Chronic Illness Essays (Examples)

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Chronic Fatigue Is Normal Aspect

Words: 2091 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48201858

However, he questions the research that has been done in this area. First, he wonders whether the exercise is a placebo effect based on the anticipation of improvement. The second question is the acceptability of this treatment. Many CFS patients actively avoid exercise and many healthcare providers in fact recommend rest at all costs rather than a concern of relapse. However, the positive aspect of the CBT and the exercise is that it has the patients question their fears. In both cases, there is a psychotherapeutic affect that may be beneficial.

The use of antidepressants is another approach that has been suggested and studied. However, the results on this have also been mixed. As Demitrack (1996, p. 282) states, "At the present time, it is unrealistic to present medication as a sole treatment for this disease." It may be that medications could work in the short-term and provide enough symptomatic…… [Read More]

References

Center for Disease Control (2006, May 9). Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Retrieved January 30, 2007 http://www.cdc.gov/cfs/cfsbasicfacts.htm.

Demitrack, M. And Abbey, S. (1996) (Eds) Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. New York: Guilford Press.

Hyland, M.E. et. al. (2006) Letter to the Editor. The Lancet 367 (9522), 1573-1576

Komaroff, a., & Fagioli, L. (1996) Medial Assessment of Fatigue and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. In M. Demitrack and S. Abbey (Eds) Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (pg. 154-181). New York: Guilford Press,.
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Chronic Sorrow

Words: 1631 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67060671

Chronic sorrow is a continuous, pervasive sadness and also permanent and intermittently intense. An individual often encounters loss experience because of their disability, relative or chronic illness (Isaksson, 2007, p. 18). Chronic sorrow as a concept was introduced by Olshansky (1962) while he was dealing with children with disability of various kinds and their parents or relatives. He noted that the children's parents showed what he referred to as a pervasive reaction of psychological nature to the predicament of parenting mentally defective children (Monsson, 2010, p.16).

Such grief, he observed, was not dissimilar to the type shown by parents that have lost a child. The parents of mentally defective children have it worse because their pain is a continuous one. This is why he referred to the concept as chronic sorrow (Monsson, 2010, p. 16). It has been thought that chronic sorrow entails experiencing intermittent spans of distress and pain,…… [Read More]

References

Ahlstrom, G. I. (2007). Experiencing Loss and Chronic Sorrow in Persons with Severe Chronic Illness. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16 (3A), 76-83.  https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6313596_Experiencing_loss_and_chronic_sorrow_in_persons_with_severe_chronic_illness 

Borkon, D. A. (2008). Is Chronic Sorrow Present in Maternal Caregivers of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disordered Children? Adlerian Counselling and Psychotherapy.  http://alfredadler.edu/sites/default/files/Borkon%20MP%202009.pdf 

Dozier, B. (2015). Application of Middle-Range Theory. Professional Practices in Nursing. Wordpress.com.  https://barbradozier.wordpress.com/2015/07/03/application-of-middle-range-theory/ 

Eakes, G., Burke, M. L. & Hainsworth, M. A. (1998). Middle-Range theory of Chronic Sorrow. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 30(2), pp. 179(6).  http://www.psychodyssey.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Middle-range-theory-of-chronic-sorrow.pdf
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Challenges and Management of Chronic and Terminal Illness

Words: 732 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44141157

Management of Chronic and Terminal Illness

For people dealing with chronic or terminal illness, stress levels can be very high. While that is to be expected, high stress levels only make things worse. Accepting the inevitable is easier on a person's emotional well-being, but it may take some time to get to that point (Taylor, 2005). If a diagnosis is new, denial is often the first emotion the person faces. He or she does not want to believe the sickness or the severity of it. After denial, there are other stages that a person usually works through, including bargaining, anger, and depression, before acceptance finally sets in and the person is able to get on with life as much as possible. Chronic illnesses can include things like diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease, COPD, and other health problems (CDC, 2010). Many of these diseases are preventable, but they are not curable…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, G. (2004). The growing burden of chronic disease in America. Public Health Reports, 119.

CDC (2010). Chronic diseases and health promotion. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/index.htm 

Taylor, S.E. (2005). Health psychology (8th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill
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Application of Chronic Sorrow Theory

Words: 2439 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96370577

Chronic Sorrow Theory

The term 'chronic sorrow' may be described as sadness of a persistent, periodically severe, increasing, and lasting nature. This condition may be triggered in a person because of ongoing loss, arising from personal chronic disease, a loved one's illness, or personal disability (Isaksson, 2007, p. 18). Olshansky (1962) first put forward the "chronic sorrow" concept when working with children suffering from physical or mental disabilities and members of their family (parents, siblings, etc.). The researcher noted that these children' parents exhibited a persistent psychological response to their experience of being the parents of a physically or mentally disabled child (Monsson, 2010, p. 16). Through inductive reasoning, the chronic sorrow theory -- a middle range model -- was developed, which was corroborated using both qualitative research and literature review. (Peterson & Bredow, 2013, p. 98)

The chronic sorrow theory helps create a framework to comprehend individuals' reactions to…… [Read More]

References

Azar, R. & Solomon, C. R. (2001). Coping Strategies of Parents Facing Child Diabetes Mellitus. Journal of Paediatric Nursing, 16(6), 418-428. doi:10.1053/jpdn.2001.27878  http://www.mta.ca/pshl/docs/copingstrategiesparents.pdf 

Cousino, M. K. & Hazen, R. A. (2013). Parenting Stress among Caregivers of Children with Chronic Illness: A Systematic Review. Journal of Paediatric Psychology, doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jst049. http://jpepsy.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2013/07/10/jpepsy.jst049.full

Eakes, G., Burke, M. L. & Hainsworth, M. A. (1998). Middle-Range theory of Chronic Sorrow. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 30(2), pp. 179(6).  http://www.psychodyssey.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Middle-range-theory-of-chronic-sorrow.pdf 

Isaksson, A-K. (2007). Chronic Sorrow and Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Orebro Studies in Caring Sciences 12.  http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:137348/FULLTEXT01.pdf&sa=U&ei=mRpOU-_jNoHdtAaX_IHADQ&ved=0CEIQFjAH&usg=AFQjCNEOnPREJrlQluN534bq57kX56S8oQ
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Managing Mental Illness Variations of

Words: 1875 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9189453

One aspect of a goal attainment program researched within the content of an article by Ng & sang, is group therapy work, where individuals are offered the opportunity to self-reflect through the group process to help assimilate "normal" behaviors and reasonable goals into their own hoped for future.

raditional psychiatric rehabilitation programs focus on 'problems' and 'negatives' of individuals and tend to ignore strengths and assets (Hagedorn, 1992). Unlike the traditional approach, this program uses a holistic and client-centered approach (Rogers, 1984) which helps individuals establish future directions in home and work resettlement. he Goal Attainment Program focused on the participants' future expected life roles and social functioning in relation to the environmental context (i.e. their 'participation level', according to the International Classification of Impairment, Disability and Handicap (ICIDH-2) of the World Health Organization). he program emphasized the needs and positive aspects of individuals (Rogers, 1984), as well as the…… [Read More]

Traditional psychiatric rehabilitation programs focus on 'problems' and 'negatives' of individuals and tend to ignore strengths and assets (Hagedorn, 1992). Unlike the traditional approach, this program uses a holistic and client-centered approach (Rogers, 1984) which helps individuals establish future directions in home and work resettlement. The Goal Attainment Program focused on the participants' future expected life roles and social functioning in relation to the environmental context (i.e. their 'participation level', according to the International Classification of Impairment, Disability and Handicap (ICIDH-2) of the World Health Organization). The program emphasized the needs and positive aspects of individuals (Rogers, 1984), as well as the attainment of self-esteem in the self-actualization hierarchy (Maslow, 1970). The program is based on the belief that each individual has the potential to control his/her life and to choose what he/she wishes to become. With this belief, change can only take place when the individual finds the meaning in himself/herself. Positive change can occur throughout life. The role of therapist is to facilitate the willingness to change (Hagedorn, 1992). This study also used Frankl's (1946/1992) belief that the most basic human motivation is the will to meaning. (Ng & Tsang, 2002, p. 59)

Self-control and self-esteem cannot be learned in a vacuum, as individuals have little if any comparison models, which given them hope for their own future, if they are isolated from society. Group therapy settings can allow the individual to create a reasonable set of hopes that can build social health and help the individual learn how to develop coping skills for their positive, rather than negative future in the community where they live. Group therapy is an essential tool for this attainment, as the intense interaction within groups helps individuals see and feel what it might be like to confront the steps and stages of social growth while commiserating with others who have the same or similar obstacles, i.e. mental illness management, as they themselves have.

Managing Mental Illness: Variations of Group Therapies in the Literature
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Chronic Lyme Disease Lyme Disease Is a

Words: 2174 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35983372

Chronic Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is a contentious illness, and the reality of chronic Lyme disease induced by unrelenting infection with the Lyme spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) is the topic of continued debate (Hogan 16). The objective of this paper is to analyze critically the claims of existence of the illness. The paper would also offer a discussion on why insurance companies should provide cover for patients suffering from the Lyme disease.

Chronic Lyme disease does exist. A greater part of the patients does not exhibit the initial symptoms of the Lyme infection. However, some patients show chronic symptoms, which persist long after the antibiotics are over. A tiny tick forms the foundation of the question as to whether the Lyme disease exists. The disease got its name in 1975 after its first diagnosis in Old Lyme. A well renowned infection transmitted through the bite of a deer tick the disease…… [Read More]

Works cited

Hogan, Mary. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: The Facts. New york: Oxforfd University press.

2002. Print

Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Committee on Lyme Disease and Other Tick-Borne Diseases: the State of the Science; National Academies Press . Critical needs and gaps in understanding

, amelioration, and resolution of lyme and other tick-borne diseases: the short-term and long-term outcomes: workshop report. New york: national Academies press, 2007. Print
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Illness Modern Nursing Is Extremely

Words: 723 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34974867

It is also a population that often has limited resources and one that seeks to find others to help comfort and educate them. Modern technology has certainly improved both the diagnosis and treatment of the illness, but there are so many options that the patient is often left bewildered and frightened (Guadalupe).

A proactive and professional nursing approach to this illness takes Mishel's theory and uses it in four ways:

To combat ambiguity -- Patients are unaware of the progress and severity of their illness and often fill in with worst-case scenarios. Open and honest communication about that status of the illness will alleviate many concerns, or at least allow for uncoerced decision making.

To combat complexity -- Illness is complex and often based on statistical tables, not individual expressions. Using Michel, the nurse can simplify to the necessary degree both the illness and options.

To provide information -- More…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Alligood, M. (2010). Nursing Theory: Utilization and Application. Denver, CO: Mosby.

Guadalupe, K. (2010, Feb.) Understanding a meningioma diagnosis using Mishel's theory of uncertainty in illness. British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing. 6 (2): 77-82.

Mishel, M. And Clayton, M. (2003). Theories of Uncertainty in Illness. In Smith, M. ed. Middle

Range Theory for Nursing. New York: Springer. Chapter 2.
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Breaking the Cycle of Chronic Pain and Depression

Words: 1778 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76236090

chronic pain and resulting depression. Specifically, it will show the connection between chronic pain and depression, how it affects the person and the ones around them, what treatments are available, and ways to break the cycle.

BEAKING THE CYCLE OF CHONIC PAIN AND DEPESSION

There is always hope. Depression blinds us to that fact. If we can somehow hold on to our hope, just maybe we can find a way to get through"(Feinberg, 2002).

Depression - "Depression results when individuals forfeit their personal power. To overcome guilt, insecurity, and anxiety is to conquer frustration and to regain personal power" (Miletich, 1995, p. 1). "Depression is derived from 'deprimere,' a Latin word which means 'to press down'" (Miletich 1995, p. 26).

Chronic Pain - is defined as pain that lasts six or more months. Pain is any type of feeling or hurt that is annoying, hurtful, or causes discomfort. Chronic pain…… [Read More]

References

Block, A.R. (1996). Presurgical Psychological Screening in Chronic Pain Syndromes: A Guide for the Behavioral Health Practitioner. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Fineberg, Andrew. (2002). Andrew's Depression Page. Retrieved November 12, 2002, Personal Web site: http://www.blarg.net/~charlatn/depression/Depression.html

Kleinman, A. (1988). The Illness Narratives: Suffering, Healing, and the Human Condition. New York: Basic Books.

Miletich, John J., compiler. (1995). Depression: A Multimedia Sourcebook. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
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Harmful Health Effects of Chronic

Words: 2208 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57971802

"The IOM report recognized the therapeutic benefits of medical marijuana and urged that marijuana be made available to individual patients while research continued on the development of new drugs developed from marijuana" (Zeese).

Conclusion

In conclusion, there are two schools of thought on this issue. One view sees very little difference in terms of health implication between marijuana and cigarette smoking. However, there is some resistance to the idea that marijuana is as unhealthy or as dangerous as cigarettes. This had led to the notion that marijuana is less harmful to the user than tobacco. However, many reports and studies tend to stress that while the effects of each substance on the individual differ, in the long - term both have negative effects that should be emphasized. (Vlahov et al., 2004)

While there is a strong case for the benefits of marijuana in certain instances and for certain conditions, this…… [Read More]

References www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=98432636

Bock, a.W. (2000). The Politics of Medical Marijuana. Santa Ana, CA: Seven Locks.

Executive Summary: Institute of Medicine (1999). Retrieved July 3, 2008, from http://www.nap.edu/html/marimed/es.html

Fact Sheet Cigarette Smoking-Related Mortality. (2006) Retrieved July 3, 2008, at http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/factsheets/cig_smoking_mort.htm

Gieringer D. (1994) Marijuana Health Mythology.
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Living With Chronic Low Back Pain Snelgrove

Words: 2475 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70504720

living with chronic low back pain." (Snelgrove & Liossin, 2009 P. 735). Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a major health problem with enormous economic and social costs. In the United States, between 60% and 80% of the people suffer from back pain in their life of which 30% develop into CLBP. Despite the widespread occurrence of CLBP, the traditional treatments which include back exercises, drug, physical treatment, and education do not always help. (Hadi, Ali, Isa et al. 2009).

Weiss, & Werkmann, (2009) define CLBP as the pain in the lumbosacral region and the sacroiliac joints. Typically, the radicular symptoms and iliolumbar ligaments may also be part of syndrome in the CLBP, and there is prevalent of CLBP in the aged population. CLBP is a type of chronic pain that results to diverse painful and benign condition. Chronic pain may occur despite no evidence of tissue damage in the…… [Read More]

References

Briggs, A.M. Jordan, J.E. O'Sullivan, P.B. et al. (2011). Individuals with chronic low back pain have greater difficulty in engaging in positive lifestyle behaviours than those without back pain: An assessment of health literacy. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders: 12:161.

Curry, L.A. (2009). Qualitative and Mixed Methods Provide Unique Contributions to Outcomes Research. Circulation.119:1142-1452.

Hadi, M. Ali, S.V. Isa, M.Z. et al. (2009). Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for Chronic Low Back Pain (LBP). European Journal of Scientific Research.29 (1): 76-81.

Pope, C. Ziebland, S. & Mays, N. (2000). Analysing qualitative data. BMJ 320: 114
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Foodborne Illness Foodborne Diseases and

Words: 1547 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84939334

(De Leon, 2010)

Finally, in recent years there has been a call for more stringent regulatory measured to be put in place in order to prevent this category of disease. Many experts refer to outdated laws and policies that are not successful in detecting and prevent problems along the entire food production process (Jessen). They also refer to restricted and inadequate legal tools to check the spread of the diseases. There is therefore a need not only to update present legislation but also for organizations and individuals to be become more aware of the need to prevent this type of disease from occurring.

eferences

De Leon D. ( 2010) Start at the Store: 7 Ways to Prevent Foodborne Illness. etrieved from http://www.foodsafety.gov/blog/7ways.html

Definition of Foodborne disease. etrieved from http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=25399Focus on Epidemiology. Houston Health (2001). etrieved from http://www.houstontx.gov/health/HoustonHealth/winter01.pdf

Foodborne diseases take heavy toll on public health. etrieved from http://www.google.co.za/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=18&ved=0CDgQFjAHOAo&url=http%3A%2F%2Fbioniche.com%2Fnewsroom_factsheet.cfm&ei=SJ7ITMX1LdDCswako7iPDg&usg=AFQjCNESQAvUohGiQZZN1L1TCFwwl-DYQ&sig2=bnOdvFEDnTPpuZO8D2blQ

Foodborne Illness.…… [Read More]

References

De Leon D. ( 2010) Start at the Store: 7 Ways to Prevent Foodborne Illness. Retrieved from http://www.foodsafety.gov/blog/7ways.html

Definition of Foodborne disease. Retrieved from http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=25399Focus on Epidemiology. Houston Health (2001). Retrieved from  http://www.houstontx.gov/health/HoustonHealth/winter01.pdf 

Foodborne diseases take heavy toll on public health. Retrieved from http://www.google.co.za/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=18&ved=0CDgQFjAHOAo&url=http%3A%2F%2Fbioniche.com%2Fnewsroom_factsheet.cfm&ei=SJ7ITMX1LdDCswako7iPDg&usg=AFQjCNESQAvUohGiQZZN1L1TCRFwwl-DYQ&sig2=bnOdvFERDnTPpuZO8D2blQ

Foodborne Illness. Retrieved from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/foodborneillness.html
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Stereotypes of Mental Illness in

Words: 1069 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21625032

, 2009). To the extent that these young people are perceived in terms of stereotypical views by clinicians will likely be the extent to which the therapeutic relationship will be adversely affected. In this regard, Villaneuva and her associates conclude that, "Myths and stereotypes about mental illness that can create personal biases and lead to discrimination. Such stereotypical views together with long-standing beliefs about mental illness can affect the nurse-patient relationship and ultimately influence the care that patients receive" (p. 221).

In response to this potential for stereotypical perceptions influencing clinicians' treatment of adolescents with mental disorders, a growing number of programs across the country have been launched in recent years to educate the public and healthcare professionals concerning stereotypes about mental illness in general and among young people in particular. Popular stereotypes about mental illness, though, can be powerful forces that are not easily changed. For example, a study…… [Read More]

References

Hinkelman, L. & Granello, DH (2003). Biological sex, adherence to traditional gender roles, and attitudes toward persons with mental illness: An exploratory investigation. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 25(4), 259-261.

Overton, S.L. & Medina, S.L. (2008). The stigma of mental illness. Journal of Counseling and Development, 86(2), 143-144.

Villanueva, C.S., Scott, S.H., Guzzetta, C.E. & Foster, B. (2009). Development and psychometric testing of the attitudes toward mental illness in Pediatric Patients Scale.

Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, 22(4), 220-221.
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Psychological Basis of Mental Illness Is Certainly

Words: 924 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60673893

psychological basis of mental illness is certainly only half of the story. Though mental illness is genetic, the actual symptoms and condition being presented is based on a careful marriage between biological and environmental factors. In particular, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), is a mental illness in which "people have unwanted and repeated thoughts, feelings, ideas, sensations or obsession, or behaviors that make them feel driven to do something (compulsions)" (National Institute of Mental Health, 2011). This mental illness, like many others is multi-faceted, in that there is a physiological process associated with it, a set of symptoms that manifest, certain diagnostic criterion and then a set of treatment options.

Foremost, the physiological process of mental illness is mainly concerned with the brain and certain regions of it. The physiological process is a process that evaluates the neural mechanisms of perception and behavior. esearch examining the brain has found that "a selective…… [Read More]

Riccardi, Christina J, Timpano, Kiara R, & Schmidt, Norman B (2010). A Case Study Perspective on the Importance of motivation in the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Clinical Case Studies, Volume 9, (Issue 4), pages 273-284.

Rosenberg, David R. & Keshavan, Matcheri S. (1998). Toward a Neurodevelopment Model of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Biological Psychiatry: Official Journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, Volume 43 (Issue 9), Pages 623-640.

Swinson, Richard P (2001). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Theory, Research, and Treatment. New York: The Guilford Press.
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Person for Mental Illness the

Words: 1953 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10571299

, 2001). (Corrigan, Watson, Byrne & Davis, 2005, p. 363)

Individuals who then enter the system and attempt treatment are taking a leap of faith that doing so will improve rather than continue to degrade their life and their options in it. Though HIPPA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) attempts to resolve issues of confidentiality, creating strict rules for who when and how communications about one's health can be communicated between individuals attempts to aide all health care clients they are specifically helpful with regard to mental health clients. Possible barriers they create with regard to the sharing of information between clinicians can also be specifically troubling in the mental health arena as the individual must be shown to be giving consent in some way to these communications and they also bar clinicians from sharing information with the individual's support network, such as family, unless permission has been granted…… [Read More]

References

Suicide. (2007). In the Columbia Encyclopedia (6th ed.). New York: Columbia University Press.

Corrigan, P.W., Watson, a.C., Byrne, P., & Davis, K.E. (2005). Mental Illness Stigma: Problem of Public Health or Social Justice?. Social Work, 50(4), 363.

Heeringen, K. (Ed.). (2001). Understanding Suicidal Behaviour: The Suicidal Process Approach to Research, Treatment, and Prevention. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Seaburn, D.B., Lorenz, a.D., Gunn, W.B., Gawinski, B.A., & Mauksch, L.B. (1996). Models of Collaboration: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals Working with Health Care Practitioners. New York: Basic Books.
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Pulmonary Rehab Program Chronic Lung

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13434437

he most common progressive chronic lung situations that would require the rehabilitation include interstitial lung disease, chest wall disease, bronchiectasis, and pre and post thoracic surgery. he fourth category of patients to offered pulmonary rehabilitation is those with recent exacerbation of COPD requiring hospitalization, without the anticipated recovery path, and whose functional baseline has changed significantly ("Service Specification," 2012).

he Problem:

Chronic lung diseases have developed to become one of the most common respiratory illnesses across the country. As the diseases have become one of the major reasons for hospitalizations of patients, they usually affect individuals at the age of 35 years and above despite of the fact that these individuals are usually not diagnosed until they are 50 years and above. he growth and rapid increase of chronic diseases is attributed to the tendency of many people with the disease not to get medical assistance. While the conditions continue…… [Read More]

The most common progressive respiratory disease is the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), which is a name that is also used to refer to a collection of lung diseases ("Introduction," 2012). The other common chronic lung diseases include emphysema, chronic bronchitis, chest wall disease, interstitial lung disease, chronic asthma, and obstructive airways disease. These chronic lung diseases usually involve a combination of three major factors i.e. airway diseases, lung circulation diseases, and lung tissue diseases. As the name suggests, the airway diseases affect the airways or tubes that transport oxygen and other gases to and from the lungs. In contrast, the lung tissues diseases affect the lung tissue structure through inflammation or scarring of the tissue. Lung circulation diseases affect the blood vessels in the lungs through scarring, clotting, or inflammation of these vessels. As a result, these diseases contribute to difficulties of the lungs to receive oxygen and release carbon dioxide. The severity of chronic lung diseases is basically dependent on the combination of these three conditions. However, most of the chronic lung diseases are attributed to the narrowing or blockage of the airways. For instance, emphysema, COPD, and chronic bronchitis are conditions that inhibit the ability of the tubes or airways to carry oxygen and other gases to and from the lungs. Generally, patients with chronic lung diseases such as COPD always have difficulties breathing because of airflow obstruction or narrowing of the airways.

As previously mentioned, these diseases account for a huge number of hospital emergency room visits and hospitalizations, although they are largely preventable. Despite being preventable, these diseases have become some of the major causes of death and key factors in the ever-increasing huge human and economic burden because of the tendency of patients to ignore their symptoms ('Emergency Department Support Fund Application," n.d). The major symptoms of these diseases include rising breathlessness, frequent chest infections, and constant cough with phlegm ("Introduction," 2012). The tendency to ignore these symptoms contributes to the many incidents of recidivism to acute care facilities.

The main cause of chronic lung diseases, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is smoking. An individual enhances the risk of developing these diseases when he/she smokes more and for long periods of time. Smoking results in scarring that increases the risk of chronic lung diseases, through irritating or inflaming the lungs. The inflammation in turn results in permanent lung changes over many years. During this period, the walls of the tubes or airways thicken as more mucus is generated. In addition to making the lungs lose their normal elasticity, the damage or harm to the delicate walls of the air sacs in the lungs results in the development of emphysema. Moreover, the smaller airways or tubes become narrowed or scarred. The combination of these permanent changes to the lungs contributes to symptoms of cough, breathlessness, and phlegm linked to chronic obstructive pulmonary
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Treating Mental Illness With a Family Oriented Approach

Words: 1782 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91979540

Family Therapy Treatment of Mental Illness

There has been a growing movement towards the use of family therapy methods for the treatment of mental illness in recent years. To determine the facts about this trend, this paper provides a review of the relevant literature concerning family therapy treatment of mental illness in three sections. In Section 1, a discussion concerning the views of O'Hanlon and owan's (2003) and Zeig and Munion (1999) for working with clients with chronic or severe mental illness is followed by an analysis of the extent to which they succeed in making a strong case for "brief therapy" with intensive clients. An assessment concerning the contribution of Milton Erickson to the assessment and treatment of different mental health diagnoses is followed by an analysis of their respective approaches and the corresponding benefits and limitations of each of these models. Section II provides a discussion concerning the…… [Read More]

References

Daroff, R. B. (2005, Fall). Solution-oriented therapy for chronic and severe mental illness. Journal of Psychotherapy Practice Research, 8(4), 318.

Gurman, A. S. & Messer, S. B. (2003). Essential psychotherapies: Theory and practice. New York: Guilford Press.

McFarlane, W. R., Dixon, L., Lukens, E., & Lucksted, A. (2003): A review of the literature about psychoeducation and schizophrenia. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 29(2), 223-227.

Simoneau, T., & Miklowitz, D. (2001): The sights and sounds of schizophrenia.
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Physiological Effects of Chronic Stress

Words: 1831 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31344353

Continuous production of cortisol may also decrease the availability of tryptophan, the precursor for serotonin, resulting in depression, other mood disorders, and changes in appetite and sleep. Hyperactivity of the stress response has been implicated in the pathophysiology of melancholic depression, anxiety, diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, substance abuse, eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, hyporeactivity of the stress response has been associated with disorders such as atypical depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, hypothyroidism, and obesity (Selhub, 2002).

It has been shown that there is a definite connection between chronic stress and physical and psychological responses in the body. Stress in small amounts is fine, but chronic stress over a long extended period of time has been shown to manifest itself in a number of different physical and physiological aliments. It is believed by many experts that people should take steps to decrease their stress levels in…… [Read More]

References

Dennis, Barbara. (2004). Interrupt the stress cycle. Natural Health. 34(9), p. 70-75.

Innes, Kim E., Vincent, Heather K. And Taylor, Ann Gill. (2007). Chronic Stress and Insulin

Resistance -- Related Indices of Cardiovascular Disease Risk, Part 2: A Potential Role for Mind- Body Therapies. Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine, 13(5), p44-51.

Rosch, Paul J. (2007). Stress and the Gut: Mind over Matter? Health & Stress. 11, p. 1-4.
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Queensland Fever the Illness Known

Words: 703 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65180266



In order to treat this condition, patients were hospitalized and given a series of treatments that nearly always included multiple daily dosages of doxycycline. Other treatments included intubation, ventilation, intravenous penicillin (for the patient provisionally diagnosed with leptospirosis), antimicrobial drugs, and digital amputation (for the patient suffering from digital necrosis) (Hanson). Most patients were able to recover after hospitalization for seven days, and continued to be treated for another seven days with doxycycline out of hospital. Other more severe cases were kept hospitalized for two weeks, and in one case, the patient was unable to return to work for two months (Hanson). Multiple tests were performed on each patient in order to determine further infections that may have developed in skin and blood tissues and to discover other common symptoms and effects of this specific disease. It was through these tests that the best treatments for each case were also…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anderson, Catherine, et al. "Diagnosis of Queensland Tick Typhus and African Tick Bite Fever

by PCR of Lesion Swabs." Emerging Infectious Diseases. 15.6 (2009): 963-965. 23 Jan.

2011. .

Hanson, Joshua P., et al. "Severe Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiosis, Australia." Emerging
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PICOT Analysis on Chronic Heart Failure

Words: 952 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20575519

PICOT Analysis on Chronic Heart Failure

One may describe heart failure (HF) as a complicated medical condition which may arise due to functional or structural cardiac disorders capable of hindering ventricular capability of ejecting or filling blood. Chronic HF (CHF) represents a serious health issue. Its prevalence in America stands at over 5.8 million, while over 23 million individuals across the globe are affected by this problem. The mortality rate linked to HF is 40% in the initial diagnostic year, which reduces to 10% subsequently. Individuals most impacted by the condition lie in the age group of over 65 years. This age group is associated with rather high healthcare costs and high mortality and morbidity rates. HF patients get admitted to hospitals often and their re-hospitalization rates continually increase. In this paper, peer-reviewed articles will be employed for shedding light on the clinical issue, its diagnosis, patient care and the…… [Read More]

References

Nicklas JM, Bleske BE, Van Harrison R, Hogikyan RV, Kwok Y, Chavey WE. (2013) Heart Failure: Clinical Problem and Management Issues. PubMed retrieved from  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23402460
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Sociological Theories of Mental Illness

Words: 1646 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45334137

social structures exert a definite pressure upon certain persons in the society to engage in nonconformist rather than conformist conduct," (Merton, 1938, p. 672). With his own italics emphasizing the stress and strain that social structures can produce in the individual, obert Merton outlines the basis of strain and stress theories. Stress is a natural part of life; it is how people cope with stress or react to it that matters most. Individual differences in background, situational variables, and also personality and psychological traits can also impact how people deal with stress and respond to stressors. However, some people will naturally encounter more stressors and more strain than others. Merton and other sociologists who recognized the value of strain theory showed how poverty and other structural variables cause stress and strain, and can often be the cause for behavioral problems including criminality. Yet once a person has been labeled a…… [Read More]

References

Agnew, R. & Scheuerman, H. (2015). Strain theories. Retrieved online: http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780195396607/obo-9780195396607-0005.xml

"Labeing Theory," (n.d.). Retrieved online: https://www.d.umn.edu/~bmork/2306/Theories/BAMlabeling.htm

McLeod, S. (2010). Stressful life events. Retrieved online: http://www.simplypsychology.org/SRRS.html

Merton, R.K. (1938). Social structure and anomie. American Sociological Review 3(5): 672-682.
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Applying Theory to a Practice Problem

Words: 928 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47724863

Chronic Sorrow

Chronic illness is a concept that was brought to the fore over 40 years ago by Olshansky. The term is used to describe the grief and sadness experience that parents of children with disabilities go through for a lifetime. The intensity of this experience varies from person to person, family member to family member and situation to situation. Olshansky chose to view the phenomenon as a normal and continuous response as opposed to a pathological condition. Experts were encouraged to note the occurrence of the condition when dealing with a parent or a caregiver of a child with disability. They are encouraged to provide support the expressions and feelings of such parents (Peterson & Bredow, 2013, pp. 96-97).

The occurrence of chronic sorrow syndrome was validated by initial research carried out in the 80s. esearchers such as Burke et al. pointed out that the continuous nature of losing…… [Read More]

References

Ahlstrom, G. I. (2007). Experiencing Loss and Chronic Sorrow in Persons with Severe Chronic Illness. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16(3A), 76-83.  https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6313596_Experiencing_loss_and_chronic_sorrow_in_persons_with_severe_chronic_illness 

Borkon, D. A. (2008). Is Chronic Sorrow Present in Maternal Caregivers of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disordered Children? Adlerian Counselling and Psychotherapy.  http://alfredadler.edu/sites/default/files/Borkon%20MP%202009.pdf 

Isaksson, A-K. (2007). Chronic Sorrow and Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Orebro Studies in Caring Sciences 12.  http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:137348/FULLTEXT01.pdf&sa=U&ei=mRpOU-_jNoHdtAaX_IHADQ&ved=0CEIQFjAH&usg=AFQjCNEOnPREJrlQluN534bq57kX56S8oQ 

Monsson, Y. (2010). The Effects of Hope on Mental Health and Chronic Sorrow in Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.  https://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/bitstream/handle/1808/6981/Monsson_ku_0099D_10980_DATA_1.pdf?sequence=1
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The Effectiveness of Behavioral Changes on Health

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54474099

Chronic illnesses, for instance diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are liable for several deaths that take place in the United States. Primary or causal factors for these illnesses are in general nutritional factors for instance use of tobacco (smoking), poor nourishment, and sedentary living. In particular, this research study attempted to establish the behavioral and medical effect of a therapeutic lifestyle-change intervention on a set of community helpers. The method of the study encompasses 348 participants in a randomized clinical trial between the ages of 24 and 81 years of age. The participants were requested to participate along with their significant other and thereafter randomized as a unit in pairs. The remaining participants were randomized individually as units. This encompassed teaching the participants the significance of making better decisions with reference to their lifestyles. The program results, six months later indicated that the patients had been having better nutrition and had…… [Read More]

References

Aldana, S. G., Greenlaw, R., Alberg, A., Diehl, H. A., Merrill, R. M., Thomas, C., Ohmine, S. (2006). The Behavioral and Clinical Effects of Therapeutic Lifestyle Change on Middle-aged Adults. Preventing Chronic Diseases.

Jepson, R. G., Harris, F. M., Platt, S., & Tannahill, C. (2010). The effectiveness of interventions to change six health behaviours: a review of reviews. BMC public health, 10(1), 538.
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managing coronary heart disease

Words: 1466 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41343563

Chronic Illness: Coronary Heart Disease

Outline of Coronary Heart Disease

The Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) has been on the increase of late across the globe and this disease, alongside stroke have been the top causes of death in many countries like Australia (Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, 2017). There have been cases of people succumbing to complications occasioned by the CHD hence the need for any medic or clinician to fully furnish themselves with the CHD and the causes and effects as well as how it can be managed.

CHD is a disuse characterized by the development of a waxy substance called plaque building up in the inner walls of the coronary arteries. These are the arteries responsible for supplying oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscles. The buildup of plaque on the inner walls of the arteries results into atherosclerosis and this takes many years to pile up to harmful…… [Read More]

References

Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, (2017). Heart disease and stroke are the top two causes of death -- and among the leading causes of disability -- in Australia. Retrieved April 9, 2017 from  https://baker.edu.au/health-hub/fact-sheets/cardiovascular-disease?gclid=Cj0KEQjwt6fHBRDtm9O8xPPHq4gBEiQAdxotvNmN_YV05am6ts6wLgbbEPubE3I2Z6wwGSNl0AaycX0aAnFy8P8HAQ 

Cleveland Clinic, (2017). Coronary Artery Disease Symptoms. Retrieved April 9, 2017 from https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/cad-symptoms

Mayo Clinic, (2017). Coronary Heart Disease: Symptoms and Causes. Retrieved April 9, 2017 from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronary-artery-disease/symptoms-causes/dxc-20165314

Southern Cross, (2017). Coronary heart disease - causes, symptoms, prevention. Retrieved April 9, 2017 from  https://www.southerncross.co.nz/group/medical-library/coronary-heart-disease-causes-symptoms-prevention
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Forces of Healthcare Numerous Forces Have Changed

Words: 935 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39367420

Forces of Healthcare

Numerous forces have changed the way healthcare has developed. Rising healthcare costs, service fragmentation, variable access and quality, poor health, high costs for disadvantaged, social and political conflict, infections, chronic diseases, and emotional and behavioral aspects have all been forces in the development of healthcare in the U.S. (Cunningham, 2003). Consumer awareness, high costs of insurance as well as health services, and chronic illness have been major contributors to the way healthcare has developed over time.

Consumer awareness has raised questions to the service quality of healthcare, more especially compared to the rising costs of the services. As a result, healthcare institutions are being challenged with the way healthcare services get delivered to the patient. Consumers are now more aware of healthcare standards and the way illness should be treated, which challenges the healthcare system in the way that service is delivered in treatment settings. This includes…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cunningham, W. (2003). The Development of the U.S. Healthcare System and It's Problems. Retrieved from UCLA Schools of Medicine/Public Health: http://www.ph.ucla.edu/hs/hs_100_4_02_lecture_cunningham.pdf

Singh, J. (2013). Importance of technology in hospitals. Retrieved from Importanceoftech.com: ttp://importanceoftech.com/importance-of-technology-in-hospitals
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Cukrowicz Kelly C Otamendi Ainhoa

Words: 982 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80571701

Researchers used standard sleep questionnaires to assess sleep problems and characteristics in ADHD (n = 122) and non-ADHD (n = 105) comparison youths. They concluded that ADHD may be one of the consequence of nightmares but is not an outcome of it.

This study is valuable to my study in that it teaches me to be skeptical regarding differentiating between outcome and cause.

4.

StRanjbaran, Z., Keefer, L., Farhadi, a., Stepanski, E., Sedghi, S. And Keshavarzian, a. (2007), Impact of sleep disturbances in inflammatory bowel disease. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 22: 1748 -- 1753.

Study showed that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have significant sleep disturbance even when their disease is not active. This problem might affect quality of life, gastrointestinal symptoms and coping ability, and might potentially increase or decrease disease severity. A self-administered, mail-in questionnaire package was sent to 205 subjects using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index…… [Read More]

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Resuscitate DNR as a National

Words: 2548 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87860891

When patients with chronic or acute illness in the setting of a severe chronic illness with a declining functionality so that death is expected within days to weeks, no CP will be initiated.

The keys to the policy are severely chronic illness as represented by the patient's declining functionality; and that death is imminent. It is a policy that advocates the right of a patient to forego life sustaining technology and intervention in what is constituted as legal death when the patient's heart stops and, without CP which could ostensibly revive the patient to life, is final death for the patient. The policy resolves decisions of the healthcare provider and the healthcare staff to act in response to the patient's cessation of life.

Today, unless a DN order is signed by the patient or the patient's family rights designee, then the hospital staff responds to the cessation of patient life…… [Read More]

Reference List

Dubbler, N. And Nimmons, D. (1993). Ethics on Call: Taking Charge of Life and Death

Choices, Harmony Books/Crown Publishers, New York: New York.

Jones, M. And Marks, L. (1999). Disability, Divers-ability, and Legal Change, Martins

and Nighoff Publishers, Kluwer Law International, The Hague, Netherlands.
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Diabetes and Nursing Interventions

Words: 583 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30977912

chronic disease?

A disease is classified as 'chronic' when it cannot be cured and will last throughout the duration of the patient's life. Type II diabetes is an example of a chronic disease which is on the rise and which can be managed but cannot be entirely 'cured.' Unlike type I diabetes, which typically manifests itself in early childhood as an autoimmune disorder, type II diabetes is caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. "The majority of people (80%) who develop type 2 diabetes are overweight" (Burden 2003).

What two nursing preventions can nurses do for this chronic illness?

Because type II diabetes is classified as a lifestyle-related disorder, treating it requires a change of diet and altering other habitual factors. "The basis of initial treatment is to pay attention to dietary intake and to encourage exercise so as to induce weight loss, the rationale being to improve…… [Read More]

References

Burden, M. (2003). Diabetes: treatment and complications - the nurse's role. Nursing Times,

99 (2): 30. Retrieved from  http://www.nursingtimes.net/nursing-practice/clinical-zones/diabetes/diabetes-treatment-and-complications-the-nurses-role/205780.article
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Medication Compliance

Words: 1451 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99747909

Population and Global Health: Medication Adherence in Seniors

Assess the preventive and protective healthcare needs of a community of individuals, including emergency preparedness. Develop a plan for using behavioral change techniques to promote optimum health of a community, include culturally and spiritually sensitive care.

Describe the population/community you have chosen

The elderly are an incredibly high needs population when it comes to the field of professional medicine: they are consistently under-served and struggle very often to get even their most basic health needs met. One of the particular issues that prevents this population from staying healthy is the issue of medication adherence. A lack of proper medication adherence can cause a range of complicated issues and all of these issues are highly preventable: the individual just needs to stay on their medication. Medication adherence in seniors greater than 60 years of age is a primary factor for preventing serious complications…… [Read More]

References

Coughlin, T.A. (2006). The health care experiences of rural Medicaid beneficiaries. Journal of Health

Care for the Poor and Underserved, 17(3), 575-91.

Griffiths, R., Johnson, M., Piper, M., & Langdon, R. (2004). A nursing intervention for the quality use of medicines by the elderly clients. International Journal of Nursing Practice,

Griffiths, R., Johnson, M., Piper, M., & Langdon, R. (2004). A nursing intervention for the quality use of medicines by the elderly clients. International Journal of Nursing Practice,
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Practical Health Solution

Words: 599 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64453124

Community Health Education

Obesity response

The aim of every community is to have a healthy society where each individual can carry on with their daily activities with ease and also contribute back to the welfare of the society. This is the target that I aim at in engaging in the community-based programs like the obesity reduction bid among adults. The number of obese adults within the U.S. was pegged at 34.9% between the years 2011 to 2012 and amazingly this was the same prevalence rates experienced between 2009 and 2010, meaning the prevalence rates did not change (CDC, 2013). This is a worrying trend since the adult risk of developing chronic illnesses and subsequent waste of their life in treatment is a real threat. This is one of the central motivating factors for my involvement in the pursuit to ensure the reduction in the number of obese adults and in…… [Read More]

References

CDC, (2013). Prevalence of Obesity Among Adults: United States, 2011 -- 2012. Retrieved September 25, 2014 from  http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db131.htm 

McNeal, G. (2014). Academic scholarship redefined. The ABNF Journal: Official Journal of the Association of Black Nursing Faculty In Higher Education, Inc., 25(1), 3-4.
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MSW Program How Did You

Words: 1194 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12573579

Rather than treat this as a handicap, though, I think it can be used to the advantage to serve my future clients by putting their best interest as the primary consideration in any decision that need to be made.

In terms of value conflict, I don't think there will be any in when providing services to those who are vulnerable. Instead, I believe that the placing the welfare of others above my own is an overarching value that I have in my life, which is essential and should be inherent in any social-work professional and practitioner.

6. What do you consider your personal strengths and limitations in terms of your development as a professional social worker? What qualities do you possess which prepare you for graduate social work (insight, intuitiveness, self-awareness, etc.)?

As a young professional, my drive to continually strive to do something better is a personal strength that…… [Read More]

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Biomedicine Explain How Sociological and Lay Ideas

Words: 1640 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41193251

Biomedicine

Explain how sociological and lay ideas about illness differ from those of biomedicine

Individuals and societies have over the years engaged in identifying the causal factors which can be attributed with an ailment. Illness and its related explanation has been a focal point of health professionals. It is also important to note that the attribution of illness with a specific cause may not be the same in terms of biomedicine and sociological or lay ideas. Sociological ideas tend to lay emphasis on the norms, values and subjective experiences of the individuals as the core elements which formulate their perception about an illness (Blaxter 2010). The layman is more likely to base the explanation of an ailment on social causes rather than exploring the dimensions of the illness through medical explanation. On the other hand, medical professionals (biomedicine) seek causal factors which are linked with the physiological and anatomical aspects…… [Read More]

References:

Barker, KK 2010, 'The social construction of illness: medicalization and contested illness' in Bird, CE, Conrad, P, Fremon, AM & Timmermans, M (ed.) Handbook of medical sociology. Vanderbilt University Press, USA.

Blaxter, M 2010, Health, 2nd edn, Polity Press, USA.

Bury, M 2005, Health and Illness, Polity Press, USA.Nettleton, S 2006, The Sociology of Health & Illness, 2nd edn, Polity Press, USA.

Naidoo J & Wills, J 2008, Health Studies: An Introduction, Palgrave Macmillan, USA.
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In-Service Teaching Portfolio One of

Words: 2630 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84446587

For elderly patients who have no one to appoint as their proxy, completing a living will that outlines their wishes is preferable to not providing any information at all about care preferences. This is equally so for patients who want to provide their proxy with some guidance about their treatment preferences and end-of-life care wishes, including artificial nutrition, ventilator support, and pain management. A living will (LW) provides specific instructions to health care providers about particular kinds of health care treatment that an individual would or would not want to prolong life. Living wills are often used to declare a wish to refuse, limit, or withhold life-sustaining treatment when an individual is unable to communicate. All but three states (New York, Massachusetts, and Michigan) have detailed statutes recognizing living wills. The usefulness of LWs is limited, however, to those clinical circumstances that were thought of before the person became incapable…… [Read More]

References

Burnell, G.M. (1993). Final Choices: To Live or to Die in an Age of Medical Technology. New York: Insight Books.

Fisher, C.B. (2002). A Goodness-of-Fit Ethic for Informed Consent. Fordham Urban Law Journal, 30(1), 159.

Galambos, C.M. (1998). Preserving End-of-Life Autonomy: The Patient Self-Determination Act and the Uniform Health Care Decisions Act. Health and Social Work, 23(4), 275.

Hardwig, J. (2000). Spiritual Issues at the End of Life: A Call for Discussion. The Hastings Center Report, 30(2), 28.
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Wishing to Pursue Graduate Study Dr Paul

Words: 1820 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79455352

Wishing to Pursue Graduate Study

Dr. Paul Farmer of Partners in Health was asked in an interview if he knew at a young age what he wanted to do or if it was an idea that evolved over time. He replied: "You can…grow into what you want to do…grow into your aspirations." I took that to mean that personal experiences can open our eyes to possibilities and that small successes can focus our attention on goals that once seemed too lofty. I have learned the importance of taking one step at a time and striving to excel in every stage before reaching for the next level. Like a rock climber, I have also learned to visualize my next handhold -- and picture myself achieving that goal even as I reach for it.

Despite some difficult life circumstances, I have been graced by my origins and my experiences as an immigrant.…… [Read More]

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Statement of Intent

Words: 1185 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17773858

Letter of Intent: Personal Statement

To College of ____ Admissions Committee,

I am applying for the Master's degree in the School of Social Work, because I truly believe that it is my life's calling to make people's lives better by helping them with their daily struggles through practical help and techniques for self-empowerment. This is no easy task for either party, but I believe that if both parties are committed to the task of improvement and the task of making things better, then all things are possible. The strengths that I bring to this endeavor are a full commitment, a tremendous amount of empathy, and practical experience and theories under my belt to work for concerted improvements for other people.

Imagine that you have had the social work career of your dreams. Now, you have retired and written an autobiography.

I've been extremely blessed and fortunate to have a long…… [Read More]

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12th and 13th Chapter of

Words: 1427 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62620627



Injustice in the society

he tenacity of Bill's hypothesis of workplace toxins takes a clear significance when it comes to other experiences which together form the narrative reconstruction of the illness genesis that carries a political image of the social world. When it comes to both the illness and the response to it there is the suggestion that there is a world power inequality. Lot of Bill's account highlights some injustices and the world was portrayed as an environment where ordinary people were exploited manipulated and conned by some social powers including doctors, police or bureaucrats.

Reconstruction of social psychology

Bill's reconstruction left out references of his identity as he did not portray any sense of his self-identity. He did not bring out any sense of personal responsibility or any socio-psychological involvement when it comes to the development of his affliction. Social relations are a place where social identity can…… [Read More]

These narrative reconstructions are in attempt of reconstructing and repairing ruptures between one's body, self and the world through linking up and interpreting the different biological aspects as to realign the present, past and self with the rest of the society. For Bill illness result from working life; for Gill illnesses arises from way of life in which personal identity had been defined and constrained by important features of womanhood. For Betty, illness was seen to be residing from the realm of transcendence of the purpose tat God had.

Reference

Brown, P.(2008). "Perspective in Medical Sociology." Fourth Edition. Waveland Press. Chapters 12 & 13
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Access to Health Services in Canada

Words: 2899 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18134733

Determinants of Health elated to Chronic Disease Management of Elderly in Canada

It is agreeable that the health of Canada's population is well, particularly in contrast to various developed economies. However, the prevention and management of chronic diseases among the elderly present the greatest challenge to Canada's health care system. Today, the seniors have a tendency to living longer as they are healthier and economically better off compared to the previous generations. However, as they age, studies reveal that the elderly suffer increasingly from chronic diseases that exert extra burdens on the country's healthcare system. Canada's elderly populations are highly prone to poverty and have the greatest demands for community, home and acute care services (Belanger, Gosselin Valois & Abdous, 2014). Lack of government support and the shortage of home care nurses imply that most of the seniors are confronting health challenges of aging. As a result, the only health…… [Read More]

References

Belanger, D. Gosselin P, Valois P, & Abdous B. et al. (2014). Perceived Adverse Health Effects of Heat and Their Determinants in Deprived Neighborhoods: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Nine Cities in Canada. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume 11, Issue 11, pp. 11028-11053

Bradley-Springer, L. (2012). The social determinants of health. The Journal of the Association of Nurses in Aids Care: Janac, 23, 3.)

Cott, C. A., Gignac, M. A. M & Badley, E. M. (1999). Determinants of Self Rated Health for Canadians with Chronic Disease and Disability. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1979-). Vol. 53, No. 11: 731-736

Kralik, D., Paterson, B. L., & Coates, V. E. (2010). Translating chronic illness research into practice. Chichester, Toronto: Wiley-Blackwell.
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Social Psychology

Words: 1921 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51524486

Optimism and Pessimism Relates to Stress and Coping with Cancer

An increasing amount of research links negative and positive emotional states to wellness or ill health. The negative or pessimistic emotions seem to have a negative effect on the immune system and on general health. Pessimism has been shown to be unhealthy and have adverse effects on health, including increasing the risk of cancer and preventing recovery from the disease. On the other hand, positive or optimistic emotions have been shown to strengthen immune function and bring good health. (Gillman, 1989)

There is a wealth of research that suggests optimism has a positive association with better mental and physical health, as well as coping with stress. Pessimism has been linked to a higher risk of death before the age of 65, while positive emotions, like optimism, are linked to lowered production of the stress hormone cortisol, better immune function, and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Schultz, Richard. Bookwala, Judith, Scheier Michael. "Pessimism, Age, and Cancer Survival." Psychology and Aging, Vol. 11, No. 2, pp 304-309.

Brissette, I., Scheier, M.F., & Carver, C.S. (2002). The role of optimism and social network development, coping, and psychological adjustment during a life transition. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82, 102-111.

Carver, C.S., & Scheier, M.F. (2001). Optimism, pessimism, and self-regulation. In E.C. Chang (Ed.), Optimism and pessimism: Implications for theory, research, and practice (pp. 31-51). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Gillman, Jane. The Science of Optimism and Hope: Research Essays in Honor of Martin E.P. Seligman. Templeton Foundation Press, 1999.
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Patient Assessment and Analysis

Words: 825 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89222306

Patient Assessment

DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT PLAN

Diagnosis and Disease Processes

Using an appropriate patient assessment form (Sample Forms, 2013), D.M. has been found to have uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, uncontrolled hypertension, chronic anemia, and probable hypothyroidism (Sample Forms).

Diabetes Type 2

is most probably on a poorly controlled diet of high cholesterol and high simple sugars. Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a metabolic disease wherein the body is not able to properly use ingested food because of insulin resistance. If more simple or refined sugars are consumed, the less the body is able to process them as nutrients. These tend to stay and float in the blood stream, un-used, and in this condition, they cause trouble in the different parts of the body. These include the end organs, such as the brain, the eyes, the kidneys, the heart, and even the feet. A poorly controlled diet and the lack…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Glasgow, R.E., et al. (2005). Development and validation of the patient assessment of chronic illness care. Vol. 43 # 5, Medical Care: PuMed. Retrieved on October 15,

2014 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15838407 

Sample Forms (2013). Patient assessment form. Sample Forms.org. Retrieved on October 15, 2014 from http://www.sampleforms.org/patient-assessmentform.html
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Bipolar I Disorder

Words: 4472 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47788968

Bipolar I disorder is an axis 1 clinical disorder in the DSM-IV and is a serious mental illness that can lead to suicidal ideation or action. The history of bipolar disorder research is a long one, and understanding of the disease has deepened considerably over the last several generations. Diagnosis of bipolar disorder 1 is complicated by its resemblance to other mood disorders, mainly major depression but also psychotic disorders like schizophrenia. esearch is revealing new treatment interventions that are targeted to the biological needs of bipolar patients, as antidepressants are often or usually contraindicated. A Christian worldview suggests that individualized treatment plans take into account the family history and patient's lifestyle when recommending a treatment plan.

History

Bipolar I disorder is a serious mental illness that affects between 1 and 2.5% of the general population in the United States (Ghaznavi & Deckersbach, 2012). The more conservative estimate, 1%, is…… [Read More]

References

"A Brief History of Bipolar Disorder," (2012). Today's Caregiver. Retrieved online:  http://www.caregiver.com/channels/bipolar/articles/brief_history.htm 

Angst, J. & Marneros, A. (2001). Bipolarity from ancient to modern times: Conception, birth, and rebirth. Journal of Affective Disorders 67(1-3): 3-19.

Angst, J. & Sellaro, R. (2000). Historical perspectives and natural history of bipolar disorder. Biological Psychiatry 48(6): 445-457.

Baethge, C. Salvatore, P. & Baldessarini, R.J. (2003). Cyclothymia, a circular mood disorder. Historical Psychiatry 2003/14: 377-399
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African-American View of Healthcare

Words: 1692 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93011380

Emergency room usage [...] why African-Americans utilize emergency departments instead of primary doctors. What are the age, gender, and income of the African-Americans that come to E.D? What type of insurance (if any) do they have? Why do they utilize the E.D. (chronic conditions vs. acute conditions)? How is the health system viewed by the African-Americans and what if anything is being done to change and/or correct their conception? What obstacles exist and what accommodations are needed in African-American teaching? The use of emergency rooms by African-Americans is well documented and studied. There are many reasons African-Americans turn to emergency rooms rather than their own primary care physicians, and many ways the United States could turn this healthcare problem around.

Studies have clearly documented that African-Americans on the average receive less health care than whites, and there are several reasons for this dissimilarity in the health care process. One of…… [Read More]

References

Belgrave, F.Z. (1998). Psychosocial aspects of chronic illness and disability among African-Americans. Westport, CT: Auburn House.

Daniels, S. (1996). 11 Reproductive rights: Who speaks for African-American women?. In African-American women's health and social issues, Collins, C.F. (Ed.) (pp. 187-194). Westport, CT: Auburn House.

Davidson, R.A., Giancola, A., Gast, A., Ho, J., & Waddell, R. (2003). Evaluation of access, a primary care program for indigent patients: Inpatient and emergency room utilization. Journal of Community Health, 28(1), 59+.

Rust, George, MD, MPH; George E. Fryer Jr., MSW, PhD; Robert L. Phillips Jr., MD, MSPH; Elvan Daniels, MD;Harry Strothers, MD, MMM; and David Satcher, MD, PhD. (2004). Modifiable determinants of healthcare utilization within the African-American population. Retrieved from the National Medical Association Web site: http://www.nmanet.org/OC1169.pdf8 Oct. 2004.
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Ulcerative Colitis Initial Presentation the Patient Is

Words: 2339 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12190706

Ulcerative Colitis

Initial presentation

The patient is an 18-year-old of the Filipino-American origin. He has no known family history of ulcerative colitis or chronic illnesses similar to colitis. He is a high school senior student.

Historical information

The patient complains of diarrhoea 3-4 times a month although it has been on and off for one year. There is no known allergy that the patient experiences.

Presenting Symptoms

He experienced rectal bleeding, rectal pain and often had an urgent need to empty his bowels. His diarrhoea had bloodstains with mucus at least once a month. This led to few red blood cells due to the low level of iron, which resulted from the bloody stool. He had belly pains, which he described as cramping and his belly felt sore if touched. He experienced constipation, but it was less frequent than diarrhoea. He had no signs of vomiting or nausea, but he…… [Read More]

References

Baumgart, D. (2012). Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis: From epidemiology and immunobiology to a rational diagnostic and therapeutic approach. New York: Springer.

Bayless, T.M., & Hanauer, S.B. (2010). Advanced therapy of inflammatory bowel disease: Volume 1. New York: McGraw-Hill Medical.

Hanauer, S.B., & Marteau, P. (2001). Ulcerative colitis: Focus on topical treatment. Paris: J.

Libbey Eurotext.
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For the Legalization of Marijuana

Words: 1130 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82013604

Legalization of marijuana has been a controversial topic in the media as of lately. Completely legalizing marijuana would mean allowing just about anyone to have access to it -- of course with some government regulation. However, opponents of this process argue that the health detriments are enough to merit harsher punishments and the complete ban of this substance. Despite opposition to marijuana's legalization, there are many more benefits that need to be taken into consideration before rushing to any particular judgment. Marijuana should be legalized because it will bring a much needed boost to the economy, it has documented health benefits, and it is a safer drug than alcohol and cigarettes, which are already considered to be legal substances (ABC 20/20). In order for the welfare of all of the aforementioned entities to be established, marijuana needs to be legalized.

As of 2012, the states of Colorado and Washington have…… [Read More]

References:

ABC 20/20. "Should Marijuana Be Legalized?" ABC News. ABC News Network, 27 Aug. 0000. Web. 01 May 2013. .

Astaiza, Randy. "All The Reasons Pot Is Good For You." Business Insider: Science. Business Insider, 08 Nov. 2012. Web. 01 May 2013. .

Ferner, Matt. "Why Marijuana Should Be Legalized: 'Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol' Campaign Discusses Why Pot Prohibition Has Been A Failure." The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 28 Aug. 2012. Web. 01 May 2013. .

Robesonian.com. "Legalization of Marijuana Paying off." The Robesonian - Legalization of Marijuana Paying off. The Robesonian, 30 Apr. 2013. Web. 01 May 2013. .
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Management of Osteomyelitis in the Diabetic Patient

Words: 3435 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7686776

Osteomyelitis in the Diabetic Patient

Management OF OSTEOMYELITIS IN THE DIABETIC PATIENT

Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone or bone marrow which is typically categorized as acute, subacute or chronic.1 It is characteristically defined according to the basis of the causative organism (pyogenic bacteria or mycobacteria) and the route, duration and physical location of the infection site.2 Infection modes usually take one of three forms: direct bone contamination from an open fracture, puncture wound, bone surgery, total joint replacement, or traumatic injury; extension of a soft tissue infection such as a vascular ulcer; or hematogenous (blood borne) spread from other infected areas of the body such as the tonsils, teeth or the upper respiratory system.2(p807) Bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli are the most common causative agents of the disease, although viruses, parasites and fungi may also lead to the development of osteomyelitis.3

Patients…… [Read More]

References

1. Stedman's Medical Dictionary. 27th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2000.

2. Butalia S, Palda V, Sargeant R, Detsky A, Mourad O. Does This Patient With Diabetes Have Osteomyelitis of the Lower Extremity?. JAMA: Journal of The American Medical Association [serial online]. February 20, 2008; 299(7):806-813. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.

3. Lavery L, Peters E, Armstrong D, Wendel C, Murdoch D, Lipsky B. Risk factors for developing osteomyelitis in patients with diabetic foot wounds. Diabetes Research & Clinical Practice [serial online]. March 2009; 83(3):347-352. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.

4. Turns M. The diabetic foot: an overview of assessment and complications. British Journal of Nursing [serial online]. August 12, 2011;:S19-S25. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.
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Psychosocial Assessment of a Person

Words: 2602 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7516775

Jamison's work, Allen notes, has drawn public attention to the intertwined relationship or creativity and manic depressive disorder.

Poets, out of all the artists, appear to suffer most often from mood disorders. One study Jamison notes, estimates that 50% of poets are adversely affected. A recent study of poets, however, at the famous Iowa Writers' Workshop, reported 80% are affected. Jamison likely felt confusion at one time regarding this contention. Strong evidence also indicates that mental illness impedes the creative process. Gwyneth Jones writes -- and a number of others appear to concur: "There is a very close connection between depression and creativity, but it's not of the crudely co not be the most representative" (Evans, 2006, ¶ 7). One common theme linking depression and creativity appears to concur that the depression contributes to vision while it impedes creation. David Budbill, another bipolar survivor, however, stated he had come to…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Allen, B. (2008). Aesthetic phantoms. The Hudson Review. Hudson Review, Inc. NY.

Retrieved April 23, 2009 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P31597331351.html

The Bipolar Spectrum Diagnostic Scale. Retrieved April 23, 2009 from http://www.mdf.org.uk/index.aspx?o=56891

Evans, J. (2006). Personal accounts of mood disorders often undervalued. Clinical Psychiatry
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Heart Problem

Words: 967 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31837065

Personal Health History

Yes (Please list medications and reasons for usage below)

Medication

eason for usage

Tiotropium Breathlessness

Emsam Depression

Are you taking any vitamins or dietary supplements?

Yes (If yes then please list supplements and reasons for usage below)

I am taking Vitamin C through consuming multitude of fruits in order to fight muscle spasms, fatigue, and joint pain.

Do you now, or have you had in the past: Yes No

History of heart problems, chest pain or stroke?

Increased blood pressure?

Any chronic illness or condition?

Do you ever get dizzy, lose your balance or lose consciousness?

Difficulty with physical exercise?

Advice from physician not to exercise?

ecent surgery (last 12 months)?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

No

No

History of breathing or lung problems? No

Swollen, stiff, or painful joints? Yes

Foot problems? No

Back problems? Yes

Any significant vision or hearing problems? No

14.…… [Read More]

Reference Article

National comprehensive cancer network (NCCN). NCN clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology: Myeloid growth factors. Version 1. 2006
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How to Cope With Cancer

Words: 1682 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25766201

Coping With Cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Half of all men and one-third of all women in the U.S. will develop cancer during their lifetimes. oday, millions of people are living with cancer or have had cancer. he numbers are dismal; according to most statistical data American's possess almost a fifty percent chance of developing cancer. With these alarming statistics it is unfortunate and inevitable that almost everyone will have to in some way or another learn how face and cope with the depressing hardships and obstacles of cancer. Whether an individual is diagnosed personally with cancer or a friend or family member is, it seems as though all of us at some point in time may have to learn coping mechanisms for this illness.

his paper addresses the various coping techniques that individuals can employ…… [Read More]

Telch, C.F. & Telch, M.J. "Group skills instruction and supportive group therapy for cancer patients: A comparison of strategies." Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1966, 54, 802-808.

Kyngas, H.; Mikkonen, R. et al. Coping with the onset of cancer: coping strategies and resources of young people with cancer. European Journal of Cancer Care, Mar2001, Vol. 10 Issue 1, p6.

Coping with Cancer
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Family Case Study Presenting Problem

Words: 4052 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32471628

Expressive functioning is related to communication such as emotional, verbal, and nonverbal communication, problem solving and roles within the family. Beliefs within the family are also a part of expressive functioning.

For the purpose of the Calgary Family Assessment Model, a family is defined as who they say they are. It is very important that the clinician performing the assessment not assign their own beliefs upon what he or she believes a family is, and take into account what the patient feels about family as to the patient is may mean not only the people who actually live within the household but can also address past, present and future emotional attachments.

Calgary Family Intervention Model:

The immediate family is composed of Mr. Herbert Schelley (the patient), Mrs. Annette Schelley (his wife), and their son Thomas Schelley. The extended family consists of the Schelley's two married daughters, their husbands and their…… [Read More]

Reference:

Brownwald H. ed. (2003) Harrison's Textbook of Internal Medicine, 15th edition,

McGraw-Hill, New York

Clement S. (2004) Guidelines for glycemic control. Clin Cornerstone. 6(2):31-9

Echeverry D.M., Dike M.R., Washington C., Davidson M.B.. (1995). The impact of using a low-literacy patient education tool on process measures of diabetes care in a minority population J. Natl Med Assoc. (11):1074-81
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Alcoholism as a Disease Throughout

Words: 1556 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15817776

The research results will demonstrate that alcoholism is a disease and support this notion with overwhelming evidence.

Conclusion

In short, alcoholism is a major problem for all countries across the world. Alcoholism destroys lives and tears many families apart. The purpose of this argumentative research paper is to demonstrate with supporting evidence that alcoholism is a disease and not a social stigma.

orks Cited

Foroud Tatiana, Howard J. Edenberg, and John C. Crabbe. "Genetic research: who is at risk for alcoholism?." Alcohol Research & Health 33.1/2 (2010): 64-75. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. eb. 9 June 2011.

Organization, orld Health. "Society should focus on reducing the negative impacts of alcohol." Alcohol. Ed. Andrea C. Nakaya. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2008. Opposing Viewpoints. Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context. eb. 10 June 2011.

"Survey:…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Foroud Tatiana, Howard J. Edenberg, and John C. Crabbe. "Genetic research: who is at risk for alcoholism?." Alcohol Research & Health 33.1/2 (2010): 64-75. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 9 June 2011.

Organization, World Health. "Society should focus on reducing the negative impacts of alcohol." Alcohol. Ed. Andrea C. Nakaya. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2008. Opposing Viewpoints. Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 10 June 2011.

"Survey: people still unsure whether alcoholism is disease or moral weakness." Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Weekly 17.40 (2005): 1-5. Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition. EBSCO. Web. 9 June 2011.
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Rct Relational Cultural Theory as

Words: 2229 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4486894

RCT believes that everyone desires growth and that growth is by necessity connective in relational and cultural links. Mutual empathy and mutual empowerment foster these relationships in positive ways. (Jordan, "The role of mutual")

Sigmund Freud and Erik Erickson may arguably be two of the most influential icons in the field of human development and psychology. Their fundamental concept that human's develop over a lifetime and not just in a few stages from birth to adolescence and then are frozen into psychological patterns, revolutionized thinking in the field of developmental psychology. The term Life Span Development came to the fore as Erickson devised his eight stages of psychosocial development ranging from birth to eighty years old. Later as he himself passed eighty he realized that there is yet another stage and the count became nine. (Erikson & Erikson, 1997) One can see the striking resemblance between Erickson and Freud's stages…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Comstock, Dana L., et al. "Relational-Cultural Theory: A Framework for Bridging Relational, Multicultural, and Social Justice Competencies." Journal of Counseling and Development 86.3 (2008): 279-288.

Crethar, Hugh C., Edil Torres Rivera, and Sara Nash. "In Search of Common Threads: Linking Multicultural, Feminist, and Social Justice Counseling Paradigms." Journal of Counseling and Development 86.3 (2008): 269-276

Erikson, E.H. & Erikson, J. M . The Life Cycle Completed / Extended Version. New York:

W.W. Norton. 1997
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Socio Cultural Perspective on Rising Suicide Rate for South Koreans

Words: 2901 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49955776

ising Suicide ates for South Korea |

Public Health Issues

A Socio-cultural Perspective on ising Suicide ate for South Koreans

Suicide is an overarching social concern that affects all age groups. In recent years, there has been growing concern regarding the increasing rates of suicidal tendencies among adolescents. The Korea National Statistical Office reported that suicide numbers for ages 10 -- 29 years in South Korea (1,255) comprised 22.2% of the total number of suicides (5,663) for the year 2002, thus representing a higher percentage of total suicide victims, compared with those in other age groups (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007). In addition, suicide was the 10th leading cause of death in the adult population in 1992 and the seventh leading cause of death in 2002, but was the fourth leading cause of death in 2005 in the Korean population. More importantly, suicide was one of the three…… [Read More]

References

Ashton, J. (1980) The Epidemic of Suicide by Fire. New Society 54(1): 58-60.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2007). YRBSS: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Youth Online: Comprehensive Results. Retrieved Nov. 26, 2010 from http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/yrbss/

Cho, Young-rae (2003) A Single Spark The Biography of Chun Tae-il. Trans. Soon-ok Chun. Seoul: Dolbegae Publishers.

Crosby, K., Joong-Oh R., and Holland, J. (1991). "Suicide by Fire: A Contemporary Method of Political Protest." International Journal of Sodal Psychiatry, 23(1): 60-69.
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People Help Themselves An Interdisciplinary

Words: 12988 Length: 47 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92004923

The study will also be important to those in the future, because scientists have not yet found ways to cure these chronic illnesses or correct some of these problems that are seen today, and therefore it stands to reason that there will be more people in the future who will have to face the same problems as those with chronic illnesses and traumatic injuries today.

Scope of the Study

The scope of the study is relatively large, simply because there has been a great deal written about chronic illness and injuries from the perspective of the physician and from the perspective of the patient. Both sides are important, although the focus here will remain largely on the patient perspective. Because there are so many people today that suffer from a chronic illness or traumatic injury, much study has been done about these individuals. Despite these studies, however, not a lot…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, B.L. (2002). Biobehavioral Outcomes Following Psychological Interventions for Cancer Patients. Journal of Counsulting and Clinical Psychology, 70(3), 590-610.

Brannon, L., & Fiest, J. (2004). Health Psychology: Vol.. An Introduction to Behavior and Health (Fifth ed.) Belmont CA: Thompson/Wadsworth.

DiMatteo, M. (2004). Social Support and Patient Adherence to Medical treatment: A Meta- analysis. Health Psychology, 23(2), 207-218.

Eitel, P., Hatchett, L., Friend, R., Griffin, K.W., & Wadhwa, N.K. (1995). Burden of Self-Care in Seriously Ill Patients Impact on Adjustment. Health Psychology, 14(5), 457-463.
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Teaching on the Cognitive Learning

Words: 9169 Length: 33 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78651518

The kidneys of someone that has chronic renal failure are generally smaller than average kidneys, with some notable and important exceptions (ogers, 2004). Two of these exceptions would be polycystic kidney disease and diabetic nephropathy (ogers, 2004). Another diagnostic tool that is used, that of the study of the serum creatinine levels, can not only diagnose chronic renal failure, but also help to distinguish it from acute renal failure, as the acute version would see a rapid and sudden spike in the serum creatinine levels over several days or several weeks, as opposed to a gradual rise that is seen over months or even over years (ogers, 2004).

Sometimes, the levels of serum creatinine have not been measured in the past, and therefore the patient is often first treated as having acute renal failure. Only when blood tests continue to show elevated serum creatinine levels and it is determined that…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, B.L. (2002). Biobehavioral Outcomes Following Psychological Interventions for Cancer Patients. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 70(3), 590-610.

Arszyla, D.M. & Gastelum, K. (2001). Coursework Document: Theorist Presentation. Retrieved at http://dana.ucc.nau.edu/~dma27/WebWizard/courseworkdoc0.html

Boston College. (2003). The Roy Adaptation Model. Retrieved at http://www2.bc.edu/~royca/

Coresh, J. & Greene, T. (2003). Prevalence of chronic kidney disease and decreased kidney function in the adult U.S. population: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. American Journal of Kidney Disease, 41, 1-12.
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Social Cultural and Political Influence in Healthcare Delivery

Words: 4282 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16620351

Social, Cultural, And Political Influence in Healthcare Delivery

Social, cultural, and political inequalities are detrimental to the health and healthcare system of the U.S. This is because the U.S. is one of the most multicultural, overpopulated, diverse and undergoing rapid economic growth. The federal government has embarked on efforts geared at addressing unsustainable costs of health care in the U.S. With the leadership of the current president, Barrack Obama, initiatives of containing health care costs will evaluate and explore strategies to contain the growing costs of health care based on a system-wide while enhancing the value and quality of health care (Ubokudom, 2012). The apparent system of health care is rife with opportunities of minimizing waste, delivering coordinated, effective care, and improving well-being and health of all Americans. The government in collaboration with care providers must prioritize cost effective containment strategies with the greatest possibility for political success and non-partisan…… [Read More]

References

Albrecht, G.L., Fitzpatrick, R., & Scrimshaw, S. (2013). Handbook of social studies in health and medicine. London: Sage Publications.

Armstrong, E.G. (2011). The health care dilemma: A comparison of health care systems in three European countries and the U.S. Singapore: World Scientific.

Bale, J.R., Stoll, B.J., & Lucas, A.O. (2013). Improving birth outcomes: Meeting the challenge in the developing world. Washington, DC: National academies press.

Buseh, A.G. (2008). Empowering resilience: Improving health care delivery in war-impacted African countries: a case study of Liberia. Lanham, Md: University Press of America.
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Health Education for Personal Care

Words: 9314 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66373376

Diabetes and Self-Care Ability of High School Diabetics

The diabetes menace has become on of the central health challenges that ail our contemporary society. The trends have change significantly over the last 50 years and now the high school population that suffers form diabetes has vastly increased. This is informed by the predisposing factors that the children are exposed to at their younger age and the fewer physical activities like sports that they engage in before the high school stage. The dietary habits of most young children is yet another factor that leads to the development of diabetic conditions among the children with the easiest foods that they indulge in on a daily basis being high sugar low-carb diets. These being the prevailing facts, there is need to have an intervention plan which will help the high school students who suffer from diabetes to better handle the condition. This is…… [Read More]

References

Alice P., (2015). Self-Care Deficit Theory. Retrieved March 17, 2016 from http://www.nursing-theory.org/theories-and-models/orem-self-care-deficit-theory.php

American Diabetes Association, (2013). Kidney Disease (Nephropathy). Retrieved March 17, 2016 from http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/kidney-disease-nephropathy.html

Australian Government, Department of Health and Ageing, (2012). Diabetes. Retrieved March 17, 2016 from http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/pq-diabetes

Baker IDI, Heart & Diabetes Institute (2013). Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic and its Impact on Australia. Retrieved March 17, 2016 from http://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/Documents/DA/What%27s%20New/12.03.14%20Diabetes%20management%20booklet%20FINAL.pdf
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Reducing 30 Day Readmissions

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95495647

Patient Eduation

Patients eduation

Patient eduation an be desribed as a proess by whih majorly health professionals and other related stakeholders impart information to patients together with their aregivers so that there an be improvement of health status and also alter health behavior of patients. Those who may be involved in health eduation may inlude physiians, pharmaists, registered nurses, psyhologists, speial interest groups, and pharmaeutial ompanies. Health eduation an also be used as a tool by managed are plans in general preventative eduation and health promotion. Some of the important elements that are supposed to be onsidered when dealing with patient eduation are skill building and responsibility. It is neessary for patients to know why, when and how they are required to make their lifestyle hange. This proess of patient eduation is apable of reduing healthare osts.

Looking at studies pertaining ost ontainment, it shows that patient eduation results to…… [Read More]

c) Having the ability to carry out normal roles and activities

According to a prospective random control study by Department of Child Health, 25% are re-admitted to hospital within a year, (Madge P, McColl J, Paton J. 1997). There was asthma home management training programme using children aged two years or over. About two hundred and one children became randomized to intervention group (n=96) that was receiving the teaching or control group (n=105). The study found out that there was a very significant-admission and significant lowered the intervention group that was made up of 25% to 8. Such reduction was never accompanied through any increase within subsequent emergency room attendance. Another area of intervention indicated reductions in a day as well as night mobility three to four weeks after hospital administration.

There are theoretical models where principles of self-management have been developed, mainly from the fields of behavioral and psychology science. Among the models, the one that is mostly referred to is Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Self-efficacy includes persons' believing in their capacity to fruitfully learn and carry out a specific behavior. When a patient feels a strong sense of self-efficacy, they feel they are in control and have the urge of continuing with new and complicated tasks, (Warsi A et al., 2004). Meaning that patients are empowered and motivated to have the courage to manage their health problems when they gain a feeling of confidence regarding their ability to