Corporate Strategy Essays (Examples)

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Corporate Strategies The Importance of Leadership

Words: 3149 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46595671

Corporate Strategies: Why are they so Important?

Domino's Pizza

Strategic Leadership

Strategic Entrepreneurship

Innovation Applied

What is your biggest Professional Accomplishment?

Organizational Design and Culture

The 80s and Deregulation

The Election of Barack Obama

US rise as a world super power

Domino's Pizza

Dominoes use the strategy by depending on the population and household. They believe that the population and household income are what needs to help when it comes to figuring out if people are willing to pay the pizza price and how much is the request for pizza. They think that this method is important because the population is what helps figuring out the demand for pizza as a consequence of the law of the demand, the bigger population the greater the demand. The household income will help likewise for the reason that the more disposable income the more individuals will purchase a common good. However, Pizza is…… [Read More]

References

Albarracin, D. (2012). The Effects of Chronic Achievement Motivation and Achievement Primes on the Activation of Achievement and Fun Goals. J Pers Soc Psychol., 1129 -- 1141.

Broken Racial Barriers Pave the Way for Obama Presidency. (2013, May 2). Retrieved from Voice of America:  http://www.voanews.com/ 

Dukes, E. (2013, May 21). 4 Ways Technology Has changed the Modern Workplace. Retrieved from Office:  http://www.iofficecorp.com/blog/4-ways-technology-has-changed-the-modern-workplace 

Goldsmith, J. (2014, April 3). Three Approaches to Innovation. Retrieved from CBSMoney Watch:  http://www.cbsnews.com/news/three-approaches-to-innovation/
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Corporate Governance as Some Queries About Corporate

Words: 5545 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39945568

Corporate Governance

As some queries about corporate governance were there ever since 1932 - the period of erle and Means, the expression of the concept of Corporate Governance was not found in English vocabulary until 25 years ago. However, in the previous two decades, matters relating to corporate governance have gained importance in academic literature as well as in public policy deliberations. Corporate governance came to be acknowledged as being synonymous with takeovers, financial restructuring, and activities of institutional investor's during this part of the era. Corporate Governance is now at a turning point. Several budding and up-coming economies that are on the path of development have identified by now that excellent corporate governance is vital for sustainable economic development. Furthermore, a lot are on the lookout for a novel or appropriate standard for making it relevant for their particular internal situation. (erle and Means, 1932)

The last ten years…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Berle, A; G. Means (1932) "The modern corporation and private property" Macmillan, NewYork. pp.54-58

Hart, O. (1995). "Firms, contracts and financial structure" Clarendon Press, Oxford. pp.32-36

Jensen, M and Meckling, W. (1976). "Theory of the firm: Managerial Behavior, Agency Costs and Ownership Structure" Journal of Financial Economics, Volume. 3.pp. 305-360

Shleifer, Andrei; Vishny, Robert W. (1997) "A Survey of Corporate Governance," Journal of Finance Volume. 52. pp. 737-83.
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Corporate Culture Analysis and Comparison

Words: 2525 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46940656

Mercedes-Benz determined that an annual increase in the score of a corporation of a single statistical point on the customer satisfaction barometer five years consecutively corresponded to more than an 11% increase in profitability (oss, 2002).

Mercedes-Benz also determined that generating positive attitudes among its employees was essential to achieving high employee retention rates and to maintaining a positive work environment (ussell-Walling, 2005). The company determined that this is particularly important with respect to the quality of customer service interactions and to the willingness of employees to conduct customer relations in the manner most conducive to retaining customers for the long-term. Essentially, Mercedes-Benz determined that employee satisfaction, in large part, determined the company's success at retaining both quality employees and also its success retaining customers thereby (ussell-Walling, 2005).

Mercedes-Benz began soliciting the opinions of employees by inquiring anonymously into such things as whether or not they enjoy their work, whether…… [Read More]

References

Kinicki A. And Williams B. (2005). Management: A Practical Approach. New York:

McGraw-Hill.

Liker JK. (2003). The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principles from the World's Greatest

Manufacturer. New York: McGraw-Hill.
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Strategy in Action and Contemporary

Words: 3557 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47132055

The shared understanding is crucial in order to build strength and enough confidence necessary for the implementation of strategy and to necessitate evolution.

Second Phase: LG's strategic intent

In order to remain competitive, LG has to stick to its long-term vision which should act as stabilizers to the corporation in times of uncertainty. The vision in this case refers to as a statement of the things that can be achieved by the corporation. The concept of strategic intent is very crucial to the operating of a corporation since it acts as a magnet that pulls the present corporate dynamics and activities to the future. Any given strategic intent should be formulated in a manner that the corporation's remain with a large vision that can energize the workforce at all times. The formulation of new strategic intent options can help LG in capturing new markets while remaining competitive within the uncertain…… [Read More]

References

Chandler, AD (1962).Strategy and structure: chapters in the history of the industrial enterprise.

The American Historical Review, October 1962, Vol. 68 Issue: Number 1 p158-158

Bradford, RW (2008). Communicating Your Strategic Plan with Employees . Available online  http://www.strategyletter.com/CD1103/featured_article.php  retrieved 16 January 2011

Bartlett, C. And Ghoshal, S. (1994), "Changing the role of top management: beyond strategy to purpose," Harvard Business Review, Vol. 72
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Corporate Operations Management

Words: 354 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47923174

Corporate Operations Management

Corporate strategy provides long-range guidance for the whole organization. It is often expressed as a statement of its mission that defines key stakeholders and describes the overall strategy to meet objectives. Business strategy is concerned with products and services offered in the market defined at the corporate level. It defines the competitive advantage of the products and services. Functional strategy, termed operational, is where business functions make long-range plans that support the competitive advantage and incorporate corporate goals (Greasley).

The performance objectives allow the organization to measure performance in achieving strategic goals. Quality is measured by the cost of quality, speed measures time delay between customer request and receipt of product, dependability measures the consistency of promised delivery, flexibility measures ability to quickly change what it does, and cost measures profits and competitor deterrence.

3. 4. Product or service needs to flexibility to quickly meet changing customer…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Greasley, A. (n.d.). Chapter 2. In A. Greasley, Operations Management, 2nd Ed.

Moore, S. (2014). The Disadvantages of Focused Manufacturing. Retrieved from Chron:  http://smallbusiness.chron.com /disadvantages-focused-manufacturing-35836.html
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Corporate Process There Are a

Words: 647 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80137357

They are held responsible by the CEO.

The shareholders of the corporate are the legal owners of the corporation. In most cases, they do not actively control the corporation, but rather are responsible for appointing the board to oversee the corporation on their behalf. The shareholders as owners have some entitlement to profits from the company, but the terms of that profit distribution are generally decided by management when it announces its dividends. The shareholders do have a small handful of legal responsibilities. They elect the board. They also vote to approve the auditors. Occasionally, such as when Arthur Andersen collapsed, shareholders may be compelled to vote outside of normal shareholder meetings. The shareholders also have certain rights of ownership such as the rights to the proceeds from the dissolution of a company, should there be any.

The above definitions apply primarily to public corporations. These roles may differ in…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

eNotes. (2010). Agency theory. eNotes. Retrieved September 24, 2010 from http://www.enotes.com/biz-encyclopedia/agency-theory

Raymond, D. (2005) Independence and the private company: Adopting Sarbanes-like rules on director independence would impair the smooth function. Entrepreneur. Retrieved September 24, 2010 from http://www.entrepreneur.com/tradejournals/article/135241457.html
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Corporate Culture Can Be Effectively Defined as

Words: 3358 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43611338

Corporate Culture can be effectively defined as the basic behaviors and the attitudes and all the related approaches that individuals within an organization use when they interact with one another for any reason at all. It also refers to formal and written policy within the company that is concerned with things like the dress code of the employees, the employee relationship with each other within the organization, and also the various informal behaviors that are generally accepted by the entire group of employees. (Stress Management: Corporate Culture) Corporate Culture also refers to a company's basic values, business principles, its traditions and views, its various methods of operations, and its basic internal work environment. (Define corporate culture) When an individual wishes to learn about the corporate culture of a particular state, like for example, if he wanted to gather information about the basic work ethic and corporate culture in the United…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

"Corporate Culture: Auxillium West" Retrieved From

http://www.auxillium.com/culture.shtml Accessed 20 August, 2005

"Corporate Culture: Introduction" Retrieved From

http://career.ucsb.edu/students/corporatecult/undrstcorpcult.html
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Corporate Governance There Have Been Controversies on

Words: 2666 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70365114

Corporate Governance

There have been controversies on the subject of the governance and accountability of big corporations, but it is only recently that these issues have gained prominence. The compensation for the top management is one of the major issues of corporate governance today. The primary reason for offering stocks to executives was for raising the share prices and thereby increasing its value for both investors as well as shareholders. Though this proved to be a major success, there were a few executives who would not disclose their stock options or would not make full use of the stock options offered to them. This caused inefficiency in the financial market. Stakeholders have the freedom to check their shares and to question the management if there were any discrepancies. Despite these constant checks with financial analysts, the board of directors, the panel of regulators, auditors and managers, there has been instances…… [Read More]

References

Charkham, Jonathan. 1994. 'Keeping Good Company: A Study of Corporate Governance in Five Countries' New York: Oxford University Press.

Davies, Adrian. 1999. 'A Strategic Approach to Corporate Governance' Gower.

De George, Richard T. 1995. 'Business Ethics' New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Fort, Timothy L. 2001. 'Ethics and Governance: Business as Mediating Institution' New York, N.Y: Oxford University Press.
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Corporate Governance Shareholder Wealth Maximization

Words: 665 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71100744

Communities are looking for social expenditures by the business to benefit the community (hospitals, stable employment, donations, and investments). Managers face a challenge in making such crucial decisions. Therefore, corporations must be clear on how to make tradeoffs between these often inconsistent and conflicting interests from different stakeholders.

In the Shareholder Wealth Maximization model, three types of maximization exist in a company. They include total stakeholder maximization, shareholder maximization and stakeholder-owner maximization. Shareholder maximization is based on a single stakeholder maximization whereby the sole business owner is taken into account during maximization. The stakeholder owner maximization focuses on desired interests and resources important for shareholders commitment. It is crucial for the overall success of the business venture (Tricker, 2012).

Of all the three-wealth maximization of companies, shareholder wealth maximization is more significant than the other two. While most businesses presume total stakeholder maximization to be the most significant role, it…… [Read More]

References

Calder, a. (2008). Corporate governance: A practical guide to the legal frameworks and international codes of practice. London: Kogan Page.

Moffett, M.H., Stonehill, a.I., & Eiteman, D.K. (2012). Fundamentals of multinational finance (4th Ed.). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.

Tricker, R.I. (2012). Corporate governance: Principles, policies and practices. Oxford: Oxford University Press
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Strategy & Ethics Bowden &

Words: 1279 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38930871

The claim that a board member familiar with forensic accounting would have been able to uncover such a fraud holds little water given that it took a team of experts working in secret many months to uncover the fraud. However, the argument generally holds that better board composition, and more engaged board members, would have prevented such a fraud. Nadler (2004) argues that better boards are less important for preventing frauds as they are for driving better performance. This then shifts the emphasis of the board away from governance and towards performance enhancement.

Nadler's argument supports Nohria's claims about the relative irrelevance of strong corporate governance. No matter whether the boards take a strict shareholder approach or the expanded stakeholder approach proposed by Post et al. (2002), there are limits as the impact that they can have over a company's performance, no matter how well-composed the board is. If the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bowden, P. & Smythe, V. (2008). Theories on teaching & training in ethics. Electronic Journal of Business Ethics and Organizational Studies. Vol. 13 (2) 19-26.

Nadler, D. (2004). Building better boards. Harvard Business Review. May 2004, 102-111.

Nohria, N. (2004). What really matters. Harvard Business School. Retrieved February 28, 2011 from http://info.umuc.edu/mba/HBS/realmathi/presentation/title/start.html#play

Post, J.; Preston, L. & Sachs, S. (2002). Managing the extended enterprise: The new stakeholder view. California Management Review. Vol. 45 (1) 6-28.
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Corporate Executives Be Bound by

Words: 1556 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37585578

This is too simple a solution. An analysis of the corporate strategies shows that the flaw in the lack of any ethics in the formulation of these strategies is greater the culprit and the corporate executives that were responsible for the development of these flawed strategies, lacking in ethics were more to blame than a few leaders in the organization. (Leadership: Facing Moral and Ethical Dilemmas)

In conclusion a corporate executive may choose to employ ethical and moral values at the time of formulating corporate strategies, but should he choose to ignore the immense good that morals and ethics bring to a corporate strategy he does at not just his peril but puts at risk the whole organization with the chances of it collapsing like Enron very high.

eferences

Ethics Must Come From the Top. Jacksonville Business Journal. August 27, 2004. etrieved from http://www.foley.com/publications/pub_detail.aspx?pubid=2226Accessed on March 3,

Implementing Ethics Strategies…… [Read More]

References

Ethics Must Come From the Top. Jacksonville Business Journal. August 27, 2004. Retrieved from http://www.foley.com/publications/pub_detail.aspx?pubid=2226Accessed on March 3,

Implementing Ethics Strategies within Organizations. Retrieved at http://www.aicpa.org/cefm/management_control_02.asp. Accessed on March 3, 2005

Leadership: Facing Moral and Ethical Dilemmas. Retrieved at  http://www.leadershipadvantage.com/moralAndEthicalDilemmas.shtml . Accessed on Orlitzky, Marc. A case for ethics. August 30, 2001. Retrieved at http://www2.agsm.edu.au/agsm/web.nsf/Content/AGSMMagazine-AcaseforethicsAccessed on March 3, 2005

Tishler, Carla. Where Morals and Profits Meet: The Corporate Value Shift. November 18, 2002. Retrieved at http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item.jhtml?id=3530&t=strategyAccessed on March
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Strategy Corporate and Competitive Management

Words: 1301 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28315505

Others feel Five Forces is too cumbersome in its need for data and heavy-duty analysis and does not fit today's rapidly changing, dynamic market.

So where do we go with this thought that some of today's tools may not suffice as the market moves faster and companies need these dynamic, flexible analytical tools to update their strategies?

Where Is the Field of Strategy?

Disruptive Innovation? Four actions framework? Factor conditions? Demand conditions? Preemptive strategies? Five Forces? Ten Schools? Are any of these concepts/theories new and innovative? Do they pave the path toward the future of corporate and competitive strategizing? The answer is probably yes...and no.

It is difficult to find a brand new strategizing tool or model or school that is not just a rehashed version of our current standard, and quite effective, methods to analyze strategies. One innovative strategy to arise out of an existing concept is "lue Ocean."…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Corporate Level Strategy. (2003, January). Retrieved 11-07, 2008, from BNet Business

Network: http://jobfunctions.bnet.com/abstract.aspx

Day, G., & Reibstein, D. (1997). Wharton on dynamic competitive strategy. Hoboken,

N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Corporate and Business Level Strategies for GM

Words: 1854 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97583351

Business Level and Corporate Level Strategies

Business-Level and Corporate-Level Strategies

General Motors business level and corporate level strategies

General Motors (GM) is a company based in the United States with its headquarters in Detroit, Michigan. GM is a publicly traded company that is listed on the New York Stock Exchange. GM designs, manufactures, distributes, and markets vehicle parts and vehicles (Laudon & Laudon, 2011). The company also sells financial services. GM acquired the title for the world's largest automaker in 2011. It managed to do this by achieving the highest number of unit sales in vehicles since its establishment. For 77 consecutive years, GM was able to lead the global automobile unit sales from 1931 to 2007. However, GM lost this position to Toyota with GM coming second. Toyota still dominates the market. The preference and needs of the customers are the focus of a company's core competencies. In a…… [Read More]

References

Aguinis, H., Joo, H., & Gottfredson, R.K. (2012). Performance management universals: Think globally and act locally. Business Horizons, 55(4), 385-392.

Freyssenet, M. (2011). The start of a second automobile revolution: corporate strategies and public policies. Economia e Politica Industriale.

Laudon, K.C., & Laudon, J.P. (2011). Essentials of management information systems. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Shimokawa, K. (2010). Japan and the global automotive industry. UPH, Shaftesbury Road: Cambridge University Press.
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Strategy of Cellox

Words: 2621 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65922836

Cellox case

Using the concepts developed by Collis and Montgomery in Competing on esources describe how the Cellox could attain a sustainable competitive advantage. Clearly state the competitive advantage and indicate how the following impact the competitive advantage

The esource-Based View (BV) combines internal analysis of phenomena within companies with external analysis of industry and competitive environment. Since no two companies are alike, a company is best positioned for success if it has the best and most appropriate pool of resources for its business and strategy. esources may be both physical such as needed element for the product, and intangible such as the brand name or technological know-how. It is these specific resources slanted to the need of the particular company that make the company an outstanding, rather than mediocre, organization in the long run. Competitive advantage gives the company an edge over competitors. For Cellox, therefore, to become distinct…… [Read More]

References

Buchanan, D. & Huczynski, A.: Organizational behavior, introductory text. Prentice Hall, Third Edition (1997)

Cellox.com http://www.myconcretemanufacturers.com/company/3936/cellox

Celblox.com  http://www.celblox.com/ 

Corning, P.A. Synergy and self-organization in the evolution of complex systems.
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Corporate Tax Law Rules

Words: 1788 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42450341

eorg and Tax eturns

There are a seven types of reorganizations, and each type has different consequences. The client is considering a Type B reorganization, which is an acquisition. Two of its subsidiaries have been acquired this way. The client is considering type A, which is a merger or consolidation; Type C, which is an acquisition, with liquidation, and Type D, which is a transfer. This paper will outline the differences between these in terms of structure, and in terms of their tax consequences. Now, the client should be aware that tax reasons are a terrible reason to do things like mergers and acquisitions because of the profound impact those activities can have on corporate strategy, but it is always good to know the tax consequences of the different types of corporate reorganization before engaging in them.

Type A The Type A reorg is merger and consolidation. In this, the…… [Read More]

References

26 U.S. Code § 368 - Definitions relating to corporate reorganizations. Retrieved May 14, 2016 from https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/26/368

Accounting Tools (2016). Tax-free acquisitions. Accounting Tools. Retrieved May 14, 2016 from http://www.accountingtools.com/tax-free-acquisitions

Kilbilko, J. (2016). 7 types of corporate reorganization. Houston Chronicle. Retrieved May 14, 2016 from  http://smallbusiness.chron.com /7-types-corporate-reorganization-17885.html

Skinner, W. & Nugent, R. (2014). Structuring tax-free type D business reorganizations. Strafford. Retrieved May 14, 201 6 from http://media.straffordpub.com/products/structuring-tax-free-type-d-business-reorganizations-2014-03-18/presentation.pdf
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Importance of Leadership in Strategy Implementation Strategy and Leadership

Words: 605 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2354168

Strategy and Leadership: The Importance of Leadership in Strategy Implementation

Strong leadership as Lussier and Achua (2009) point out is regarded one of the most critical strategy implementation tools. In that regard, therefore, the relevance of proper and sound leadership in organizational strategy implementation cannot be overstated. This is particularly the case given that the implementation of strategy remains one of the most critical components of the process of strategic management.

From the onset, it is important to note that the implementation of corporate strategy requires the involvement and participation of the entire organizational leadership team. Essentially, "one of the most critical elements in successful implementation is leadership" (abin and Miller, 2005, p. 502). In addition to identifying the departments or units to be affected and putting in place effective change management processes, leaders are responsible for the development of an accountability system that clearly assigns responsibilities and indicates timelines…… [Read More]

References

Fuller, J.N. & Green, J.C. (2005). The Leader's Role in Strategy. Graziadio Business Review, 8(2), 72-89. Retrieved from  http://gbr.pepperdine.edu/2010/08/the-leaders-role-in-strategy/ 

Henry, A. (2008). Understanding Strategic Management. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Lussier and Achua (2009). Leadership: Theory, Application, and Skill Development (4th ed.). Mason, OH: Cengage Learning.

Rabin, J. & Miller, G.J. (Eds.). (2000). Handbook of Strategic Management (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Marcel Dekker, Inc.
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Analyzing the Corporate Communication

Words: 1723 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80497824

Corporate Communication

Detailed Notes

Clarify and discuss the purposes of corporate communication strategies

In definition, corporate communication encompasses the entirety of a company's endeavors to have communication that is not only efficacious but also effective in attracting revenues. In particular, it can be delineated as a tool utilized by corporate managers in the way that they make certain that all kinds of internal and external communication are in synchronization in the most efficacious manner. The general purpose of corporate communications strategy is to institute and sustain positive engagement between the company and its stakeholders (Cornelissen, 2011). In addition, the purpose of the corporate communication strategy takes into account the promotion of effectual corporate principles and beliefs, a comprehensive distinctiveness, a fitting and capable association with all channels of communication and instantaneous, responsible means of communicating in all circumstances (Cornelissen, 2011). The organization in consideration is Coca Cola Company. In particular,…… [Read More]

References

Adrian, A. D., Downs, C. W. (2004). Assessing Organizational Communication: Strategic Communication Audits. New York The Guilford Press.

Cornelissen, J. (2011). Corporate Communication: A Guide to Theory and Practice. London: SAGE Publications.

Eisenhauer, T. (2015). 15 Ways to Measure the Effectiveness of Internal Communications within Your Company Intranet. Axero. Retrieved 9 July 2016 from:  https://axerosolutions.com/blogs/timeisenhauer/pulse/325/15-ways-to-measure-the-effectiveness-of-internal-communications-within-your-company-intranet 

Essays, UK. (November 2013). Purpose of Corporate Communication Strategy Marketing Essay. Retrieved from https://www.uk***.com/essays/marketing/purpose-of-corporate-communication-strategy-marketing-essay.php?cref=1
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Why Are Horizontal Corporate Strategies More Effective

Words: 2041 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12566045

Management and Ethical Issues

hat is the difference between efficiency and effectiveness?

hen companies brainstorm about how to get employees to be more effective and more efficient they are trying to make their business more successful. But the two concepts are quite different and often times they are confused as being the same. According to the Small Business section in the Houston Chronicle, an effective worker "produces at a high level" while an efficient worker "…produces quickly and intelligently" (Miksen, 2012). And when an employee is both efficient and effective, a company can produce "better products faster and with fewer resources" (Miksen, p. 1).

Basically, effectiveness is defined by business as the results from the "…actions of employees and managers," and employees and managers that are effective in the workplace generally produce "high-quality" results, Miksen writes on page 1. For example, in a retail situation, the worker on the sales…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Goh, Gareth. "Effectiveness vs. Efficiency -- What's the Difference?" Insight Squared.

Retrieved March 25, 2014, from http://www.insightsquared.com. 2013.

Green, Charles H. "The New Leadership is Horizontal, Not Vertical." Trust Advisor.

Retrieved
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Corporate Sustainability Summary of the Purpose of

Words: 2925 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14047818

Corporate Sustainability

Summary of the purpose of Corporate Sustainability Reporting

Reporting corporate sustainability is one of the best ways to ensure that a company is not only doing well financially in the present but also in securing a better and more certain future. The reporting of corporate suitability ensures that the current needs of the organization are effectively met without comprising future needs of the organization. Reporting on corporate sustainability also ensure that organization are able to keep up with all changes in the industry, with ensuring that new innovations have been developed, maintained and employed in the daily operations of the organization. Corporate sustainability is developed on a grid developed to ensure that the future is secure, and that the organization will survive for a long time.

Corporate sustainability also encompasses the assessment of current and future risks that the organization is likely to endure. As such, a majority…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chee Tahir, A., and Darton, R. C, 2010, "The process analysis method of selecting indicators to quantify the sustainability performance of a business operation." Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol. 18, 1598 -- 1607.

Kaufman, A. And Englander, E, 2011, "Behavioral Economics, Federalism, and the Triumph of Stakeholder Theory." Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 102 No.3, 421-438.

Fassin, Y, August 2012. "Stakeholder Management, Reciprocity and Stakeholder Responsibility." Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 109 No.1, 83-96.

Pryor, M, Humphreys, J, Oyler, J, Taneja, S. And Toombs, L, December 2011, "The Legitimacy and Efficacy of Current Organizational Theory: An Analysis." International Journal of Management Part 2, Vol. 28 No.4, 209-228.
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Corporate Social Action of Mcdonald's and the Problem of Obesity

Words: 2460 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42842669

Corporate Social Action of McDonald's and the Problem of Obesity

Corporate Social Responsibility

This paper proposes a corporate social action to McDonald's to address the issue of obesity among general consumers which is caused by high-calorie and spicy fast foods. The paper starts by highlight some research studies which explain how fast foods cause obesity among children and adults, and proceeds by discussing why McDonald's should take an initiative to remove this criticism by the local and international community. The paper also highlights the strategies to implement this action plan, the intended outcomes and affected stakeholders, the constituent parts of the plan, and unintended consequences or weaknesses of this initiative by the company.

The Social Problem:

Obesity is one of the major issues in health care. It gives rise to various heart diseases, diabetes, and other health related consequences (orld Heart Federation). A number of research studies have been conducted…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Benloulou, Jonathan. "Pelman v. McDonald's: An In-depth Case Study of a Fast Food -- Obesity Lawsuit," 2005. Print.

Environmental Action, "Marching against McDonalds," ProQuest Central, 1993: 25 (3). p-10.

Lu-sted, Marcia, Amidon. Obesity & food policing, 1st Edition. Edina, Minn.: ABDO Pub. Co., 2008. Print.

McBride, Sarah. "Currents: Exiling the Happy Meal; Los Angeles Lawmakers Want to Escalate the War on Obesity (and Fast Food)." Wall Street Journal, 22nd July, 2008: A.14. ProQuest. Web. May 11th, 2013.
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Corporate Roles in Environmental Ethics

Words: 5925 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39363295

Corporate Social esponsibility and Environmental Ethics

Abstract/Introduction -- No one can argue that the international business community is becoming more and more complex as a result of globalism. In turn, this complexity is driven by an increasing understanding of sustainability, going "green," and bringing ethical and moral philosophy into the business community. British Telecom, for instance, noted in 2007 that it had reduced its carbon footprint by 60% since 1996, setting itself a target of 80% reductions by 2016 (Hawser, 2007). Francois Barrault, CEO, BT Global Services, said that by supporting sustainability his company hoped not only to reduce its carbon footprint but also to attract younger people who prefer to work for environmentally and socially responsible companies. He didn't always think that way, though. Barrault said that when he first met former U.S. vice president and environmental activist Al Gore, who showed him pictures of icecaps melting, he thought…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Career Services. The University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from:

http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/careers.

Corporate Social Responsibility in the Global Supply Chain.. APEC

Human Resources Development Working Group. Retrieved from:  http://hrd.apec.org/index.php/Corporate_Social_Responsibility_in_the_Global_Supply_Chain .
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Corporate Culture Survival Guide Chapter 1 &

Words: 1499 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84372633

CORPORATE CULTURE SURVIVAL GUIDE (CHAPTER 1 & CHAPTER 2)

The work of Edward H. Schein (1999) entitled "Corporate Culture Survival Guide" begins by examining the question of why it is important to understand culture. It is important according to Schein (1999) to understand that the organization exists "within broader cultural units that matter in today's global world because mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures and special projects are often multicultural entitles who must have the ability to work across cultures." (p.3) Culture is residual in the individual and is reported by Schein to be the "hidden force hat drives mot of our behavior both inside and outside organizations." (Schein, 1999, p. 3)

Schein (1999) makes it clear that the organizational culture is no small thing but instead is vital and a living aspect of the organization that determines the organization's projection whether that be toward failure or success. People belong to their…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Schein, EH (1999) The Corporate Culture Survival Guide. John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved from: http://books.google.cz/books?id=LkYRFu05W-AC&printsec=frontcover&hl=cs#v=onepage&q&f=false
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Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility

Words: 5027 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12778445



Additionally, it has been observed that whenever companies implement strategies of CS, they do this not out of individual choice and desire, but as a result of imposed legislations. "All of these decisions are made under the mandatory legal rules embodied in employment and labor law, workplace safety law, environmental law, consumer protection law, and pension law. Such rules, because they often apply to all businesses, are not susceptible to easy evasion through choice of form. As a result, those charged with governing a corporation find their decision tree considerably trimmed and their discretion decidedly diminished by mandatory legal rules enacted in the name of protecting stakeholders" (Winkler, 2005). In other words, the modern day evolutions of corporate social responsibility "caution against a rush to declare the ultimate triumph of shareholder primacy" (Winkler, 2005).

As a direct result of this changing legislation, more companies have commenced corporate social responsibility programs.…… [Read More]

References:

Akerstrom, a., 2009, Corporate governance and social responsibility: Johnson & Johnson, GRIN Verlag, ISBN 364045605X

Boyd, C., 2003, Human resource management and occupational health and safety, Routledge, ISBN 0415265908

Conley, J.M., Williams, C.A., 2005, Engage, embed and embellish: theory vs. practice in the corporate social responsibility movement, Journal of Corporation Law, Vol. 31, No. 1

Greenwald, R., 2005, Wal-Mart: the high costs of low price (documentary available on DVD)
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Corporate Social Responsibility I Attaching Assignment Paper

Words: 1851 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37663316

Corporate Social esponsibility

I attaching assignment paper write essay CS.

Given the heightened level of international operations and globalization, pressure is mounting for corporations to behave ethically. Corporations are forced to developing standards, policies and behaviors as a demonstration of their sensitivity to concerns of stakeholder. The policies behaviors and standards are what a European commission called corporate social responsibilities. The Commission defined corporate social responsibility (CS) as "a concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders on a voluntary basis" Commission, 2001.

Complementing this definition, McWilliams and Siegel. (2001)

, said CS include all actions that are intended to forge, beyond the firm's interest, a social good, and is a requirement in law.

Composition Corporate Social esponsibility

Corporate social responsibility entails coming up with solutions specific to a society. The corporation is however, not forcefully charged with an…… [Read More]

References

Balmer, John M.T., & Dinnie, K. (1999). "Corporate identity and corporate communications: the antidote to merger madness," Corporate Communications: . An International Journal,, 4, 68-86.

Balmer, J.M.T. (2001). Corporate Identity, Corporate Branding and corporate marketing European Journal of Marketing 34(4), 248-291.

Buckley, P.J., & Ghauri, P.N. (2004). Globalisation, Economic Geography and the Strategy of Multinational Enterprises. Journal of International Business Studies, 35(2), 81-98.

Commission, E. (2001). Promoting a European Framework for Corporate Social Responsibility.' Green Paper, 264.
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Corporate Conduct Global Corporations Are Often Difficult

Words: 2879 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65909683

Corporate Conduct

Global corporations are often difficult to control because they operate in various countries throughout the world. As such actions that may be illegal in some countries are perfectly legal in others. Furthermore law enforcement officials and governments do not have the power to enforce laws that are outside of their jurisdictions. These issues call into question the effectiveness mechanisms that exist to control global corporate conduct. The purpose of this discussion is to Assess the effectiveness of various mechanisms that exist to control global corporate conduct and recommend a mechanism that I believe is the most effective.

Survey of Mechanisms and their Advantages/Disadvantages

Private Regulation

Private regulations employ civil regulations to compel transnational corporations to operate according to a certain set of standards. According to the "defining feature of civil regulation is that its legitimacy, governance and implementation is not rooted in public authority. Operating beside or around…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Fritsch, S.(2008) The UN Global Compact and the Global Governance

of Corporate Social Responsibility: ComplexMultilateralism for a More Human Globalisation? Global Society, Vol. 22, No. 1, pg. 2-26

Haufler, V. 2003 "Globalization and Industry Self-Regulation," in Governance in A Global Economy: Political Authority in Transition, Miles Kahler and David Lake, eds. Princeton University Press, 2003, p. 226

Haufler, V. 2002 The Public Role for the Private Sector, and The Emergence of Private Authority in Global Governance Rodney Hall and Thomas Biersteker, eds. Cambridge University Press, 2002.
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Corporate Governance Under Globalization in

Words: 5529 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45396322

It should not be treated as a separate exercise undertaken to meet regulatory requirements." (ICA, 29) Here is expressed a philosophical impetus that drives the focus of this research, that such compliance which will generally concern matters such as corporate accounting, the practice of internal oversight and the practice of financial transaction must be considered inextricable from other aspects of practical, procedural and legal operation in terms of its relevance and necessity.

Chapter 3-Practice

The practice of corporate governance may perhaps best be understand from the perspective that deregulation has largely defined the processes and direction of the global economy across the two decades following the Cold ar and its inevitable opening of economic channels. This is because in practice, corporate governance is a concept which has suffered much neglect. To the point, the statistics availed by organizations such as the orld Bank and the International Monetary Fund illustrate that…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Aguilera, R.V. & Yip, G.S. (2004). Corporate Governance and Globalization:

Toward an Actor Centred Institutional Analysis. University of Illinois: College

of Business. Online at .

ASB. (1999). Reporting Financial Performance. Financial Reporting Council. Online at
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Corporate M& a Takeover of Two

Words: 2121 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50094313

was sold off in March of 2002 (www.stadium-electronics.com/investor-relations/corporate-history/). KP Power Source was acquired in 2006, a key acquisition as KP specializes in the distribution of power supplies. In 2007, Ferrus Power was acquired, and additionally was a key acquisition due to its specialization in custom power supplies. 2008 of October, Fox Industries Limited was acquired, which produced custom made power supplies and EMC filter products; November was the acquisition of EMS provider Zirkon Limited; 2010 saw the sale of the non-core asset Branded Plastics Business (www.stadium-electronics.com/investor-relations/corporate-history/).

Stadium managed to acquire the distribution and manufacturing units of many of its competitors. Such strategic acquisition from Stadium is a strategic target for a bigger competitor to discover the value in Stadium and acquire the company before they become too large for acquisition. When reviewing the acquisition strategy of Stadium, one must ask whether the company was preparing its balance sheet to be…… [Read More]

References

Maximising Shareholder Value -- Achieving clarity in decision-making. Technical Report. Measuring Shareholder Value, the Metrics

Farinella, M.A. 1996, "Mergers and acquisitions drove 1995 corporate changes," Best's Review, vol. 97, no. 2, pp. 65.

Huang, C.T.W. & Kleiner, B.H. 2004, "New Developments Concerning Managing Mergers and Acquisitions: MRN," Management Research Review, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 54.

"Mergers and Acquisitions: What Has Changed," 2011, Healthcare Financial Management, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 105.
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Corporate Social Responsibility the Aim

Words: 769 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64236251

This strategy was successful for some time but when WorldCom tried to acquire MCI (a company with two times more revenues than WorldCom), the binge of acquisitions was ended due to objections from antitrust and other stakeholders.

WorldCom's strategy was to display revenues and profits in extremely positive basket; for which the company had to make false misstatements in their accounting records. I think, it was the social and ethical responsibility of WorldCom to avoid misinterpretations in their financial statements and to show clear picture of the company to its stakeholders.

This strategy resulted in expansion of WorldCom through acquisitions and the expansion became so huge that the management of WorldCom was unable to handle the business. The debt of the company touched $41billion with $11billion of accounting frauds and misinterpretations. These all were the fruits of strategies implemented by Ebber just to display a very sound and positive picture…… [Read More]

References

Besser, T. And Miller, N. (2008). Is the good corporation dead? Journal of Socio-Economics, 30 (3). 221-241.

Crawford, K. (2005). Ex-WorldCom CEO Ebbers guilty: Faces up to 85 years in prison after being convicted on all nine counts in accounting fraud. Retrieved on May 7, 2011, from http://monev.cnn.eom/2005/03/l5/news/newsmakers/ebbers/index.htm?cnn=yes

Sidak, J.G. (2003). The failure of good intentions: The WorldCom fraud and the collapse of American telecommunications after deregulation. Yale Journal on Regulation, 20(2), 207-267.
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Corporate Risk Management Comparing Strategies

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41886525

Advisers for example survey the market and make recommendations to their customers on the strength of such estimations. Such investments carry a high level unknown risks, depending upon the type of investment a customer prefers to make. Some customers prefer higher risks for higher returns, while others are more careful with their investments. In such a company, risk quantification and creation play a more important role than risk prevention.

Diversifying risks in the financial business is a strategy that mitigates the risk of investment. The strategy entails diversifying the number and types of investment made in order to minimize the risk of financial loss for the client. Such a strategy is useful in high-risk and high-return types of investments.

Concentrating risk is the opposite strategy of diversifying risk in the investment business. This strategy carries a high risk of loss, but also a high possibility of return if successful. It…… [Read More]

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Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility

Words: 1946 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55901165

(Roy, 2006)

In these cases, others working in those fields are the only ones who have the ability to conduct quality check to verify instances of possible fraud. Qualified doctors can analyze the work of other doctors to attest their medical malpractice. An honest lawyer who deals with related issues can understand how a fellow lawyer could have used deceitful methods to cheat a client off his money. Proficient lecturers can set good examples for students to bring out the incompetency of others. In the managerial level, well qualified professionals are the only ones who are smart enough to figure out the plots hatched by higher executives in order to use the shareholder money for personal needs. Scams in the political sector can only be challenged by opposing political parties or powerful entities like the court. The media is highly potent in this regard as they present malpractices in front…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Description of Corporate Governance [online] Available at: [Accessed 11 August 2010]

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) [online] Available at: [Accessed 11 August 2010]

Blundell M., Explain what is meant by the principal agent problem [online] Available at:

< tutor2u.net/blog/files/Principal_Agent_Problem.pdf > [Accessed 11 August 2010]
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Corporate Risk Management Associated Risks

Words: 691 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1856808

When combining the two, future market trends can be more accurately predicted by basic it upon existing trends. In this way, the risk factors associated with both areas of R&D are significantly reduced.

The most prominent risks associated with R&D, as identified above, include market research and competition. In addition to risks associated with market trends, risks posed by competitors can also be mitigated with a combination of strategies. The three remaining categories of R&D include long-term, short-term, and intermediate-term R&D.

Long-term R&D can be associated with the offensive R&D strategy, as it entails a projection of market needs in the long-term. This means that products and services are developed on the basis of prediction rather than fact. The most important reason for this is to rise above the competition. The risk associated with this is the fact that competitors may develop long-term products that exceed the company's projects, thus…… [Read More]

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Strategy Implementation There Are a

Words: 812 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51950172



Control systems are more difficult to discern, especially in relatively private organizations. Ideally, the best source would be personal interviews with managers or staff. In lieu of that, inference is the best option. As noted, literature can help to understand the types of mechanisms used in different types of companies, although such inferences could lead to wildly inaccurate conclusions.

Insights can be gained from seemingly random websites like Novelguide.com, for some reason (1999); books that discuss the company (Hardy, 2005), blogs (DeBroff, 2009) and media articles (Boorstin, 2004). These sources of information can contain somewhat random tidbits of information that provide useful in painting a picture. Each of the above sources, for example, discusses corporate culture. The multiple sources corroborate each other and provide slightly different perspectives on the same issue. The information contained in some of these sources should be treated with a grain of salt, but as each…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Aronoff, C. & Ward, J. (1993). The high cost of paternalism -- corporate culture -- family businesses. Nation's Business. Retrieved June 12, 2010 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1154/is_n5_v81/ai_13801513/

Boorstin, J. (2004). JM Smucker. CNN/Fortune. Retrieved June 12, 2010 from http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2004/01/12/357910/index.htm

DeBroff, S. (2009). The Smucker's blogger retreat: Inside a family-run company. The DeBroff DeBrief. Retrieved June 12, 2010 from http://thedebroffdebrief.momcentral.com/2009/11/the-smuckers-blogger-retreat-a-day-with-the-smuckers-family-and-family-of-products.html

Hardy, J. (2005) the Core Value Proposition. Victoria, BC: Trafford.
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Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility

Words: 3265 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92564365

Both proposals were consequently amended and eventually accepted by the SEC.

The audit committee makes sure that the books aren't being cooked and that shareholders are properly informed of the financial status of the firm. Characteristically, the audit committee advocates the CPA firm that will audit the company's books, appraises the activities of the company's independent accountants and internal auditors, and reviews the company's internal control systems and its accounting and financial reporting requirements and practices. The compensation committee usually does the following: (1) recommends the selection of the CEO, (2) reviews and approves the appointment of officers who report directly to the CEO, (3) reviews and approves the compensation of the CEO and the managers reporting to the CEO, and (4) administers the stock compensation and other incentive plans. The suggested committee establishes experience for potential directors (Lunnie, 2007; pg. 90). It also puts collectively a list of candidates…… [Read More]

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Corporate Risk Management Insurance Currently

Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5713896

Another alternative for companies with uninsurable risks is mutualization. However, this category of insurance carries further risks that may not be suitable for all companies. The main problem is that mutual insurers require participants to be from a homogenous population, making this alternative unviable for a variety of clients. Some companies are however working on overcoming such problems to make mutualization less problematic for their investors.

Some insurance companies now recognize the main concern of organizations for cash flow in the event of a major loss. These insurers then offer such organizations solutions that guarantee cash flow in the form of a possible loan alternative, which is then to be repaid at a later time, when the company has mitigated its loss. Cash flow insurance can then be based upon income factors such as future royalties or rental income, that are generally not shown on current income statements.

Captives are…… [Read More]

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Corporate Bail-Out and the Current

Words: 1500 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27989951

Such problems are not overcome easily, but in time and with sustained efforts. To better understand my standpoint of defending the bailouts, consider what would have happened had the TAP never been implemented. All of the companies would have commenced bankruptcy procedures and the millions of workers they were employing would have been fired. At a first level, the state would have had to offer those former employees social aid. Then, the national purchasing power would have decreased even more, to impact the national demand and the national production. Also, the country's competitive position within the global market would have decreased dramatically. Overall then, while the bailouts may not have been fairly and efficiently allocated and while they did not revive the economy immediately, they did prevent it from taking an even more damaging turn.

eferences:

Haugen, D., 2010, Bailout Money Should Not Be Used to Pay Executive Bonuses, Detroit:…… [Read More]

References:

Haugen, D., 2010, Bailout Money Should Not Be Used to Pay Executive Bonuses, Detroit: Greenhaven Press

Haugen, D., 2010, the Government Bank Bailout Plan Is a Fraud, Detroit: Greenhaven Press

Haugen, D., 2010, the Government Bank Bailout Will Not Jump Start the American Economy, Detroit: Greenhaven Press

September 2008, Government Bailouts Must Put Americans First, U.S. Newswire
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Corporate Entrepreneurship the Purpose of

Words: 1739 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85309915

For IBM, it took Louis Gerstner getting angry about unfulfilled opportunities for new businesses to create the EBO structure. For Nokia, the similarities with IBM are at a very high structural level, yet Nokia relies on a completely different set of processes for fostering innovation and corporate entrepreneurship. The rapidly changing world of laptop computers needed a corporate nonconformist to accomplish what carefully defined processes in Toshiba could not. In the case of Trilogy the need for creating a steady stream of significant new innovation forced the creation of a proving ground where PhDs in software and mathematics could quickly define entirely new product and business concepts.

eferences

Abetti, P (2004) - Informal corporate entrepreneurship: implications from the failure of the Concorde alloy foundry and the success of the Toshiba laptop;. J. Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, Vol. 4, No. 6, 2004, pp. 529-545

Arthur D. Little (2002) - Developments in…… [Read More]

References

Abetti, P (2004) - Informal corporate entrepreneurship: implications from the failure of the Concorde alloy foundry and the success of the Toshiba laptop;. J. Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, Vol. 4, No. 6, 2004, pp. 529-545

Arthur D. Little (2002) - Developments in the area of Corporate Venturing based on a global Arthur D. Little Study. December, 2002. Page 11 quoted with the Nokia graphic. Accessed from the Internet on March 30, 2007: http://www.adlittle.com/insights/studies/pdf/corporate_venturing_study_report.pdf

Garvin, D.A., & Levesque, L.C. (2006). Meeting the Challenge of Corporate Entrepreneurship Harvard Business Review, Business School Publishing. Pages 102-112.

Nunes, S. (2004). IBM research: Ultimate source for new business. Research Technology Management, 47(2), pages 20-23.
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Corporate Social and Environmental Reporting Companies Have

Words: 1787 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17585803

Corporate Social and Environmental eporting

Companies have presented investigations about their motivation towards voluntarily social and environmental as insolvent. This paper argues in agreement with Adam's view that the goal of CS reporting is to promote credibility and corporate image of stakeholders operating in a particular industry. Whereas companies must focus their efforts on enhancing their profitability, they should also ensure that the welfare of other stakeholders is protected.

Previous literature offers a revelation on various competing theories based on why companies make voluntarily report and engagements in corporate social responsibility. The major perspectives considered are within the scope of application include accountability and image promotion. Many studies hold consequential evidence towards accountability to shareholders making it difficult for organizations to distinguish relevance from accountability based on continued practice. The absence of actual legitimacy crises makes it hard to identify voluntarily reporting as a proactive measure in preventing future crises…… [Read More]

References

Adams, C. (2002). "Internal organizational factors influencing corporate social and ethical reporting beyond theorizing." Accounting, Auditing, and Accountability Journal, Vol. 15 No. 2, pp. 223-250

Bebbington, J., Larringa-Gonzalez, C., and Moneva, J. (2008). "Corporate social responsibility reporting and reputation risk management." Accounting, Auditing, and Accountability Journal, Vol. 21 No. 3, pp. 337-361.

Brennan, N.M. And Merkl-Davies, D.M. (2013). "Accounting Narratives and Impression management," In Jackson, L., Davison, J., and Craig, R. (Eds.). Routledge Companion to Communication in Accounting. Routledge, pp. 109-132. (on blackboard)

Daft, R.L. (2011). The leadership experience (5th ed.). Mason, OH: Thomson, Southwestern
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Corporate Communication it Has Been

Words: 1923 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83036851

With this position, she gained a wide variety of skills in many different areas of P such as corporate reputation, product marketing and placement, crisis communications, employee communications and social marketing. She says that some people get frustrated at the beginning of a communication position because of all the administrative and coordination work.

With the changes that are rapidly occurring across the world, crisis communication is an area that is growing in importance. All organizations are vulnerable to crises, from an oil spill or 9-11, to Enron and Worldcom, the Asian Tsunami Disaster, Hurricane Katrina and Virginia Tech killings. Organizations have to be prepared for the very worst and have an emergency plan in action for handling all areas of communication.

In a "crisis document audit," they look for a failure to address the many communications issues related to crisis/disaster response. Organizations do not understand that, without adequate communications: Operational…… [Read More]

References

Berkeley Career Center (May 13, 2005). What's a Communication Manager? Retrieved http://career.berkeley.edu/article/050513a-rh.stm

Bernstein, J. Ten steps of crisis communication. March 8, 2008 http://www.bernsteincrisismanagement.com/docs/the_10_steps_of_crisis_communications.html

Encyclopedia of Careers and Vocational Guidelines. (2005) New York: Ferguson.

Fogg, N., Harrington, P.E., and Harrington, T.F. (2004) College Majors Handbook.
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Corporate Structure a Corporation Is a Form

Words: 1052 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98718661

Corporate Structure

A corporation is a form of business structure. The corporation is given the same basic rights and duties as an individual. This shields members from the corporation from some liability for the corporation's actions, but also prevents them from utilizing corporate assets in the same way that one would use personal assets. There are some differences between publicly held and privately held corporations; however the basic structure of a corporation remains the same regardless of how the corporation is held. There are three main groups in the corporate structure. The first group consists of the directors of the corporation. The second group consists of the officers of the corporation. The third group consists of the shareholders of the corporation. Individuals may belong simultaneously to more than one of these groups, but each group has different responsibilities.

The first group consists of the directors of the corporation. When forming…… [Read More]

References

Findlaw. (2011). Corporate structure: directors to shareholders. Retrieved from http://smallbusiness.findlaw.com/business-structures/corporations/corporations-structure.html

Investopedia. (2009). The basics of corporate structure. Retrieved from  http://www.investopedia.com/articles/basics/03/022803.asp#axzz1PF3LAIe7 

Investopedia. (2011). What's the difference between publicly- and privately- held companies?

Retrieved from  http://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/162.asp
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Corporate Leadership an Analysis of

Words: 2392 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66076683



Like many of the great charismatic military leaders of the past such as Alexander the Great (Bristol 204) or General George S. Patton (Rosenback & Taylor 223; Rost 72), Gibson and Blackwell report that Kelleher is not afraid to get down in the trenches with his "troops" and endure the same types of challenges that his employees typically encounter on their jobs. Kelleher is also well-known for his insistence on allowing his employees to identify appropriate solutions to the problems with which they are most familiar, just as George Patton was fond of saying, "Never tell people how to do things, tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity" (Valle 1999:245). In addition, both Alexander the Great and General Patton were famous for leading their troops into battle and for being willing to suffer the same types of deprivations and make the same personal sacrifices…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blackwell, Charles W. And Jane Whitney Gibson. (1999). "Flying High with Herb Kelleher: A Profile in Charismatic Leadership." Journal of Leadership Studies 120.

Blackwell, Charles W., Jane Whitney Gibson and John C. Hannon. (1998). "Charismatic Leadership: The Hidden Controversy." Journal of Leadership Studies, 5(4):11.

Bristol, Michael D. (2001). "Charismatic Authority in Early Modern English Tragedy." Shakespeare Studies, 203.

Chaganti, Rajeswararao and Hugh Sherman. Corporate Governance and the Timeliness of Change: Reorientation in 100 American Firms. Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998.
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Corporate Risk Management - Hindrance

Words: 632 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84375469

Internal entities therefore bear the burden of the company's interest, making the risk identification process subjective, and compromising it to the eventual disadvantage of the company. Here also it is advisable that entities from the outside be involved in the process.

The risk quantification process refers to assessing the scale of severity in the risks identified. When a risk is identified, resources need to be allocated in order to mitigate it. Severe risks will therefore require a greater amount of resources, while lower severity also means lower priority. Quantification therefore results in prioritizing. This is a process that can then mitigate the financial resources necessary for preventing the risk factors involved.

In the quantification process, however, ambiguity and subjectivity are also detrimental factors. Ambiguity for example means that there is uncertainty regarding which priority to assign to which levels of risk. Once again, subjectivity works in concomitance. Internal risk teams…… [Read More]