Cultural Diversity in Healthcare Essays (Examples)

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Healthcare for Latinos and African Americans New Challenges

Words: 3430 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23577326

Diversity of Aging Population -- Innovative Healthcare

Over the past several decades there has been an avalanche of research and scholarly narratives focusing on the aging of millions of Americans -- among them the "baby boomers" that were born between 1946 and 1964 -- including their numbers and their health vis-a-vis the impact on the sometimes struggling healthcare system. But there has been a dearth of research on how American healthcare services will respond -- and is currently responding -- to an increasingly diverse older population when it comes to racial, cultural and ethnic identities. This paper points to the numerous issues and challenges that not only face an increasingly diverse older American population when it comes to healthcare, but also the challenges that the healthcare system itself faces as these Americans move into the twilight of their lives.

hat should be the Vision and Mission of Healthcare Professionals in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Administration on Aging. (2010). A Statistical Profile of Black Older Americans Aged 65+.

Retrieved April 2, 2014, from  http://www.aoa.gov .

Bookman, A. (2008). Innovative models of aging in place: Transforming our communities for an aging population. Community, Work & Family, 11(4), 419-438.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2007). The State of Aging and Health in America
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Diversity in Healthcare A Synopsis

Words: 3232 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80574563

Barak concludes by suggesting that the issue and concept of diversity take on a "special urgency" in human service healthcare organizations among the organization as a whole and staff, and that the organization review its quality of service and commitment to the community in order to truly impact the lives of diverse populations.

Managing Diversity: Best Practices

H Management often works off of the ideals of 'best practices.' This concept is discussed in the next article, "Managing the Diversity evolution: Best Practices for the 21st Century Business." Aronson takes a more general approach to diversity but one that can be applied directly to the healthcare industry nonetheless. Aronson points out many of the trends previously identified with regard to diversity problems in the nation's business climate as a whole. In particular the author points out that diversity issues may stem from a number of causes including cultural differences and systematic…… [Read More]

References:

Aronson, D. (2002). "Managing diversity revolution: Best practices for the 21st century."

Civil Rights Journal, 6(1):46

Barak, M.E.M. (2000). "The inclusive workplace: An ecosystems approach to diversity

Management." Social Work, 45(4):339
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Healthcare Administration

Words: 835 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77118325

Healthcare Administration: Healthcare Law, Cultural Diversity, And Principles of Accounting

Cities, Suburbs, And ural Areas

ural areas are geographic areas located away from suburbs and cities, often characterized by a small population and abundant natural resources. Currently, in the U.S., rural residents make up 16% of the entire population - as compared to 17% in 1910. This implies that poor job opportunities and lack of skills that are evident in these areas have pushed people into towns and cities. Suburban areas are residential areas often situated on the outskirts of major cities. Although they have more residents, they have fewer resources as compared to rural areas. The current population in the suburbs has increased to 51%, something that has never been witnessed before. Cities in the U.S. are the largest areas of settlement and are often congested due to high population. The National Center for Education statistics reported that 33%…… [Read More]

References

Kazmier, J.L. (2008). Introduction to Health Care Law. Clifton Park, New York: Cengage Learning

Samovar, L.A., Porter, R. A & McDaniel, E.R. (2009). Communication between Cultures. (12th Ed.). Independence, KY: Cengage Learning

Warren, C.S., Reeve J. M & Duchac, J.E. (2013). Financial Accounting. Mason, OH: Cengage Learning
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Health Care -- Philosophy of Graduate Nursing

Words: 516 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89487080

Health Care -- Philosophy of Graduate Nursing Education

In many senses, the nurse practitioner (NP) takes the profession of nursing to the next level. While the treatment of illness important, the NP also has broader focus of total well-being, including wellness, rights, education and preventative medicine for the patient, his/her family, and local, state, national and global communities. Consequently, in addition to treating the physical ailments of a patient, the modern NP must be clinically and intellectually excellent, an eternal student and teacher who fulfill numerous roles in nearly every health care situation.

A crucial aspect of nursing is the caregiver's relationship with the patient. Patient education is an important aspect of nursing and when carried over to the NP role, patient education greatly improves treatment because the patient has a greater understanding of the reasons for treatment and is likelier to effectively participate in treatment. A NP is a…… [Read More]

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Health Care & Faith Diversity it Is

Words: 1406 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31369841

Health Care & Faith Diversity

It is quite obvious how different religions hold different philosophical views on various aspects and even when it comes to healing. Each religion highly upholds their spiritual values hence the need for health practitioners to be cautious while handling varied clientele whether they hold the same religious sentiments or not. In this research we will major on the views held by the Sikh, Buddhist and Judaist religions in comparison to the Christian belief on healing.

Sikh religion

The Sikh hold the belief that when one is sick it is the will of God and that He is merciful to heal; however one has to consider medical treatment in order to get well. During illness: Sikh patients engage in prayers to seek God for help, seek to obtain peace by remembering Gods name, recite sacred hymns (Gurbani) which are words from the holy scriptures (Guru Granth…… [Read More]

References:

Dharma Haven, (2005).Tools for Healing Relaxing and Awakening. Retrieved March 30,

2012 from  http://www.dharma-haven.org/tibetan/healing.htm 

Manitoba, (2006). Core Competencies for Spiritual health care Practitioners. Retrieved March 30, 2012 from http://ahpcc.org.uk/pdf/compaudittool.pdf

Marinell & James (2009). Jewish Views of Illness and Healing. Retrieved March 30, 2012
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Healthcare for Mentally Impaired Patients Probing What

Words: 3532 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69380077

Healthcare for Mentally Impaired Patients

Probing what information is available about the current status of placement or accommodation and level of personal healthcare available to mentally impaired and emotionally disturbed individuals, it is clear that the analysis is as diverse as there are different mental illnesses. While statistics on managed care treatment for people with severe and disabling mental illnesses are sparse, it is evident that the financial responsibility to care for and house these patients is enormous.

According to Dr. David Satcher, the Surgeon General (1999), approximately 20% of the U.S. adult population has a mental illness. He says, "These illnesses include anxiety disorders, mood disorders, anorexia nervosa, and severe cognitive impairment. More serious mental illnesses include ipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mental illness accounts for 15% of overall burden of disease -- more than malignant cancer and respiratory diseases -- and as far back as 1996 the direct cost…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Boulard, G. (2000, April). Forgotten Patients the Mentally Ill. State Legislatures, 26, 12. Retrieved February 13, 2004, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Callahan, D. (1993, October) Minds and hearts: priorities in mental health services.

The Hastings Center Report.

Fox, M. & Kim, K. (2004, January) Evaluating a Medicaid Home and Community-based Physical Disability Waiver. Family and Community Health. Vol 27: 37.
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Healthcare Strategic Planning & Management

Words: 2211 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49323645

Canada.

Increase benefits

To gain more employees for the nursing staff, SKMC should increase their level of satisfaction by offering several incentives such as increased living expenses or better housing facilities. Moreover, they should include full medical coverage in the work contract. Regarding the foreign employees they should expand the annual leave from 42 days to at least 60 days in order for the abroad workers to be able to spend two full months with their families back home.

The management of Sheikh Khalifa Medical City might object to these propositions arguing the increased costs they would involve. However, their objection can be counteracted by the fact that satisfied personnel perform better at their jobs, leading to an increased quality of the services offered by SKMC and therefore to an increased number of patients and increased revenues and profits.

Emphasis on culture

To attract more foreign personnel within SKMC, the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

John M. Bryson, September 1995, Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations: A Guide to Strengthening and Sustaining Organizational Achievement, Jossey-Bass Publishing, Revised edition

Janet Shapiro, Strategic Planning Toolkit, Civicus, World Alliance for Citizen Participation, http://www.civicus.org/new/default.asp?skip2=yes, last accessed on March 1, 2007

Jay Cooper, Acting Chief Executive Officer Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Official Website of SKMC, http://www.skmc.gov.ae/,last accessed on March 1, 2007

International Hospital Recruitment Inc. Canada, Sheikh Khalifah Medical Center, 2004, http://www.ihrcanada.com/hospital/uae/sheikskhalifa_mc.htm, last accessed on March 1, 2007
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Appreciating Diversity in a Hospital Setting

Words: 1295 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62709592

Cultural Diversity

Healthcare providers deal with people and family during stressful and difficult situations. Professionals delivering palliative care must understand how culture and religious background affect this interaction. The provision of a favorable healing environment is possible via the understanding of culture and religion.

How cultural diversity affects the quality of services and health outcomes

egardless of the similarities, fundamental variations among people arise from nationality, culture, ethnicity, as well as from personal experience and family background. These variations affect the health behaviors and beliefs of both providers and patients have of each other. The provision of high-quality palliative care that is accessible, effective, affordable and requires medical care practitioners to exhibit an in-depth understanding of the socio-cultural backgrounds of a patient, their families, and the environments in which they live. Culturally competent palliative care facilitates clinical experiences with more favorable outcomes, support the possibility for an extremely rewarding patient…… [Read More]

References

Andrews, M.M., & Boyle, J.S. (2008). Transcultural concepts in nursing care. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Coward, H.G., & Ratanakul, P. (2009). A cross-cultural dialogue on health care ethics. Waterloo, Ont: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Daniels, R. (2014). Nursing fundamentals: Caring & clinical decision-making. Australia: Delmar Learning.

Srivastava, R. (2007). The healthcare professional's guide to clinical cultural competence. Toronto: Mosby Elsevier.
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Healthcare the Population That Was

Words: 2597 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 211164

He is made at himself for not coming to terms with himself earlier in life and he is mad at himself for spending so much time "giving his love" to people - men -- who didn't deserve it. He says that if he could go back, he would go to school, he would embrace who he is, he would be honest with family about his sexuality, and he would have found a spiritual life sooner. Bruce is quite spiritual now. He is no longer Baptist, but rather he has taken up belief in the tenets of Buddhism, which he claims has brought him much peace inside as well as has made him more tolerant of others -- including whites.

One interesting fact about Bruce is that he says that he has never had a very strong identity to gay men either -- whether they are white or black. He seems…… [Read More]

Gay Men of African Descent (GMAD). (2010). Gay men of African Descent. Accessed on October 28, 2010: http://www.gmad.org/index.html

Sue, D.W., & Sue, D. (1999). Counseling the culturally different: Theory and practice

(3rd ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Lebanese and Middle Eastern Cultural Beliefs Regarding Health Care

Words: 646 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68029225

The Lebanese and the overall middle easterners are known to be strict to their cultural beliefs and practices. Such beliefs and practices dictate every aspect of their lives and how they interact with other people from other cultures across the world as well as other aspects of life that are widely applicable in the contemporary world. This culture has a great impact on the structure and nature of health care that is appreciated among the Lebanese and other middle easterners (Shiloh, 2007). It is imperative to understand their cultural perception on care presentation, accommodation, and repatterning to offer a more effective healthcare under this cultural setting.

The Lebanese have a unique perception on culture care presentation. The cultural practices in Lebanon emphasize the importance of both nuclear and extended families. Moreover, the family members rely heavily on each other. During illnesses, the family members offer the primary care and support…… [Read More]

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patient centered care in healthcare nursing

Words: 4617 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92870872

Introduction

Patient-centered care is the goal of many healthcare organizations, but the ability of an organization to deliver patient-centered care is influenced by a number of factors both internal and external. Business practices, regulatory requirements, and reimbursement all can impact patient-centered care in any healthcare organization. Promoting patient-centered care requires an organizational culture committed to this paradigm, which also needs to be embedded in the mission and values of the organization.

Executives and administrators create the organizational culture that promotes patient-centered care. All leaders in the organization are responsible for using patient-centered practices and communications styles in their interactions with patients and their families. Furthermore, administrators oversee the policies and procedures that directly impact the culture of care. Analyzing areas of weakness within the organizational structure and culture via established assessments like the Patient-and Family-Centered Care Organizational Self-Assessment Tool, it is possible to create multidisciplinary teams that promote the organization’s…… [Read More]

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Health Care to Varied Faiths Spirituality in

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5377887

Health Care to Varied Faiths

Spirituality in Health Care

roviding

Health Care to All Faiths

roviding health care is a challenging prospect. Compounding the challenge is the need to provide health care to individuals with differing beliefs from that of the caregiver. Nurses must recognize the multifaceted paradigm of health care in that the patient has spiritual as well as physical needs. Addressing these needs becomes even more complex when the spiritual beliefs of the patient are unfamiliar to the nurse. Discovering the details of the patient's specific religious affiliation enables the nurse to provide quality, spiritually-appropriate care. The following discussion addresses several distinct cultural perspectives on healing

erspective on Healing

Native American Indian Spirituality

One religion with distinctive health care beliefs is American Indian Spirituality. The Native American patient considers illness to be the result of spiritual problems (Native American, 2008). Further delving into the religion reveals a belief…… [Read More]

Purifying rituals are performed to prepare the body for healing (Native American, 2008). A shaman may be called in to address the spiritual health of the patient: this aspect is central to wholeness (Native American, 2008). Symbolic rituals, which include praying, chanting, singing, or dancing, are performed to entreat the spirits to intervene on the patient's behalf and provide healing (Native American, 2008). These may involve the patient's entire community (Native American, 2008). In addition, American Indians utilize many natural herbs and plants in their quest for healing (Deubel, 2009).

Confucianism

While followers of Confucius need to be consulted in regard to health care interventions, the nurse must be cognizant of the familial hierarchy and ascertain who the head of the family is in order to include this person in decision-making (Chen & Fan, 2010). Specific edicts are not in place for daily living, including edicts which could pertain to health care interventions; however, prayers and sacrifices of food or incense may be proffered in
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Cultural Diversity Although I Believe That I

Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 751333

Cultural Diversity

Although I believe that I have critically met the objectives for a master's degree in working in many ways (particularly academically), I can honestly state that the area in which I progressed the most was in dealing with cultural diversity. Prior to entering this program, I had extremely limited experience dealing with cultural diversity, especially in the workplace. Despite working as a nurse for the past 16 years, the most diversity I had ever experienced in my patient population was the occasional Spanish speaking client -- which would require me to utilize the language line for interpreting my directions and interacting with the patient. However, thanks to my involvement in this particular academic program, I am now much more acclimated with cultural diversity and believe that I have significantly improved my prowess in this aspect of my work as a professional nurse.

My experience with cultural diversity changed…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Has Been Moving From a Total

Words: 980 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65357474

healthcare has been moving from a total "organic" model to a more holistic viewpoint of the patient and their individual needs. Healthcare professionals have come to realize that within any organization, nothing is ever in isolation. Research has shown us many things that can be improved using the holistic and multi-cultural models, as well as the direction(s) we are suggesting with our new program. Clearly, the empirical research shows us that there are many modifiers that can create illness, modify illness patterns, contribute to healing, and act in a preventative manner (Adler, 1994). This is particularly true when dealing with chronic diseases like AIDS. Specialized AIDS units within a modern healthcare facility offer a team of experts who are familiar with the various permutations of the disease and who have greater responsibility and autonomy within the nursing staff. This should, in theory, increase both objective and subjective outcomes for the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adler, N., et.al. (1994), "Health Psychology: Why do Some People Get Sick and Some

Stay Well?," Annual Review of Psychology, 45. http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/oi/abs/10.1146/annurev.ps.45.020194.001305

Aiken, L., Sloan, D. (1997). Effects of Specialization and Client Differentiation on the Status of Nurses: The Case of AIDS. Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 38 (3): 203-22.

Chow, M.k, et al. (2010). The benefits of using a mixed methods approach -- quantitative with qualitative -- to identify client satisfaction and unmet needs in an HIV healthcare centre. AIDS Care. 22-94): 491-98.
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Diversity Important in Health Care

Words: 3805 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98981928

The Foundation called specific attention to the prospect of institutional and policy-level strategies to increase the participation of under-represented minorities in the health professions. In response, the Institute Committee on Institutional and Policy-Level Strategies for Increasing the Diversity of the U.S. Healthcare Workforce came out with a report, entitled "In the Nation's Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health Care Workforce." The Committee consisted mostly of academicians, two of whom represented the nursing profession.

In its report, the Committee recognized the importance of increasing racial diversity among health professionals in order to improve access to care, greater patient choice and satisfaction and better educational experiences for practitioners, among other benefits. It also recognized the lack of strategies in reducing institutional and policy-level barriers among health profession educational institutions or HPEIs. In response to the lack, the Committee recommended that health professions education make a clear stand and mission on the…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

AHRQ (2007). The national healthcare disparities report, 2006. Agency for Healthcare

Quality and Research, Medscape. Retrieved on June 18, 2009 from http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/552271

www.medscape.com

Alabama Nurse (2004). ANA Review: Institute of Medicine report on workforce diversity,
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Healthcare Communication Theory in Healthcare

Words: 1121 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9893030



One of the more controversial questions that arises when discussing group interactions is if one person need to lead the group, for the group to be effective (Lane, 2000, Decision mapping). In healthcare, some type of hierarchy is essential. Treatment decisions cannot be made through consensus alone, especially when a patient's life is in immediate danger. Also, seniority and areas of expertise are essential to define -- a more experienced nurse's decision-making ability must have priority over a novice nurse's. Certain areas of expertise, like the staff's registered nutritionist, must be respected when providing care. In fact, research in support of a communication theory known as decision-mapping notes that "groups with ineffective leadership" are less rather than more cohesive (Stephens 1999). Knowing there is an effective source of leadership can produce confidence. However, some consultation between different people, including the patient, family, nurses, physicians, and other caregivers, is ideal when…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cartwright Stephens. (1999). Recasting groupthink as a consequence of ineffective leadership: Is cohesion the problem or the solution? Small Groups' Communication Context.

Retrieved January 20, 2009  http://www.uky.edu/~drlane/capstone/group/dmap.htm 

Lane, Derek (2000). Groupthink. Small Groups' Communication Context.

Retrieved January 20, 2009 at  http://www.uky.edu/~drlane/capstone/group/gthink.htm
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Healthcare Practices and History of Nursing in the Jewish Culture

Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44685893

healthcare practices and history of nursing in the Jewish culture.

There are several healthcare practices within the Jewish culture. According to the rabbinic lore, no aging process existed until the time that Abraham was born. No disease also existed until the time when Jacob came to existence.

The connections of Jews to the healing process at patients as well as physician level is noted to be ancient with a deep root in history and theology (MyJewishLearning.com, 2011).In most religions, the idea of medical treatment was largely an anathema. In most traditional religions, disease, deformity and accident were regarded as parts of God's creation that those of human beings. Anything to do with medical treatment was largely considered to be a process of meddling with the Creator's (God's) work and will. Judaism however, views the concept of medical treatment in appositive light. It views medical treatment as an obligation on the…… [Read More]

References

Gesundheit, B., Hada, E (2005).Maimonides (1138-1204): Rabbi, Physician and Philosopher*. IMAJ 2005;7:547-553

Illievitz, AB (1935).Maimonides the Physician. Can Med Assoc J. 1935 April; 32(4): 440-442.

Leininger MM (1997) Overview and Reflection of the Theory of Culture Care and the Ethnonursing Method. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 8:2, 32.52.

Leininger MM (1991) Culture Care Diversity and Universality: A Theory of Nursing. National League for Nursing Press, New York.
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Healthcare and Teamwork

Words: 1384 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84211170

Development of the Team

The team was developed to accommodate the needs of a growing organization. Basically we had two people, and then the team grew quickly to a staff of six, as the team became a much higher priority. This has proved to be incredibly valuable to the organization, and gave me an opportunity to basically build a team from scratch, and to create the culture of that team. One of the things that we realized early on as that we needed to structure the need in such a way that the team worked for each other, to help each other out. That way, we felt that we could cover many of the basic advantages of teamwork, such as increased efficiency, a high level of responsiveness to patient needs, and overall effectiveness as wait times were diminished (Ray, 2017).
For example, we were able to take on projects on…… [Read More]

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Cultural Diversity Affect You as

Words: 828 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27084026

90).

Therefore, in the light of these current developments, I envisage that the nurses will require much more comprehensive training in issues related to cultural diversity in the future. For example, the nurse will need to become more knowledgeable about the way that various cultures respond to conventional medicine and that alternative medicine and therapies play in the healing process.

The subject of alternative therapies illustrates the way that the role of nursing is changing. For example, it has been found that "…44% of Mexican-Americans had used alternative practitioners at least once in the previous year" and that "Mental or physical illness is seen by many Hispanics to be a consequence of behavior, or simply the result of fate" (Breeding, Harley, ogers & Crystal, 2005).

This means that in future the nurse will need to be trained in greater depth in order to understand the way that other cultures perceive…… [Read More]

References

Breeding, R.R., Harley, D.A., Rogers, J.B., & Crystal, R.M. (2005). The Kentucky Migrant Vocational Rehabilitation Program: A Demonstration Project for Working with Hispanic Farm Workers. The Journal of Rehabilitation, 71(1), 32+.

Business Case for Diversity. Retrieved June 7, 2009, from http://www.chubb.com/diversity/chubb4450.html

Kim, H.S. & Kollak, I. (Eds.). (2006). Nursing Theories: Conceptual and Philosophical Foundations (2nd ed.). New York: Springer.

Varcoe C. ( 2004) Advancing Nursing Scholarship in Diversity: Complexity and Equity. CJNR Editorial, 36 (4).
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Cultural Diversity Issues

Words: 675 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69969007

From WWMT.com comes the news story of Western Michigan University Bronson School of Nursing receiving $2 million in grant money for scholarships to students who are from different cultural backgrounds so that a more diverse culture of student nurses can be achieved (VanTimmeren, 2017). As Bryan (2014) points out, culture is very important in this day and age because it informs people’s perspectives and values about what is good and bad regarding others in society. If people have a very narrow and poorly conceived viewpoint or perspective on other cultures, there is going to be tension in the field. To discourage this tension, the Bronson School of Nursing is looking to bring a wider diversity to its student body with the aim being that the more diverse its student population is the more likely that population is to generate tolerant, accepting, respectful and understanding viewpoints of different cultures.

This news…… [Read More]

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Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings

Words: 478 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52197051

Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings for Nurses

On a continuum of cultural awareness to cultural relativity, how do you view yourself and your interactions with others?

As a nurse practitioner, it is easy to see the patient simply as a patient, as a sick person needing treatment, rather than a well person who perceives his or her body as only temporarily ill, but sees his or her person as permanently a part of a family and culture outside of the hospital. As Small and Dennis (2003) counsel, the increase in immigration has resulted in greater diversity of both patients and practitioners within the United States, rather than in traditional urban locations. Thus Small and Dennis remind the nurse that it is not simply enough to treat the patient, but the patient must also understand his or her illness in culturally comprehensible terms. A nurse must be able to communicate to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dennis, Betty Pierce & Ernestine B. Small. (Jan-Feb, 2003) "Incorporating cultural diversity in nursing care: an action plan" The ABNF Journal.

"New Position Statement Originated by: Council on Cultural Diversity in Nursing Practice, Congress of Nursing." (1996) Adopted by: ANA Board of Directors.
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Cultural Diversity Issue of Non-American Employees Communicating

Words: 4611 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43058477

cultural diversity issue of non-American employees communicating frequently in their own native language creating an environment of sensitivity and bias amongst the non-Hispanic community.

Handling Diversity in an Organization

The contents of this paper focus on the cultural diversity involving Films ecovery Systems, an American company located at the heart of Chicago, Illinois. The paper takes an insight into the issue and also proposes solutions that can resolve the problem. The most important aspect of the paper is that it takes into account the material we find and read in books and compares to what degree the literature is actually applicable in real life situations.

Academic Literature

The study of public administration includes a spectrum of many disciplines, which include psychology, sociology, philosophy and also management sciences. Even though, the nature of public administration does not conveniently classify its elements into components, public administration is primarily categorized to highlight the…… [Read More]

References

Leaders are Learned Optimists - The CLEMMER Group Management

Consulting, available at http://www.clemmer.net/excerpts/leaders_learned.shtml accessed on: March 31, 2004

Robert Bacal, Conflict Prevention In The Workplace, available at http://www.work911.com/products/i-coop.htm, accessed on March 31, 2004

QSM Consulting - Leadership Driving Change, available at http://www.qsmconsulting.com/lds/index.shtml, accessed on: March 31, 2004
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Healthcare Administration

Words: 962 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4768841

Accounting, Cultural Diversity and Healthcare Administration: Law, Ethics and Policy

The difference between the cash basis and accrual basis of accounting

The cash basis of accounting is applied when revenues in an income statement are reported in the period cash from the customers is received, and when all the expenses in an income statement are paid for (Warren, eeve and Duchac, 2014). For example, a payment for a service is recorded in the income statement once the fee from the client is received. Under this basis, the variance that arises from the expenses and revenues is the resultant net profit or loss at that particular period. This method is popular with small businesses that have few debtors and creditors.

The accrual basis of accounting reports revenue on the income statement in the period they are earned. The expenses are also reported once they occur. This method applies the matching principle,…… [Read More]

References

Kazmier, J.L. (2009) Health Care Law. Clifton Park, New York: Cengage Learning, Inc.

Samovar, L.A., Porter, R. E & McDaniel, E.R. (2009). Communication Between Cultures (7th Ed.). South Western: Cengage Learning, Inc.

Warren, C.S., Reeves, M. J & Duchac, J. (2014). Financial Accounting (13th Ed.). South Western: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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Interview of a Health Care Leader

Words: 2539 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74030797

Healthcare

The term health care refers to the inter-related system of care provided to persons during illness. In most of the cases, healthcare begins with the family doctor who refers patient to specialists if needed or directly order further diagnostic testing. Community health clinics perform the same procedure as a family doctor, but alongside with that, clinics also provide insight into patterns of health or illness seen within the community. Hospital just form one part of the healthcare community, as are mostly visited when a patient's condition is more acute and requires intervention by the hospitals high-end staff, since more can be done for him in a hospital rather than in a clinic where he is just an out-patient.

Clinics of various types provide very specific services, such as "pain management clinics" these clinics are targeted for towards people suffering from pain conditions. ehabilitation services also form a needed part…… [Read More]

References

DDI (2006) Health Care Global Comparison: Leadership Forecast 2005|2006. DDI, Pennsylvania.

DDI (2007) Leading the Past: Preparing the Future. DDI, Pennsylvania.

Fischer (2007) Culture and cultural analysis as experimental systems. Cultural Anthropology. 21(1) 1-65.

Greenfield D (2007) The enactment of dynamic leadership. Leadership in Health Sciences. 20(3) 159-168.
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Culture Accounting and Ethical Issues Healthcare Administration

Words: 979 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47763184

Healthcare Administration: Culture, Accounting, And Ethical Issues

Cultural Diversity

The causes of prejudice

Prejudice is described as the generalization of a group of people, based on negative attitudes that stem from stereotypes and non-factual beliefs. Although the reasons for prejudice may vary, Samovar, Porter and McDaniel (2009) explain three major motivations: societal pressures, social identities and scapegoating. Societal sources refer to rules and regulations that may be put in place in a given society to maintain one group's dominance over others. Social identities, on the other hand, are people's connection to their cultures and beliefs. Any groups that are deemed a threat to this connection are treated as enemies and are often at the receiving end of prejudice. Sometimes, different groups, such as gays and African-Americans are used as scapegoats to express anger and discontentment over various issues in society (Samovar, Porter and McDaniel, 2009). This allows one group to…… [Read More]

References

Kazmier, J.L. (2008). Introduction to Healthcare Law. Clifton Park, New York: Cengage Learning

Samovar, L.A., Porter, R.E. & McDaniel, E.R. (2009). Communication between Cultures (7th Ed.). South-Western: Cengage Learning

Warren, C.S., Reeve, J.M. & Duchac, J.E. (2013). Financial Accounting (13th Ed.) South- Western: Cengage Learning
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Business of Health Care

Words: 2602 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85234356

Business of Health Care

This study highlights essential facts about health care and health in the local, national, and international health care delivery. Healthcare in the U.S. stands at crossroads between opportunities and challenges. Both the local, national, and international health systems face common problems in the delivery of efficient, high quality and equal health services. All these are concurrently happening in times when the amount of care delivered exceeds the resource base. In the U.S., the demand for healthcare, just as in any industrialized country, is rising because of rising public expectation and the ageing population. The combination of technological developments and demographic changes increases the provision costs (Garman, oyer & Johnson, 2011).

Consequently, local, national, and international health care delivery systems are facing same issues of service rationing to cut costs due to a decreasing tax base for paying a rising demand and an increasing demand. Similarly, maintaining…… [Read More]

References

Garman, A.N., Royer, T.C., & Johnson, T.J. (2011). The future of healthcare: Global trends worth watching. Chicago, Ill: Health Administration Press.

Geisler, E., Krabbendam, K., & Schuring, R. (2013). Technology, health care, and management in the hospital of the future. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Gibson, R., & Singh, J.P. (2012). The battle over health care: What Obama's reform means for America's future. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Kolker, A. (2011). Management engineering for effective healthcare delivery: Principles and application. Hershey: Medical Information Science Reference.
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Nursing Healthcare Business

Words: 5470 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30995758

Healthcare

We can compare the healthcare workplace to what is seen by a person when he/she looks through a kaleidoscope: since there are numerous different patterns that appear as the moments pass by. The shortage of nurses which has been publicized widely and the high turnover rates amongst the nurses are some of the unwanted patterns which have occurred. The dependence of healthcare institutions on the nurse-managers for the retention and recruitment of nurses is steadily increasing (Contino, 2004).

There are a number of routes through which the critical care nurses have become the leaders. Most of these routes don't have any educational or managerial training as a part of the process. There is a need for effective strategies for the care leaders who provide critical care in order to inspire the staff and manage the departmental operations in an effective manner to get positive results. One of the strategies…… [Read More]

References

Adams, J., Erickson, J., Jones, D., & Paulo, L. (2009). An evidence-based structure for transformative nurse executive practice, Nursing Administration Quarterly, 33(4), 280-87

Advisory Board Web site. (2004). Available at: http://www.advisory.com.

Ales, B.J. (1995). Mastering the art of delegation. Nurs Manage. August; 26: 32A, 32E.

American Organization of Nurse Executives (2005). AONE Nurse Executive Competencies. Nurse Leader, 3(1), 15-22.
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Personal Awareness of Cultural Bias in Social and Cultural Diversity

Words: 2763 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49030133

Cultural bias implies an emphasized distinction or preferential status that indicates a predilection for one culture, over another. It is often discriminative, and is characterized by an absence of integration in a group, in terms of social principles, codes of conduct, and beliefs. Cultural partisanship introduces the accepted behaviors of one group as superior, and more valued, than those of another lesser-respected cultural group. In my surroundings, most of the residents, and hence, patients are white, making us (Afro-Americans and Asians) minorities, feel different if not isolated. Such deferential factors are responsible for establishing where specific individuals live, and what opportunities are available to them, in the healthcare and educational context (Sue et al., 2009)

Question 2

The presence of cultural bias within the context of healthcare-related recommendations and decision-making gives rise to significant challenges. Well-documented inequalities in health status of different racial and ethnic communities, in addition to nationally-publicized…… [Read More]

Resources and Services Administration (http://www.hrsa.gov/culturalcompetence/)

American Psychiatric Association's Steering Committee to Reduce Disparities in Access to Psychiatric Care (2004) (Natl. Assoc. Social Workers 2007).

These and many more substantive readings from research are listed by the author for assimilating culture-centric education. (Sue, Zane, Nagayama Hall, & Berger, 2009)

Question 7

As a Counselor, I will need to be aware that being culturally aware implies delivering services in a manner consistent with the recipient's culture, through regards to linguistic variation and cultural discussion. I would seek to be more sensitive to unaccultured ethnic minority clients. In addition, I would use discretion in cases where patients of a particular community or ethnicity are prone to certain clinical problems (for which I would study the ethnic group and its history in more depth) and if certain ethnic groups respond poorly to EBT (Evidence-based Treatment). (Sue et al., 2009)
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Flows in Health Care Since the Government

Words: 2383 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28030136

Flows in Health Care

Since the government had started the practice of handing over major departments to private sector like health care and education, these areas are now more focused on employing techniques that can draw major profit flow. On examining the three crucial aspects of profit earning such as the number of patients, quality of staff and management, we come to a conclusion that all three areas go side by side and need to be checked upon regularly (Michael, 2006 ).

The numbers of patients are important, to a hospital; patients are the customers who are taking advantage of the health care services provided by that respective hospital. Another item that is associated to the number of patients is the type of patients coming in which is directly associated with the services that a hospital is providing at that particular time. In order to earn more profit in this…… [Read More]

References

Del. Donna M., Christensen M.D. (Oct 2003). Women on the Cutting Edge of Health Care and Research. Ebony, 82.

Funtleyder, L. (2008). Healthcare Investing: Profiting from the New World of Pharma, Biotech, and Health Care Services. McGraw-Hill Professional.

Harry A. Sultz, Kristina M. Young. (2010). Health Care USA. New York: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Leiyu Shi, Douglas A. Singh. (2011). Delivering Health Care in America. Jones & Bartlett Publishers.
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Social Cultural and Political Influence in Healthcare Delivery

Words: 4282 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16620351

Social, Cultural, And Political Influence in Healthcare Delivery

Social, cultural, and political inequalities are detrimental to the health and healthcare system of the U.S. This is because the U.S. is one of the most multicultural, overpopulated, diverse and undergoing rapid economic growth. The federal government has embarked on efforts geared at addressing unsustainable costs of health care in the U.S. With the leadership of the current president, Barrack Obama, initiatives of containing health care costs will evaluate and explore strategies to contain the growing costs of health care based on a system-wide while enhancing the value and quality of health care (Ubokudom, 2012). The apparent system of health care is rife with opportunities of minimizing waste, delivering coordinated, effective care, and improving well-being and health of all Americans. The government in collaboration with care providers must prioritize cost effective containment strategies with the greatest possibility for political success and non-partisan…… [Read More]

References

Albrecht, G.L., Fitzpatrick, R., & Scrimshaw, S. (2013). Handbook of social studies in health and medicine. London: Sage Publications.

Armstrong, E.G. (2011). The health care dilemma: A comparison of health care systems in three European countries and the U.S. Singapore: World Scientific.

Bale, J.R., Stoll, B.J., & Lucas, A.O. (2013). Improving birth outcomes: Meeting the challenge in the developing world. Washington, DC: National academies press.

Buseh, A.G. (2008). Empowering resilience: Improving health care delivery in war-impacted African countries: a case study of Liberia. Lanham, Md: University Press of America.
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Community Health Oklahoma Modern Healthcare

Words: 3003 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68725313

The subject is now part of a national political task force, with the goal of eliminating the problem within one generation (Ferran, 2010).

Formally, teen pregnancy is based on a woman who will not reach her 20th birthday by the expected birth of her first child. This definition does not assume marriage, nor if the woman is legally an adult (depending on the country). The idea of marriage and birthing age has, of course, changed based on societal and cultural issues. At one time, when the lifespan was 40, it made sense for a girl to begin her childbearing years as soon as she was able, usually around 12-13. In contemporary U.S. culture, however, the amount of information and professional data that is needed to become a well-rounded citizen is so high that we usually gauge 18 as the very minimum age to begin to have the resources and/or acumen…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Key Health Data About Oklahoma. (2011). Trust for America's Health. Retrieved from:

 http://healthyamericans.org/states/?stateid=OK 

Linking Teen Pregnancy Prevention to Other Critical Social Issues. (2010, March). Retrieved from the Namtional Campaign: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/why-it-matters/pdf/introduction.pdf

Oklahoma at a Glance. (2011). Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Retrieved from:
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Reflection Public Preferences and Health Care

Words: 1004 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76564057

Pesonal Values Spiitual Beliefs and Health Cae Policy

I have taken up the majoity of values beliefs fom my paents. I value peace as a citical facto in people's lives. People should show goodwill to othes while tying to limit the conflict unless with absolute necessity. Individuals should have some fom of love within thei life. I believe that loving oneself allows people to adoe to fellow humans. Futhe, showing cae to natue involves engaging in sustainable activities that potect all ceatues. The love fo someone o something and eceiving love in etun indicates a level of espect. Ease aises when people feel that thee is a need to be modeate and balance life's offeings (Sooka & Wlezien, 2010). I believe that the equality between female and male aspects and evil and good ae integal phenomena. I value espect fo life and embace divesity that the wold offes. Inceased divesity…… [Read More]

references and Health Care Spending in the U.S. And UK. British Journal of Politics and International Relations 5 (4): 576-93.
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Legacy Emanuel A Healthcare Organization Audit Summary

Words: 1793 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4977496

Legay Emanuel:

A healthare organization audit summary

Legay Emanuel Medial Center, at 2801 North Gantenbein Avenue, Portland, Oregon is

is an IRS 501 ( ) 3 not-for-profit, tax-exempt orporation omprised of five full-servie hospitals and a hildren's hospital. The Center's award-winning failities offer an integrated network of health are servies: aute and ritial are, inpatient and outpatient treatment, ommunity health eduation and a variety of speialty servies.

The area's largest loally owned, nonprofit health system, Legay Health's is a lead healthare institution in the region, ommitted to omprehensive servie provision to lients through a network of healthare providers toward a healthier and wellness ommunity. Projeted growth for the institution under the diretion of the Offie of Development advanes the mission and vision of Emanuel Medial Center, dediated to legay of good health for 'Our people, Our patients, Our ommunities, Our world' through development of sustainable programs that generate private support…… [Read More]

cited in the cultural protocol of the Medical Center's daily routine are mentioned in Table 2.

Table 2

Image: Legacy likes to be perceived as family and patient oriented, not for profit, and for giving back to the community.

Department: All RNs must wear scrubs that cannot be worn in to work. RNs cannot wear false or painted nails.

Status Symbols and Reward Systems: Kudos if the co-workers think other co-workers have done good jobs. The manager will sometimes give coffee cards of something like that. Every 5 years of service workers receive recognition and get to select a prize.
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African-American Healthcare Needs A Plan

Words: 850 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60321878



LEADING CAUSES OF MOBIDITY:

Some of the diseases which often result in early death in African-Americans, provided that the go untreated or undiagnosed, include hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, dementia (i.e., Alzheimer's disease), diabetes and certain types of cancer, most notably lung cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer and prostate cancer (in men). Exactly why the morbidity rates for these disease are so much higher in African-Americans than in other ethnic/racial groups include a lack of education, lower incomes and the inability to access professional health care providers and clinics ("Health and Health Care," 2009, Internet). At the top of the list, there is hypertension, coronary heart disease (especially arterial blockage), stroke and some major types of cancer. With hypertension, some studies have shown that if a black male lives in poverty, his chances of being stricken with high blood pressure increases, perhaps because of the stress which goes…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

"Health and Health Care of African-American Elders." (2009). Internet. Accessed June 24,

2009 from http://www.stanford.edu/group/ethnoger/african.html.

Spector, Rachel E. (2008). Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness. New York: Pearson

Prentice-Hall.
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Educational Mission the Unc Health Care System

Words: 917 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27540462

Educational Mission

The UNC Health Care System runs a teaching hospital that publishes its mission statement, statement of core values, and nursing philosophy on the organization's Web site at < http://www.unchealthcare.org/site/Nursing/nurseleadership/visionvalues >. The mission is stated briefly as: "to be a leader in providing compassionate, quality care focusing on the unique needs of patients and their families." Key words in the mission statement include "compassionate," "quality care" and "unique needs." The core values of the UNC Health Care System's nurses include five main elements. Those elements include "My patient," "My team," "My Hospital," "My Community," and "My Profession." Phrasing these five main values in terms of "my" helps the nurse to feel like an integral part of the organization.

Furthermore, the nursing philosophy of the UNC Health Care System is outlined as being a reflection of the vision and values of the organization as a whole. The main principles of…… [Read More]

References

East Carolina University College of Nursing (2012). Philosophy of the college of nursing. Retrieved online: http://www.nursing.ecu.edu/philosophy.htm

UNC Health Care System (2007). Nursing mission, core values, philosophy. Retrieved online: http://www.unchealthcare.org/site/Nursing/nurseleadership/visionvalues
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Change Management in Healthcare Organizations

Words: 16366 Length: 42 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93329389



1.3. Summary of argument, Hypothesis

The role of leadership styles and their applicability to the success or failure of mergers, acquisitions and alliances is the focus of this research. Any leadership study, to be relevant, must also focus on the needs of those served by the organizations studies. That is why in the proposed Change Management Equilibrium Model have customer-driven processes at their center or core. The focus of the research to either validate or refute the model is based on consistency and collaboration as two factors that also serve to create greater levels of integration between the two or more healthcare providers merging or changing their organizational structures to better serve the market. This market orientation is what many public-ally-owned and operated healthcare providers struggle with, as often the source of funding becomes their "customer" or whom they serve (Brinkmann, O'Brien, 2010). Studies by AM esearch for example show…… [Read More]

References

Abbott, R., Ploubidis, G., Huppert, F., Kuh, D., & Croudace, T.. (2010). An Evaluation of the Precision of Measurement of Ryff's Psychological Well-Being Scales in a Population Sample. Social Indicators Research, 97(3), 357-373.

Faten Fahad Al-Mailam. (2004). Transactional vs. Transformational Style of Leadership-Employee Perception of Leadership Efficacy in Public and Private Hospitals in Kuwait. Quality Management in Health Care, 13(4), 278-284.

Antonakis, J., & House, R.J. (2002). The full-range leadership theory: The way forward. In B.J. Avolio & F.J. Yammarino (Eds.) Transformational and Charismatic Leadership, Volume 2, p. 3 -- 33. Boston: JAI Press.

Avolio, B.J., & Yammarino, F.J. (2002). Introduction to, and overview of, transformational and charismatic leadership. In B.J. Avolio & F.J. Yammarino (Eds.) Transformational and Charismatic Leadership, Volume 2, p. xvii -- xxiii. Boston: JAI Press.
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Developing an Ideal Health Care System

Words: 1271 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53540165

Health Care System

Healthcare Professionals

Health care providers must be properly integrated at every system level and must be allowed to lead the processes of designing, implementing and operating ideal health systems. esearch works identify a number of challenges with regard to healthcare personnel integration. Apparent loss of control, status, returns or practice style modifications may lead to healthcare providers becoming discontented. This discontentment can give way to bitterness and, ultimately, practitioners may end up resisting change (Suter et al., 2009).

Capitalizing on current networks, an intense emphasis on patients and informal inter-provider bonds are anticipated to ease healthcare practitioners' functioning within ideal healthcare systems. Economic integration of healthcare providers, utilization of compensation structures for recruiting and retaining the best candidates, measures for improving workplace climate quality and financial incentives are identified as crucial to system success.

Facilities and Supplies

Amodel healthcare system would include a standard formulated list of…… [Read More]

References

Nelson, A. (2002). Unequal treatment: confronting racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Journal of the National Medical Association, 94(8), 666.

Suter, E., Oelke, N. D., Adair, C. E., &Armitage, G. D. (2009).Ten Key Principles for Successful Health Systems Integration. Healthcare Quarterly (Toronto, Ont.), 13(Spec No), 16 -- 23.
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challenges of discrimination in health care'system

Words: 1490 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32082092

Hanin from New Haven

This is an individual with earning disability and takes good care of herself. She has dental problem where her teeth are rotting. She is an individual who needs some serious work but she is unfortunate that she has no dental insurance. In effect, she is not able to get dental treatment due to lack of this insurance. She has been keen to find help and the last was a dental clinic that she heard about on TV but on follow-up she was informed that they no longer took new cases. From her appearance, this patient is a young African American woman of the age range of between 20-28 years old.

Hanin’s case is a typical example of where poverty and environment plays a big role in increasing the health care disparity within the US. This is a lady who has no employment, in effect she is…… [Read More]

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Nursing Leadership and Diversity Management Philosophy

Words: 1558 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38969073

Diversity Management and Nursing Leadership Philosophy

In the last two decades, influx of nursing professionals from the different part of the world into the United States has created a diversity work environment within the health organizations. The issue has made leaders facing challenges to manage the workforce that compose of professionals from different cultural background. To manage a diverse health environment effectively, a leader must develop a leadership philosophy that should be accepted by all workforce. The transformation and transactional leaderships have been identified as the effective leadership styles to manage a diverse work environment to achieve organizational objectives. However, a leader needs to be culturally competent to develop a strategy to manage workers effectively. The study illustrates the challenges that nursing leaders in the Saudi Arabia hospitals face in the work environments since nursing staff in the region are composed of workers from different countries and different cultural background.…… [Read More]

Reference

Avoka, A. J. Florence, N. Ofei, A. et al. (2016). Leadership Styles in Nursing Management: Implications for Staff Outcomes. Journal of Health Sciences. 6(1).

Avolio, B., & Bass, B. (1994). Transformational leadership and organizational culture. International Journal of Public Administration, 17(3-4), 541-554.

Castle, N.G. & Decker, F.H. (2011). Top Management Leadership Style and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes. The Gerontological Society of America. 51 (5):630 -- 642.

Hewlett, S.A. Marshall, M. & Sherbin, L. (2013). How Diversity Can Drive Innovation. Harvard Business Review.
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Strategies to Improve Healthcare Outcomes

Words: 2306 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30947055

Patient-Centered Care

The author of this report has been asked to answer several questions relating to a survey that was taken and the conclusions or outcomes that can be drawn from the same. Within this report, the current practice setting will be describe as well as the patient- and family-centered nature (or lack thereof) of the organization. The gaps that exist will be described, there will be an analysis of how business practices and regulatory requirements can impact patient- and family-centered care and there will be a strategy created based on all of the above. While all businesses need to make a profit and while not all feedback is helpful or based on the most good for the most people, cutting out the feelings and feedback of families and patients is less than wise and should never be happening.

State of the Practice

The basic state of the practice at…… [Read More]

References

Ahmed, S.M., Lemkau, J.P., Nealeigh, N., & Mann, B. (2001). Barriers to healthcare access in a non-elderly urban poor American population. Health & Social Care In

The Community, 9(6), 445-453. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2524.2001.00318.x

Brown, B.P. (2014). Interpreting Medicine: Lessons From a Spanish-Language

Clinic. Annals Of Family Medicine, 12(5), 473-474. doi:10.1370/afm.1661
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role of faith in healthcare

Words: 749 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44342172

Religious Sensitivity

Everyone on the planet Earth has their own concept of religion, spirituality and what they believe when it comes to both. Of course, those mindsets and perceptions evolve and change over time. They are influenced by life events, exposure to religion exposure to others when it comes to religion and so forth. However, most situations and applications do not call for religion to even be brought up or discussed. Even so, healthcare is absolutely an exception to the norm given that many people rely and lean on their faith, whatever it may be, when they face their mortality or other levels of health challenges. While some healthcare workers may be hesitant to use the faith or religion of another as a vehicle to soothe and help them, it is the right thing to do so long as the wishes and preferences of the patient are heeded.

Analysis

Many…… [Read More]

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Race Ethnicity and Cultural Diversity

Words: 2018 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12382376

And there are always a few racists in any town. But I believe we have a great, open, accepting community. e entertain tourists from all over the planet, and many of them are from ethnic cultures different from ours. They say they feel welcomed here.

Q: hat use does the community foundation make of the local AM station KMHS-AM?

M: I'm glad you asked. e have learning programs for parents and students. And students make up their own little reports and broadcasts. Topics range from the environment, world news, California news and Coos Bay news.

Q: Typically what news items from Coos Bay do you use on KMHS?

M: e interview people who are doing interesting things in town and with businesses. Biologists from the college and local fishermen. The news in this town isn't really very earth shaking. Look at the list of news items on the orld's ebsite…… [Read More]

Works Cited

City of Coos Bay, Oregon. (2010). Welcome to Coos Bay. Retrieved February 3, 2011, from http://www.coosbay.org/.

City-Data.com. (2010). Coos Bay, Oregon. Retrieved February 3, 2011, from  http://www.city-data.com/city/Coos-Bay-Oregon.html .

Coos Bay School District. (2010). Middle School -- Grade 8 -- Reading / Language. Retrieved February 2, 2011, from  http://cbd9.net .

Coos Bay School District. (2010). Welcome to Coos Bay School District. Retrieved February 2,
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Analyzing Healthcare Cultural Assessment

Words: 5773 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24073629

cultural diversity issues and its impact on nursing professionals' practice. It assesses a client hailing from a different culture, and employs information derived from the assessment determining and reflecting on health practices and beliefs of the client's culture. Lastly, nurses' role in the care of patients hailing from diverse backgrounds care is analyzed, and a conclusion is drawn.

Client Interview Data

Client's health beliefs in relation to cultural diversity

The client comes from a family-focused background, in which she plays the role of chief household organizer and attends to her family and their needs. She believes one ought to lead a life of a good and virtuous individual, and support one's family, particularly in times of need. In her opinion, sickness must be tended to, for preserving life. She believes in healthcare professionals and services they offer, for leading a healthy life. She is comfortable having healthcare professionals take care…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Association. (1998). Discrimination and Racism in Health Care. Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.

Anderson, L. (2012, October 10). Cultural Competence in the Nursing Practice. Retrieved from Nurse Together: http://www.nursetogether.com/cultural-competence-nursing-practice

Coe, S. (2013, January 15). Cultural Competency in the Nursing Profession. Retrieved from Nurse Together: http://www.nursetogether.com/cultural-competency-nursing-profession

Graue, M., Dunning, T., Hausken, M. F., & Rokne, B. (2013). Challenges in managing elderly people with diabetes in primary care settings in Norway. Scand J Prim Health Care, 31(4), 241-247.
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Rural Healthcare Clinic Technology

Words: 1344 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93768951

H in Healthcare

Over time, everything changes. This is truer of some things as compared to others and healthcare is certainly one of those things. Indeed, the last ten years has marked some major changes for healthcare. Among other things, technology has significantly advanced, the Affordable Care Act has been passed and the financial workings of healthcare have become more and more complex and worrisome to many people. This report will discuss a theoretical clinic that will be set up in a rural setting. The overall factors and points that will be covered will include change in demography, change in disease, change in societal norms/values, changes in healthcare technology, financial pressures that are rendered upon healthcare professionals and cultural awareness/cultural diversity in work environments. While some things in healthcare and human resources have remained unchanged over the years, there are other things that changed significantly.

Analysis

There have been some…… [Read More]

References

Burton, H., & Walters, L. (2013). Access to Medicare-funded annual comprehensive health assessments for rural people with intellectual disability. Rural & Remote Health, 13(3), 1-

15 15p.

Fleming, B. D., Thomas, S. E., Shaw, D., Burnham, W. S., & Charles, L. T. (2015). Improving

Ethnocultural Empathy in Healthcare Students through a Targeted Intervention. Journal Of Cultural Diversity, 22(2), 59-63 5p.
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Ethical Issues in Healthcare Prayer and Religion

Words: 1079 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53667214

eligion and health have long been linked, and continue to be so in most cultures around the world. In fact, both mental and physical health problems were once believed to have supernatural or spiritual origins, a belief which persists until this day in spite of empirical evidence showcasing the biological and chemical causes of illnesses (Koenig, 2000). egardless of whether or not religion is a worthwhile social institution, religion, spirituality, and practices like prayer remain central to the lives of most people. eligion can be inextricably linked with personal and cultural identity, and can greatly inform both medical decisions and health practices including lifestyle choices. There is also a notable link between religiosity and a number of health outcomes including morbidity and mortality rates, proven in empirical studies. The literature tends to support a strong connection between prayer and stress relief in particular, as prayer and religion are widely believed…… [Read More]

References

Bearon, L.B. & Koenig, H.G. (1990). Religious cognitions and use of prayer in health and illness. The Gerontologist 30(2): 249-253.

Davis, L.I. & Owens, C. (2013). The impact of religion on health practices. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Retrieved online: http://www.aacp.org/governance/SIGS/hdcc/Documents/Webinar%20Materials/Impact%20of%20Religion%20Webinar.pdf

Koenig, H.G. (2000). Religion and medicine I. International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine 30(4): 385-398.

Koenig, H., King, D. & Carson, V.B. (2012). Handbook of Religion and Health. Oxford University Press.
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Managing Cultural Diversity Using Hofstedes Five Cultural Dimensions USA and Italy

Words: 1735 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56463006

Managing Cultural Diversity: Hofstede's Five Cultural Dimensions Applied to the U.S. And Cuba

Cuba Relations Background

Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions - U.S.

Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions - Cuba

Country Comparisons

Implications for Rescue orkers

This paper analyzes the history and cultural differences between the United States and Cuba using Hostede's cultural scale. Cuba and the U.S. have a long history of political tension which manifested in a trade embargo being issued against Cuba. This not only a source of tension between the Americans and Cubans but nearly every nation that is a member of the United Nations has consistently voted to lift the embargo except Israel and some island called Palau which has accepted the U.S. position. Not only are there staunch political differences, the cultural differences are estimated to be nearly polar opposites; especially on the criteria of the individualism cultural dimension. It was concluded that if these two cultures had…… [Read More]

Works Cited

ITIM International. Geert Hofstede ™ Cultural Dimensions - Venezuela. 2011. Web. 12 September 2011.

-- . Geert Hofstede ™ Cultural Dimensions Latin American Averages. 2011. Web. 12 September 2011.

-- . Geert Hofstede ™ Cultural Dimensions USA. 2011. Web. 12 September 2011.

Murray, M. Katrina aid from Cuba? No thanks, says U.S. 14 September 2005. Web. 12 September 2011.
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How a Healthcare Website Reflects Diversity

Words: 2335 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35802126

Sloan Kettering Healthcare Website

The Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City is "the world's oldest and largest private cancer center" (About Us, 2016) and has a website that is accessible by all users. Its home page displays a series of alternating full-screen banner videos that rotate beneath a simple tab navigation system at the top of the page. The Center's logo appears in the top left-hand corner of the page and opposite it in the right-hand corner is another series of tab options: Giving -- Location -- Find a Doctor -- Appointments -- Contact Us -- followed by a search option. Below this is a Patient Login Access link in the main tool bar -- and in the same tool bar are the larger direct links for users, consisting of the following tabs: For Adult Patients -- For Child & Teen Patients -- For Healthcare Professionals -- For…… [Read More]

References

About Us. (2016). Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Retrieved from https://www.mskcc.org/about

Benjamins, M., Whitman, S. (2014). Relationships between discrimination in health

care and health care outcomes among four race/ethnic groups. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 37: 402-413.

Browne, A., Varcoe, C., Wong, S., Smye, V., Khan, K. (2014). Can ethnicity data collected at an organizational level be useful in addressing health and healthcare inequities? Ethnicity & Health, 19(2): 240-254.
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Motivation for Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner

Words: 703 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97504629

Motivation for the Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner (PHCNP) Comment by babyliza: Part 2 of 3 not answered: How are NPs important in the delivery of primary health care to diverse populations?

In my opinion, the profession of nursing is more of a degree in changing habits. Nurses are essentially individuals who are extraordinarily enthusiastic when it comes to their own and others' wellbeing and health. Nurse practitioners (NPs) are individuals who apply appropriate knowledge to aid patients in identifying and adopting suitable health and food habits to suit their bodies' unique needs. I am personally keen on utilizing the established system to ensure patients develop healthy, lasting behaviors and habits with positive global health effects. I would proudly make a difference in people's life, effectively differentiating between theoretical knowledge on what is good and bad for people's health and practically applying my knowledge. Nurses function as guides, empowering individuals…… [Read More]

References

Gagnon, C. (2016, July 27). What is a Health Coach and why would we need one? Retrieved from LinkedIn Pulse: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/what-health-coach-why-would-we-need-one-catherine-gagnon

Jeffreys, M. (2015). Dynamics of Diversity. NSNA.

Skar, R. (2010). How Nurses Experience Their Work as a Learning Environment. Vocations and Learning, 1 - 18.

Zarshenas, L., Sharif, F., Molazem, Z., Khayyer, M., Zare, N., & Ebadi, A. (2014). Professional socialization in nursing: A qualitative content analysis. Iranian Journal of Nursing Midwifery, 432 - 438.
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State Involvement in Healthcare

Words: 1640 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22131679

History Of State Involvement in the Delivery of Health Care

Eugenics

Eugenics is the belief and practice that involves the improvement of genetic quality of the human population.it is a science that deals with influences that are able to bring an improvement in inborn qualities of race also with those that develop them to their utmost advantage. There is a considerable difference between goodness in various qualities and in the entire character as a whole. The character largely depends on the proportion that exists between these quantities whose balance can be greatly influenced by education. This is a social philosophy that advocates for the improvement of the human genetic traits by promoting higher reproduction of people that posses' desired traits also termed as positive eugenics and reducing the reproduction of people that posse's undesired ort less desired traits which is negative eugenics. Therefore Eugenics is a social movement that is…… [Read More]

Norrgard, K.(2008). Human Testing, the Eugenics Movement, and IRBs. Retrieved May 6,2014 from  http://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/human-testing-the-eugenics-movement-and-irbs-724 

Galton, F.(2009).Eugenics: its definition, scope, and aims. Retrieved May 6,2014 from  http://galton.org/essays/1900-1911/galton-1904-am-journ-soc-eugenics-scope-aims.htm 

Bergman, J.(2000). A Brief History of the Eugenics Movement . Retrieved May 6, 2014 from  http://users.adam.com.au/bstett/BEugenics72Bergman73Potter77.htm
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Diversity in the Elderly Population Elderly There

Words: 1013 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25357428

Diversity in the Elderly Population

Elderly

There is an abundance of diversity of the newest elderly generation. There is a lack of diversity in the health care coverage for the elderly. This would not exist in the future of health care. It is simply not practical nor ethical to ignore this issue of geriatrics as part of the visualization of the future of health care. Subtracting ethics for those who do not care about the elderly, on a practical level, soon there will be too many elderly around to ignore them and their needs. They will likely become an increasing voice of influence on issues such as this one and others, if only because of their great numbers. Those numbers are projected to continue to escalate.

This author imagines a future of health care where all elderly people have access to free, low cost, or subsidized quality health care. In…… [Read More]

References:

America Geriatric Society. (2005). Caring for Older Americans: The Future of Geriatric Medicine. Journal for Aging Geriatric Society, 53(6), S245 -- S256.

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. (2008). Retooling for an Aging America: Building the Health Care Workforce. Web, Available from: ReportBriefRetoolingforanAgingAmericaBuildingtheHealthCareWorkforce.pdf. 2014 February 03.

The Economist Intelligence Unit. (2009). Healthcare strategies for an ageing society. The Economist, Web, Available from:  http://graphics.eiu.com/upload/eb/Philips_Healthcare_ageing_3011WEB.pdf . 2014 February 03.
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Health Diversity Promoting Diversity in

Words: 561 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56577798

While promoting and encouraging diversity in hiring and advancement policies and actions is a definite area of concern for health care managers and executives, and this necessarily has an effect on the diversity of care ultimately offered to patients, this latter issue should be dealt with between physicians and patients themselves as much as possible (IDHM 2010). Manager involvement in this issue should consist of a broader appraisal of the physician's attitude towards cultural diversity in the patients seen by the physician; it could be that the efficacy and quality of care being provided by this doctor is diminished by a lack of cultural understanding. Developing a full plan of care for the individual patient in question, however, is not something that a manager at the health care organization should become involved in directly.

The ethical provision of healthcare includes meeting each individual patient on their own terms, applying their…… [Read More]

References

ACHE. (2010). Amercian College of Healthcare Executives. Accessed 4 August 2010.  http://www.ache.org/ 

IDHM. (2010). Institute for Diversity in Health Management. Accessed 4 August 2010.  http://www.diversityconnection.org/
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Cultural and Linguistic Barriers to

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19345798



Cultural differences extend to language. In some instances, this merely necessitates "code-switching" -- the use of different words and speaking patters in different cultural settings (e.g. The difference between conversation at a business meeting and a baseball game, although with intercultural issues the impact of code-switching becomes far more profound). On a less esoteric level, however, there is the simple issue of language barriers in providing equal multicultural care. Evidence shows that simply increasing he availability of multilingual care -- especially in populations with a large number of non-English speakers -- greatly increases the quality of healthcare and overall health of immigrant populations (Ngo-Metzger et al., 2003).

This suggests one of the main ways that the healthcare industry can combat these barriers -- simply educating more providers in cultural differences, and actively recruiting new students and practitioners from among different cultures and across linguistic lines will greatly improve the availability…… [Read More]

References

Ngo-Metzger, Q., Massagli, M., Clarridge, B., Manocchia, M., Dvais, R., Iezzoni, L. & Phillips, R. (2003). "Linguistic and cultural barriers to care." Journal of general internal medicine, 18 (1), pp. 44-52.

Uba, L. (1992). "Cultural barriers to health care for southeast Asian refugees." Public health reports, 107 (5), pp. 544-8.
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Health Diversity Questions Diversity What Is Diversity

Words: 760 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74921234

Health

Diversity

Diversity questions

Diversity

What is diversity?

Diversity refers to the differences that occur among people and groups which should be taken into account in the healthcare setting. In the healthcare environment diversity and the recognition of diversity is an extremely important concept as it deals with recognizing the needs and requirements of the individual, as well as the needs and requirements of different groups. Furthermore, diversity is seen in a positive light in the healthcare context, as understanding diversity means that the healthcare professional is in a better position to understand the needs of the patient and to improve the treatment of people from different groups or areas of society.

Discuss and give examples of how people are diverse.

People can be diverse in various ways. One could refer to gender differences, as well as cultural and ethnic diversities. Understanding these differences becomes important in dealing with specific…… [Read More]

References

Davidhizar, R., Dowd, S., Newman-Giger, J. ( 2008). Model for cultural diversity in the radiology department. Retrieved from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb3387/is_n3_v68/ai_n28683141/
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Health Seeking Behaviors of Appalachian

Words: 2162 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84721921

15).

Furthermore, and despite its popularity as a tourist destination because of its natural beauty, the Appalachians are not a sterile environment by any means and the people who live there have higher risks for certain types of conditions than their counterparts elsewhere. According to Bauer and Growick (2003), "Americans who live in Appalachia experience unique and different ways of life than most Americans. Appalachian culture runs from the bottom half of the State of New York through the mountains of West Virginia and Southeast Ohio to the flatlands of Alabama. This area of the country offers different perspectives and challenges to life. Because of the geographical vastness and uniqueness of the Appalachian culture, many people with disabilities who live in Appalachia are unable to access rehabilitative services and agencies" (emphasis added) (p. 18).

Likewise, many rural residents throughout Appalachia may have septic tanks and will lack access to other…… [Read More]

References

Anguiano, R.P., & Harrison, S.M. (2002). Teaching cultural diversity to college students majoring in helping professions: The use of an eco-strengths perspective. College Student Journal, 36(1), 152.

Barrett, E., Hackler, R., Highfill, K.A., Huang, P., Jiang, X., Monti, M.M., & Peipins, Lucy. (2002). A Norwalk-like virus outbreak on the Appalachian Trail. Journal of Environmental Health, 64(9), 18.

Bauer, W., & Growick, B.M. (2003). Rehabilitation counseling in Appalachian America. The Journal of Rehabilitation, 69(3), 18.

Brown, J.W., & May, B.A. (2005, April). Rural Appalachian women's formal patterns of care. Southern Online Journal of Nursing Research, (2)6, 1-21.
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Cultural Competence

Words: 662 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82945452

Health

Cultural competence: What does this really mean to health care professionals?

Cultural Competency is a significant issue that faces health care providers today. It is important for organizations to have and utilize polices, trained and skilled employees and resources to foresee, distinguish and respond to a variety of expectations in language, cultural and religion of members and health care providers. Health literacy takes place when there is shared understanding between healthcare providers or anyone communicating health information and patients. Joint understanding is not just good medicine; it is also a right and responsibility (Health Literacy and Cultural Competency Provider Tool Kit, 2008).

Addressing disparities in health care and health results is more and more becoming a main concern on national and state levels. The Department of Health is dedicated to generating health justness and devoted to endorsing cultural competency among health care providers, to enhance affirmative results for all…… [Read More]

References

Cultural Competence. (2008). Retrieved from http://www.culturediversity.org/cultcomp.htm

Cultural Competency in Health Services and Care. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.doh.wa.gov/hsqa/professions/Publications/documents/CulturalComp.pdf

Health Literacy and Cultural Competency Provider Tool Kit. (2008). Retrieved from http://www.bcbst.com/providers/08-538CulturalCompProvToolKit.pdf
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Health Literacy the Nurse Plays

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35885390

Therefore, I would tell the patient that their symptoms should not be considered in isolation of their whole person. Websites that address symptoms only are not taking into account the wealth of factors that can influence the diagnosis of a specific disease.

At the same time, patients have the right to know about alternative solutions other than those provided or suggested by the physician or health care organization. Sometimes insurance constraints prevent nurses and doctors from mentioning interventions, diagnoses, and cures. The insurance provisions should not come in the way of the patient seeking second opinions or investigating such things as alternative and complementary medicine.

The strategies for assisting patients in becoming informed consumers of online health information include creating brochures and pamphlets, as well as websites. These materials can offer patients helpful links to the CDC (2013) and similar credible resources related to health literacy. The nurse can also…… [Read More]

References

CDC (2013). Health literacy. Retrieved online:  http://www.cdc.gov /healthliteracy/

Speros, C.I. (2011). Promoting health literacy: A nursing imperative. Nurs Clin North Am. 2011 Sep;46(3):321-33, vi-vii. doi: 10.1016/j.cnur.2011.05.007
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Cultural Perspectives on Health Changing

Words: 2175 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76259472



In the health care practice, there are those aspects of culture that are sensitive and that the health care practitioners need to consider when making decisions related to the practice. Some of these cultural aspects are those that contradict with the principles of modern medicine. Therefore, by the practitioner having a good understanding of these sensitive aspects of culture, he/she will be able to make the appropriate decision for the situation at hand.

Communication skills are also important for all culturally competent health care professionals. For example, in situations which concern culture and the norms associated with culture based on the amount of information that can be disclosed and the type of information. This can form a serious barrier in the provision of health care and therefore the practitioner needs to understand the culture and the norms in order to be able to enable communication and self-disclosure of the patient.…… [Read More]

References

AUSTRALIAN NURSING and MIDWIFERY COUNCIL National Competency Standards for the Registered Nurse. Australia: Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council.

BURNS, N. & GROVE, S.K. 2009. The practice of nursing research: Appraisal, synthesis, and generation of evidence., St. Louis, MO Elsevier.

CROSS, T., BAZRON, B., DENNIS, K. & ISAACS, M. 1989. Towards a Culturally Competent System of Care, Volume I, Washington, DC, Georgetown University Child Development Center, CASSP Technical Assistance Center.

LEE, H.C., DUDLEY, R.A. & GONZALES, R. 2011. Translating Evidence into Practice, Policy, and Public Health in Perinatal Medicine. NeoReviews, 12, e431-e438.
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Health Maintenance Organization Impact on

Words: 13949 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80930377

" (AAF, nd)

The Health Maintenance Organization further should "…negotiate with both public and private payers for adequate reimbursement or direct payment to cover the expenses of interpreter services so that they can establish services without burdening physicians…" and the private industry should be "…engaged by medical organizations, including the AAF, and patient advocacy groups to consider innovative ways to provide interpreter services to both employees and the medically underserved." (AAF, nd)

One example of the community healthcare organization is the CCO model is reported as a community cancer screening center model and is stated to be an effective mechanism for facilitating the linkage of investigators and their institutions with the clinical trials network. It is reported that the minority-based CCO was approved initially by the NCI, Division of Cancer revention Board of Scientific Counselors in January 1989. The implementation began in the fall of 1990 and the program was…… [Read More]

Principles for Improving Cultural Proficiency and Care to Minority and Medically-Underserved Communities (Position Paper) (2008) AAFP -- American Academy of Family Physicians http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/policy/policies/p/princcultuproficcare.html

Volpp, Kevin G.M. (2004) The Effect of Increases in HMO Penetration and Changes in Payer Mix on In-Hospital Mortality and Treatment Patterns for Acute Myocardial Infarction" The American Journal of Managed Care. 30 June 2004. Issue 10 Number 7 Part 2. Onlineavaialble at: http://www.ajmc.com/issue/managed-care/2004/2004-07-vol10-n7Pt2/Jul04-1816p505-512

Darby, Roland B. (2008) Managed Care: Sacruificing Your Health Care for Insurance Industry Profits: Questions You must ask before joning an HMO. Online available at: http://www.rolanddarby.com/br_managedhealth.html
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Cultural Competency in Nursing

Words: 1874 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29513439

Cultural Competency in Nursing

The basic knowledge in nursing or medical studies needs substantial facilitation in order to be effective and appropriate towards addressing the needs and preferences of the patients. Watson notes the need to integrate humanistic aspect into the career or nursing profession. He also believes on the need for the establishment of the caring relationship between the patients and nurses thus demonstration of unconditional acceptance of the patients in any condition. Nurses should integrate holistic and positive treatment with the aim of promoting health through knowledge and interventions thus elimination of interruptions during treatments or 'caring moments'. Modern patients have diverse problems and issues because of the cultural differences, races, and ethnicity thus the need to enhance the operations of the nurses. There is need to ensure that the nurses obtain cultural competencies with the aim of enhancing their ability to address diverse issues and problems faced…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, N.L.R., Calvillo, E.R., & Fongwa, M.N. (2007). Community-based approaches to strengthen cultural competency in nursing education and practice. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 18(1), 49S-59S.

Beach, M.C. (2005). Cultural competency: A systematic review of health care provider educational interventions. Cultural Competency, 43(4), 356-373.

Campinha-Bacote, J. (2002). The process of cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare services: A model of care. The Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 13(3), 181-185.

Rosswurm and Larrabee, (1999). A Model for Change to Evidence-Based