Cultural Heritage Essays (Examples)

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Cultural Expressions and How They Reflect Tradition

Words: 1056 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26245780

Traditional cultural expressions include tangible and intangible items unique to a specific culture, including everything from visual and performing art forms to religious ceremonies and architecture. It was not until I realized that wearing or using the cultural expressions from other societies often constituted cultural appropriation that I began to examine my own cultural expressions more critically. For example, for non-native people to wear moccasins is a form of cultural appropriation by taking traditional cultural expressions and taking them completely out of context. As Franklin (2016) also points out, some indigenous cultures perform dances or music in front of tourists with potentially problematic results. Yet cultural expressions are one of the most important ways of retaining the core elements of a traditional culture, helping societies to pass on their knowledge, wisdom, and traditions to future generations. Cultural expressions also allow members of a society to communicate and share the beauty…… [Read More]

References

Franklin, J.A. (2016). Traditional cultural expressions and cultural institutions. In Indigenous Notions of Ownership and Libraries, Archives, and Museums. Walter de Gruyter.
Wong, T. & Fernandini, C. (2010). Traditional cultural expressions: preservation and innovation. Intellectual Property and Human Development. Retrieved online:  http://www.piipa.org/images/IP_Book/Chapter_5_-_IP_and_Human_Development.pdf 
World Intellectual Property Organization (2017). Traditional cultural expressions.
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Heritage Assessment Indian Chinese and American Cultures

Words: 1045 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29423217

Heitage Assessment: Indian, Chinese and Ameican Cultues

In using the heitage assessment tool, thee (3) cultues wee consideed and compaed: Indian (autho's cultue), Chinese and Ameican.

Indian

The autho's cultue is highly influenced by ual Indian cultue, as s/he was aised in India until s/he was 25 yeas old. Because of this late influence of Ameican cultue, my Indian cultue has emained stonge within me. This is eflected in the autho's lifestyle, which stictly adheed to taditions and values held impotant by the Indians. Raised a Catholic, the autho is actively involved in the Chuch and paticipates in activities like Bible eading and celebating eligious holidays. The autho's stong Catholic Indian identity is also eflected in he social cicle, which pimaily consisted of Indians shaing the same cultual identity as he and pacticing Catholics.

Howeve, when talking about health maintenance, the autho mixes the influence of Indian cultue with the…… [Read More]

references to documents in history." ICCROM Working Group 'Heritage and Society.' Available at:  http://cif.icomos.org/pdf_docs/Documents%20on%20line/Heritage%20definitions.pdf
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Cultural Identity We Are All

Words: 1516 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35389105

" Taking into consideration these three stages, I would position myself in the second stage - that of cultural identity search. I am aware of my cultural background and I always have been, but the fact that I live in the multicultural American society made it hard for me to fully embrace my cultural heritage. I am at a stage in my life when I feel the need to understand my culture in order to better understand who I am. The fact that I am aware of my cultural appurtenance does not mean that I completely embrace my cultural identity. Learning about my cultural heritage is the path towards better understanding who I am and identifying myself with the cultural group that I belong to.

ibliography

Culture of Pakistan, available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_Pakistan;

Sharmeen, Hassan, the Pakistani identity crisis, available at http://www.pakistanlink.com/Letters/2004/oct04/08/04.html;

Chapter 4, Cultural Patterns andCcommunication: Foundations.

Chapter 6, Cultural…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Culture of Pakistan, available at  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_Pakistan ;

Sharmeen, Hassan, the Pakistani identity crisis, available at http://www.pakistanlink.com/Letters/2004/oct04/08/04.html;

Chapter 4, Cultural Patterns andCcommunication: Foundations.

Chapter 6, Cultural Identity, Cultural Biases, and Intercultural Contact.
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Cultural Awareness in Romania

Words: 1221 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92219407

Cultural Awareness in omania

The objective of this work in writing is to examine cultural awareness in omania. The official language of omania is stated to be that of omanian and the primary issues in relation to language in omania is stated to be the "protection of the languages of the 10 minority ethnic groups." (Compendium, 2011) Protective principles are such that can be located in the 'Local Public Administration Law' No. 215.2001 which includes the "right to use a mother tongue within administrative procedures (Article 8) or the systematic translation of geographical names and indicators in all the spoken languages of a given area (Article 10 to 13)." (Compendium, 2011) The primary priorities of omanian cultural public policies "in the cultural field" have undergone recent changes. (Compendium, 2011) IN 2010, the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage priorities are "supporting the national heritage and contemporary creation." Mid-term priorities are…… [Read More]

References

Doing Business in Romania (2011) Rabobank International. Retrieved from:  http://www.rabobank.nl/images/factsheet_romania_eng_29304211.pdf-ra_resize=yes&ra_width=800&ra_height=600&ra_toolbar=yes&ra_locationbar=yes 

Romania / 4. Current issues in cultural policy development and debate (2011) Compendium. Retrieved from: http://www.culturalpolicies.net/web/romania.php?aid=41

Romania / 4.2 Specific Policy Issues and Recent Debates. Compendium. Retrieved from: http://www.culturalpolicies.net/web/romania.php?aid=425

Romania-Language, Culture, Customs and Etiquette (2011) Kwintessential. Retrieved from:  http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/romania.html
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Cultural Perceptions of Time in Africa Time

Words: 6951 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52859355

Cultural Perceptions of Time in frica

Time is a foundational factor in every culture. The perception of time is different for most cultures and the determining factor to those differences is often based on the means of production. "Most cultures have some concept of time, although the way they deal with time may differ fundamentally." (Kokole 1994, 35) Tracing the perception of the concept of time in frica can be seen as tracing the European racial prejudices of the intellect of the indigenous populations in the colonized regions of frica. Much of the information regarding the development of time concepts in frican culture is colonial and based on the European interlopers recorded ideas.

Some of those recorded ideas are those of missionaries and others are those of capitalist adventurers, with the intermittent mark of a very few true historians.

In Mali, as in many other parts of frica, there are…… [Read More]

Akan" is an ethnographic and linguistic term used to refer to a cluster of culturally homogenous groups living in central and southern Ghana and parts of the adjoining eastern Cote d'Ivoire. The Akan constitute two broad subcategories: the inland Asante, Bono, Akyem, Akwapem, and Kwawu, who speak the Twi, and the coastal Fante, who speak a dialect of the same name. The Akan dialects are, for the most part, mutually intelligible. Most of these ethnic groups constituted autonomous political systems in the pre-colonial period. www.questia.com/PageManagerHTMLMediator.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=55458430" (Adjaye 1994, 57)

Studies of Akan time perceptions and calendrical systems have been limited despite the fact that the existence of institutions and mechanisms for time-reckoning have been noted in the literature on the history and ethnography of the Akan for nearly two centuries. Beyond early sparse references by Rattray (1923) and Danquah (1968), a full-length monograph on the subject did not appear until Deborah Fink "Time and Space Measurements of the Bono of Ghana" (1974); however, the author's primary concern was with the applicability of Bono terminologies for measuring volume, weight, and time to formal education, rather than with time-marking systems P.F. Bartle brief five-page paper, "Forty Days: The Akan Calendar" (1978), was an exploratory essay into a single calendrical framework, the 40-day (adaduanan) cycle. Its treatment is consequently restrictive and limited to the 40-day calendrical structure. Similarly, Tom McCaskie "Time and the Calendar in Nineteenth-Century Asante: An Exploratory Essay" (1980) and Ivor Wilks ' "On Mentally Mapping Greater Asante: A Study of Time and Motion" (1992) are concerned primarily with a specific aspect of time: the scheduling of diplomatic and other governmental business in Asante.

(Adjaye 1994, 57)
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Cultural Competence Sensitivity and Empowerment Nursing

Words: 3277 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43772626

Nursing: Cultural Competence, Sensitivity and Empowerment

Cultural Competence, Sensitivity and Empowerment: Nursing

The changing demographics of the modern-day multicultural world are increasingly challenging healthcare professionals to consider cultural diversity as a priority in the health sector. Being able to deliver effective care to patients from diverse backgrounds begins with understanding the values, beliefs, and customs associated with different cultures. This text summarizes the writer's experience in a Native American powwow, and explores the effect of the Native American culture on the nursing profession.

Nursing: Cultural Competence, Sensitivity and Empowerment

Diversity is a word that perhaps means something different to each and every individual (Campinha-Bacote, 2003). What is for sure, however, is that the changing demographics of the modern-day multicultural world have, and continue to challenge healthcare professionals to consider cultural diversity as a fundamental concern in the health sector. The U.S. population is projected to reach 400 million by 2050,…… [Read More]

References

Campinha-Bacote, J. (2003). Many Faces: Addressing Diversity in Healthcare. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 8 (1), Manuscript 1. Retrieved from  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Volume82003/No1Jan2003/AddressingDiversityinHealthCare.aspx 

Cooper, M. (2012, December 12). Census Officials, Citing Increasing Diversity, Say U.S. will be a Plurality Nation. The New York Times, p. A20.

Grandbois, D. M. (2012). The Impact of History and Culture on Nursing Care of Native American Elders. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 38(1), 3-5.

McCluskey, M. (2009). Indian Education for All: Your Guide to Understanding and Enjoying Powwows. Montana Office of Public Instruction. Retrieved from http://www.opi.mt.gov/Pdf/IndianEd/Resources/PowWows.pdf
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Cultural Identity Essay

Words: 3931 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: Array

Abstract
This paper discusses all the facets and considerations inherent to a cultural identity essay. Namely, the paper describes the importance of cultural identity, the definition of cultural identity, and examples of cultural identity—both theoretical and literal examples in the world today. This paper seeks to show how one’s cultural identity is so much more than just a melee of one’s race, environment and heritage. Cultural identity is made up of so many factors and influences, both positive and negative, and both direct and covert. This paper sheds light on how one’s cultural identity manifests and how the cultural identity of two people from the same family can be slightly or tremendously different, as a result of a difference of lived experiences and preferences. Finally, this paper investigates some of the more dominant theories of cultural identity.

Related Topics 

Social identity

One’s cultural identity is closely connected to one’s social…… [Read More]

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Health Care Cultural Competence

Words: 563 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26201472

Cultural Competence

The culture that I have chosen is Native Americans, which for U.S. government purposes are usually defined as Native Americans and Alaskan Natives. This is an umbrella group for all of the different tribes, and people descended from those tribes, so there can be significant cultural differences between the groups. This group often suffers from health care outcomes that are worse than those in the general population. The leading causes of morbidity/mortality among this group have been identified as motor vehicle accidents, suicide, firearms and homicide in order. While motor vehicle accidents are the highest cause among whites as well, the rate of such among Native Americans is more than double either whites or blacks. Suicide rates among Native Americans are nearly five times what they are for whites or blacks. Firearm rates are much higher than those of whites, but lower than those for blacks. The homicide…… [Read More]

References

CDC. (2003). Morbidity and Mortality weekly report. Center for Disease Control.

Guadagnolo, B., Cina, K., Helbig, P., Molloy, K., Reiner, M., Cook, E. & Petereit, D. (2009). Medical mistrust and less satisfaction with health care among Native Americans presenting for cancer treatment. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. Vol. 2009 (1) 210-226.

ACS. (2008). Native American healing. American Cancer Society. Retrieved February 26, 2015 from  http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/complementaryandalternativemedicine/mindbodyandspirit/native-american-healing
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Heritage Assessment

Words: 1270 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10789829

Heritage Assessment

Click http://wps.prenhall./wps/media/objects/663/679611/box_6_1.pdf order access "Heritage Assessment Tool." Assess Heritage Assessment Tool answering questions. In 1,000-1,500 words discuss usefulness applying a heritage assessment evaluating person, summarize learned Heritage Assessment Tool.

Heritage assessment tool

The heritage assessment tool acknowledges the different degrees of impact an individual's ethnic heritage may have upon his or her worldview. For some individuals who are very emotionally connected to their family and extended family, their sense of self is defined by their religion, customs and beliefs as they relate to a larger tradition. For example, someone who is Hispanic-American may spend a great deal of time not only with his or her nuclear family, but also with an extended network of cousins, grandparents, and even friends of the family. Even if not particularly religious, the rituals of the Catholic Church might provide a source of joy during traditional holidays and a source of comfort during…… [Read More]

References

Heritage assessment tool. (2013). Prentice Hall. Retrieved:

http://wps.prenhall./wps/media/objects/663/679611/box_6_1.pdf
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Heritage Assessment Tool Cardsmax Upon Completing the

Words: 1170 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62627752

Heritage Assessment Tool

Cardsmax

Upon completing the Heritage assessment tool there were several things that I realized. The primary realization was that in my family we do tend to cling to those things familiar, we seek things that are known and comforting. Some of the common health issues in my family consist of Cancer, Diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. In my family, these are issues that have not only been handed down within my bloodline, but they have been issues within my heritage for as long as you can trace back.

When looking at health maintenance there are certain things that have occurred in my family for generations to try to hinder the onset of certain illnesses and disorders, physical activity and a healthy diet have been important because if the increased risks of cardiovascular issues as well as the high chances of having high blood pressure and diabetes (Last-Name, 2011).…… [Read More]

References

Arnone, J. (2011). Family 3 heritage Interview/Interviewer: Your name Here. Heritage Family Interviews, U.S..

Last-Name, First initial. (2011). My Family Interview for Heritage Project/Interviewer: Your Name Here. Family 1 Interview for Heritage Project, U.S.

Picchu, K.A. (2011). Family 2 heritage Interview/Interviewer: Your Name Here. Heritage Interviews, U.S.
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Cultural Diversity Interview Narrative Cultural

Words: 4850 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8522541

While in high school, she worked as a waitress at a local diner. Most of the population was black, therefore there was little contact with white customers or employees. Margaret feels that she was socially isolated until the 1950s. She was not exposed to white culture; it was foreign to her. She was only exposed to black culture of the time. They were not allowed in certain stores, restaurants, or other places of business. She remembers "white only" restrooms and "black only" fountains. This cultural isolation was oppressive.

Margaret feels that the oppressive attitudes and discrimination that she experienced as a child determined much of how her life proceeded in adulthood. The idea that she could only go so far was ingrained as a child. She never really broke free of this feeling. In her 40s, she moved to upstate New York. Here, she found that many women had succeeded…… [Read More]

References

Diller, D. (1999). Opening the dialogue: Using culture as a tool in teaching young African

American children. Reading Teacher, 52(8), 820-828. [Available electronically through ERIC/EBSCOhost]

Moll, L.C., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching:

using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. Theory into Practice, 31 (2), 132-141.
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Heritage British Cinema and Thatcherism

Words: 5866 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36273614

There has been a lot of debate and discussions on how exactly these so called heritage films must be interpreted, in academic circles as well as in the mainstream press, and in the more specialized film publications.

As a part of the debate, certain issues became more important than others, and some of them were that a limit must be imposed on this type of trend in production, and that in terms of subject matter of the film, the sources from which the film would draw, the casting in the film, and the style. Would all these factors be able to make up and contribute to a major genre of films? As a matter of fact, heritage films do indeed operate at the culturally respectable end of the market, and they are also the main players in the British Art Film genre. The heritage film generally has a sort of…… [Read More]

References

Biography for Colin Welland. Accessed 22 August, 2005; Available at  http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0919815/bio 

British Cinema in the eighties, Cinema, - Review - Book Review. Film Quarterly. Summer, 2001. Accessed 21 August, 2005; Available at  http://www.gobelle.com/p/articles/mi_m1070/is_4_54/ai_76997332 

Chariots of Fire, 1981. Accessed 22 August, 2005; Available at  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082158/ 

Frederic; Brussat, Mary Ann. Spirituality and Health, Movie Review, Maurice. Accessed 22 August, 2005; Available at  http://www.spiritualityhealth.com/newsh/items/moviereview/item_9017.html
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Cultural Diversity Interviewed a Co-Worker

Words: 1099 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49107987



Unlike the culture of my interviewee, African-American isn't really broken into subgroups. I was born and raised in Buffalo, New York, which is very close to the Canadian Border and the "U.S. Peace Bridge." I grew up speaking English, and it is the only language I speak.

My religion is not typical of most African-Americans, who tend to be Baptist, Methodist, or Lutheran. I was raised as a Catholic and still practice that religion today. I'm not the only African-American I know who is Catholic, but it's not common in my subculture.

Like my interviewee, I think the media is generally doing a good job of representing African-Americans in the media. However, I still see instances when African-Americans seem to be portrayed as being ruthless and slovenly, which in my opinion makes all African-Americans appear to be the same way (association assimilation).

I believe that all cultures have something that…… [Read More]

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Cultural Challenges of Doing Business Overseas Steve

Words: 1246 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11675456

Cultural Challenges of Doing Business Overseas:

Steve Kafka, franchisor for Chicago Style Pizza

Steve Kafka, a proprietor of Chicago Style Pizza, a U.S.-based franchise, is attempting to capitalize upon his Czech heritage, and knowledge of Czech culture and language to expand into Prague and take advantage of a largely untapped pizza market in the region. However, it is critical that Steve does not forget that, despite his familiarity with Czech culture, he was born in the United States and must orient himself to the unique cultural worldview of the Czech nation

Major differences and incompatibilities between cultures and risk mitigation

Perhaps the most significant difference between the U.S. And Czech business culture is a historical one, namely the legacy of communist rule in the Czech epublic. "All commentators on Czech business culture focus on the difficulty of developing deep levels of trust within any business relationship" (Doing business in Czech…… [Read More]

References

Czech Republic. (2010). Geert Hofstede Cultural Dimensions. Retrieved December 10, 2010 at  http://www.geert-hofstede.com/hofstede_czech_republic.shtml 

Czech Republic. (2010). U.S. Department of State. Retrieved December 10, 2010 at  http://www.state.gov/r/pa /" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Cultural Awareness of Mexico Is

Words: 1472 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62143460

In fact, unless specified otherwise, it can be considered quite rude to come 'on time.'

Another common characterization of cultures is in terms of their 'orientation' -- whether they are present, future, or past-oriented. Mexican culture is often characterized as far more past-oriented than Anglo cultures. "Part of the difference may be related to cultural concepts of control over the environment, which may in turn be related to religious tradition. Mexico, for instance, is usually viewed as a fatalistic culture where the past is in control of the present and future. Americans, by contrast, have a greater sense of control over present and future events" (O'Hara-Devereaux & Johansen 1994). A lack of popular involvement in the government and sense of autonomy over bureaucratic government decisions can foster a sense of powerlessness, which may be reinforced by the strong, relatively homogeneous Catholic tradition of the nation, interwoven with folk customs.

Of…… [Read More]

References

"Mexican farmers protest." CBC. January 31, 2008. [March 27, 2011]

 http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2008/01/31/mexico-nafta.html 

"Mexican social etiquette." Mexperience, 2011. [March 27, 2011]

 http://www.mexperience.com/living/mexico-social-etiquette.php#1
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Cultural Hybridity Identity and South

Words: 690 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64629981

Gogol seeks to escape his name and his past by re-naming himself, but when he does he gives himself another Russian rather than an Indian name -- Nikhil (and his sister is named Sonya) and the more he rejects his Indian heritage, the more it haunts him.

Like the Namesake, Amitav Ghosh's novel, the Hungry Tide is mainly populated by members of the Bengali community. However, Ghosh's novel is set back in India. The most obvious cross-cultural figure within the novel is that of Kanai Dutt, a professional translator who goes to visit his aunt on her small island in the Bay of Bengal to receive a package left to him by his late uncle. The last time Kanai spent any time on the island was when he was sent there as punishment for his arrogance as a young boy, and he remains just as self-satisfied as when he left.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ghosh, Amitav. The Hungry Tide. Houghton Mifflin, 2005.

Lahiri, Jhumpa. The Namesake. Houghton Mifflin, 2003.
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Cultural Dimensions and Cultural Differences

Words: 1360 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49433001

Cultural Dimensions

Cultural Differences/Similarities

Both France and Greece are Mediterranean countries in Europe. They are both part of the EU and have a shared Western Civilization heritage. Both have moderately high power distance and uncertainty avoidance. However, France scores much higher for individualism and Greece for masculinity. Hofstede does not outline time horizon for Greece; France scores as a short-term time horizon society.

II. Cultural Dimensions

There are five dimensions under Hofstede. Power distance "expresses the attitude of the culture towards the inequalities amongst us." A high power distance country would be more accepting of these differences. The second dimension is individualism. This reflects "the degree of interdependence a society maintains among its members." A high individualism society has members who reflect their self-image as I, rather than we. The third dimension in masculinity/femininity. This dimension defines masculinity as desiring achievement and success, with femininity oriented towards caring for others…… [Read More]

References:

Heritage Foundation. (2013). 2013 Index of economic freedom. Heritage Foundation. Retrieved April 8, 2013 from  http://www.heritage.org/index/ranking 

Geert Hofstede: France. (2013). Retrieved April 8, 2013 from  http://geert-hofstede.com/france.html 

Geert Hofstede: Greece. (2013). Retrieved April 8, 2013 from  http://geert-hofstede.com/greece.html 

OANDA. (2013). USD/EUR. Retrieved April 8, 2013 from  http://www.oanda.com/currency/converter/
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Cultural Differences in Management Styles

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12392752

In a large measure, these concepts reflect the problems that have accompanied increased diversity as both a consequence and a cause of a great many social problems" (1999, p. 1). In this regard, Naylor defines culture as being "the learned way (or ways) of belief, behavior, and the products of these (both physically and socially) that is shared (at least to some degree) within human groups and serves to distinguish that culture group from another learning different beliefs and behaviors" (1999, p. 2). It is important to note as well that "cultural diversity is not restricted to particular nationalities; it includes issues of gender and individuals with disabilities" (Russell & McLean, 1999). Because there are some fundamental differences between cultural beliefs and behaviors, it is not surprising that cross-cultural differences can have a profound effect on organizational performance, and these issues are discussed further below.

Effect of Cultural Diversity on…… [Read More]

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Cultural Dimensions

Words: 2623 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32081712

Cultural Dimensions

"Culture is more often a source of conflict than of synergy. Cultural differences are a nuisance at best and often a disaster." - Dr. Geert Hofstede

After working for six years as a clinical psychologist at BM, both collecting and analyzing data from over 100,000 individuals from forty different counties, Hofstede became interested in the sociology of communication between people of different cultures. An expert, Hofstede's influential wisdom on the interactions between national cultures and organization cultures begot a model identifying five dimensions to differentiate cultures; these dimensions, particularly as they relate to strategy, team communications, influence tactics, and conflict management, are integral in analyzing the cultural communications of such vastly different states as the United Arab Emirates, Mexico, and Spain.

n his work, Gert Hofstede demonstrated that there are national and regional cultural groupings that affect the different dynamics of behavior in organizations, both corporate and civic.…… [Read More]

Ibid.

"Spain." <  http://www.cyborlink.com/besite/spain.htm >

Ibid.
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Cultural and Construction History of

Words: 5800 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2908770

Charles Van Doren has concluded that the Copernican Revolution is actually the Galilean Revolution because of the scale of change introduced by Galileo's work.

The technological innovation of the Renaissance era started with the invention of the printing press (the Renaissance). Even though the printing press, a mechanical device for printing multiple copies of a text on sheets of paper, was first invented in China, it was reinvented in the West by a German goldsmith and eventual printer, Johann Gutenberg, in the 1450s. Before Gutenberg's invention, each part of metal type for printing presses had to be individually engraved by hand. Gutenberg developed molds that permitted for the mass production of individual pieces of metal type. This permitted a widespread use of movable type, where each character is a separate block, in mirror image, and these blocks are assembled into a frame to form text. Because of his molds, a…… [Read More]

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Cultural Profile of Danny Below Is the

Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53226579

Cultural Profile of Danny

Below is the profile of a college Freshman using the ADRESING format by Hays (Hays; Hays 309-315) This method of assessment of cultural awareness is used by many clinical psychologists in order to guarantee cultural sensitivity during therapy and to provide culturally relevant care:

Age or generational differences:

Danny is 19, and a Freshman in college

Disability:

He has no visible disabilities and none of which he is aware.

Religion:

He is a Christian, but is not currently attending any local church.

Ethnicity:

Danny is Han Chinese.

Social status:

At home in Beijing, Danny is upper middle class. His parents have good jobs and are party members, though they are not rich.

Sexual orientation:

Unknown

Indigenous heritage:

He is a member of the majority culture in Beijing, but is Asian minority in America.

Nationality:

Citizen of the PRC

Gender:

Male

Profile:

Danny is a college freshman…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"China - Chinese Geert Hofstede Cultural Dimensions Explained "Web. 11/23/2010 .

"China today "Web. 10/31/2010 .

Hays, Pamela A. "

Multicultural Applications of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy." Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 26.3 (1995): 309-15. Web.
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Cultural and Construction History of

Words: 3190 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30043809



Crusaders were able to implement feudal states throughout their travels during this period of warfare, many of which have been termed Crusader states and which were erected throughout the Holy Land and in parts of Asia Minor as well as Greece. The most famous of these, of course, was the establishment of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, which took place in 1099 and reigned until its fall in 1291.

Kingdom of Jerusalem

It should be remembered that for the vast duration of the reign of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, European settlers were widely outnumbered by Franks and Muslims, and only comprised approximately 15 to 25% of the entire population (Kedar 148). The Europeans lived in areas which were both rural as well as urban, and despite attempts to integrate with the surrounding foreigners, they did not infiltrate areas which were predominantly Muslim and which had never had many Christian dwellers (Ellenblu…… [Read More]

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Cultural Differences New Mexican History

Words: 1406 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73696118

Before Anglos came to dominate the land, Cabeza de Baca portrays a kind of paradise-like environment, where even the sheepherders were like "musicians and poets" and "the troubadours of old," and every person had a story (Cabeza de Baca 11). This has been called a method of "preserving the culture" against the dominant discourse of Anglos: Cabeza de Baca, along with other writers of her generation are portrayed as trying to "get it [their culture] right" in an effort to transcend the overwhelming discourse of the Anglo "other" (Cabeza de Baca xx). Using Hispanic phrases and names, blurring historiography and biography, and the view of the past as a kind of lost "Eden" are all aspects of the authors 'agenda' (Cabeza de Baca xx). Cabeza de Baca deliberately uses English as a way of communicating with the Anglo reader and 'setting the record straight.'

Yet while Cabeza de Baca strives…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Cabeza de Baca, Fabiola. We fed them cactus. UNM Press, 1954.
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Cultural vs Biological Evolution Cultural

Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5850796

We now have the means to study the evolution of the human genome more closely than ever in the past. One of the key ideas presented by the authors is the idea of transmission fidelity. This means that culture can act as an inheritance system, promoting the transmission of certain genetic traits in a predictable fashion. This type of cultural inheritance results in distinct societies that not only share the same cultural traits, but also share similar genetic traits as well. In the past, geography and proximity to others was a factor in this process as well. Richerson, oyd, and Henrich (2010) concluded that cultural evolution and biological evolution occur simultaneously. They also suggested that cultural evolution had a significant influence on biological evolution.

This research supports the supposition that cultural evolution has a significant effect on biological evolution. This research focused on cultural evolution, as opposed to placing the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bell, A. And Richard McElreath. Culture rather than genes provides greater scope for the evolution of large-scale human prosociality. PNAS 106 (2009): 17671-17674.

 http://www.des.ucdavis.edu/faculty/Richerson/Bell%20PNAS.pdf 

Boyd, R. And Peter Richerson," Gene-culture coevolution and the evolution of social institutions." In Better than Consciousness? Decision Making, The Human Mind, and Implications for Institutions. Edited by Christoph Engel and Wolf Singer. MIT

Press. 2008. pp. 305-323.
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Nursing Heritage Assessment

Words: 1379 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11397680

Nursing Heritage Assessment

The Heritage Assessment Tool is a useful way of examining how strongly a person identifies with his or her heritage. It asks questions that can give a healthcare provider information about how long the family has been in the United States, how many generations of the family have been in the United States, how close the family is with other family members, whether the person lives in an ethnically-identified community, and whether the person married someone from the same cultural background (Spector, 2000). Furthermore, the questions in the assessment tool also seem aimed at helping determine whether the person is from a minority ethnic community. While it is not always the case, people who belong to minority groups may be more likely to identify with ethnic sub-communities. This can have a tremendous impact on the healthcare choices made by the individual patient, so that understanding a patient's…… [Read More]

References

My Jewish Learning. (Unk.). Jewish health & healing practices. Retrieved September 28, 2013

from  http://www.myjewishlearning.com/practices/Ethics/Our_Bodies/Health_and_Healing.shtml?p=1 

The Office of Minority Health. (2013, May 9). What is cultural competency? Retrieved

September 28, 2013 from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlID=11
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Professional Communication Cultural Sensitivity Among Native Americans

Words: 1623 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5979652

Professional Communication: Cultural Sensitivity Among Native Americans

In nursing school, we are normally taught that we should respect the dignity and rights of all clients. As the "world becomes reduced" and societies and individuals become more mobile, we are progressively able to network with people that are from other cultures. Cultural respect and competence for others becomes particularly significant for us as nurses and patient supporters. Applying the principles and theories of communication is important for sufficient patient care. A lot of various communication methods are executed and have diverse focuses. Small groups use mechanisms such as objectives, standards, cohesiveness, behaviors, and therapeutic issues. Duty, process and midrange groups are separate categories. Orientation, tension, cohesion, working and dissolution are stages groups go through. Successful personal and professional communication profits the patients and other health professionals; however, the lack of applicable communication can lead to poor patient results and a hostile…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barker, A.M. (2009). Advanced practice nursing -- Essential knowledge for the profession. Boston: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Doane, G. (2004). Exploring the heart of nursing Ethical Pratices. Nursing Ethics, 11(3), 241-251.

Makaroff, K.S. (210). Do We speak of Ethics. Nursing Ethics and, 17(5), 566-576.

Ryan, M. (2000). Learning to Care for Clients In Their World not Mine. Journal of Nursing Education, 3(9), 25-79.
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Battle of Okinawa on Cultural Treasures the

Words: 2954 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30543796

Battle of kinawa on Cultural Treasures

The research paper is about the impact of battle for control of kinawa fought between Allies and Japan during world war two, on the cultural heritage and valuables of the Ryukyu Kingdom. The paper starts with a general introduction of the topic and building a stance that humans have been involved in wars and battles from the start in order to gain control over resources and in order to prove their supremacy over one another and in struggle of survival. During these wars of survival of the fittest, the humans neglect the dreadful impacts and effects these wars leave on the mankind, environment, and culture.

The research paper provides a general history and background related to the situation, describes the valuable cultural resources of the Island, examines the impact and influence of the battle of kinawa on the cultural heritage and valuables of the…… [Read More]

Ota, Y. (2008). Cultural authenticity as entropic metanarrative: a case from ryukyuan studies. Central Issues in Anthropology, 9(1), 87-94.

Selden, M. (1971). Okinawa and American colonialism. Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, 3,

Tolliday, S. (2000, February). Review of Embracing Defeat. Japan in the Wake of World War Two, (review no. 90). Retrieved March 4, 2011, from
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Culture in Uzbekistan Cultural Characteristic

Words: 1090 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15120804

366).

CULTURAL Characteristic FOUR: Hospitality. An essential part of the Uzbek cultural heritage is hospitality. The country is located at the crossroads where trade routes pass through opening up the door to Central Asia. Many villages had oasis facilities and so caravans passing through would stop and use the hospitality of people in small villages where there was water, shade and rest. The "Silk Road" runs right through Uzbekistan. The hospitality that was shown to these caravans was in the form of safety from the dangers of the road, a place to sleep, food and water for the camels, hot tea, food, and graciousness, according to Central Asian Cultures.

The route through Uzbekistan is called the Silk Road because on many of the "complex overland routes gained their name from the most famous of luxury items" to pass through -- and that was silk (www.centralasiacultures.com/silkroad). It was not just silk…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adams, Laura L. (1999). Invention, Institutionalization and Renewal in Uzbekistan's National

Culture. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 2(3), 355-373.

Central Asia Cultures. (2010). Uzbekistan -- Uzbek Culture, Customs and Traditions. Retrieved June 4, 2010, from  http://www.centralasiacultures.com/uzbekistan .

Djumaev, Alexander. (2005). Musical Heritage and National Identity in Uzbekistan.
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African-American Heritage Is a Lengthy

Words: 1309 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87836080

This fact and the preceding quotation proves that Maggie views heritage as an interactive process, unlike the viewpoint of her sister. The fact that Maggie's mother ultimately gives her the quilts alludes to the fact that she shares this belief as well.

The conclusion of this story in which Maggie's mother gives her the valued quilts appears to suggest that the author believes that the more interactive application of heritage, as opposed to the passive reverence of heritage as art, is more valid. Walker does not seem to pose the notion that these two views of heritage are incompatible with one another, however. Instead, she indicates that Dee is simply not able to understand the value in the form of heritage that her mother and sisters represent and practice. The following quotation which ends the story and precedes Dee's departure, alludes to this fact.

"You just don't understand," she said,…… [Read More]

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Serbian Culture the Spiritual Heritage of the Serbian Church

Words: 689 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14383160

Serbian Religious Heritage

Generally speaking, Serbian society has maintained a highly traditional structure, with religious beliefs at the core of the national identity. However, locates on the leading edge of three distinct empires, the small country has traded political philosophies many times, and with each new ruler came a new set creed, and a new wave of persecution. Ancient Indians, during the time of American expansionism made and broke new alliances with tribes which were formerly enemies in order to fight against the 'white man' settlers. During this time, the proverb "the friend of my enemy is my enemy, and the enemy of my enemy is my friend." In looking at he spectrum of Serbian history this same proverb an accurately described the shifting alliances, and civil wars which have marketed their social and political history.

Serbia sits at the north eastern end of the Roman Empire. Under the forced…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Mihailovich, Vasa. Landmarks in Serbian culture and history.
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China-Cultural Review Touching Upon the

Words: 1888 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88159045

The latter type of employees will act as mediators between the foreigner and the host, will point out potential mistakes and will also be more easily accepted by the staff. Undoubtedly, if Chinese who haven't had international experiences are capable of appropriately managing the business, they will be given the chance to hold top management positions after a certain period of intercultural training.

4) Referring to demand and customer relations, a foreign company should display a high respect towards its clients by offering them qualitative products and services that take into account their cultural background (i.e. avoiding colors which are associated with fatality, avoiding gestures, words that are considered to be offensive etc.).

The Chinese market's demand for a foreign company's products is significantly influenced by collectivism. For instance, in Japan which is a collectivist culture too, a U.S. based company selling ice cream paid several Japanese to stay in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. China Interview (2007). On the internet at: www.cyborlink.com/besite/china_interview.htm. Retreievd March 4.

2. Chinese Business Etiquette (2007). On the Internet at: www.cyborlink.com/besite/china.htm. Retrieved March 4.

3. Geert Hofstede Analysis (2007). On the Internet at: www.cyborlink.com/besite/hofstede.htm. Retrieved March 4.

4. Hofstede's Analysis for China (2003). On the Internet at: www.geert-hofstede.com/hofstede_china.shtml. Retrieved March 4.
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Amadou Hampate Ba's Cultural and

Words: 8023 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19553480

" (Pettersson, 2006) Oral and written verbal art languages are both used for the purpose of information communication as well as information presentation with the reader and listener receiving an invitation to consider the information.

The Narrative & the Symbolic

The work of Abiola Irele (2001) entitled: "The African Imagination: Literature in Africa & the lack Diaspora" states that Hampate a "...incorporates the essential feature of the oral narrative at significant points in his work in order to reflect their appropriateness to situations and for special effects. Their conjunction with the narrative procedures sanctioned by the Western model thus enlarges their scope and give them an unusual resonance. At the same time, although he writes with conscious reference to this Western model, he does not feel so constrained by the framework of its conventions that he is unable to go beyond its limitations. His departures from the established codes of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aggarwal, Kusum. Amadou Hampate Ba et l'africanisme. De la recherche anthropologique a l'exercice de la fonction auctoriale. Paris: L'Harmattan, 1999.

Dielika Diallo "Hampate Ba: the great conciliator." UNESCO Courier. FindArticles.com. 30 Sep, 2009.  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1310/is_1992_Jan/ai_11921818/ . UNESCO 1992. Online available at:
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Roles of Physical Cultural & Vernacular Landscapes

Words: 788 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55752382

ROLES OF PHYSICAL, CULTURAL & VERNACULAR

LANDSCAPES IN HUMAN DIMENSIONS RESEARCH

As an extension of the sciences of geography and physical morphology, human dimensions research explores various concepts associated with human fairness, risk, biodiversity and sustainability and provides methods to measure public satisfaction and identify different communities of interest, conflict or consensus. Human dimension categories include economics with a focus on the monetary measurement of ecosystems; recreation which seeks to understand the relationship between the recreation setting and human experience; cultural heritage which explores the characteristics of sustainable societies, and lastly environmental psychology and social interactions which involve the measurement of ecosystem-related public perceptions, attitudes and beliefs and the objectives of the concerned parties.

A prime example of this research concerns the findings of the Department of the Interior and its exploration on how human dimensions affect certain areas of the western United States. Research topics associated with these findings…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alanen, Arnold R. "Grounded in Reality: The Importance of Vernacular Landscapes."

Courier 34 (August 1989): 10-13.

Appleton, Jay. The Experience of Landscape. New York: John Wiley, 1975.

United States Global Change Research Program. The Human Dimensions Program.
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Senghor Cultural Religious and Political

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28346560

" (2009) Oguejiofor states that there is no understanding "exept if there is misunderstanding, a negativity that beomes the originative instane of hermeneutis…" (2009)

Oguejiofor writes that Senghor's onept of negritude is entered on the misunderstanding or misrepresentation of the Afrian and his heritage, a situation that has sine imposed enormous burden on all aspets of his life." (Oguejiofor, 2009) Oguejiofor states that negritude has been desribed "…as a philosophy of soial ation" and states additionally that in the view of Senghor "negritude was 'a weapon of defense and attak and inspiration." (2009) Speifially Senghor sates that negritude is the "sum total of the values of the ivilization of the Afrian world, it is not raialism, it is ulture." (Oguejiofor, 2009)

Oguejiofor writes that negritude as a philosophy "has the advantage of 'reognizing the situatedness of our lived historiity as the proper objet of refletion for Afrian philosophi thought. (Salhi…… [Read More]

cited in Quest, 2005)

When Senghor was imprisoned for the already mentioned two years period he composed poetry, read the work of Goethe and delved into Western philosophical works and as well reestablished his link with his fellow Africans and songs and tales were shared from Africa and this resulted in the "fostering [of] an alternative understanding of humanism and society." (Quest, 2005)

The Quest Journal editorial states that it seems nice to think that the prison experiences of Senghor as well as Senghor's knowledge spanning the intellectual traditions of the Western world and his admiration for values, traditions and cultures of Africa together resulted in a "subjectivity that was transcultural and transnational in it sympathies, accomplishments and aspirations." (Quest, 2005) Senghor set the stage for "a post-anthropological humanism, one that truly points to the possibilities for a democratic and cosmopolitan world." (Quest, 2005)

5. Poetry as 'Key' Outlet for Combating Cultural Alienation in for Africans

The work of Nyathi (2005) states that the work of Senghor influenced many and in fact that poetry "became a key outlet for Africans to combat cultural alienation." The work of Baaz and Palmberg (2001) entitled: "Same and Other: Negotiating African Identity in Cultural Production" relates the writings of Leopold Sedar Senghor "on negritude and the ideas of negritude which are "above all associated with the writings of Senghor and Aime Cesaire, were developed by African, Afro-American and Caribbean intellectuals in Paris in the 1930s." (Baaz and Palmberg, 2001) Negritude was defined by Senghor as "the sum of the cultural values of the black world." (Baaz and Palmberg, 2001)
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Byzantine Empire Cultural and Construction

Words: 3480 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15522864



One of the most brilliant contributions of the Byzantium is its contribution to modern music and the development of what the world has come to appreciate as the foundations of classical music. The Byzantine "medieval" (Lang, 1997), in fact, the Byzantium influence is considered to be critical to the development of the Greek music and the relative genius behind Greek music (Lang, 1997)

The quoted sovereign melody (Lang, 1997) is the oft punctuated contribution to the sovereign nature of today's music throughout the world. The Byzantium facilitated the sovereign method of music ostensibly from what would be the earlier influences to the Byzantine Empire. Lang continues to point to such influence as having its origins in the Orient (Lang, 1997).

Sports were a major part of the Byzantine Empire and are representative of the development of competition within the Roman Empire and subsequently to the importance of sporting events within…… [Read More]

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World History Cultural Globalization

Words: 1361 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50378981

Globalization and Middle Eastern Culture

The term globalization has positive connotations in that it implies interaction and sharing through technology and suggests the improvement and development of less developed countries through connections with countries that are more economically wealthy. However, this is not always the way in which the term is interpreted by some countries and cultures. There has been a negative reaction throughout the world in recent years to the concept of globalization which is increasingly viewed as a means of domination and assimilation -- especially with regard to cultural aspects. A more formal definition of globalization is as follows:

Globalization can be conceived as a process (or set of processes) which embodies a transformation in the spatial organization of social relations and transactions, expressed in transcontinental or interregional flows and networks of activity, interaction and power (see Held and McGrew, et al., 1999).

In essence globalization is characterized…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Cheruiyot K. Our Languages Are Dying [article online] Available from  http://www.globalpolicy.org/globaliz/cultural/2003/0224language.htm ; Internet: accessed December 1, 2004.

Held D. And McGrew A. Globalization. (article online); available from; Internet: available from http://www.polity.co.uk/global/globocp.htm; Internet: accessed 6 December, 2004

Maisami Mona, Islam and Globalization. [essay online] Available from The foundation Magazine (August 2003)  http://www.fountainmagazine.com/articles.php?SIN=5a952d9bae& ; k=33& 1677948306& show=part1; Internet: Accessed 1 December, 2004.

Moussalli Mohammed, Impact of Globalization ( Article online) Available form Daily Star ( August 25, 2003)  http://www.globalpolicy.org/globaliz/cultural/2003/0826islam.htm ; Internet: accessed 5 December, 2004
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Clinician's Mirror Cultural Self-Assessment in

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18764787

He looks at the methodological and practical problems that can impact assessment research in correctional settings, including the distinctive culture in correctional institutes. Megargee's reason for doing the research is today's huge population of incarcerated persons and the fact that psychological research that has been conducted on people outside of the incarceration setting may not be applicable to people who are incarcerated. He recognizes that there is a need for research in this area to determine whether tools developed elsewhere are applicable. He points out the irony of this lack of applicable research because clinical psychology was developed in the criminal justice setting. He does not really conduct any individual research, therefore the methodology is most akin to a literature review in which he assesses the information available about correctional institutions and draws conclusions from that information to determine why there is a lack of research on assessment in correctional…… [Read More]

References

Author Last Name, First Initial. (Year). Chapter 3: Looking into the clinician's mirror: cultural self-assessment. In Editor's Last Name, First Initial (Ed). Book Title. Place of Publication, Publisher.

Megargee, E. (1995). Assessment research in correctional settings: Methodological issues and practical problems. Psychological Assessment, 7(3), 359-366.
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China Why Did the Cultural

Words: 1572 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16996476



The following quotation provides an indication of the changes that an emerging China represents. "We are now witnessing an historic change, which though still relatively in its infancy, is destined to transform the word. The developed world...is rapidly being overhauled in economic size by the developing world. (Jacques, 2009, p. 2) This view is also supported by other predications such as the projections by Goldman Sachs that "…the three largest economies in the world by 2050 will be China, followed by a closely matched America and India some way behind…" (Jacques, 2009, p. 3)

In the final analysis, an ideological impetus and the struggle for power were the main reasons for the inception of the Cultural evolution. This revolution brought about many dramatic changes in the society that had mainly negative social and economic consequences. However, it is also possible that the excesses and failures of the Cultural evolution have…… [Read More]

References

Chen, Jack 1976, Inside the Cultural Revolution, Sheldon, London.

Cohen, M.L. 1993, 'Cultural and Political Inventions in Modern China: The Case of the Chinese Peasant', Daedalus, volume 122, no 2.

Fenby, J 2008, the Penguin History of Modern China: The Fall and Rise of a Great Power, 1850 to 2008, Allen Lane, London

Gao, M 2008, the battle for China's past: Mao and the Cultural Revolution, Pluto Press, London.
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False Claims of Cultural Ownership

Words: 2497 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69233953

The artistic authenticity of a particular object is determined, in part, by the objects provenance -- its history that helps us to understand the significance and original cultural context of the object. ithout this context it becomes complicated to identify certain tribal cultural artifacts as artwork or not.

But let's imagine that there exists an institutional framework or bureaucratic organization with the resources to undertake such a monumental task of artistic identification. There would still be additional problems to consider. In Indonesia, for instance, there are numerous political and cultural obstacles facing the emerging push for preservation. Communication in the nation is lackluster. Identifying and controlling all potential tribal art among the indigenous people is a task best left to the imagination. The infrastructure simply does not yet exist to properly compensate indigenous artists and craftsmen, let alone stem the tide of black-market deals and random destruction. Yet this is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barbier, Jean-Paul. "The Responsible and the Irresponsible: Observations on the Destruction and Preservation of Indonesian Art."

Duffon, Denis. "Authenticity in Art." In the Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Ed. Jerrold Levinson. (NY: Oxford University Press, 2003). 18 Dec. 2006  http://www.denisdutton.com/authenticity.htm .

Hamlin, Jesse. "How de Young Is Handling New Guinea Art Question." San Francisco Chronicle (4 May 2006): E1. 18 Dec. 2006  http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/05/04/DDGJMIJFVO1.DTL .

Lehmann, Karl and Lehmann, Andrew. "Tribal Art of Papua New Guinea." Lost World Arts. (Maui, Hawaii: 2004). 18 Dec. 2006  http://www.lostworldarts.com/new_page_2.htm .
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Cross Cultural Education

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12918060

Values Americans Live by." This is a reflection should include how you relate or not to the concepts suggested in the article. I understand that the article was written in 1988, however, many of the topics still are present today.

After reading the article "Values Americans Live By," which was written by L. Robert Kohls in 1988, I found myself thinking about what the term "values" truly means. I believe Dr. Kohls is referring to the customs, beliefs and attitudes which drive a culture's behavior. Kohl confirms this in the article when he states "the different behaviors of a people or culture make sense only when seen through the basic beliefs, assumptions and values of that particular group" (1988). In the case of American society, Kohls makes it clear that the most important value for Americans is perhaps their lack of values, which simply means Americans believe themselves to be…… [Read More]

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Cultural Characteristics Chinesse Korean Heritage Assigned Cultural

Words: 729 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49287188

cultural characteristics chinesse korean heritage, assigned cultural groups, discuss factors considered provide a culturally competent environment care patients cultural groups. 2)Among cultural groups, traditional folk health healing practices, including persons native USA.

The Chinese are very different from the South Koreans when considering general attitudes promoted in these two cultures and the way that people think and behave.

A primary issue involving Chinese and Korean patients regards the way that they are likely to react to treatment. The former group is probable to employ more hostile behaviors and to be less willing to cooperate with doctors. In contrast, the latter group is typically supportive toward treatment strategies they are provided with.

Religion is also an important concept when considering Korean and Chinese patients. The fact that numerous individuals in South Korea are Buddhist means that they might see death as being perfectly normal. The same thing applies when considering Chinese…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Bebchuk, Lucian, "Unblocking Corporate Governance Reform," Retrieved April 13, 2014, from  http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/unblocking-corporate-governance-reform 

Bihari, Michael, "Managed Care -- Understanding Managed Care HMOs, PPOs, and POS Plans," Retrieved April 13, 2014, from  http://healthinsurance.about.com/od/understandingmanagedcare/a/managed_care_overview.htm 

"BHAISHAJYA KALPANA & RASA SHASTRA," Retrieved April 13, 2014, from  http://sscasrh.org/sri-sri-ayurveda-college/index.php/widgetkit/bhaishajya-kalpana-a-rasa-shastra#.U0rEvfl5PJk 

"Communicating with Your Chinese Patient," Retrieved April 13, 2014, from  http://depts.washington.edu/pfes/PDFs/ChineseCultureClue.pdf
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Cultural Immersion Experience The Student

Words: 2139 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42782163



A gratefully accepted and began attending the family meetings regarding this upcoming event. Apparently there had been previous meetings but I was only made aware of the event as part of this project so I got to go to the final four meetings.

he first thing that happens during this event is that the girl renews her commitment to God and to the church before her family and friends and congregation members.

he ceremony is serious with bells ringing and music playing at the church which can be decorated for the event.

In the case of this family the church was decorated with white satin and ribbon and flowers. On addition when the church part was over there were a dozen white doves released into the sky as the girl made her way outside among the onlookers.

Following the church service the family throws a large party. It was explained…… [Read More]

This immersion project provided me with the opportunity to learn about Hispanic culture in a way that was much more enjoyable and interesting than reading it in a book. Through this project I got to live as a Hispanic for short times and really feel what they feel during various times of family life. Whether it was attending festivals, church or going to a young girl's coming out party I was surrounded with Hispanic family members that went out of their way to help me understand. I came away with the understanding that the Hispanic culture is about love, celebration and enjoyment of life, something I think many of us could learn from.

REFERENCE

Good News from the Hispanic Church (Accessed 10-29-06)  http://www.ctlibrary.com/bc/2004/julaug/9.18.html
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Heritage Site Report the Sydney

Words: 427 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2256577



o learn more about the Sydney Opera House, those interested in Australian culture can visit the official Sydney Opera House web site (http://www.sydneyoperahouse.com/visit/index.aspx),which caters primarily to those who want to visit or learn more about the opera house, containing a great quantity of information and photos relating to architecture and events, but few outside links. A similar, but less extensive site catering to tourists and offering information about both tours and events is the 2008 Biennale of Sydney web site (http://www.bos2008.com/app/biennale/venue/6),which also includes a brief history of the attraction and links to other Australian cultural gems. Finally, the Australian Government's Culture and Recreational Portal's information on the Sydney Opera House site (http://www.cultureandrecreation.gov.au/articles/sydneyoperahouse/),which caters to educators, students, and those who simply want to learn about Australia is quite impressive and comprehensive, including a long list of links to information and photos. hus, because of both its contribution to architecture and culture,…… [Read More]

The Sydney Opera House: A Monument of Both Architectural and Cultural Grandeur modern architectural wonder, the Sydney Opera House was inaugurated in 1973 and continues to maintain its position as one of Australia's most important cultural and architectural sites. Architectural features of significance include the well-known three shells that interlock on the top of the structure and contain different areas of interest -- including restaurants and a theater -- and the pedestrian platforms that lead to ground level. it's architectural significance results not only from the beauty and uniqueness of its impressive design, but also from the engineering feats that resulted in its construction. Designed by Jorn Utozon, a Danish architect, the opera house is lauded for its glorification of the Sydney harbor as well as its modern technology and feel. Furthermore, the building was constructed with an eye on environmentalism and conservation.

In addition to its innovative structural design, however, the opera house lends additional cultural gems to the city of Sydney. An operational performing arts center, the Sydney Opera House offers a variety of cultural entertainment. In fact, the 2008 season lists performances from modern Rock and Roll wonder Sting to Mozart's classical opera Don Giovanni. Additionally, the area offers a variety of tours, restaurants, and bars that introduce the visitor to the cultural scene of Australia.

To learn more about the Sydney Opera House, those interested in Australian culture can visit the official Sydney Opera House web site ( http://www.sydneyoperahouse.com/visit/index.aspx ),which caters primarily to those who want to visit or learn more about the opera house, containing a great quantity of information and photos relating to architecture and events, but few outside links. A similar, but less extensive site catering to tourists and offering information about both tours and events is the 2008 Biennale of Sydney web site ( http://www.bos2008.com/app/biennale/venue/6 ),which also includes a brief history of the attraction and links to other Australian cultural gems. Finally, the Australian Government's Culture and Recreational Portal's information on the Sydney Opera House site (http://www.cultureandrecreation.gov.au/articles/sydneyoperahouse/),which caters to educators, students, and those who simply want to learn about Australia is quite impressive and comprehensive, including a long list of links to information and photos. Thus, because of both its contribution to architecture and culture, the Sydney Opera House is an important monument in Australia and all over the world. Those who want to learn more about the opera house can do so by visiting a variety of sites on the Internet.
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Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings

Words: 478 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52197051

Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings for Nurses

On a continuum of cultural awareness to cultural relativity, how do you view yourself and your interactions with others?

As a nurse practitioner, it is easy to see the patient simply as a patient, as a sick person needing treatment, rather than a well person who perceives his or her body as only temporarily ill, but sees his or her person as permanently a part of a family and culture outside of the hospital. As Small and Dennis (2003) counsel, the increase in immigration has resulted in greater diversity of both patients and practitioners within the United States, rather than in traditional urban locations. Thus Small and Dennis remind the nurse that it is not simply enough to treat the patient, but the patient must also understand his or her illness in culturally comprehensible terms. A nurse must be able to communicate to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dennis, Betty Pierce & Ernestine B. Small. (Jan-Feb, 2003) "Incorporating cultural diversity in nursing care: an action plan" The ABNF Journal.

"New Position Statement Originated by: Council on Cultural Diversity in Nursing Practice, Congress of Nursing." (1996) Adopted by: ANA Board of Directors.
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Cultural Differences in IQ Scores

Words: 2525 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80317230

IQ Test Scores

Cultural Differences in IQ Test Scores

Most studies carried out in the United States to measure intelligence (IQ) indicate a significant gap in the IQ test scores of Blacks and Whites. The gap is more pronounced in certain areas of intelligence such as general intelligence and on tests requiring problem solving and more complex mental operations than on tests of rote learning and immediate memory. The gap has narrowed since the 1970s but still persists stubbornly. Debate has raged among the psychologists and social scientists about the reasons for the gap. The "hereditists" believe that the difference in the IQ test scores of Blacks and Whites is largely due to genetic reasons. The "environmentalists" are equally certain that the gap is due to environmental reasons and has nothing to do with genetics. This paper looks at both the heredity explanation as well as the environmental explanations of…… [Read More]

References

Dorfman, Donald D. (1995). "Soft Science with a Neoconservative Agenda." A Review of the Bell Curves. 40: 5. Contemporary Psychology, APA's journal of book reviews. Retrieved on June 20, 2004 at http://www.apa.org/journals/bell.html

Haughton, Noela A. (2002). "Biased Content, Context, and Values: An Examination of the SAT." Retrieved on June 20, 2004 at http://www.sq.4mg.com/IQincome.htm

Jencks, Christopher and Phillips, Meredith. (1998). "The Black- White Test Score Ga: An Introduction." (pp. 2-22) The Black-White Test Score Gap. Christopher Jencks and Meredith Phillips - eds. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.

Keita, L. (1999). "Why Race Matters: Race Differences and What They Mean." The Western Journal of Black Studies. 23: 1, p. 65.
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Heritage Sites in Danger the

Words: 1746 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43209942

Additionally, conservationists suggest increasing patrols to improve overall enforcement of existing laws, better boundary demarcation, and the development of stronger hunting quotas. All of these measures require significant and lasting funding.

Current Status

This Park is in a state of crisis. ith most of its large mammals now extinct from the Park, and illegal users on the rise, Park Rangers are simply outmatched. Poachers can find a thriving market for illegal bushmeat and rare birds. Illegal loggers easily find buyers for rare trees. The Park is under-staffed and under-funded and soon to face new challenges if the upstream dam is built along the Gambia River as planned.

Conclusion

The Galapagos Islands and the Niokola-Koba National Park represent two of Planet Earth's most valuable treasures. They contain biodiversity that not only provides scientific opportunity but may support the health of the entire ecosystem in their respective regions. Both sites are listed…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Novy, Julia W. 2010. Incentive Measures for Conservation of Biodiversity and Sustainability: A Case Study of the Galapagos Islands. United Nations

Environment Program: WWF-USA.

UN Chronicle. 1999. Conservation of Endemic Biodiversity of the Galapagos World

Heritage Site. Available at:  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1309/is_3_36/ai_58675442/
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Cultural Cues of Eastern and Western Schools in Today's World

Words: 1756 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14860448

Education in the East and West

The difference between education in the East and the West is primarily a difference in culture. Today, cultural differences are less pronounced than they were a century ago. Globalized society has seen cultures meld and melt into one another, so that in many senses the East resembles the West in more ways than one (Igarashi). However, deeply rooted cultural cues still represent a fundamental reason for existing educational differences between the East and the West. This paper will describe these differences and show why they exist.

Medieval Guilds were important to production standards in the time of the Renaissance. For example, "in places where guilds were strong, they exercised strict oversight over training" (Hansen). In fact, the education and apprenticeship of the Renaissance was a highly skilled exercise that began at the youngest age and often required more than a decade of training.

Western…… [Read More]

Li, Jin. Cultural Foundations of Learning: East and West. UK: Cambridge, 2012.

Print.

Li's book is very helpful in understanding the differences between Eastern and Western education: it highlights cultural influences in the West, from the Greeks, and in the East, from Confucius and Buddha, etc. It looks at how religion and science have both played a part in where East and West are educationally speaking.
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Cultural and Construction History of the Islamic Golden Age

Words: 4350 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85878794

Islamic Technology

Cultural and Construction History of the Islamic Golden Age

Cultural Environment

The Islamic Golden Age is also known as the Caliphate of Islam or the Islamic Renaissance. The term refers to a system of political, cultural, and religious authority derived from the teachings of the Prophet Mohammed in the early sixth century AD. At its high point under the Abbassid Dynasty (eighth to thirteenth centuries AD), Islamic civilisation experienced a flourish of art and culture that blended Arab, Persian, Egyptian, and European elements (Kraemer). The result was an era of incredible intellectual and cultural advancements (Wiet). At the height of its power, the Caliphate controlled all of the present-day Middle East, all of northern Africa and into Spain, and as far east as the Indus Valley, making it among the largest empires of all time and one of the few states ever to extend direct rule over three…… [Read More]

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Cultural Anthropology

Words: 1124 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95870926

Race is one of the most bedeviling of anthropological characteristics. The concept, with the barest tips of its roots in biological realities and the rest of the plant firmly grafted to cultural and sociological constructs, is one of the first concepts that anthropologists dealt with vigorously in terms of the history of the profession. Ideas about race both helped establish anthropology as a discipline in its own right (distinct from history, political economy, philosophy, comparative religion and ethics) and kept it from being entirely assimilated into the post-colonial mindset. Like the poor for the rest of humanity, the idea of race - for both good and ill - seems always to be with the anthropologist.

Thus it is hardly surprising that Roger Lancaster should become fascinated with the concept of race during his fieldwork in Nicaragua. For the milieu in which he is working provides a fascinating swirl of ideas…… [Read More]

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Cultural Diversity on Websites

Words: 2197 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16109724

Auditing a Website for Cultural Diversity

'Diversity' in the website

The usefulness of the diversity information

The appropriateness of the photographs and graphic material

Website eliance as Employee, Customer & Supplier

Internal Issues Affecting reflection of Diversity

As a Female Potential Employee Aged 55 years

'Diversity' in the website

For this study we consider the case of Tesco Plc, a global retail chain with business in almost every continent in the world.

The company corporate website - http://www.tescoplc.com is an interesting website. The website of the company has a 'search' option. When the word 'diversity' is put in the search box, it yielded several answers and most of them were related to customers and employees. The results showed where the company used the word 'diversity' in documents related to customers and employees.

One of the documents titled 'Core Purpose and Values' of the company stated

"Understanding people -- customers, colleagues,…… [Read More]

References

Alserhan, B., Forstenlechner, I., & Al -- eNakeeb, A. (2009). Employees' attitudes towards diversity in a non-ewestern context. Employee Relations, 32(1), 42-55.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/01425451011002752 

Aulenbacher, B., & Innreiter-Moser, C. (2013). Making the difference -- " critical perspectives on the configuration of work, diversity and inequalities. Equal Div And Incl: An Int J, 32(6).  http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/edi.2013.03032faa.001 

Garib, G. (2013). Leisure managers' perceptions of employee diversity and impact of employee diversity. International Journal Of Hospitality Management, 32, 254-260.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhm.2012.07.002 

Tesco plc,. (2015). Tesco plc. Retrieved 7 November 2015, from  http://www.tescoplc.com/index.asp?pageid=10
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Health-Related Interviews Cultural Difference

Words: 1217 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88200289

Heritage Assessment Tool

Benchmark assessment

Heritage Assessment Tool: Cultural values and health beliefs

Cultural sensitivity is an integral part of effective nursing. Although the definitions of concepts such as 'health' and 'wellness' might seem on their surface to be self-evident, these notions are, in fact, highly mutable and particular to the individual and his or her culture. Cultural insensitivity can result in patients becoming alienated from the medical system and this results in poorer, ineffectual care. One of the reasons instruments such as the Heritage Assessment Tool can be so useful is that it can be a clear and efficient way to establish the culturally-contextual health beliefs of a patient whose experiences and values that are different those of the physician, nurse, or other healthcare provider treating the patient.

The first family I interviewed was a Chinese-American household. Although the family was relatively assimilated and the children were second-generation residents…… [Read More]

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Positive Ways of Thinking About Cultural Diversity

Words: 985 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57987776

Cultural Diversity: What Is It?

Cultural diversity is that quality or characteristic of any society, community, group or family that consists of a variety of cultural and/or ethnic backgrounds. Thus, for example, a nation like America could be said to be culturally diverse because it is represented by various cultures and ethnicities throughout the land. At the same time, being culturally diverse is also about showing respect and appreciation for and towards the various cultural and ethnic groups within the community. Diversity is something that is recognized rather than something is suppressed or ignored. True cultural diversity is not just the physical make-up of the group of community but also the state of mind of the members of that group regarding how they think about and view diversity. Yet, as DiMaggio and Bryson (2000) show, cultural diversity remains a controversial subject for some.

One of the main challenges of cultural…… [Read More]

References

Day, R. (2007). Facing the Challenge of Cultural Diversity. Retrieved Nov. 2010 from  http://farnhamcastle.blogspot.com/2007/09/facing-challenge-of-cultural-diversity.html 

DiMaggio, P., and Bryson, B. (2000). Public attitudes towards cultural authority and cultural diversity in higher education and the arts. Retrieved December 2012 from http://www.princeton.edu/~artspol/workpap/WP11%20-%20DiMaggio%2BBryson.pdf

Turner-Vorbeck, Tammy A. (2005). Expanding multicultural education to include family diversity. Multicultural Education,13(2), 6-10. Retrieved August 2013 from ProQuest.
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Recognize the Social Cultural and Economic Dimensions of Information Use

Words: 669 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1699569

Social, Cultural, And Economic Dimensions of Information Use

Library institutions play a vital role in addressing social and political issues through the provision of relevant information. It is the responsibility of front-line employees, reference service librarians, and the paraprofessionals to make decisions and set the tone that will inspire a dynamic relationship within a community. In order to find the best ways of creating and maintaining a strong community involvement, library floor-employees consider the economic, social, and cultural factors for information use (Gallagher & Leckie, 2010).

Social Dimension

Librarians are responsible in ensuring that their institution meets the demands of its users in multiple ways. In terms of the community, libraries are more than access to media and books or even the internet. In some cases, it acts as the focal point for community opportunity and involvement. In small cities, libraries are among the few public buildings where community members…… [Read More]

References

Gallagher, A., & Leckie, S. (2010). Economic, social, and cultural rights: A legal resource guide. Philadelphia, Pa: Univ. Of Pennsylvania Press.

Trauth, E.M. (2011). The culture of an information economy: Influences and impacts in the Republic of Ireland. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic.
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Social and Cultural Impacts of Establishing an

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23476641

socal and cultural mpacts of establshng an eco-Toursm enterprse n Joao Pessoa, Brazl. The man focus of the dssertaton s on the followng areas:

An analyss of eco-toursm development

An assessment of the opportuntes - regonal, domestc, nternatonal

An evaluaton of the projects feasblty

An examnaton of the socal-cultural mpact of the eco-toursm

Brazl has a sanctuary of the fnest natural resources ("fauna & flora") n the world, and therefore toursm s n ascendence, and demands for md-class hotels are on the ncrease. The development of eco-toursm n specfc areas s antcpated due to partnershp wth local bankng ntutons; local government nterest and regulatons; and a general growth of awareness of the tenson between the tourst dollar, the envronment and local cultures.

Research Methods

Prmary research (ntervews and questonnares) wll be conducted to analyze the feasblty of the project. Secondary research wll be carred out, n the form of a…… [Read More]

i) Adventurers set out to discover other lands (e.g., Captain Cook) ii) People traveled for scientific research (e.g., Darwin) iii) People traveled for business (trade) iv) People traveled in order to visit friends and family (social), v) People traveled for leisure (relaxation) vi) People travel as Eco-Travelers (learners).

The development of tourism has influenced people and society, and has created thousands of organizations, at many levels: national and international, governmental or non- governmental. Tourism has thus led to the creation of million of jobs worldwide, in what is today is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. Tourism has led people to confront different attitudes and to admire eclectic cultures. In addition, to be able to understand these cultures, society at large has had to adapt to the pluralism of cultures by learning languages other than their own, different types of gastronomy and music, and also by adopting a greater tolerance of different religions.

Accordingly to Kaluf (2001), the development of tourism has been worldwide, and has been sustaining a growth of 20% over last five years: 5% in mass tourism and an incredible 15% in
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Personal Cultural Diversity the World

Words: 997 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61218229

Not celebrating Christmas, and not having time off from school for Persian religious holidays, has always made me take great notice of the fact that I am "different." As I have matured, however, I have come to appreciate this difference, and to realize that everyone truly is "different" in many ways. It took me quite awhile to come to this realization and to fully accept my culturally diverse identity as a Persian-American, but now that I have I realize that the diversity I struggled with in my youth has actually given me a great advantage in modern society. I am already prepared and well equipped not only to "deal with" cultural diversity, but to actively engage and navigate a world where it is commonplace.

Learning to not only tolerate but to utilize cultural diversity in the workplace can be very difficult. Even something considered as standard by many people such…… [Read More]

References

Carnevale, a. & Stone, S. (1994). "Diversity beyond the golden rule." Training and development, pp. 22-39.

During, J. & Mirabdolbaghi, Z. (1991). The art of Persian music. New York: Mage publishing.

Fordham. (2007). "Persia." Internet ancient history sourcebook. Accessed 8 September 2009.  http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook05.html 

Woods, S. (2009). "Workplace diversity." Cornell university ILR school. Accessed 8 September 2009.  http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/library/research/subjectguides/workplacediversity.html