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Clinical Residency for a Family

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 80369850

According to the AACN's report, "Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas: Adult, Family, Gerontological, Pediatric, and Women's Health" (2002), "Competencies are the domain or body of knowledge and skills that essentially define a profession or discipline. This domain of competencies guides training programs, provides expectations for employers, and drives the nature of assessment instruments and performance standards for credentialing institutions, certifying agencies, and accrediting organizations" (p. 14).

The core competencies for nurse practitioner graduates are intended to help candidates used what they have already learned and require a graduate-level education in order to attain certification as an APN and the AACN has developed this graduate curriculum as the basis for advanced practice nursing. As described by AACN, advanced practice nursing preparation includes ". . . graduate nursing core content (e.g., research, health policy, ethics, and more) and advanced nursing practice content (e.g., advanced health assessment, advanced physiology and…… [Read More]

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Clinical Assessment of Learners Clinical Assessment Involves

Words: 2688 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35872340

Clinical Assessment of Learners

Clinical assessment involves the evaluation of technical skills, communication skills, professionalism, knowledge base, and teaching skills, where applicable, of students who are about to enter independent practice. Technological changes have made it possible to assess clinical performance in ways that are far more advanced than pencil and paper tests relied on in the past (Dauphinee, 1995). In the late 1970s, clinical training programs utilized continuous practical assessments to evaluate learner competencies and as means of providing formative assessment feedback. These continuous practical assessments were considered to be "a much more valid, reliable, and realistic method of assessment" (Quinn, 1989). As clinical placements grew shorter and the number of staff, including those with "supernumerary status" grew larger, the quality of continuous practical assessments was substantively impaired (Girot, 1993). The goal of assessment has always been to identify a "competent practitioner" and to support the educational efforts required…… [Read More]

References

Andrews, M. And Chilton, F. (2000) Student and mentor perceptions of mentoring effectiveness, Nurse Education Today, 20 (7), 555-562.

Atkins, S. And Williams, A. (1995) Registered nurses' experiences of mentoring undergraduate nursing students, Journal of Advanced Nursing, 21, 1006-1015.

Cahill, H.A. (1996) A qualitative analysis of student nurses' experiences of mentorship,

Journal of Advanced Nursing, 24(4), 791-799.
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Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse

Words: 2026 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59055950



Since modern medicine can sustain patients with proper medical follow-up for years, it becomes incumbent on the profession to follow the patients and provide them with the knowledge and tracking to insure that they are observing the procedures and medications which prolong their quality of life. Given hospitals' short-term orientation with the patients, there is a need to bridge patient care before, during and after acute-care visits.

While there are some nursing specialties which can be regarded as solely hospital- or community-based, many of the specialties call for a more holistic notion of patient care. y combining the CNS and NP specialties, this profession has a better chance of assuring better patient outcomes, and a better quality of life for the patient.

ibliography

ennett, .J. (1998). Psychiatric mental health nursing: thriving in a changing environment through outcomes-based measurements. Semin. Nurse Manage., 144-148.

erger, a.M.-F. (1996). Advanced practice roles for nurses…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bennett, B.J. (1998). Psychiatric mental health nursing: thriving in a changing environment through outcomes-based measurements. Semin. Nurse Manage., 144-148.

Berger, a.M.-F. (1996). Advanced practice roles for nurses in tomorrow's healthcare systems. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 250-255.

Chaska, N.L. (2001). The Nursing Profession Tomorrow and Beyond. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Cukr, P.L. (1997). The psychiatric clinical nurse specialist/nurse practitioner: an example of a combined role. Arch Psychiatr Nurs, 2-12.
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Clinical Coding Specialist Is a

Words: 655 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 99921909



Salary

Employment Opportunities

Clinical coding specialists may work in hospitals, clinics, ambulatory, long-term and mental health care facilities, physicians' offices and government agencies that need coding expertise. (Western Kentucky University Website "Clinical Coding Specialist," 2003, NP)

Professional Association

American Health Information Management Association

233 N. Michigan Ave. Suite 2150

Western Kentucky University Website "Clinical Coding Specialist," 2003, NP)

According to an interview I conducted with a CCS, the traditional route to becoming a CCS has been to learn the systems on the job, especially with regard to institution specific computer coding systems, with minimal additional facility sponsored continuing education credit hours per year, yet as the job becomes increasingly important, with regard to accountancy and cost containment in medical care more and more institutions are requiring certification and therefore prior education with regard to clinical coding. The professional noted that when she began her job 15 years prior it was…… [Read More]

References

Johns, M.L. (2007) Information Management for Health Professionals Second Edition. AHIMA.

Tinsley, R. (1993). Engagements for Medical Professionals. Journal of Accountancy, 175(4), 34.

Western Kentucky University Website (2003) "Clinical Coding Specialist" Accessed September 8, 2008  http://www.wku.edu/Dept/Academic/chhs/scahec/clinicalcoding.htm
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Clinical Supervision Is a Phenomenon

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18640378

In clinical situations, for example, problem-solving techniques are often required to ensure best practice. According to Lyth, some authors argue that a balance between roles should be maintained in order to optimize both clinical practice and theoretical knowledge.

Generally, it appears to be agreed among theorists that the focus of clinical supervision should be professional development and self-actualization. In addition, an inter-disciplinary approach to supervisory practice will also provide a platform for emerging best practice among the various professions, and ultimately benefit the practice in nursing. Although it appears that the theory on clinical supervision is often arbitrary and little researched, it is also true that the phenomenon has been in effect of many years, decades, and even centuries. For midwives, for example, supervision has been part of their profession since 1902, being a statutory requirement.

One problem with clinical supervision, according to Lyth (2000, p. 276), is the fact…… [Read More]

References

Lyth, Gordon M. (2000). Clinical supervision: a concept analysis. Jounral of Advanced Nursing, Vol 31, No. 3.

Macdonald, Joanna. (2002, Feb). Clinical Supervision: a review of underlying concepts and developments. Australian and New Aealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 35, Iss 1. Retrieved from  http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a772090191 

McLean, Duncan (1996). Clinical Supervision. Psychiatric Bulletin, Vol. 20. Retrieved from  http://pb.rcpsych.org/cgi/reprint/20/1/1.pdf 

Todd, C. & O'Connor, J. (2005). Clinical Supervision. In N. Skinner, a.M. Roche, J. O'Connor, Y. Pollard, & C. Todd (Eds.), Workforce Development TIPS (Theory Into Practice Strategies): A Resource Kit for the Alcohol and Other Drugs Field. National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA), Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Retrieved from  http://www.unodc.org/ddt-training/treatment/VOLUME%20D/Topic%202/8.Workforce%20Development%20TIPS.pdf
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Clinical Nursing Practice for a

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19771195

27).

The proficient nurses perceive situations as wholes rather than in terms of distinct aspects, and performance is determined by maxims. Perceive or perception is the main word: The perspective is not thought out but presents itself based on experience and earlier events. Proficient nurses understand a situation because they perceive its meaning in regard to long-term goals. Because of their experience, proficient nurses can recognize when the expected normal picture does not materialize, which can considerably improve decision making (Benner, 1984, p. 27-29.)

Lastly, the expert performers do not have to count on an analytic principle, such as a rule, guideline or maxim, to connect their understanding of a situation to an appropriate action. Because of their strong background with an intuitive grasp of situations, they can zero in on the accurate region of the problem without trying unfruitful alternative solutions.

Benner's model of skill acquisition is based on…… [Read More]

Communicability: It is almost impossible for intuitive models to communicate something that is intangible and which the practitioner is unable to express. Given that Benner's model relies on experimental knowledge as the basis of "knowing" as opposed to the science of communicable research, it is difficult to think of a situation where nursing's knowledge base becomes a shared resource open equally to all practitioners.

Similarly, systematic-rational models may promote communicability, but the process itself may not be that relevant if it does not fit with reality of clinical practice (Thompson, 1999, p.1225).

Simplification: If the information processing model does not capture all variables in decision making and clinical diagnosis, and also communicating this incomplete picture to other practitioners in the form of scientific evidence, then nursing's knowledge base will continue to develop in an ad hoc manner with major holes in the complete picture. The intuitive model at least permits the complexity of decisions akin to healthcare provision and sees that health is more than the sum of its parts. Also,
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Clinical Psychology the Field of Clinical Psychology

Words: 1204 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19328472

Clinical Psychology

The field of clinical psychology emerged as a viable method through which the theoretical foundations of cognitive studies could be effectively applied within the clinical setting to prevent and treat psychological syndromes. Derived from the first clinical psychology work conducted by Lightner Witmer in the late 19th century, and expanding throughout the 20th century as diagnostic tools were refined and classification systems for mental disorders were standardized, modern clinical psychology has been adapted to fulfill a niche within a whole host of divergent fields, including criminal justice, the social sciences and gender relations. Clinical psychologists premise their work on the use of empirical analysis to accurately investigate matters of cognitive processing, psychological assessment and mental illness, with the administration of personality tests, neurological scans and clinical interviews the most frequently utilized diagnostic resources. As clinical psychology expanded the base of knowledge pertaining to the human brain's highly refined…… [Read More]

References

Blackburn, R. (1993). The psychology of criminal conduct: Theory, research and practice. John Wiley & Sons.

Donohue, J., & Levitt, S. (2001). The impact of race on policing and arrests. Journal of Law and Economics, 44, 367-394. Retrieved from  http://pricetheory.uchicago.edu/levitt/Papers/LevittDonohueTheImpactOfRace2001.pdf 

Fite, P.J., Wynn, P., & Pardini, D.A. (2009). Explaining discrepancies in arrest rates between

Black and White male juveniles. Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 77(5), 916. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2981137/ >.
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Clinical Education the Objective of This Study

Words: 2827 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72250556

Clinical Education

The objective of this study is to conduct a critical analysis of issues in clinical education. Toward this end, this study will conduct a review of literature in this area of inquiry.

The work of Strohschein, Hagler and May (2002) entitled 'Assessing the Need for Changes in Clinical Education Practice' reports a study that identifies areas of need within clinical education and well as describing "…various models and tools that are proposed and utilized in clinical education, as well as the exploration of the extent to which these models and tools might meet the identified needs of the clinical education process in physical therapy." (p.1) Physical therapists are reported as working in a health care climate "of increasing complexity and rapid change, of fiscal restraint and demands for accountability, of scrutiny from both internal and external sources. In such a climate, the ability to respond appropriately to these…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cross V. (1997) The professional development diary: a case study of one cohort of physiotherapy students. Physiotherapy.1997; 83:375 -- 383.

Hagler P, McFarlane L. (1991) Achieving maximum student potential: the supervisor as coach. Canadian Journal of Rehabilitation.1991; 5:5 -- 16.

Hayes KW, Huber G, Rogers J, Sanders B. (1999) Behaviors that cause clinical instructors to question the clinical competence of physical therapist students. Phys Ther.1999; 79:653 -- 667.

Higgs J, Glendinning M, Dunsford F, Panter J. Goals and components of clinical education in the allied health professions. In: Proceedings of the 11th International Congress of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy, London.1991: 305 -- 307.
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Clinical Education There Are Many Aspects to

Words: 4480 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20794554

Clinical Education

There are many aspects to the nursing profession, but before a person becomes a nurse he or she has to focus on the clinical education it takes to become one. In other words, one cannot just study from books and pass tests to graduate to working with patients. He or she has to be able to demonstrate through clinical evaluation methods that he or she is capable of doing what is necessary to handle patients properly. Addressed here will be reasons behind the methods used. The humanistic and transformative learning theories will be discussed. Then the paper will move into the specific methods used for clinical evaluation, what those methods are, and why they are important. Overall, it is highly significant to have different kinds of methods, because everyone learns a little differently. When evaluations measure the same kinds of skills in different ways, they are more likely…… [Read More]

References

Bendeck S.S. ed. (2013). Psychology and the perennial philosophy: Studies in comparative peligion. Bloomington, IN: World Wisdom.

Billings & Halstead (2012). Teaching in nursing. A guide for faculty. (4th ed) NY: Saunders.

Cranton, P. (2006) Understanding and promoting transformative learning: A guide for educators of adults (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

D'Antonio, P. (2010). American nursing: A history of knowledge, authority, and the meaning of work. NY: John Hopkins University Press.
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Clinical Diagnosis of Patient Condition

Words: 1080 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67941309

Diagnosis and Assessment in a Clinical Setting

Given the information provided in the subjective portion of the note, the clinician would want to find out if the patient has ever engaged in anal intercourse. If the patient has engaged in such intercourse, the clinician would want to know how many partners she’s had in this regard and when was the last incidence of anal intercourse. The clinician would also want to find out if the patient used protection when engaging this form of intercourse. Getting the total number of partners that this woman has had over the past year might shed some light on the situation as well. Additionally, it might be worth asking if the patient has made an obvious changes in personal hygiene or underwear. For example, the sudden usage of baby wipes in the vaginal or anal area has been found to cause irritation in some cases.…… [Read More]

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Clinical Supervision the Distribution of

Words: 1498 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19403960

Clinical supervision provides a mechanism of data collection and the information reclamation in support to the recent projects and the programmatic developments.

Management of the high number of complex mental health caseloads

These implementations occur under the influence of the Workplace Implementation Committees (WIC) that were established to the oversee agreement by the CMS at the local levels. The CMS is supposed to accompany the implementation of the policies that clearly outline the expectations and responsibilities based on periods and review methods (Cogan 1972). The implementations are expected to be transparent in the process of the WIC members and the staff groups. This includes the clear articulate mechanism for regular workload assessment, management and review.

I. egularly collect the workload from all the executives to make the caseload management process easier.

II. Use the caseload information to make the staff allocation of the resources while measuring their performances.

The workforce…… [Read More]

References

Cogan, M.L. (1972). Clinical supervision. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management., & National Institute of Education (U.S.). (1984). Clinical supervision. Eugene, or: ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, College of Education, University of Oregon.

Powell, D.J. (1980). Clinical supervision: [1]. New York: Human Science Pr.

Bernard, J.M., & Goodyear, R.K. (1998). Fundamentals of clinical supervision. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
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Clinical Risk Management Hospitals Are One of

Words: 1817 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67417286

Clinical isk Management

Hospitals are one of the top listed high-risk places of work. Just like any high-risk workplaces, Clinical isk Management (CM) procedures are formulated to enable hospitals in identifying, containing, as well as manage work related risks such as injuries, which are bound within the facilities. Implementation of element contained in risk management procedures in any hospital setting should be effected in order to ensure for the safety of both patients and workers accommodated in the facility.

isk Management

isk management is highly prioritized in most high-risk organizations. Technological advances have been realized in modern medicine progressively resulting to more complex care and treatment processes. Despite the positive result of leveraging care opportunities, such advancements may result in adversities that might in turn affect patients and staff working in hospital environments. Since it is far from possible to eradicate such risks completely, clinical risk management procedures are there…… [Read More]

References

Elizabeth, A. H and Betty, J.H. (1976). The American Journal of Nursing, Vol. 76, No. 6, pp. 924 -- 927: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins Publishers.

Stanbury, M. S and Anderson, H.A. (2000). Guidelines; Minimum and Comprehensive State-Based Activities in Occupational Safety and Health: DHHS (NIOSH) publication No. 95 -- 107.

Stanbury, M.J. And Goldoft, M. Use of OSHA Inspection Data for Fatal Occupational Injury Surveillance in New Jersey. Am J. Public Health 1990; 80: 200-202.

Tepper, A. (2000). Surveillance of Occupational Illnesses, Injuries, and Hazards in New Jersey. NJDOH.
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Clinical Supervision the Subject Supervisor

Words: 2443 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 64456789

In certain countries, an effective supervisor possesses basic teaching skills, facilitation skills, negotiation and assertiveness skills, counseling and appraisal skills, mentoring skills, and knowledge of learning resources and certification requirements (Kilminster).

The most important aspect of the role of an effective supervisor is giving supervisee responsibility and the opportunity to practice it (Kilminster, 2000). Supervisees come to view the supervisor as a colleague and this leads them to become self-directed. Some supervisees consider teaching skills and techniques, interpersonal style and professional competence the most important characteristics of an effective supervisor. An effective supervisor shows empathy, is supportive, and exhibits flexibility, instruction, knowledge, interest in supervision and good tracking of supervisees. He is interpretative, respectful, focused ad practical. In contrast, an ineffective supervisor is rigid, shows little empathy and provides low support. He fails to consistently track supervisee concerns, teach or instruct. He is indirect and intolerant. He is close-minded. He…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Borders, L.D. (1994). The good supervisor. ERIC Digests: ERIC Clearinghouse on Counseling and Student Services. Retrieved on October 28, 2011 from  http://www.ericdigest.org/1995-1/good.htm 

Joslin, v. (2008). Ten traits of a good supervisor. Associated Content: Yahoo. Inc. Shine.

Retrieved on October 28, 2011 from  http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/969660/ten_traits_of_a_good_supervisor.html 

Kilminster, S.M. (2000). Effective supervision in clinical practice settings. Vol 34
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Clinical Theory Practice of the

Words: 1172 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 13460142



Concisely, Comfort results when an individual keeps of negative or unhealthy living and sticks to positive and healthy living. Comfort has been associated with positive institutional outcomes that include patient satisfaction. The outcome of Comfort is therefore one of the most important indicator of measuring success in nursing practice particularly for patients and families going through some tough or stressful healthcare conditions.

Benefits of the Comfort theory to the Clinical Nurses of the 21st Century

Comfort theory is an important theory that is applicable to the 21st Century clinical practice because of its many inherent benefits or advantages. This theory defines the working environment for healthcare practitioners while at the same time it charts the direction for improving the services offered by the clinical nurses. The universality of the language and concepts used in presenting the theory also promotes its wide acceptance. The simplicity of the tenets of the Comfort…… [Read More]

References

Kolcaba, K. (2003) Comfort Theory and Practice: A Vision for Holistic Health Care and Kolcaba, K.Y. (1994). A theory of holistic Comfort for nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 19(6), 1178-1184.

Kolcaba, K., & DiMarco, M.A. (2005). Comfort Theory and its application to pediatric nursing. Pediatric Nursing. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company, Inc.

Magyrary, D. (2002) Positive mental health: a turn of the century perspective. Issues of Mental Health Nursing, 23, 331-349

Malinowski, a., & Stamler, L.L. (2002). Comfort: exploration of the concept in nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 39(6), 599-606.
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Clinical Learning

Words: 816 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15848913

Clinical Learning Outcomes

Interaction of Variables.

Evaluating clinical learning outcomes

Describe the skill and the learner you intend to teach and evaluate

Because of cutbacks in the number of days new patients are allotted to spend in the hospital, patients and their families are increasingly responsible for more of the patient's care, even immediately following a diagnosis of a serious illness such as type I, or juvenile, insulin-dependent diabetes. Teaching patients to correctly monitor their blood sugar and self-administer insulin is essential, but it requires a high level of patient compliance and willingness to learn. It is essential that young patients and their parents have a thorough understanding of the process.

Briefly describe how you would design the learning experience

Learning is a step-by-step process. It is important not to bombard patients with knowledge right away, when they are still frightened and confused. Also, although there are real risks with…… [Read More]

References

Hahn, K.K. (1990). Teaching patients to administer insulin. Nursing, 20(4), 70-70.

Retrieved:  http://search.proquest.com/docview/79701645?accountid=10901 

Silvestrone, J.M. (2004). Performance-based assessment: Improving the value of laboratory and skills examinations. New Directions for Teaching & Learning, 100, 65 -- 71.
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Clinical Problem of Interest

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 98420570

Clinical Problem of Interest

Anabolic Steroids and Their Effects on the Body

Even though governing bodies and media reports may have a person thinking otherwise, the use of anabolic steroids by athletes is nothing new or unique. The use of these drugs has been going on for some time throughout many different kinds of sports, and there is no reason to think that it will stop, despite the illegality of it and the dangers that are seen when athletes engage in the use of anabolic steroids and other drugs believed to enhance performance. The biological and psychological effects can be very strong, and can include an increase in desire for sex, aggressiveness, and an increase in behaviors that are typically considered to be masculine (Graham, et al., 2008). These behaviors can also include sleep disorders, paranoia, euphoria, confusion, hallucinations, and anxiety (Graham, et al., 2008). Naturally, these are the kinds…… [Read More]

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Clinical Nurse Leader Role Implementing

Words: 4307 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 71454882

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the Council on Graduate Education for Administration in Nursing (AACN, 1996; Dienemann & Aroian, 1995) operationally define the professional nurse as one who has been prepared with a minimum of a baccalaureate or higher degree in nursing. (Feldman & Greenberg, 2005, p. 219)

These were necessary requirement in the 90's. Now in an ever increasing age of need for more highly educated professional, the Clinical Nurse Leader armed with a Master's degree or better, is more adapted to handle a wide range of situations and create a fulcrum from which to balance all the staff in a given unit.

Literature eview

Clinical Nurse Leader

Kennedy, M.S.. (2004) Introducing the Clinical Nurse Leader. American Journal of Nursing, 104 (10), 22.

This article is a report regarding the decisions calling for a new role for nurses. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing…… [Read More]

References

Dalton, B., & Wright, L. (1999). Using Community Input for the Curriculum Review Process. Journal of Social Work Education, 35(2), 275.

Feldman, H.R. & Greenberg, M.J. (Eds.). (2005). Educating Nurses for Leadership. New York: Springer.

Kennedy, M.S.. (2004) Introducing the Clinical Nurse Leader. American Journal of Nursing, 104 (10), 22.

Knorr, R.S., Condon, S.K., Dwyer, F.M., & Hoffman, D.F. (2004). Tracking Pediatric Asthma: The Massachusetts Experience Using School Health Records. Environmental Health Perspectives, 112(14), 1424-1439.
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Clinical Journal Leadership Nursing Medical-Surgical

Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 10650151

The nurse must 'read' the patient's personality, and know whether acting firm or sensitive is the best way to deal with the individual. A nurse must always comport herself in a professional manner, but needs to take a different tone with a child vs. An adult; a person in a dissociated state vs. A man experiencing chest pains. Communications decisions, much like medical decisions, must often be undertaken in a split second. The first few minutes of the encounter can set the tone of the entire client-nurse interaction, even the tone of the patient's entire experience on the unit.

Effective communication is also required with other healthcare professionals on the unit, including but not limited to doctors, other nurses, and physician's assistants. 'Triage' -- deciding what patients and procedures are of highest priority, establishing standard operating procedures to deal with being short-staffed, and using time and resources in an effective…… [Read More]

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Masters in Nursing for Clinical Teaching the

Words: 2049 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41817290

Masters in Nursing for Clinical Teaching

The objective of this study is to examine the importance of a Masters in Nursing for the Nurse in Clinical Teaching endeavors.

The work of Orton (2007) entitled "Nurses As Clinical Teachers" Variables Affecting Teaching Comfort and Self-Efficacy" reports a descriptive correlations study that examined whether there was a "common understanding of a good clinical teacher among nursing students and faculty." (p.ix) Stated as a secondary purpose was the validation of a tool for development of individual prescriptions for improvement of the clinical teaching of nursing instructors.

Common Assumptions

A third stated purpose was testing for common assumptions about good teaching:

(1) if experience in clinical teaching leads to a better praxis;

(2) if educational training (the most common intervention) leads to better teaching;

(3) if experience in teaching (other than nursing) leads to better clinical teaching;

(4) if the education degree status has…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Benner, P., Sutphen, M., Leonard, V., and Day, L. (2010). Educating nurses: A call for radical transformation. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.

Davis, D.C., Dearman, K. Schwab, C. & Kitchens, E. (1992). Competencies of novice nurse educators. Journal of Nursing Education, 31(4), 159-164.

Krisman-Scott, M.A., Kershbaumer, Sr. R., & Thompson, J.E. (1998). Faculty preparation: a new solution to an old problem. Journal of Nursing Education, 37(7), 318-320.

Leuner, JD and Ruland, JP (2010) Master's Programs Preparing Nurse Educators: What is the Current State of Affairs. Nurse Educator. Vol. 35 No. 6. Retrieved from:  http://www.nursingcenter.com/lnc/journalarticle?Article_ID=1078569
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Excellence in Clinical Nursing

Words: 798 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24064625

clinical nursing professionals require self knowledge as well as expertise in order to be successful in their field using Patricia Benner's book as a background. It has one source.

Clinical professions today require experts. In a clinical setting both nurses and doctor are equipped with information which will validate their presence for patient care. A critical understanding of the processes of diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of the patient is imperative as they are responsible for the patient care outcomes. Nurses today are playing a critical role as intermediaries, more knowledgeable than an attendant but with less expertise than the physicians themselves. Nursing is no longer a comparatively inferior career but a highly sophisticated field requiring clinical expert skills to carry out patient care duties. They are responsible for making on the spot decisions; act as coaches for aspiring nurses; specialize in certain areas such as rehabilitation, injuries, administrative nurses etc.…… [Read More]

Reference

Benner, PE (1984). From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice. Menlo Park, Calif: Addison Wesley Publishing Co, Inc.
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Social Work Supervision of Clinical

Words: 5496 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 54097164

By improving their self knowledge, leaders can change and develop as leaders of people. Clinical supervision for leaders is sometimes called administrative clinical supervision. This is managerial clinical supervision with a focus on problems related to leadership and organization of work, particularly human relations issues. Administrative clinical supervision makes use of experiential learning focused on oneself and one's work (Sirola-Karvinen and Hyrkas, 2008).

Administrative clinical supervision means clinical supervision for leaders that address leadership issues in order to achieve set goals. Supervision promotes cohesion within the organization and is directed at change. Administrative clinical supervision is the examination of leadership in which leaders have the chance to reflect upon the quality of their decisions and share their feelings. In terms of action, administrative clinical supervision involves process-like support and mentoring, which boost the leader's confidence in coping with leadership duties and changes associated with it. Administrative clinical supervision addresses issues…… [Read More]

References

Clinical supervision 'can inoculate staff against stress'. (2010). Mental Health Practice. 13(7),

p.8.

Clinical Supervision. (2009). Retrieved June 27, 2010, Australian College of Mental Health

Nurses Web site:  http://www.acmhn.org/career-resources/clinical-supervision.html
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Forensic and Clinical Roles and Assessment While

Words: 1410 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27727725

Forensic and Clinical oles and Assessment

While psychologists and psychiatrists may engage in both clinical and forensic practice, it important to recognize that clinical and forensic practice are distinct areas of practice. This means that the role of the forensic and clinical practitioner differs in several ways: "who the client of the psychologist is the nature of the relationship between the psychologist and the individual being evaluated, and the psychologist's approach to the material provided by the individual" (Packer, 2008). Moreover, it also means that the professional assesses the individual differently. These differences include: the purpose of the assessment, the goal of the intervention, and psycho-legal vs. psychological assessment. While the differences may seem clear, the reality is that even forensic evaluations can lead to the establishment of the type of relationships that develop in clinical practice, making it difficult for health care professionals and for their clients to differentiate…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (2011). Specialty guidelines for forensic psychologists.

Retrieved September 8, 2013 from American Psychology-Law Society website: http://www.ap-ls.org/aboutpsychlaw/SGFP_Final_Approved_2011.pdf
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Vulnerable Adults in Healthcare Settings

Words: 998 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24855774

Older people are associated with increased risk for hospitalisations due to illness or trauma (Seymore & Cannon, 2010). The nature and burden of the illness that the older person faces is related to the quality of health care services they may receive when admitted to a hospital or other clinical setting (Dossa & Capitman, 2010). In terminal cases, the patient may choose to engage Hospice services, either in the clinical setting or at home. The human rights of such patients are ethically fundamental in their quality of care through palliative care services (Brenna, Carr, & Cousins, 2007).

The care received in the clinical health care setting for elderly patients may be substandard due to staffing and regulation issues (Maas, Specht, Buckwalter, Gittler, & Bechen, 2008). There is a need to identify the failings in quality of care and promote the human rights of elderly patients in healthcare settings (Gittler, 2008).…… [Read More]

References

Barry, P., & Planalp, S. (2008). Ethical issues for hospice volunteer. The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, 458-462.

Brenna, F., Carr, D., & Cousins, M. (2007). Pain management: a fundamental human right. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 205-221.

Dossa, A., & Capitman, J. (2010). Community-based disability prevention programs for elders: predictors of program completion. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 235-50.

Gittler, J. (2008). Governmental efforts to improve quality of care for nursing home residents and to protect them from mistreatment: a survey of federal and state laws. Research in Gerontological Nursing, 264-284.
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Staffing Shortage Clinical Management Issue the United

Words: 1646 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19413780

Staffing Shortage: Clinical Management Issue

The United Kingdom is facing a serious nursing shortage that seems destined to get much worse before it gets better (othcock, 2000). Clinical managers are finding it increasingly difficult to find qualified, experienced nurses and much interest is being given as to how to hire and retain nurses for hospital facilities.

It is important to understand why a nursing shortage exists. The nursing shortage is basically a product of supply and demand (othcock, 2000). The majority of nurses today are over the age of 30. The average practicing nurse is in his or her mid-40s. These nurses will begin to reach retirement age (65) around 2010, leading the nursing retirement wave, and half of the nurse workforce will be eligible to retire over the next two to three decades. In addition, numbers show that nursing school enrollments have been dropping. In a nutshell, this means…… [Read More]

References

McKee, Louise. (October 31, 1998). Nurse shortage threatens UK care. BMJ 1998;317:1176.

Rothcock, J. (January/February, 2000). How to Beat the OR Nursing Shortage. Outpatient Surgery Magazine.

BBC News. (September 5, 2001). 'My battle to find nurses'. Retrieved from the Internet at:  http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/1527176.stm .

BBC News. (October 31, 2002). Half of nurses 'consider quitting'. Retrieved from the Internet at:  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/2375725.stm .
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Professional Settings and Improved Quality of Healthcare

Words: 5045 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 50252563

Happy on the Job: Is Employment Satisfaction among Saudi Nurses necessary for working Suitably in the Professional Settings and Improved Quality of Healthcare.

When it comes to Saudi Arabia, nursing plays a major role in any health care system. Many evidences support the quality of nursing care and patient outcome. Patient interact with nurses more than any other health profession. Improved level of job satisfaction among Saudi nurses will be significant in the delivery of quality healthcare to the patients. Variable such as appropriate wages, effective facilities, healthy environment, professionalism, suitable working hours, and successful management will improve the level of job satisfaction among Saudi nurses. The correlation between impaired job satisfaction levels of nurses will affect their performance in the clinical settings, which will certainly result in the poor quality of healthcare. Thus, job satisfaction among Saudi nurses is necessary for working appropriately in the professional settings and improved…… [Read More]

References

Ahsan, N., Abdullah, Z., Fie, D. G., & Alam, S. S. (2009). A study of job stress on job satisfaction among university staff in Malaysia: Empirical study. European journal of social sciences, 8(1), 121-131. Retrieved from ejournal.narotama.ac.id/files/A%20study%20of%20Job%20stress%20on%20Job%20Satisfaction%20among%20University.pdf

Al Juhani, A. M., & Kishk, N. A. (2006). Job satisfaction among primary health care physicians and nurses in Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah. J Egypt Public Health Assoc, 81(3-4), 165-180. Retrieved from http://www.epha.eg.net/pdf/n3-4-2006/2-Nahla%20keshk-Job%20Satisfaction.pdf

Castle, N. G., Degenholtz, H., & Rosen, J. (2006). Determinants of staff job satisfaction of caregivers in two nursing homes in Pennsylvania. BMC Health Services Research, 6(1), 60. Retrieved from  http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6963/6/60/ 

Cimino, J. J. (2011). High-quality, standard, controlled healthcare terminologies come of age. Methods of information in medicine, 50(2), 101. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408886/
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Treating and Preventing Clinical Depression

Words: 1428 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 97988991

Depression

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2013a) reported that in 2005/2006 an estimated 5.4% of all Americans over the age of 12 sought medical help for depression. Americans, however, are far from alone. Globally, 37% of lost life years due to disease have been attributed to mental illness (Insel, 2011). Of this 37%, depression is responsible for a full third. The economic burden of mental illness on a global scale is massive, representing $2.5 trillion dollars in 2010. By comparison, all health care spending worldwide in 2009 reached $5.1 trillion. These statistics suggest mental illness accounts for half of all health care spending globally and depression is responsible for approximately one-third. In addition, mental illness is expected to account for 35% of lost economic output within two decades. Given the substantial impact that depression has on society and the lives of individuals, this essay will review what is…… [Read More]

References

APA. (2013). Highlights of changes from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5. Retrieved 15 May 2014 from  http://www.dsm5.org/Documents/changes%20from%20dsm-iv-tr%20to%20dsm-5.pdf .

CDC. (2013a). Depression: Surveillance data sources. Retrieved 15 May 2014 from  http://www.cdc.gov/ mentalhealth/data_stats/depression.htm" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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What Clinical Nursing Phenomena Are You Most Interested in

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Application Essay Paper #: 52151476

University Doctor of Nursing Practice Program?

The Doctor of Nursing Practice is a unique degree in that it prepares nurses with the research skills to work more effectively in clinical settings. Unlike a purely academic degree, it is designed to prepare nurses to become leaders in the field, rather than work primarily in a university. But it still demands a rigorous understanding of evidence-based practice. The DNP reflects the fact that research can be critical in improving the quality of medicine while still ensuring that the research has a practical focus and can be used in a meaningful way to better the lives of patients and providers alike.

The increased complexity of healthcare regulation, the sophistication of medical technology, and the growing diversity of the patient population all reflect the need for leaders in the nursing field to pursue advanced degrees. To have the necessary background to act as an…… [Read More]

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Clinical Educators Who Prepare the Students for

Words: 1668 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50509508

Clinical educators who prepare the students for enhancing knowledge and skills. They typically build the competent and provide quality clinical education. Many universities are offering these types of programmes to help students and prepare them for professional development of clinical educators. The educators develop themselves and their company for prospect healthcare challenges, this primarily help them in achieving their targets, and fulfill organization's need. It broad the horizon of student and give them inspiration to move ahead. We will also discuss the self-assessment criteria and other components of clinical education.

Goals of each workshop

In general the goal of each workshop was to learn, explore, and develop the phenomena of self-awareness. In the first module we have learned about the basic techniques of manipulating an optimal learning environment. The second module has demonstrated the abilities of learners to corroborate multiple skills throughout the framework to maximize value for patient care…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Benner, P, Sutphen, M., Leonard, V., & Day, L. (2010).Educating nurses. A call for tramsformation. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Benner, P. (1984). From novice to expert: Excellent and power in clinical nursing practice. Menlo Park, Calif: Addison-Wesley

Bransford, J. (2000). How people learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. Washington, DC: National Research Council

Chabel, MM. (2001). A model to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing education.
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Clinical Integration Healthcare

Words: 3527 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71289994

Healthcare: Clinical Integration

Item Page

What is clinical integration

History of clinical integration

Goals of clinical integration

Importance of clinical integration

Health reform

New payment models

IT advancement

Barriers to clinical integration

Legal barriers

Lack of practitioner alignment

Lack of interoperability

How to achieve success in clinical integration

Incentive alignment

Knowledge alignment

Behavioral alignment

The future of health care systems

Physician acquisitions vs. clinical integration

HIEs -- solution to clinical integration?

Policy makers are beginning to appreciate the fact that only systemic change can effectively change, for the better, the manner of health care delivery in the U.S.; and that anything less would only alter the system's edges - with little or no substantial effect on cost-control, innovation-promotion, effectiveness of reward incentive schemes, coordination and coverage (AHA, 2010). Clinical integration has been found to be crucial to the change needed for the achievement of the aforementioned goals (AHA, 2010). Despite…… [Read More]

References

AHA. Clinical Integration -- the Key to Real Reform. Trend Watch. Retrieved from [HIDDEN]

Athena Health. (2014). History of the Clinical Integration Model. Athena Health. Retrieved from https://www.athenahealth.com/knowledge-hub/clinical-integration/clinical-integration-model.php

eHealth Initiative. (2012). The Rise of the Private Health Information Exchange and Changing Role of Public Exchanges. eHealth Initiative. Retrieved from [HIDDEN]

Fridsma, D. (2013). Interoperability Vs Health Information Exchange: Setting the Record Straight. Health IT Buzz. Retrieved from  http://www.healthit.gov/buzz-blog/meaningful-use/interoperability-health-information-exchange-setting-record-straight/
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Setting the Stage for the Group Psychological

Words: 4820 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96691655

Setting the stage for the group

Psychological intervention might be most efficient when females start modification by leaving the abuser and get in a shelter. Shelters are an essential resource for victims because they offer females and kids security and link them with social, legal, and financial resources (Dutton, 1992). Furthermore, battered females in shelters have a greater threat for PTSD than those who do not look for shelter (Jones et al., 2001). Provided the problems connected with PTSD, these signs might disrupt victims' capability to successfully utilize resources made to enhance their security once they leave the shelter (Foa, Cascardi, Zollner, & Feeny, 2000).

Unlike various other PTSD victims, damaged ladies in shelters deal with continuous security issues. Numerous of their viewed dangers are genuine (Foa et al., 2000). For that reason, conventional PTSD therapies that include exposure are contraindicated, as habituation to feared stimulations might enhance their danger…… [Read More]

References

Baer, R.A. (Ed.). (2006). Mindfulness-based treatment approaches: Clinician's guide to evidence base and applications. New York: Academic Press.

Bagshaw, D., Chung, D., Couch, M., Lilburn, S. And Wadham, B. (2000), Reshaping Responses to Domestic Violence: Final Report, University of South Australia.

Beauchamp, T.L., & Childress, J.F. (2001). Principles of biomedical ethics (5th ed.). New York: Oxford.

Betan, E.J., & Stanton, A.L. (1999). Fostering ethical willingness: Integrating emotional and contextual awareness with rational analysis. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 30, 295-301.
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Setting With a Focus on One Specific

Words: 3574 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 32567229

setting with a focus on one specific EMS unit that will participate in the CDP training program. This setting was selected because it offered a snapshot collection of data that could be valuable based on the outcome of the training provided by the CDP program. The researcher will conduct pre and post-interviews with the members of the EMS unit as they start and complete the program. One of the benefits of this style of approach is that it allows for the gathering of qualitative and quantitative data.

A mixed research study design provides the researcher with hard, numerical data on feelings, thoughts, beliefs and perceptions. The organization benefits from this type of study because the organization can analyze through numerical data how its members actually perceive the training they receive. The data can help discover whether the training is effective or needs to be improved upon.

esearch Topic

This thesis…… [Read More]

References

ATLAS.ti Retrieved  http://www.atlasti.com/ .

Milley, J.E. (1979). An Investigation of case study as

Ethical Issues. Be sure that your paper includes an assessment of how you will deal with potential ethical issues that might arise in your study.

Palena Neale, P., Thapa, S., and Boyce, C. (2006, May). Monitoring and Evaluation -- 1
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Clinical Experience

Words: 3002 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 46049801

Clinical Experience

Sunrise Clinical System Version 6.1

The Emergency Room: Hybrid System

Meetings and Collaborative Care Councils

orkflow of the EMR

The KBC ( Knowledge Bas Charting) 3.4 Upgrade 6

The Role of the Nurse Informaticist

Comprehensive Analysis of my Clinical Experience

After completing 100 hours of practicum in informatics, the following will show the time at the site with my preceptor. The practicum took place at Franklin Hospital - North Shore Long Island. North Shore-LIJ which is an award-winning health system that consist of world-class tertiary hospitals, a nationally well-known children's hospital, a notorious mental facility and an assortment of community hospitals, in addition to a range of wellness and health programs. North Shore-LIJ Health System consist of 16 award-winning hospitals and approximately 400 physician practice locations all through New York, as well as Long Island, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island. North Shore-LIJ Proudly serving an area of seven…… [Read More]

Works Cited

North Shore-LIJ Health System. (2014, April 29). Retrieved from North Shore LLJ:  http://www.northshorelij.com/hospitals/services-and-programs/bariatric-surgery 

Russell, C.L. (2010). A clinical nurse specialist -- led intervention to enhance medication adherence using the plan-do-check-act cycle for continuous self-improvement. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 24(2), 69-75. doi:10.1097/NUR.0b013e3181cf554d

Seidl, K. L. And Newhouse, R.P. (2012). The Intersection of evidence-based practice with 5 quality improvement methodologies. JONA, 42(6), 299-304. doi: 10.1097/NNA.0b013e31824ccdc9

Smith, K., Tremblay, M.L., Richer, M.C., and Lanctot, S. (2010). Exploring nurses perceptions of organizational factors of collaborative relationships. The Health Care Manager, 29(3), 271-278. Doi:10.1097/HCM.0b013e3181e9351a
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Clinical Measures in Forensic Settings

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Discussion Chapter Paper #: 2942889

The authors of the article determined that by directing children into a specific line of questioning regraind a certain action "gives the child material that might appear in subsequent play or narrative" (Gilstrap and Cici, 2001).

The true relationship between both of these issues is that ultimately, Hewitt also engaged in leading children through the use of imagery, by asking them to draw how they would feel if something sexual did happen to them. Finally, the last problem identified with using clinical techniques in a forensic setting is related to relying on aspects of behavior as being congruous with abuse. Without properly attributing for the base rate of sexual abuse in the world or the population in which the children are, the propensity for gaining false positives is very real -- and problematic.

Thus, there are many different important concepts a forensic psychologist could take away form this particular article.…… [Read More]

References

Gilstrap, L.L., Ceci, S.J. (2001). "Difficulties inherent in integrating clinical wisdom with empirical research in forensic interview." PsycCRITIQUES. 46 (2). Retrieved from  http://ehis.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/eds/detail?vid=6&sid=e8439b61-401f-4d44-b03d-9552b26c9259%40sessionmgr115&hid=107&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ%3d%3d#db=pvh&an=cnt-46-2-159 

Litwack, T.R. (2001). "Actuarial vs. clinical assessments of dangerousness." Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 7(2), 409-443. Retrieved from  http://web.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/ehost/detail?sid=87617533-0386-4c21-a27f-bfc6df2dbdb5%40sessionmgr104&vid=1&hid=122&bdata=JnNjb3BlPXNpdGU%3d#db=pdh&an=2001-17852-005
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Clinical Decisions in This Chapter

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71668409

The MMPI-2 has been used successfully to detect feigning in neurological and psychiatric control groups (Klein, 2007). As a result, the MMPI-2 is the most frequently used test in forensic psychological testing. There is, however, still substantial "debate which of the four subscales is most useful for identifying malingering" (Klein, 2007). However, one of the MMPI-2's lingering problems is that it is a test where people can incorporate coaching, so that it is somewhat vulnerable to coaching.

The issue of coaching is critical in the forensics environment. This is because the goal of forensic psychology is to use neuropsychological assessment methods to help in some type of legal proceedings. These proceedings can be civil or criminal proceedings. In both civil and criminal environments, the need for accurate diagnosis can be critical to outcomes for the person being tested and for people being impacted by their testing. Moreover, it can be…… [Read More]

References

Klein, H. (2007). Assessment of malingered neuropsychological deficits. New York: Oxford
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Clinical Mental Health Setting That

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 56848216

Write a summary of this interview. Do not submit a transcript of the interview.

5. Using the information from your reading, this interview and any journal articles that you find, discuss the impact that public policies have on the roles and responsibilities of clinical mental health counselors working in diverse communities. Be sure to discuss the roles and responsibilities of counselors providing services to clients of diverse ages, backgrounds, and exceptional abilities, including strategies for differentiated interventions. (How do counselors ensure that interventions "fit" for diverse clients?)

6. Discuss how the policies of professional, governmental, and accrediting organizations have impacted the practice of this counselor.

. Share your impressions of the information that the counselor shared, anything that you found particularly interesting, surprising, or that you expected to hear. Discuss the impact that the interview had on your beliefs, expectations, and goals related to becoming a clinical mental health counselor…… [Read More]

7. Share your impressions of the information that the counselor shared, anything that you found particularly interesting, surprising, or that you expected to hear. Discuss the impact that the interview had on your beliefs, expectations, and goals related to becoming a clinical mental health counselor working in this setting.

Summary of the interview

The ability of a clinical mental health counselor to work with a socially and culturally diverse population (e.g race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, economic status) is noted by the American Mental Health Association (AMHA, 2011) to be an important quality of all professional clinical mental health counselors. The work of Patterson (1996) indicated that multicultural counseling is important in order for the inadequacies of the mental health services targeting the minority groups to be eliminated. Such inadequacies include the lack of bilingual counselors, discrimination, and the lack of counselors who are members of the minority groups as well as prejudice in counselors. In this paper we discuss the impact that public policies have on the roles and responsibilities of clinical mental health counselors working in diverse
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Clinical Asset Optimization

Words: 4381 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 16963410

service cost, Devices, and Cost per bed

Qualitative research design model

Secondary Data Collection

esearch Validity and eliability

Across the U.S., hospitals are overspending millions each year on mobile assets that are not utilized effectively. Despite more than adequate inventories, equipment often is not available when needed. As a result, more units are bought, leased, or rented. And those units, in turn, get lost in the system and therefore, underutilized. In fact, the number of mobile devices per U.S. hospital bed has increased 60% in the past 15 years while costs have doubled. Yet in most hospitals, the device utilization is approximately 45%. In the present study, the need for optimization and efficiency methods with clinical assets is investigated.

Introduction

Hospitals in U.S. have to incur increased expenses for acquisition of medical equipment utilized for their normal operations. The cost of equipment purchased is high and hospitals are required to…… [Read More]

References

Baretich, M. (2004). Equipment Control and Asset Management. The Clinical Engineering Handbook, 1, 122.

Castro, L., Lefebvre, E., & Lefebvre, L.A. (2013). Adding Intelligence to Mobile Asset Management in Hospitals: The True Value of RFID. Journal of medical systems, 37(5), 1-17.

Christe, B., Rogers, R., & Cooney, E. (2010). Analysis of the impact of a radiofrequency identification asset-tracking system in the healthcare setting. Journal of Clinical Engineering, 35(1), 49-55.

DeGraff, B. (2013). As medical devices proliferate, asset management is key. Biomedical Instrumentation & Technology, 47(2), 123-7. Retrieved from  http://search.proquest.com/docview/1363268371?accountid=34741
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Clinical Supervision

Words: 3503 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79384338

Likewise, engaging in too much control over a Stage III supervisee could lead to quite a bit of tension in the supervisor/supervisee relationship and result in negative transference to clients in counseling sessions. Nonetheless, this notion that counseling supervisees develop in relatively predictable stages and that an effective supervisor can best help them progress by approaching them at the level of supervision that corresponds to their own development is very helpful in performing efficient and rewarding supervision for counseling trainees.

Empirical research has validated the approach of the integrated developmental models to some extent. In order to determine the supervisee's developmental McNeill, Stoltenberg, and omans (1992) developed the Supervisee Levels Questionnaire -- evised (SLQ -- ). Lovell (1999) found that the SLQ -- results from trainees indicated that the level of education and prior supervised experience was related to the level of the supervisee opposed to such concepts as cognitive…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, C.E., & Bang, K. (2004). Using the Integrated Developmental Model in a Substance

Abuse Practicum. Journal of Teaching in the Addictions, 2(2), 67-82.

Bernard, J.M., & Goodyear, R.K. (2009). Fundamentals of clinical supervision (4th

ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
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Clinical Opportunities for a Counselor

Words: 1013 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 90076137

Counselor Trainee Resource List

Rachel Faybyshev

Foundations of MHC

Mary Owens

Resource 1: Name of the organization - Care Counseling Center

Address, phone, fax, email address and website address.

• Address - 214-216 West 116th Street, NY 10026

• Phone *** Fax ***

• Email address - [email protected]

• Website Address - http://www.carecounselingny.com/

Jim Malewicz

Summary of the organization's mission and services provided.

• Care Counseling Center is an approved alcohol and substance abuse center that nurtures health, growth and development. This center provides help to individuals and families in need of prevention or intervention counseling, domestic violence, parenting skills, anger and stress management, alcohol/substance abuse, mental health disorders, and LGBT issues. Through an intensive outpatient program model, Care Counseling Center offers individual and group therapy.

Student rationale

• Alcohol and drug abuse has grown into an epidemic across the globe and the need for professionals in this field has…… [Read More]

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History of Clinical Psychology

Words: 975 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23703097

Clinical psychology is a professional and scientific field in which specialists of this area of practice seek to augment understanding of human behavior in order to promote effective functioning of persons within society. Clinical psychologists encompass both the application and search for psychological principles and techniques that better the individual. In order to search for and apply the data they collect, clinicians must engage in teaching, research, assessment or diagnosis, psychotherapy, and programs meant to augment psychological well-being and performance. Due to its rich history, clinical psychology has become the biggest and one of the most dynamic fields of psychology with the latest specialist focusing on positive clinical psychology.

Many events helped shape development and practice of clinical psychology. "…the publication of William James's Principles of Psychology, Sigmund Freud's pioneer investigations into the causes and treatments of neuroses, the founding of the American Psychological Association, the opening of the first…… [Read More]

References

Durlak, J.A., Weissberg, R.P., Dyminicki, A.B., Taylor, R.D., & Schellinger, K.B. (2011). The Impact of Enhancing Students' Social and Emotional Learning: A Meta-Analysis of School-Based Universal Interventions. Child Development, 82(1), 405-432. Retrieved from  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01564.x/full 

Reisman, J.M. (1991). A history of clinical psychology. New York: Hemisphere Pub. Corp.

Wood, A.M., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Positive Clinical Psychology: A new vision and strategy for integrated research and practice. Clinical Psychology Review, 30(7), 819. doi:10.1016/j.cpr.2010.06.003
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Diabetes Mellitus in Rural Settings

Words: 1457 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Peer Reviewed Journal Paper #: 41069805

Clinical Problem: Diabetes Mellitus in Rural Settings

Mid-range nursing theories can be extremely useful in understanding specific clinical issues. These theories are less broad and all-encompassing than so-called grand theories of nursing such as Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring and seek to offer a more technical and practical approach to applying theory in daily practice (Alligood, 2018). This paper will specifically examine the application of Kristen Swanson’s Theory of Caring to the treatment of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus living in rural settings without adequate access to healthcare. Virtually all nursing theories are composed of four essential core definitions, that of person, environment, health, and nursing itself. Swanson’s theory, however, specifically focuses on nursing, which Swanson defines as a very specific type of caring.

Clinical Issue

Although obesity is increasing across the nation, obesity is often particularly rife in rural settings with limited access to healthcare and healthy foods.…… [Read More]

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Roles of a Clinical Dietician

Words: 1533 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 46564906

In an acute care setting, such Veterans Affairs, this objective is executed by educating patients about how to maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle after the leave the facility, while in a long-term care setting-such as Cobble Hill-this objective is executed on a daily basis by providing nutritious meals for elderly residents. And finally, in an ambulatory, out-patient care setting-such as Atlantic -- the clinical nutritionist works to support patients in maintaining a diet that addresses their personal healthcare needs, while still living independently within a larger community. Perhaps the most significant similarity between facilities is the notion of nutrition as merely one component of a comprehensive care program; hence the necessity of a clinical nutritional to work in conjunction with a full medical, administrative, and social support staff. The apparent goal of such an approach is to promote multiple aspects of health and well-being among patients, regardless setting or…… [Read More]

References

Cite Health. (2010). Long Island College Hospital. Retrieved December 19, 2010 from  http://citehealth.com/dialysis-centers/new-york/cities/brooklyn/long-island-college-hospital 

Cobble Hill Health Center. (2010). Resident Services. Retrieved December 19, 2010 from  http://www.cobblehill.org/services 

United States Department of Veterans Affairs. (2010). Patient Information. Retrieved December,

19, 2010 from http://www.brooklyn.va.gov/patients/index.asp
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MCMI Interpretation the Millon Clinical

Words: 661 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73513451

Finally, the subject scored 93 in major depression, indicating a severe depression that interferes with day-to-day functioning.

Article Summary: Setting Culturally elevant Goals by C.. idley

In Setting Culturally elevant Goals, C.. idley discusses the role of goal setting in the counseling process. There are two types of goals set in the counseling process: process goals and outcome goals. It is important that the goals be tailored to a client's specific needs. Furthermore, it is important that the goals be achievable. idley not only discusses goal setting in the chapter, but also discusses how culture must be considered when setting goals in the counseling process.

Because the article being summarized is a book chapter and not a specific research article, it does not contain all of the components of a traditional research article. It does not have a hypothesis, introductory research findings, methodology, or results. However, the article does have…… [Read More]

References

Ridley, C.R. "Setting culturally relevant goals." Overcoming unintentional racism in counseling

and therapy: A practitioner's guide (2nd Ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications,

Inc.
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Interruptions on Clinical Task Completion

Words: 1254 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 21194413



The results of a study like this always poses considerable challenges, including how to logically as well as accurately presenting the statistics and discussion of the results. This is where the statistical experts involved in the study clearly provided their assistance. The results begin with a description fo the total time, number of individual task actions recorded, and total TOT. The main finding was that an average of 12.8% of physician time was spent multitasking. The discussion also made clear distinctions between the task types completed as well as the seniority of physicians. Specific interruption rates were recorded for each task category and seniority level as well as expertise were also recorded. Hence, the central premise and hypothesis of the article was substantiated by the findings, each of which related to a very specific and clear category. Interestingly, the main result supported the premise that an increase of interruptions also…… [Read More]

Reference section includes an impressive range of empirical studies and academic resources, ranging from as early as 1993 to as recent as 2009. Clearly, each reference document was selected for its relevance to the study at hand. Busy clinical environments and interruption effects are not a new problem facing medical personnel and patients. Hence, the inclusion of earlier sources is warranted by the nature of the hypotheses investigated.

In general, the article appears to be very well written and organized, addressing the problem as clearly and concisely as possible. Although the limitation of focus is indeed an issue, this is addressed by including other studies and results, as well as comparing the specific results for the organization in question with those generally found across the profession.

Perhaps the article could have used more focus on suggestions for a remedy regarding the clinical environment and patient safety. However, the information as presented is ample to suggest future research of the kind and possible remedies that are perhaps beyond its current scope.
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Early Detection and Management of Diabetic Neuropathy in a Clinical and Homecare Setting

Words: 1877 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 70407806

Diabetes Management

Early Detection and Management of Diabetic Neuropathy in a Clinical and Homecare Setting

The objective of this study is to examine early detection and management of diabetic neuropathy in a clinical and homecare setting and specifically through examination of articles published after 2002. The information from each source will be summarized listing the strengths and weaknesses of each article in separate paragraphs. As well, this work will utilize table or graphs to present the findings.

O'eilly, Caryl Ann (2005) Managing the Care of Patients with Diabetes in the Home Care Setting, Diabetes Spectrum, July 2005. Vol. 18. No. 3. etrieved from: http://spectrum.diabetesjournals.org/content/18/3/162.full

The work of O'eilly (2005) reports that more patients than ever before are released earlier from hospitals and rehabilitation center and that those with diabetes are included in this trend. Diabetes is reported to be ranked second following congestive heart failure as the primary diagnosis at…… [Read More]

References

Zieger, Anne (2009) Studies Offer Mixed Grades for Remote Diabetes Care. 6 July 2009 Retrieved from FierceHealthIT at:  http://www.fiercehealthit.com/story/studies-offer-mixed-grades-remote-diabetes-care/2009-07-06 

O'Reilly, Caryl Ann (2005) Managing the Care of Patients with Diabetes in the Home Care Setting, Diabetes Spectrum, July 2005. Vol. 18. No. 3. Retrieved from:  http://spectrum.diabetesjournals.org/content/18/3/162.full 

McLaughlin, Sue (2005) From Research to Practice/Diabetes Care in Special Settings: Meeting the Challenges: Diabetes Care in Special Settings Diabetes Spectrum July 2005 18:143-145. Retrieved from:  http://www.vnsny.org/research/projects/1_implemetation.html
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Nurse Manger in the Clinical

Words: 2333 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52539973

ecause this is true, it is critically clear that the nursing leadership manager's role is one of a vital nature and that support for nurses in their role is the primary component that must necessarily be integral to leadership in nursing in dialysis units if the turnover of nurses is reduced to the lowest possible level. The nursing leadership manager's role is one that must proactively deal with burnout of these dialysis unit nurses instead of attempting to address these as they occur. Prevention is 'key' toward this end. As the demands grow for quality and competent nursing staff so does the need grow for competency in leadership nursing manager roles. ecause the dialysis unit nurse is very closely involved in their patient's care and because these patients are required to report for treatment several days a week for several hours a day the nurse's mental, physical and emotional state…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aiken, L.H., & Patrician, P. (2000). Measuring organizational traits of hospitals: The Revised Nursing Work Index. Nursing Research, 49, 146-153.

Aiken, L.H., & Sloane, D.M. (1997). Effects of organization innovation in AIDS care on burnout among urban hospital nurses. Work Occupation, 42, 453-477.

Aiken, L.H., Clarke, S.P., Sloane, D.M., Sochalski, J., & Silber, J.H. (2002). Hospital nurse staffing and patient mortality, nurse burnout, and job dissatisfaction [Electronic version]. JAMA, 288, 1987-1993.

Aiken, L.H., Clarke, S.P., Sloane, D.M., Sochalski, J.A., Busse, R.A., Clarke, H., Giovanetti, P., Hunt, J., Rafferty, a.M., & Shamian, J. (2001). Nurses' reports on hospital care in five countries [Electronic version]. Health Affairs, 20, 43-53.
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Use of CERNER Software in Acute Patient Settings

Words: 846 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57633260

CERNER software is built to allow for an enterprise-wide view of a patient\'s clinical information in order to coordinate patient care and document at which point care was delivered especially in acute patient settings. Using the software providers will have access to the right information and at the right time within the clinical workflows in order to make the best possible decision regarding patient care (Curry, 2010). In acute patient settings, it is vital that a nurse has the right information before they start attending to a patient. This is mainly beneficial to ensure that they understand the patient\'s condition or problem before they can begin to offer care. Using the CERNER software, it is easy for a nurse to access this information and make informed decisions based on the information that has been entered regarding the patient’s condition. In acute care, real-time information is vital to the provision of…… [Read More]

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Nursing Clinical Placement Report -

Words: 921 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 94611128



Studies suggest that more computerized order entry of medications helps reduce errors by limiting interpretation errors due to handwriting (Meadows, 2003). Thus more order entry is involving computers to protect patients. A culture that supports safety and safe practices has also been adopted to provide nursing staff and patients information about drug therapy and medication to ensure that everyone is aware of the need for safe practices when utilizing and dispensing medications.

Describe the strategies used to ensure nursing practice is performed within legal requirements and ethical frameworks

Nurses now "live and work in a world where there is no single reality but many coexisting realities among which they must choose" (Johnston, 1999:1). Given that through more and more nurses are forced to make legal and ethical decisions and take steps that will determine the best processes to adopt to ensure that moral and legal processes are adopted and followed.…… [Read More]

References

Campbell, D.W. & Sigsby, L.M. (1995). "Nursing interventions classification: A content analysis of nursing activities in public schools." Journal of Community Health Nursing, 12(4): 229.

Caretto, V.A. & McCormick, C.S. (1991). "Community as Client: A Hand's on experience for baccalaureate nursing students." Journal of Community Health Nursing, 8(3): 179.

Johnston, M.J. (1999). Bioethics: A nursing perspective. Sydney: Harcourt Saunders.

Lumby, J. & Picone, D. (2000). Clinical challenges: Focus on nursing. St. Leanords:
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Actuarial vs Clinical Predictions There Are Several

Words: 1214 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15352387

Actuarial vs. Clinical Predictions

There are several issues of note in the time-honored debate as to whether it is more effective to employs actuarial or clinical predications for the purpose of assessment. On the one hand, it would appear congruent with the job of psychologists to actually perform clinical studies and utilize predictions as such to evaluate various issues of people and of incidents. The principle problem with this approach is that it leaves room for human error, which can overthrow the entire purpose of a clinical study. Conversely, there is little denying the fact that an actuarial "set of rules" (Kaplan, year, p. 554) can oftentimes determine the results of clinical studies without such human error. However, the actuarial approach may possibly be bested by a clinical approach when there is a "variety of sources" (Kaplan, year, p.554) contributing data to clinical predications. Of course, the clinicians would still…… [Read More]

References

Kaplan, R.M. (no date). Psychological assessment and theory creating and using psychological tests. Beverly: Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Suzuki and Ponterotto. (2000). Multicultural assessment. Handbook of Multicultural Assessment. New York: Jossey-Bass.
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Learning Clinical Interview Revision How

Words: 1793 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Interview Paper #: 59252012



If teachers fail to design connected scaffolds than the class will develop only limited capabilities. He explains that this can be done by choosing only those scaffolding tools which have similar structures, assignment objectives, and interactive styles (Tabak, 2004). Hence when considering the scaffolds for developing skills of weak students, I will make sure that the scaffolds are complementing not only the main learning objective but also one another.

eferences

Biehler, S.M. (2010). Psychology Applied to Teaching: 12th edition. Wadsworth Publishing.

Bilal, D. (2002). Perspectives on children's navigation of the World Wide Web: Does the type of search task make a difference? Online Information eview, 26(2), 108-127.

Cho, K. & Jonassen, DH (2002). The effects of argumentation scaffolds on argumentation and problem solving. Educational Technological esearch and Development, 50(3), 5-22.

Hogan, K., & Pressley, M. (1997). Scaffolding student learning: Instructional approaches & issues. Cambridge, M.A.: Brookline Books, Inc.

Jones, P.…… [Read More]

References

Biehler, S.M. (2010). Psychology Applied to Teaching: 12th edition. Wadsworth Publishing.

Bilal, D. (2002). Perspectives on children's navigation of the World Wide Web: Does the type of search task make a difference? Online Information Review, 26(2), 108-127.

Cho, K. & Jonassen, DH (2002). The effects of argumentation scaffolds on argumentation and problem solving. Educational Technological Research and Development, 50(3), 5-22.

Hogan, K., & Pressley, M. (1997). Scaffolding student learning: Instructional approaches & issues. Cambridge, M.A.: Brookline Books, Inc.
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Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings

Words: 478 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52197051

Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings for Nurses

On a continuum of cultural awareness to cultural relativity, how do you view yourself and your interactions with others?

As a nurse practitioner, it is easy to see the patient simply as a patient, as a sick person needing treatment, rather than a well person who perceives his or her body as only temporarily ill, but sees his or her person as permanently a part of a family and culture outside of the hospital. As Small and Dennis (2003) counsel, the increase in immigration has resulted in greater diversity of both patients and practitioners within the United States, rather than in traditional urban locations. Thus Small and Dennis remind the nurse that it is not simply enough to treat the patient, but the patient must also understand his or her illness in culturally comprehensible terms. A nurse must be able to communicate to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dennis, Betty Pierce & Ernestine B. Small. (Jan-Feb, 2003) "Incorporating cultural diversity in nursing care: an action plan" The ABNF Journal.

"New Position Statement Originated by: Council on Cultural Diversity in Nursing Practice, Congress of Nursing." (1996) Adopted by: ANA Board of Directors.
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Nursing Theory Practice Setting Provide an Overview

Words: 1696 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85539740

nursing theory practice setting.

Provide an overview of the theory

Myra Estrin Levine is known as the most important Nursing theorist for developing "The Conservation Model." Levine got a diploma in 1944 and obtained her B.S in 1949 and finished M.S.N in 1962 from Wayne State College. She acted as a specialist to healthcare facilities and colleges of nursing. Furthermore, she offered a teaching format for the medical or surgical sector of nursing and developed "The 4 Conservation Fundamentals." "She clearly connected wellness to the procedure of conservation design and viewed wellness as one of its necessary elements" (Levine, 1991).

The 3 significant ideas of the Conservation Model are 1) wholeness, 2) adaption, and 3) conservation. "Whole, wellness, hale all are sourced from the Anglo-Saxon word hal" (Levine, 1973, p. 11). Myra Levine formulated her take of wholeness as an open system, which meant checking out the components of the…… [Read More]

References

Alligood, Martha Raile (2010). Nursing theory: Utilization and application. Toronto: Mosby Elsevier.

Chinn, P.L., & Kramer, M.K. (2011). Integrated knowledge development in nursing (8th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby.

Current Nursing (2010). Levine's four conservation principles. Retrieved from  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Levin_four_conservation_principles.html .

Levine, M.E. (1973). Introduction to Clinical Nursing (2nd Ed.). Philadelphia F.A. Davis.
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Ineffective Communication in Acute Care Settings

Words: 2335 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 77763657

Ineffective Communication Between Shifts in Acute Care Settings

Significant

A recent statistics of the adverse effects arisen from ineffective communication between shifts in acute care setting range from 2.6% to 7.6%, however, Okoniewska, et al. (2015) believes that the adverse effects on in-patients can be between 19% and 23%. (Classen, esar, Griffin. et al. 2011).

The Study aims to discuss the adverse effective arisen from ineffective communication between shifts within acute care settings.

Consequences of not solving the problem

Without implementing the strategies that can enhance effective communication between shifts in an acute healthcare setting, the issue can lead to mortality, readmission, and post-hospital adverse effects. Moreover, poor communication between shifts can lead to medication problems resulting to therapeutic errors. (Okoniewska, et al. 2015). Moreover, lack of intervention to address the problem can lead to medical errors, which can lead to patients' harms. Communication failure has also been identified as…… [Read More]

Reference

Aebersold, M., Averhart, V., Keenan, G., Kocan, M. J., Lundy, F., Tschannen, D. (2011). Implications of Nurse-Physician Relations: Report of a Successful Intervention. Nursing Economics. 29 (3):127-135.

Almost, J., Wolff, A., Mildon, B., Price, S., Godfrey, C., Robinson, S., . . . Mercado-Mallari, S. (2015). Positive and negative behaviors in workplace relationships: a scoping review protocol. BMJ Open, 5(2). doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007685

Carlson, E. A. (2012). Improving Patient Safety Through Improved Communication and Teamwork. Orthopaedic Nursing, 31(3), 190-192.

Classen, D.C., Resar, R, Griffin. F, et al. (2011). "Global trigger tool" shows that adverse events in hospitals may be ten times greater than previously measured. Health Aff (Millwood). 30(4):581 -- 589.
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Healthcare Leadership in the Clinical

Words: 1121 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 92116087

..above all - its situation." (Ibid)

II. Leadership Strategy for Transition or Change

Watkins proposes 'Five Fundamental Propositions' in his work and the first is which that the "root causes of transition failure always lie in a pernicious interaction between the situation, with its opportunities and pitfalls, and the individuals with his or her strengths and vulnerabilities." Or otherwise stated no superheroes exist and the leadership is not a complete failure but the combination of the two determine the direction of the organization. The second proposition is that "there are systematic methods that leaders can employ to both lessen the likelihood of failure and reach the breakeven point faster." (2003) There are however proven and reliable methods that leaders must use to ensure success or at least minimize possibilities leading to failure. Third Watkins proposes that "overriding goal in a transition is to build momentum by creating virtuous cycles that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Watkins, Michael (2003) The First 90 Days: Critical Success Strategies for New Leaders at all Levels. Harvard Business School Publishing 2003. Team Lib ISBNB: 1591391105.

Healthcare Leadership and Strategy in the Clinical Audit Unit for Healthcare
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Reaction to Business Terminology in Clinical Med

Words: 2031 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67282051

Business Terminology in Health Care

The Health Care Industry, idealistically is a large conglomeration of helping individuals and organizations who's sole purpose is to help people become more healthy, be that through prevention of disease or treatment of disease. Yet, it is known among nearly all health care professionals and almost all people who have ever been treated in the health care industry, even in the most minor way, which includes nearly all of the population, that the "Health Care Industry" is just that, an industry. This industry is governed by profit and loss just as any other; possibly even more so in the sense that the more loss there is the less people can be helped.

Over the past fifty years, as technology expands and costs rise there has been a noticeable change in health care delivery, for better and for worse most would say.

Change in the United…… [Read More]

Works Cited

2001 International Conference and Exhibition on Health Facility Planning, Design and Construction "Shaping the business of health care" Feb2001 Health Facilities

Management 14/2 PG. 12-13.

CDC Report "Average hospital stays shorter" June 2003 Case Management Advisor, 14/6 pg. S1.

L. Chordas "Risky business: health-care risk managers are focusing more on the business side of organizations and assuming more responsibility for insurance." April 2004
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Theory and Methods in Clinical Psychology

Words: 1273 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58668587

Psychological test or assessment method. "The Substance Abuse Questionnaire -- Adult Probation III

Brief Description of the Test

The recent release of one of the youngest convicted child murders in our nation's history, Lionel Tate, now an adult, into the general population, has highlighted the difficulty of determining if a former prisoner should be eligible for parole. Psychologists have attempted to answer this difficult and subjective question by designing the objectively-assessed test known as "The Substance Abuse Questionnaire -- Adult Probation III" exam. (Risk & Needs Assessment, Inc., 1997) This test was originally designed in 1987 exclusively for adult prisoners eligible for probation to determine the risk of paroling them and assessing their risk to society and has since been updated, in 1997, to include inventories for truthfulness. (Spies, 2003)

The SAQ is 165-item questionnaire. It can be administered either in a paper and pencil format or on a computer.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Educational Research Association. (1999). Standards for educational and psychological testing. Washington, DC: American Educational Research Association.

SAQ -- The Substance Abuse Questionnaire -- Adult Probation III (1997). Risk & Needs Assessment, Inc.

Spies, Robert. (2003). [Review of the SAQ -- Adult Probation [Substance Abuse Questionnaire].]. Buros Institute of Mental Measurements.  http://www.unl.edu/buros/reviewsample.html .

Toneatto, T. (1995). [Review of the SAQ -- Adult Probation [Substance Abuse Questionnaire].] In J.C. Conoley & J.C. Impara (Eds.). The twelfth mental measurements yearbook (pp. 889-891). Lincoln, NE: Buros Institute of Mental Measurements.
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Using Clinical Management for Substance Abusing Behaviors

Words: 1887 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86800581

Clinical Case Management

Case management emerged during the late 19th and early 20th centuries in an effort by professional social workers to address the broad-based social problems that followed the Industrial evolution, including most especially poverty (Aufderhaar, Giddens, Holder, et al., 2013). Since that time, case management has influenced by a wide range of evidence-based practices and social workers in virtually every field use these techniques to help their clients overcome the problems that are adversely affecting their lives. To gain a better understanding of the process, this paper reviews the relevant literature to provide a definition of case management, the rationale in support of its use, and a discussion concerning how case management can be useful as part of an overall treatment plan. In addition, based on a representative vignette involving a young couple and their minor daughter, this paper also examines how case management can help these clients,…… [Read More]

References

Aufderhaar, L., Giddens, B., Holder, L. A. et al. (2013). Social work case management. National Association of Social Workers. Retrieved from  http://www.socialworkers.org/practice  / naswstandards/CaseManagementStandards2013.pdf.

Darnell, J. S. (2013, May). Navigators and assisters: Two case management roles for social workers in the Affordable Care Act. Health and Social Work, 38(2), 123-126.

Miller, E. (2011). Individual outcomes: Getting back to what matters. Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic.

Perosa, L. M. & Perosa, S. L. (2010, April). Assessing competencies in couples and family therapy/counseling: A call to the profession. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 36(2), 126-130.
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Nursing Informatics Field Experience

Words: 2453 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 26883481

Clinical Experience

The American Nurses Association (2008) define nursing informatics as the mixture of computer and information science and nursing towards improving healthcare delivery and patient outcomes. Nursing informatics is a career that has developed from the evolution of health informatics, which involves the use of knowledge to examine and translate health data into useful information that can be utilized in enhancing patient outcomes through improved processes. As the healthcare field continues to adopt technology rapidly, nursing informatics is one of the educational programs that has emerged to prepare the workforce towards effective use of health information technology to enhance patient care delivery (Dalrymple, 2011). Nursing informatics education include formal graduate programs that provide both theoretical and practical training (which includes working with an already practicing preceptor). The ANA Scope and Standards of Nursing Informatics Practice requires students in this profession to complete a formal practicum as part of practical…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Association (ANA). (2008). Nursing informatics: Scope & standards of practice. Washington, D.C.: Nursesbooks.org.

Dalrymple, P. W. (2011). Data, information, knowledge: The Emerging Field of Health Informatics. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 37(5), 41-44. doi:10.1002/bult.2011.1720370512

Gugerty et al. (2007). Challenges and Opportunities in Documentation of the Nursing Care of Patients. Retrieved from Nursing Workforce Commission of Maryland website:  http://mbon.maryland.gov/Documents/documentation_challenges.pdf 

McLane, S. and Turley, J. P. (2011). Informaticians: How They May Benefit your Healthcare Organization. The Journal of Nursing Administration, 41 (1), 29-35. doi: 10.1097/NNA.0b013e3181fc19d6
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Implementing a Clinical Terminology in Nursing Practice

Words: 622 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 47965823

SNOMED-CT is a clinical term that was originally introduced by the College of American Pathologists and is currently managed by an international organization that deals with health terminology standards. Generally, SNOMED-CT is a terminology that adds understandable meaning to electronic medical record and plays a major role in delivery of affordable, high-quality care through meaningful, effective depiction of medical information ("SNOMED CT -- Adding Value," 2014). Given its significance in the enhancing the delivery of affordable, high-quality health care services, it is increasingly important to develop a suitable strategic action plan for implementing SNOMED CT in nursing practice. The strategic action plan entails identifying the major stakeholders, suitable strategic actions or initiatives for each stakeholder, and developing an effective communication plan for implementing this clinical terminology. For this strategic action plan, the major stakeholders in the implementation process include healthcare professionals providing patient care, support staff interacting with patients, and…… [Read More]

References

"Engaging Stakeholders in the Effective Health Care Program" (n.d.). Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Retrieved from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services website:  http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/index.cfm/tools-and-resources/how-to-get-involved-in-the-effective-health-care-program/engaging-stakeholders-in-the-effective-health-care-program-module-iv/ 

"SNOMED CT -- Adding Value to Electronic Health Records." (2014, February). The International Health Terminology Standards Development Organization. Retrieved October 9, 2015, from  http://www.ihtsdo.org/resource/resource/16