chronic sorrow entails experiencing intermittent spans of distress and pain,…… [Read More]

References

Ahlstrom, G. I. (2007). Experiencing Loss and Chronic Sorrow in Persons with Severe Chronic Illness. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16 (3A), 76-83. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6313596_Experiencing_loss_and_chronic_sorrow_in_persons_with_severe_chronic_illness

Borkon, D. A. (2008). Is Chronic Sorrow Present in Maternal Caregivers of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disordered Children? Adlerian Counselling and Psychotherapy. http://alfredadler.edu/sites/default/files/Borkon%20MP%202009.pdf

Dozier, B. (2015). Application of Middle-Range Theory. Professional Practices in Nursing. Wordpress.com. https://barbradozier.wordpress.com/2015/07/03/application-of-middle-range-theory/

Eakes, G., Burke, M. L. & Hainsworth, M. A. (1998). Middle-Range theory of Chronic Sorrow. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 30(2), pp. 179(6). http://www.psychodyssey.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Middle-range-theory-of-chronic-sorrow.pdf
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Professional in Psychology

Words: 1258 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30124457

Sigmund Freud and Jean Martin Charcot

Psychology refers to the applied and academic discipline that includes the scientific study of behaviors and mental functions. Anyone who has studied psychology has the immediate understanding groups and individuals through the general principles establish by renowned professionals in this field. Psychologists attempt to understand the role played by mental functions in social behaviors and individuals whilst exploring the biological and psychological process that underlie behaviors and cognitive functions. This study endeavors to explain the important contributions made by two psychologists namely Sigmund Feud and Jean Martin Charcot, and the similarities and contrasts of their contributions.

Sigmund Freud and his contributions

He was a neurologist based in Australia and lived between 1856 and 1939. He was the founder of psychoanalysis. He graduated from the University of Vienna as a qualified doctor and carried out extensive research into aphasia, cerebral palsy and microscopic neuroanatomical. He…… [Read More]

References

Freud, S., & Strachey, J. (2001). The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud: early psycho-analytic publications. Vol. 7, 1901-1905, A case of hysteria, three essays on sexuality and other works. London: Vintage.

Huberman, G., & Charcot, J.M. (2003). Invention of hysteria: Charcot and the photographic iconography of the Salpe-trie-re. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.
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Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to

Words: 2115 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87064250



3.3 Data Collection

Is maternal UE3A active following iPS treatment: Data will be gathered on the iPS-treated mice via positron emission tomography, and in vivo brain slice preparation, and Western lot Analysis. H1 will essentially be ascertained following these tests.

Does iPS treatment rescue the motor and cognitive deficits associated with Angelman Syndrome: Data will be gathered from testing the treated mice in scientifically recognized tests of cognitive ability in a mouse model. This project proposes using the water maze test, the electric shock test, and the submerged platform test. H2 will effectively be answered using the data gleaned from these tests.

4. Conclusion

4.1. Potential Therapeutic and Other Considerations

The potential of using iPS treatment to rescue/alleviate the severe motor and cognitive deficits witnessed in Angelman Syndrome is theoretically viable. Reliable mouse models of AS exist with which to run the tests. The technology needed to tease iPS stem…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abuhatzira, L., Shemer, R., & Razin, A. (2009). MeCP2 involvement in the regulation of neuronal alpha-tubulin production. Human Molecular Genetics, 1415-1423.

Condic, M.L., & Rao, M. (2008). Regulatory Issues for Personalized Pluripotent Cells. Stem Cells, 2753-2758.

Dindot, S., Antalffy, B., Meenakshi, B., & Beaudet, A. (2008). The Angelman syndrome ubiquitin ligase localizes to the synapse and nucleus, and maternal deficiency results in abnormal dendritic spine morphology. Human Molecular Genetics, 111-118.

Dobkin, B. (2007). Behavioral, temporal, and spatial targets for cellular transplants as adjuncts to rehabilitation for stroke. Stroke, 832-839.
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American Disabilities Act American's With

Words: 7288 Length: 27 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45502422

(Schall, 1998)

In addition to a lightened burden of proof and broader definition there were two additional changes resulting from the amendment which served to positively affect the impact and ultimate effectiveness of the legislation. This amendment clarified the fact that judges are not allowed to assess possible mitigating factors such as medication, corrective surgery, or specialized equipment in the determination of whether or not an individual is disabled. This change is directly related to the Sutton case. Further the amendments clarified the definition of major life activities. This amendment relates directly to the Williams case in which a judge deemed that Carpal Tunnel wasn't in fact a significant impairment to major life activities, it merely precluded her from successfully completing specific tasks in the work place. Though the language of the Act is still quite ambiguous, these changes help to clarify and protect the intention of the act.

Exceptions…… [Read More]

References

1. Disability Discrimination Act 1995. (c.50), London: HMSO.

2. Schall, C., 1998. The Americans with Disabilities Act -- Are we keeping our promise? An analysis of the effect of the ADA on the employment of persons with disabilities. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 10(3), pp.191-203.

3. Stowe, M., 2000. Interpreting "place of public accommodation" under Title III of the ADA: A technical determination with potentially broad civil rights implications. Duke Law Journal, pp. 297- 329.

4. Grabois, R., Nosek, M., & Rossi, D., 2005. Accessibility of primary care physicians' offices for people with disabilities: An analysis of compliance with the American with Disabilities Act. Archives of Family Medicine, 8, pp. 44- 51.
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Proletarianization and Professionalization Politics of

Words: 2736 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64102462



Neo-liberal and neo-conservative thinkers in Alberta were so focused in the end results of educational policies that they proposed two other programs that differed little from results-based curriculum: program continuity and continuous progress. Many teachers could not really understand what these programs were about. The Department of Education, for example, placed program continuity together with "results-based, levels-organized curriculum." Program continuity envisioned that students knew what they needed to learn and what they could accomplish, and the curriculum accordingly was supposed to gear towards achieving those goals. Teachers pointed out that imposing such expectations on students was at odds with the philosophy of letting students find their own comfort zones and levels of learning. Teachers also pointed out that these additional requirements forced them to work more, effectively turning them into working machines. What teachers resented most, however, was the "erosion of professionalism": "What I resent is that some are trying…… [Read More]

References

ATA (1993) Trying to Teach. Retrieved on March 4, 2011, from   http://www.teachers.ab.ca/Publications/Other%20Publications/Pages/TryingtoTeach.aspx  

Bascia, N. (2001) Learning Through Struggle: How the Alberta Teachers' Association Maintains an Even Keel. NALL Working Paper #44. Retrieved on March 2, 2011, from http://www.nall.ca/res/44learningstruggle.html

Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Department of Justice Canada. Retrieved on March 3, 2011, from http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/charter/1.html

Flower, D.J., & Booi, H.L. (1999) Challenging Restructuring: The Alberta Teachers' Association in Harrison, T.W., & Kachur, J.L. Contested Classrooms: Education, Globalization, and Democracy in Alberta. Edmonton, Alberta: The University of Alberta Press and Parkland Institute.
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Wrongful Life Damages Debate

Words: 3333 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42587617



It must be considered, as well, that genetic testing is a somewhat newer thing and the results can be skewed; so even if a doctor did do a test and results came up negative, there is a chance something could have been positive. Is the doctor responsible for the fact that the test didn't find any genetic problems? It would be absolutely nonsensical to think that the doctor should be punished for not detecting problems. It is also incredibly unfair.

When two people decide to have children, they are basically assuming all responsibilities and they should be aware that giving birth to a child means knowing that there are certain risks involved. There is this question to be considered: If an aborted child cannot sue for wrongful death, how can anyone sue for wrongful life?

What will happen, if we aren't careful, is that doctors will become very wary of…… [Read More]

References:

Bayles, Michael D. (1975). Harm to the unconceived. Kalamazoo College -- Western

Michigan University Conference in Philosophy of Law.

Doerr, Adam. (2009). The 'wrongful life' debate. Genonomics Law Report. Retrieved on September 1, 2010, from the Website:

http://www.genomicslawreport.com/index.php/2009/09/22/the-wrongful-life-debate/
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Children's Hospital for My Alternate

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56411096

The RN really became a part of the educational team, tailoring her assistance to the child to the classroom environment. In fact, because much of the education seemed tailored towards teaching the students basic life-skills information, such as the weather, the nurse was able to really interact with the child's education.

The best part of the experience was observing the inherent joy in children. From an outsider's perspective, the children in this school had very few reasons to express joy or feel happiness. Almost all of them had significant physical challenges in addition to mental retardation. None of these children has a childhood even approximating normalcy. However, many of the children seemed happy. In fact, it was seeing the joy that a small action could bring to these children was very uplifting. In fact, one particular child seemed especially joyful. Because of privacy concerns, I was not able to access…… [Read More]

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Ethics and Corporate Governance Strong

Words: 996 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39628737

In such situations, "especially if the comments have been made repeatedly" the employer may not be able to fire the employee at will. This seems to be the case with Joe, given the statements he received from his supervisors (Nolo, 2010). In the future, it would be wise for the Strong Steel Company to be careful about making such sweeping statements to employees, to protect the company's interests should the employee use such statements as evidence that they could only be fired with a 'cause.'

Even if the employer argues that there was no implied contract about his employment status, Joe's firing seems clearly linked to his ADA-qualified disability, given that he was told, after he returned to his employment after his operation that his employer felt that Joe was not doing a good job because of his heart problems. Joe, however, had only taken part-time leave for a relatively…… [Read More]

References

The Americans with Disabilities Act: Title II Technical Assistance Manual. (2010). Americans

with Disability Act. Retrieved February 7, 2010 at  http://www.ada.gov/taman2.html 

Employment at will: What does it mean? (2010). Nolo. Retrieved February 7, 2010 at http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/article-30022.html

Facts about age discrimination. (2010). Equal opportunity Commission (EEOC).
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Classical Argument Drug Prohibition Has

Words: 1767 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53741639

Most Americans value freedoms and liberties such as those protected in the United States Constitution. Those freedoms and liberties are violated when governments prevent access to drugs, which is why legalization may eventually happen on a state-by-state basis.

Marijuana has promising applications in health care, which is why states like California have recently permitted the sale and distribution of the drug to patients with prescriptions. The trend is spreading, and several other states also permit marijuana to be used for medical purposes. As more and more states follow suit, drugs will be effectively decriminalized. Law enforcement can divert its attention to violent crime, leaving ordinary citizens alone and leaving addicts in the care of trained psychological professionals. Consumers will purchase their pot from licensed dealers who they can trust, who carefully cultivate their strains to suit certain medical conditions, and who do not use chemical pesticides or any poison to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cermak, Timmen L. Marijuana: What's a Parent to Believe? Center City, MN: Hazelden, 2003.

Gerber, Rudolph J. Legalizing Marijuana: Drug Policy Reform and Prohibition Politics. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2004.

Jones, Paul and Mortin, John. Marijuana: Early Experiences with Four States' Laws that Allow Use for Medical Purposes. United States General Accounting Office, 2002.

Kleiman, Mark. Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control. Greenwood Press, 1989.
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Special Ed Learning Disabilities Chart

Words: 696 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90030934

Specifically, the parents want their son's teachers to help him not only learn, but to be able to receive instruction from others. So far, they are fairly pleased with the progress that they have seen their son make in the classroom, but wish the teachers could develop more large-group activities and take the time to really make sure their son was a full participant, which they feel would help him to progress socially more than the often individualized instruction he receives.

The difficulty, they acknowledge, is that individualized instruction is how he learns best, and with a class the size of his they understand that the teachers couldn't focus their attention on him during a large group project. Still, they are hopeful that new ideas might come up that will improve his situation even more, and they continue to work closely with the teachers regarding his progress.

eferences

LDA. (209).…… [Read More]

References

LDA. (209). Learning disabilities association of America. Accessed 2 October 2009. http://www.ldanatl.org/

WV Dept. Of Education. 92009). "Schools of Brooke County." Accessed 2 October 2009.  http://wvde.state.wv.us/ed_directory/index.html?county_id=10 

Sheet1

Disorder / impairment Characetristics Teaching Strategy Example
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Asher Lev Just as One

Words: 4145 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12492046

Such relationships in childhood begin with the parents, and for Asher, these early relationships are also significant later, as might be expected.

However, as Potok shows in this novel, for someone like Asher, the importance of childhood bonds and of later intimate bonds are themselves stressed by cultural conflicts between the Hasidic community in its isolation and the larger American society surrounding it. For Asher, the conflict is between the more controlled religious environment of the community and the more liberal environment of the art world he joins. What Potok shows about this particular conflict might seem very different from what others experience, others who are not part of such a strict religious background and who are not artists. However, children always find a conflict between the circumscribed world of their immediate family and the world they join as they strike out on their own. This conflict is often portrayed…… [Read More]

References

Belkin, L. (2004). The Lessons of Classroom 506. New York Times Magazine, 40-53.

Bowlby, J. (1988). Developmental psychiatry comes of age. American Journal of Psychiatry, 145, 1-10.

Erikson, E.H. (1963) Childhood and Society. New York: Free Press.

Kim, W.J., Kim, L. & Rue, D.S. (1997). Korean-American Children. In G. Johnson-Powell & J. Yamamoto (Ed.) Transcultural Child Development: Psychological Assessment and Treatment (pp. 183-207). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Evidence-Based Tools Review Matix Level

Words: 429 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62873854



Qualitative, meetings and seminars, then questions to ascertain efficacy.

Smallish, 65 in one hospital.

Survey and qualitative observation.

Clear and effective communication goals were met using positive educational interventions.

Longitudinal and sample size.

Good basic, lacks lengthy literature review. Data may be extrapolated, but further work needs to be done using larger, more diverse sample.

Melnyk, B., et.al.

Evidence-based Practice: Step-by-Step Igniting a Spirit of Inquiry.

2009

What is the effectiveness of an evidence-based practice format on collaborative inquiry.

Meta-Analysis and presentation of package.

None other than previous research.

Literature review and meta-analysis.

This is a presentation of a model approach suggested by an experienced nursing professor.

None for type of study.

Strong. Shows nurses how to use knowledge and skills to implement EBP consistently as part of the best practices of contemporary nursing care.

Nadzan, D. And Westergaard, F.

Pediatric Safety in the Emergency Department

2008

What are the…… [Read More]

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Persuasive Against Smoking

Words: 1123 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32760190

If a driver ignored a road sign that said "Danger: Bridge Out!" and proceeded along the street, he would be labeled as an idiot by his community. If a fence had a sign on it that read, "arning: Vicious Dogs" and some adventure-seeking teens climbed that fence, no one would be surprised when they had their legs torn off by a pack of pit bulls. However, every single year 400,000 Americans die[1] from ignoring one of the most infamous warnings: The Surgeon General's warning on cigarette packages. Smoking cigarettes may seem to be a part of the definition of being an American-- everyone from the street punk rebels to the successful big business CEOs are automatically visualized with a cigarette or fat Cuban cigar hanging from their mouths. These smokers see themselves as a better person for the momentary pleasure they receive from these tobacco products, but fail to realize…… [Read More]

Works Cited.

The American Cancer Society. Who Is At Risk? "Tobacco and Cancer." 2001.

The American Heart Association. Publications and Resources. "Tobacco Smoke."

California Department of Health Services. Youth Media Network. "Effects of Secondhand Smoke." November 2001.

Emphysema Foundation For Our Right to Survive. Medical Info Pages. "About Smoking With Emphysema." January 2002.
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Teen Pregnancy in the United

Words: 3574 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35851463

Abortion trends varied widely by state as well. "Teenage abortion rates were highest in New York (41 per 1,000), New Jersey, Nevada, Delaware and Connecticut. By contrast, teenagers in South Dakota (6 per 1,000), Utah, Kentucky, Nebraska and North

Dakota all had abortion rates of eight or fewer per 1,000 women aged 15 -- 19. More than half of teenage pregnancies ended in abortion in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut" (Guttmacher, 2010). It is important to keep in mind that teenage abortion rates may reflect multiple issues. First, they may reflect that teenager's own personal beliefs and desire to raise a baby. However, they may also reflect prevailing societal norms in that geographic area, which can make it difficult, and even practically impossible, for pregnant teenagers to obtain abortions.

Portrayal in popular culture

Perhaps one of the most alarming things about teen pregnancy is that it is receiving more…… [Read More]

References

Cape Fear Teen Health Council. (2006). Why is teen pregnancy a problem? Retrieved April 2,

2012 from http://www.capefearteen.org/cfthc.php?section=statistics&record_id=1

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012). Prepregnancy contraceptive use among teens with unintended pregnancies resulting in live births- Pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system (PRAMS), 2004-2008. Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 61(2), 25-29.

Drayton, V., Montgomery, S., Modeste, N., Frye-Anderson, B. (2002-2003). The health belief model as a predictor of repeat pregnancies among Jamaican teenage mothers. International Quarterly of Community Health Education, 21(1), 67-81.
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Internet Accessibility Some Technological Change

Words: 5013 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91756475

You'd be able to hook up to the network through your computer, interactive TV, telephone, or some future device that somehow combines the attributes of all three. Even wireless gadgets such as pagers, future versions of cellular phones, and newfangled "personal digital assistants" would be able to tap into the highway. The purpose: to provide remote electronic banking, schooling, shopping, taxpaying, chatting, game playing, videoconferencing, movie ordering, medical diagnosing... The list goes on (Antonoff, Fisher, Langreth, and O'Malley 98).

Achieving this vision, however, means addressing the issue of accessibility so that everyone will have access to this superhighway.

In its broadest sense, web accessibility refers to more than the ability to connect to the Internet and includes the idea that websites should be, and often are not, designed so as to "facilitate access to the information on the site by people with disabilities" (Darsie 1) and others who need to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Antonoff, Michael, Arthur Fisher, Robert Langreth, and Chris O'Malley. "The Complete Survival Guide to the Information Superhighway." Popular Science (1 May 1994).

Blodgett, M. (1996, September 30). Blind users stymied by new Internet graphics. Computerworld, 1.

The Business Benefits of the Internet." San Diego Business Journal (December 9, 1996), B10-11.

Cline, Andy. "Education Online." Ingram's (August 1996), 57-59.
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Assistive Technology What Is the

Words: 4146 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50166555

Many of the answers used to hold workers with disabilities can also crack work-related problems of older workers. But older workers would not point out that they are disabled, even though they may come across functional limitations that are comparable to those met by persons with disabilities. Elder workers with vision, hearing, dexterity, memory, attention, standing, and/or sitting disabilities may come across difficulties on the job. There are a range of AT aids and other useful products available to tackle the issues that older workers may experience. (Assistive Technology and Aging)

6. Describe a process as to how assistive technology devices will be transferred to and/or purchased by another agency to support postsecondary activities

Once the nature of the needs have been identified, you can then look at the appropriate assistive technology devices and services. It is also important, that most technologically advanced system may not be the best solution.…… [Read More]

References

"A framework for assistive technology planning" (2002) Education Tech Points. Retrieved from http://www.edtechpoints.org/manual.htm Accessed on 20 February 2005

"Assistive Technology and Aging" Virginia Assistive Technology System. Retrieved from  http://www.vats.org/aging.htm  Accessed on 20 February 2005

Assistive Technology Fact Sheet #2. (November 30, 2004) Department of Public Instruction and Wisconsin Assistive Technology Initiative. Retrieved from http://www.wati.org/BestPractices/factsheet2.html Accessed on 20 February 2005

'Assistive Technology: What is it?" Massachusetts Department of Education. Retrieved from http://library.thinkquest.org/11799/data/assistech.html Accessed on 20 February 2005
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Terri Schiavo Conflict

Words: 1427 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86343865

Terri Schiavo- a Case of Life-Ethics

Mercy Killing, euthanasia, life support, brain damage are some of the hotly debated issues today in medical and legal circles. When is a person really dead? Why should life support system be provided? When can it be removed? Under what circumstances a person can be killed by the medical staff? There questions, as disturbing as they may be, are high pertinent to the case of Theresa Schiavo, the 41-year-old woman who died on March 31st, this year after her feeding tube was removed. (BBC News)

Terri Schiavo, as she is popularly known now, suffered a serious brain injury in a cardiac arrest in 1990 which may have been triggered by her suspected bulimia. She was then married to Michael Schiavo and apparently living a happy life. Terri's parents, obert and Mary Schindler, wanted to keep her alive with the use of a feeding tube.…… [Read More]

References

1) Disabled state - special legislation for Terri Schiavo -- 39-year-old woman in vegetative state since 1990 Christian Century Nov 29, 2003

2) Robert Marus, Florida dispute renews life-ethics controversy - News Terri Schiavo Christian Century Nov 15, 2003

3) Excerpts from the Supreme Court decision in Washington v. Glucksberg allowing states to ban doctor-assisted suicides "The State Has an Interest in Preventing Suicide . . . And Treating Its Causes', Washington Post, Friday, June 27, 1997; Page A18

4) "Brain-damaged Terri Schiavo dies" Story from BBC NEWS: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/americas/4398131.stm Published: 2005/03/31
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Activities to Reduce Inappropriate Behaviors Displayed by

Words: 10021 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93835103

Activities to Reduce Inappopiate Behavios Displayed by Childen With Autism and Othe Developmental Disabilities

The pupose of this dissetation study is to test the effectiveness of an eveyday activities-based potocol (Holm, Santangelo, Fomuth, Bown & Walte, 2000) fo managing challenging and disuptive behavios of 13- to 23-yea-old esidential students (male and female) with Autism who live at Melmak Homes, Inc., of southeasten Pennsylvania, and attend school o adult day pogams. Applied behavio analysis and a focus on eveyday occupations (activities) will be combined duing the intevention phase. Reinfocement will be fo subtask completion and duation of paticipation, NOT fo absence of taget maladaptive o disuptive behavios. Behavio analysts, howeve, will document the fequency/duation of the taget behavios duing each condition. Inteventions will occu daily, Monday though Fiday. A single-subject, multiple-baseline, acoss-subjects design with nine subjects will be used to evaluate change in behavios unde altenating conditions. Data will be analyzed…… [Read More]

references, and favorites)

Child and Family Assets

(Abilities, strengths, skills, accomplishments, and capabilities)

Functional and Meaningful Interactions

(Purposeful interactions; ways interests and assets are used in everyday life)
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Educational Psychology

Words: 342 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69282271

Power Tools: Assistive Technologies Help Students With Special Needs Keep Pace in the Classroom. Publication source

Supportive technology, or support aids, in the classroom enhances learning and listening skills for every child involved. AIDS such as touch tone computers, voice recognition systems, mobile conveyance devices (i.e., wheelchairs), and strategies for learning are becoming an increasingly important part of today's education programming. Even schools with a less than favorable budget can deploy technology across a school or school system in an affordable and efficient manner. Assisted technology not only provides the student in need with a means whereby he or she can master a learning objective but also provide the student with a meaning learning tool wherein the level of knowledge garnered is demonstrated.

One of the most important systems being brought to the attention of educators is known as the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) wherein students with significant diversity…… [Read More]

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Pros and Cons of Trusting the Government

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31256249

Government

Do we dare not to trust the government?

There are very good reasons not to trust the government. A great deal of evidence points to the idea that the current administration is essentially owned by big business, and that it is willing to sell out the interests of individuals for the sake of corporations. Just a brief look at recent stories show why one should not trust the government: the increase in gas prices and energy company profits while those companies shell out to the administration, the brutal death of Terri Schiavo under the orders of a judge, the September 11th terrorist attacks which may have been orchestrated for the colonial good of the American empire, the nation's willingness to abandon social security, and the lack of support for victims of rural crime. Of course, there are some reasons why one should trust the government: Welfare programs are available…… [Read More]

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Universal Design for Learning and

Words: 4110 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99920686

..collaborative teachers also value and build upon the knowledge, personal experiences, language, strategies, and culture that students bring to the learning situation." (ibid)

This teaching procedure has the advantage of being multidirectional and not limited to the teachers directed knowledge only. This obviously allows for a more inclusive approach and for those student at different levels to express themselves in this environment.

The following is an example of how this process should work.

Consider a lesson on insect-eating plants, for example. Few students, and perhaps few teachers, are likely to have direct knowledge about such plants. Thus, when those students who do have relevant experiences are given an opportunity to share them, the whole class is enriched. Moreover, when students see that their experiences and knowledge are valued, they are motivated to listen and learn in new ways, and they are more likely to make important connections between their own…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Arnot C. (2003) The learning pod. Retrieved August 7, 2005. Web site: http://education.guardian.co.uk/curriculumonline/story/0,12708,902015,00.html

Bowe, F.G. (2000). Universal Design in Education: Teaching Nontraditional Students. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.

Byra, M., & Jenkins, J. (2000). Matching Instructional Tasks to Learner Ability: The Inclusion Style of Teaching. JOPERD -- The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 71(3), 26. Retrieved August 9, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Cawley, J.F., Foley, T.E., & Miller, J. (2003). Science and Students with Mild Disabilities: Principles of Universal Design. Intervention in School & Clinic, 38(3), 160+.
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Special Needs Children With Special Needs it

Words: 2213 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72002196

Special Needs

Children with Special Needs

It is difficult to imagine a more vulnerable group than that comprised by children and adolescents with special needs. The vulnerability lies in the fact that though they have a voice it is often ignored. This does not mean that people do not want to listen to them, but, unfortunately, adults often either have an agenda or they believe they know what is better for the child than the child him or herself. It is true that children who have a physical disabilities, behavioral disorders and mental disorders such as autism may not understand what is best for them, but they should be able to voice their desires also. This includes both the interactions that they have with caregivers, other authority figures and peers. The individual in this situation needs someone to advocate for them because "they are a particularly vulnerable group and have,…… [Read More]

References

Dixon, A.L., Tucker, C., & Clark, M.A. (2010). Integrating social justice with national standards of practice: Implications for school counselor education. Counselor Education & Supervision, 50, 103-115.

Knight, K., & Oliver, C. (2007). Advocacy for disabled children and young people: Benefits and dilemmas. Child and family Social Work, 12, 417-425.

Mulick, J.A., & Butter, E.M. (2002). Educational advocacy for children with autism. Behavioral Interventions, 17, 57-74.

Murray, F.R. (2005). Effective advocacy for students with emotional/behavioral disorders: How high the cost? Education and Treatment of Children, 28(4), 414- 429.
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Neonatal Ethics and Have Presented

Words: 2667 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 566514

As the mentioned societies characterized themselves for athleticism, power and strength so it was not a surprising thing that those people looked down on and hated babies who were weak, dependent and immature. Thus, an individual child was given importance on the basis of his likable future contributions to the society as a mature adult. egrettably, no rules and regulations and laws were there that prohibited people from murdering the helpless and ill babies. Sorry to say, in some cases, even the newborn babies who were in good physical health did not have protection by social custom or lawful decrees. It is a bitter reality that killing of malformed babies was considered important for the maintenance of the quality of the civilians. Similar practices were also common in some parts of the Eastern world (Wyatt 1).

As far as the secular perspective in this regard is concerned, a number of…… [Read More]

References

"Bioethical Issues - Neonatal Ethics."Adelaide Centre for Bioethics and Culture. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 May 2013. .

Brazier, M.. "How to Treat Premature Infants." The Scientist Dec. 2006: 22+.Questia. Web. 7 May 2013. .

Carter, B.S. . "Ethical Issues in Neonatal Care ." MedScape. N.p., 25 Mar. 2011. Web. 6 May 2013. .

Laurance, J.. "Should Doctors Try to Save Extremely Premature Babies? The Big Question." The Independent [London] 16 Nov. 2006: 42. Questia. Web. 6 May 2013. .
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Attitude Toward Disability

Words: 739 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84926722

disabilities as 'deficits.' Even though I did not harbor prejudices against the disabled or regard people who had disabilities as 'inferior,' I viewed disabilities as challenges that had to be overcome. This class has helped me see persons with disabilities as people with particular conditions or differences, not as people defined by a singular characteristic. Everyone has personal deficits and strengths, but needing 'talking books' to read a book does not make a blind or dyslexic person defined by their condition any more than someone who needs glasses to see the same text. Defining persons with disabilities as people 'with' specific conditions, such as saying that Johnny is a child 'with ADHD' rather than a 'hyperactive kid,' much as you would say someone is 'a person who wears glasses' rather than a 'glasses-wearing friend' has been helpful in changing my mindset.

Before I took this course, I also had a…… [Read More]

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Perception How Does Depth Perception Occur in

Words: 4390 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77917272

Perception

How does depth perception occur in a person who gains sight after being congenital blind?

Depth perception is necessary for the ability to perform many tasks including driving, and many other activities. The ability to perceive the distance of objects is a complex process. hen people are born blind in one eye, regardless of the reason, they do not develop the ability to perceive depths. Their world is flat compared to that experienced by the rest of the world. hen that person undergoes surgery or other procedures to restore sight to the blind eye many of these patients are able to perceive depth. The ability to do this defies commonly held views on the connection between visual acuity, depth perception and motor development.

This research explores current research on depth perception and the development of depth perception. Studies in this area are limited to animal studies and those involving…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bushnell, E. & Boudreau, P. "Motor development and the mind: the role of motor abilities as a determinant of aspects of perceptual development." Child Development. August 1993.

64.4: 1005-1021. Web. 21 October 2012.

Deregowski, J. "Difficulties in Pictorial Depth Perception." Africa British Journal of Psychology. August 1968. 59.3: 195-204. Web. 21 October 2012.

Fulcher. E. "Gibson's theory of direct perception." Crucial, a division of Learning Matters Ltd.
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Biological Psychology

Words: 2139 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36635259

Behavioral Psychology

The main link between the brain and the mind is through the nervous system. It processes information from various regions in the body and transmits it via electrical and chemical signals. The study of the relationship that the brain has on the mind, consciousness and behavior is called behavioral psychology. Decades ago, scientists would use electrodes to stimulate various regions of the brain to understand how it affected the body. Today psychologists use modern radiological techniques to understand mental processes and behaviorism in diseases ranging from Huntington to Epilepsy. (Nobus, 2000)

Although many interesting stories and interpretations have led to the evolution of biological psychology, a great contribution to this field was made by the famous psychologist, Signmund Freud.

Sigmund Freud was born in 1856 and spent most of his life in Vienna. From early on in life, Freud had a strong inclination towards human concerns, and even…… [Read More]

REFERENCES:

Ablon JS., & Jones EE. (1999). Psychotherapy process in the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program. J Consult Clin Psychol, 67:64 -- 75.

Cameron, P. (1967). Confirmation of the freudian psychosexual stages utilizing sexual symbolism.Psychological Reports, 21(1), 33-39. doi: 10.2466/pr0.1967.21.1.33

Sigmund, F. (1925). An autobiographical study . Retrieved from http://www2.winchester.ac.uk/edstudies/courses/level two sem two/freudautopdf.pdf

Westen, D., & Gabbard, G. (2002). Developments in cognitive neuroscience: I. conflict, compromise, and connectionism. J Am Psychoanal Assoc, 50(1), 53-98.
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Adult Day Care Industry

Words: 5610 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8036286

Adult Day Care Industry

ABC Adult Day Care will be a mid-sized company, which will provide adult day care services to the residents of Boston. This mid-sized adult care facility will serve adults aged fifty years and above. It will provide community-based day health services for the elderly and disabled. Services offered include living assistance, nursing, therapy, meals, and social activities. Their services will be secure and safe, presenting the elderly with an excellent place where their caring services will be met. ABC Adult Day Care will be a privately held organization headed by its founder, Ben Stevenson. Mr. Stevenson has extensive experience in strategic business planning. His advanced knowledge and interest in business are the driving force behind his business. A few employees who have extensive experience in adult care fields will support the daily operations of the facility. With the rising rate of inflation, many American families struggle…… [Read More]

References

Bryan, C.J., & Rudd, M.D. (2011). Managing suicide risk in primary care. New York: Springer Pub. Co.

Cooper, P.D. (2010). Health care marketing: A foundation for managed quality. Gaithersburg, Md: Aspen Publishers.

Davis, C. & Lynn, J. (2010). Start your own senior services business: Adult day-care, relocation service, home-care, transportation service, concierge, travel service and more. Irvine, Calif.: Entrepreneur Press.

Fitzpatrick, J.J., Glasgow, A., & Young, J.N. (2013). Managing your practice: A guide for advanced practice nurses. New York: Springer Pub. Co.
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Fault An Alternative to the Current Tort-Based

Words: 30263 Length: 70 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86754711

Fault: An Alternative to the Current Tort-Based System in England and Wales

The United Kingdom

statistics regarding claims

THE NATIONAL HEALTH SYSTEM

OBSTACLES TO DUE PROCESS

THE CASE FOR REFORM

THE REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT

THE RISING COST OF LITIGATION

LORD WOOLF'S REFORMS

MORE COST CONTROLS

THE UNITED STATES

PAUL'S PULLOUT

THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY

TORT REFORM IN AMERICA

FLEEING PHYSICIANS

STATISTICS FOR ERROR, INJURY AND DEATH

THE CALL FOR REFORM IN 2003: A FAMILIAR REFRAIN

THE UNITED STATES SITUATION, IN SUMMARY

NEW ZEALAND CASE STUDIES

THE SWEDISH SCHEME

COMPARISON: WHICH SYSTEM IS BETTER?

FIRST: UNDERLYING DIFFERENCES

TALKING TORT: AMERICAN PECULIARITIES

AMERICANS CONSIDER NO-FAULT

BRITAIN CONSIDERS NO-FAULT

CONCLUSION

Works Cited

Appendix A THE UNITED KINGDOM

INTRODUCTION

At issue is the economic effectiveness of tort law in the common law legal system of England and Wales, as applied to medical and clinical negligence and malpractice cases. In response to economic concerns and a continual…… [Read More]

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Methods and Materials Used in Teaching Music Art and Physical ED in the Self-Contained Classroom

Words: 1640 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34282674

Teaching in the Self-Contained Classroom

Music, Art and Phys. Ed. In Self-contained classroom

In 1996, the United States Department of Education mandated laws that required school districts to create inclusive programs to integrate students with various disabilities into the general school population.

However, a study conducted by the National Council on disabilities in 2000 showed that most school districts have not transitioned into full mainstream classes. Instead, an estimated 20% of children with disabilities continue to spend their schooldays in self-contained classrooms, apart from the general school population (right and right).

Proponents of the self-contained classroom, however, believe that such settings can be advantageous, particularly for students with hearing impairments, mental retardation and those with physical or learning disabilities.

This paper examines how students in total or semi-self-contained classrooms can benefit from instruction in art, music and physical education. It looks at the challenges of teaching such classes and how…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boyer, Lynn and Christine Lee. "Converting Challenge to Success: Supporting a New Teacher of Students with Autism." The Journal of Special Education, 35(2). Summer 2001. Wilson Database.

MacDonald, Victoria and Deborah L. Speece. "Making Time: A teacher's Report on Her First Year of Teaching Children with Emotional Disabilities." The Journal of Special Education, 35(2). Summer 2001. ProQuest Database.

Shapiro, Deborah R. And L. Kristi Sayers. "Who Does What on the Interdisciplinary Team: Regarding Physical Education for Students With Disabilities?" Teaching Exceptional Children, 35(6). July/August 2003. Wilson Database.

Wexler, Alice. "Painting their Way Out: Profiles of Adolescent Art Practice at the Harlem Hospital Art Studio." Studies in Art Education, 43(4). Summer 2002. ProQuest Databse.
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Teaching Communication Skills for Students With Autism

Words: 6440 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69966135

Teaching Communication Skills for Students With Autism

The conditions for diagnosis for autism that are presently prevalent within the U.S. are those mentioned in the American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistic Manual for Mental Disorders," Fourth Edition, which is generally pinpointed as 'DSM-IV." Autism is taken into account by the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual (4th Ed, DSM-IV, American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as an existent development disorder (PDD) that is impacted by abnormal or impaired development in social cooperation and speech combined with a constrained array of actions and individual wishes. (Gresham et el, 1999).

Autism is termed as an impotent syndrome marked chiefly by important difficulty in the evolution of speech and social functioning. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) envisages a vast definition of autism that is comprehensive of associated impotencies like Asperger Syndrome, ett's Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder. Autism and ASD are identifications portraying students with a vast array…… [Read More]

References

Biklen D. (1990) Communication abound: autism and praxis. Harvard Educational Review; 60:291-314

Biklen D, Morton M, Gold D, Berrigan C, Swaminathan S. (1992) Facilitated communication: implications for individuals with autism. Top Lang Disord; 12:1-28.

Biklen D. (1993) Facilitated communication. Harvard Mental Health Newsletter; 10:5-7

Bondy, A. And Frost, L. (1994). The Picture Exchange Communication System. Focus on Autistic Behavior 9, 1-19.
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Statement of Intent

Words: 1185 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17773858

Letter of Intent: Personal Statement

To College of ____ Admissions Committee,

I am applying for the Master's degree in the School of Social Work, because I truly believe that it is my life's calling to make people's lives better by helping them with their daily struggles through practical help and techniques for self-empowerment. This is no easy task for either party, but I believe that if both parties are committed to the task of improvement and the task of making things better, then all things are possible. The strengths that I bring to this endeavor are a full commitment, a tremendous amount of empathy, and practical experience and theories under my belt to work for concerted improvements for other people.

Imagine that you have had the social work career of your dreams. Now, you have retired and written an autobiography.

I've been extremely blessed and fortunate to have a long…… [Read More]

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How to Help a Mother Feed a Child With Difficulty Swallowing

Words: 1546 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62639660

teaching and learning to patients with dysphagia. The situation involves the researcher's own personal experience teaching a Mom of 16-month-old diagnosis with dysphagia and how to learn how to feed him. This paper discusses the client's background, learning objectives, learning needs, outcomes, teaching strategies, and evaluation of outcomes and provides guidance for a mother facing these same issues.

Infants and children need to consume sufficient amount of nutrients in order to grow. Swallowing difficulties has an effect on dietary intake and affects a child's growth and development. For this reason, it is important to manage dysphagia in pediatrics.

Dysphagia is a disruption in swallowing that compromises safety, efficiency, or adequacy of nutritional intake. Swallowing and breathing share a common space in the pharynx, and problems in either of these processes can affect a child's ability to protect their airway during swallowing and ingestion of fluid or food safely.

About 1%…… [Read More]

References

Dysphagia and swallowing disorders. Retrieved from http://nursing.advanceweb.com/Regional-Articles/Features/Nurses-Role-With-Dysphagia.aspx.

East, L., Nettles, K., Vansant, A. & Daniels, S. Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia With the Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study. Journal of Radiology Nursing.

Gosa, M. & Coleman, J. Thickened Liquids as a Treatment for Children with Dysphagia and Associated Adverse Effects A systematic Review.

Nurses' Role With Dysphagia. Retrieved from https://consultgeri.org/try-this/general-assessment/issue-20. Preventing Aspiration in Older Adults with Dysphagia
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Facilitated Communication

Words: 833 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29329424

Facilitated communication is widely under scrutiny and doubt owing to the fact that one cannot ascertain the authorship of the typed messages. FC, as it is commonly known, is designed to assist a person with autism to communicate by use of a message board or even an electronic device. The procedure involves a facilitator supporting the hand or other body organ of the affected person with the intention of assisting them to point to letters or type on a provided display to formulate messages. The intention of the physical contact is to provide support for the body organs and give stabilization and to enable them to slow down. It is also meant to assist such a person draw away from the keyboard before choosing the next letter. osemary Crossley is credited for introducing the method for the first time in the 70s in Australia. It was first used to handle…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (1994). Resolution on facilitated communication by the American Psychological Association. Adopted in Council, August 14, 1994, Los Angeles, Ca.

Supporting school age students on the autism spectrum. (2014). Retrieved August 26, 2016, from http://www.positivepartnerships.com.au/en/fact-sheet/facilitated-communication-autism
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Applying Theory to a Practice Problem

Words: 928 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47724863

Chronic Sorrow

Chronic illness is a concept that was brought to the fore over 40 years ago by Olshansky. The term is used to describe the grief and sadness experience that parents of children with disabilities go through for a lifetime. The intensity of this experience varies from person to person, family member to family member and situation to situation. Olshansky chose to view the phenomenon as a normal and continuous response as opposed to a pathological condition. Experts were encouraged to note the occurrence of the condition when dealing with a parent or a caregiver of a child with disability. They are encouraged to provide support the expressions and feelings of such parents (Peterson & Bredow, 2013, pp. 96-97).

The occurrence of chronic sorrow syndrome was validated by initial research carried out in the 80s. esearchers such as Burke et al. pointed out that the continuous nature of losing…… [Read More]

References

Ahlstrom, G. I. (2007). Experiencing Loss and Chronic Sorrow in Persons with Severe Chronic Illness. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16(3A), 76-83. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6313596_Experiencing_loss_and_chronic_sorrow_in_persons_with_severe_chronic_illness

Borkon, D. A. (2008). Is Chronic Sorrow Present in Maternal Caregivers of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disordered Children? Adlerian Counselling and Psychotherapy. http://alfredadler.edu/sites/default/files/Borkon%20MP%202009.pdf

Isaksson, A-K. (2007). Chronic Sorrow and Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Orebro Studies in Caring Sciences 12. http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:137348/FULLTEXT01.pdf&sa=U&ei=mRpOU-_jNoHdtAaX_IHADQ&ved=0CEIQFjAH&usg=AFQjCNEOnPREJrlQluN534bq57kX56S8oQ

Monsson, Y. (2010). The Effects of Hope on Mental Health and Chronic Sorrow in Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. https://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/bitstream/handle/1808/6981/Monsson_ku_0099D_10980_DATA_1.pdf?sequence=1
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Nerve Damage During Spinal Taps

Words: 799 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21905582

Nerves Damaged Spinal Tap

Nerves Damaged During Spinal Tap: Can a spinal tap cause a person pain, numbness and weakness in the right lower leg for life?

The complications resulting from lumbar puncture (spinal tap) have been well documented in the neurosurgical literature. These complications include mild backache, persistent headache, meningitis, and herniated disc, as well as inoculation of epidermal tissue, and the associated growth of epidermoid tumors (Siddiqi and Buchheit, 1982).

There have also been documented cases of nerve root injury associated with spinal tap. Siddiqi and Buchheit have reported a case of an impacted or herniated nerve root associated with lumbar puncture. The patient presented with pain in the lower left leg into the ankle. Their finding of an impacted herniated nerve root, presumably causing postmyelogram sciatica and worsening of the preexisting low-back pain, appears unique. The mechanism of such an injury is thought to be herniation of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anwar, S., Nalla, S. And Fernando, D. (2007) Abducens nerve palsy is a complication of lumbar puncture. European Journal of Internal Medicine. Letters to the Editor. 19: 636-637.

Hasegawa K., and Yamamoto N. (1999) Nerve Root Herniation Secondary to Lumbar Puncture in the Patient With Lumbar Canal Stenosis: A Case Report. Spine. Volume 24, Number 9, pp 915 -- 917.

Siddiqi T. And Buchheit, W. (1982) Herniated nerve root as a complication of spinal tap

Case report. J Neurosurg 56:565-566.
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Neurofibroma Genetic Traits and Impact

Words: 5537 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52789543

However, recently, anesthesiologists have suggest a low to mid thoracic epidural combined with adequate general anesthesia. This anesthetic technique will allow for adequate inter-operative monitoring. After the operation, the anesthesiologist must continue to monitor the patient for either hypertension, hypotension and hypoglycemia. The presence of either of these conditions may alter the course of the medication given to the patient once the patient is removed from the anesthesia.

Respiratory System

Neurofibroma can cause systemic problems within the various components of the Respiratory System. As has already been presented, Neurofibromas can cause partial blockages within upper parts of the trachea. However, Neurofibromas can also pose challenges or the anesthesiologist when dealing with nasal, sinus or maxilofacial cavities with Neurofibromas present within. One example of how devastatingly complex the Neurofibroma can become is seen when a benign neurofibroma can cause a superior vena cava compression. Such was the case of a 21-year-old…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Reflections on Disability What

Words: 1237 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67301864

What works for one patient may not work for the next. If everyone is treated according to the way that everyone else has always been treated then it may be that no one ever gets any better.

Every child should be treated so that they have the opportunity to have the best life possible. I definitely think that it would be unethical to not treat a child who I believe could minimize the consequences of a disabling condition. Every child deserves the chance to have the best life possible and if a medical professional has the ability to make sure that this happens then they should be bound to do just that. What constitutes a successful intervention for one child may not be viewed as being successful for the next, but they will find something that is successful for them. Every child has potential and it is up to the…… [Read More]

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Taliban Women Motives for Female

Words: 1232 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23626463

In some ways, the men who practice violence against women and attempt to control them to the degrees that the Taliban has decreed are simply carrying out the violence and the repression that was practiced against them; though it serves no constructive purpose and is indeed highly detrimental both to women and to the country as a whole, the Taliban's action against the women is at least partially a result of the cultural psychological repression that Afghanistan has suffered for thirty years. That, and the fact that a common enemy in women makes the Taliban that much stronger in its operations and control of the government and society as a whole, can be seen as the primary psychological motives for the Taliban's treatment of women.

Women in Islam

According to the Taliban themselves, however, their actions and attitudes towards women simply carry out strict Islamic law, and are necessary for…… [Read More]

References

Sengupta, Kim. "Abuse of Afghan women: 'It was my decision to die. I was getting beaten every day'." The Independent, 24 November 2006. Accessed 20 February 2010.  http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/abuse-of-afghan-women-it-was-my-decision-to-die-i-was-getting-beaten-every-day-425580.html .

Skaine, Rosemarie. The Women of Afghanistan Under the Taliban. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2000.
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Evidence Sixteen Individual Studies Reviews

Words: 491 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23433911

By using a review technique, evidence from many different studies and types of research could be compared and analyzed, leading to the result of a higher grade. The few guidelines that were reviewed were the most clear in their recommendations, yet because the direct evidence that led to the formation of these guidelines was not fully provided the recommendations received a lower score. This is not to suggest that these guidelines, when produced by reputable organizations, are not worthy of implementation or consideration, but rather that further investigation into the guideline areas, such that primary research data is found that supports the recommendations in the guidelines published. Having this data directly available will enable the guidelines to be viewed with a higher score of validity and reliability.

The majority of the experimental or observational studies in this set of research received low grades for their recommendation for a variety of…… [Read More]

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2004 Case of Missouri v Seibert That

Words: 368 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68962041

2004 case of Missouri v. eibert that was appealed to the U.. upreme Court to generate a new rule prohibiting a specific practice often used by, and taught to police officers. That technique involved a two-tiered interrogation strategy expressly designed and intended to circumvent the Fifth Amendment constitutional protections guaranteed by the Miranda rule. The way the strategy worked was that police would deliberately delay reading Miranda warnings to question suspects for the purpose of acquiring information about their culpable conduct. Afterwards, they would Mirandize the same subject and then re-open the discussion, referencing that information. The suspects invariably made admissions of guilt after being Mirandized because they knew they had already provided the information and were unaware of the legal distinction of statements "inside" and "outside" of Miranda warnings.

The first admission is absolutely inadmissible. At the time it was made, the suspect was already participating in a custodial…… [Read More]

Sources Consulted

Hoover, L. "The Supreme Court Brings an End to the "End Run" Around

Miranda." FBI

Law Enforcement Bulletin, Vol. 74, No. 6 (June, 2005): 26 -- 32.

http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/law-enforcement-bulletin/2005-
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Assistive Technology the Least Restrictive Environment Clause

Words: 2915 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62511655

Assistive Technology

The "least restrictive environment" clause of the IDEA requires the student be placed in a standard learning environment whenever it is practical (Beard, Carpenter, & Johnston, 2011).

Technology allows students who have visual impairments to be able to admission to the general curriculum, to increase their options towards literacy, and to improve communication. There are a variety of assistive technology tools that are designed for students with visual impairments, but most require specialized instruction. Depending on the level of the child's visual level of impairment such devices include range from electronic Braille note takers to video magnifiers to screen reader software to auditory conversion devices.

eading and writing are the fundamental tools that young students learn in the early grades and assistive devices for Emily should concentrate on developing these skills. Students with impaired vision that are not blind may benefit from changes in the size of print…… [Read More]

References

Beard, L.A., Carpenter, L.B., & Johnston, L.B. (2011). Assistive technology: Access for all students (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

Clark, R. (1983). Reconsidering research on learning from media. Review of Educational Research, 53(4), 445 -- 459.

Cramer, M., Hirano, S.H., Tentori, M., Yeganyan, M.T., & Hayes G.R. (2011). Classroom- based assistive technology: Collective use of interactive visual schedules by students with autism. Proceedings of the CHI 2011, 1-10.

Hasselbring, T.S., & Bausch, M.E. (2006). Learning in a digital age: Assistive technologies for reading. Educational Leadership, 63(4), 72-75.