Cultural Pluralism Essays (Examples)

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Cultural Awareness Americans Have Traditionally Celebrated the

Words: 2642 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94745781

Cultural Awareness

Americans have traditionally celebrated the diversity of cultures that comprises the United States. Despite some reservations, much of the country still believes that the amalgamation of different ethnicities contributes to the richness of American culture.

The merging of cultures in the United States has also given rise to conflicts and collisions, as established concepts are confronted and challenged. New belief systems, often developed over centuries, have already redefined prevailing estern cultural concepts.

This paper examines how prevailing estern cultural concepts regarding the soul and spirituality, gender and healing have been challenged and redefined by a growing awareness of cultural alternatives. Some of these concepts, such as gender, were redefined largely within an American context. Many, such as healing and spirituality, have been influenced by Eastern and African cultures and religions.

The first part of the paper looks at the various cultural meanings of healing, as practiced by the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fadiman, Anne. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1997.

Feminist Research Center. "Empowering Women in Sports." Empowering Women in Sports. March 1995. Feminist Majority Foundation. 17 April 2003 http://www.feminist.org/research/sports6.html.

Grenz, Stanley. A Primer on Postmodernism. Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1996.

Some, Malidoma Patrice. The Healing Wisdom of Africa: Finding Life Purpose through Nature, Ritual and Community. New York: Putnam, 1998.
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Culture and the Military Cultural

Words: 1915 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48326917



This also has major implications for military operations, both within a military unit and in the interaction between the military unit and another culture. Essentially, the problem of ethnocentrism can be seen at the root of the other cultural problems discussed in this context; it implies both a lack of understanding about the impacts of the unit's culture on the people of a foreign culture, as well as a lack of appreciation and understanding for that culture (Hoskins 2007).

Conclusion

Culture is strange, in that it is both constant and always changing. The only static culture is a dead one; as the various elements and generations of a culture interact, change is bound to happen. When there is no longer any interaction within a culture or between a given culture and other cultures, there is no longer any point to that culture, and indeed that culture could not realistically exist…… [Read More]

References

DiMarco, L. (2003). Traditions, changes, and challenges: Military operations and the Middle Eastern city. Diane Publsihing.

Harrison, D.; Light, L. & Rothschild-Boros, M. (2008). Cultural anthropology: Our diverse world. New York: Wadsworth.

Hoskins, B. (2007). "Religion and other cultural variable in modern operational environments." Accessed 16 October 2009. http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA470675&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf

O'Neil, D. (2007). "Characteristics of Culture." Accessed 16 October 2009.  http://anthro.palomar.edu/culture/culture_2.htm
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Personal Cultural Diversity the World

Words: 997 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61218229

Not celebrating Christmas, and not having time off from school for Persian religious holidays, has always made me take great notice of the fact that I am "different." As I have matured, however, I have come to appreciate this difference, and to realize that everyone truly is "different" in many ways. It took me quite awhile to come to this realization and to fully accept my culturally diverse identity as a Persian-American, but now that I have I realize that the diversity I struggled with in my youth has actually given me a great advantage in modern society. I am already prepared and well equipped not only to "deal with" cultural diversity, but to actively engage and navigate a world where it is commonplace.

Learning to not only tolerate but to utilize cultural diversity in the workplace can be very difficult. Even something considered as standard by many people such…… [Read More]

References

Carnevale, a. & Stone, S. (1994). "Diversity beyond the golden rule." Training and development, pp. 22-39.

During, J. & Mirabdolbaghi, Z. (1991). The art of Persian music. New York: Mage publishing.

Fordham. (2007). "Persia." Internet ancient history sourcebook. Accessed 8 September 2009. http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook05.html

Woods, S. (2009). "Workplace diversity." Cornell university ILR school. Accessed 8 September 2009. http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/library/research/subjectguides/workplacediversity.html
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Social and Cultural Impacts of Establishing an

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23476641

socal and cultural mpacts of establshng an eco-Toursm enterprse n Joao Pessoa, Brazl. The man focus of the dssertaton s on the followng areas:

An analyss of eco-toursm development

An assessment of the opportuntes - regonal, domestc, nternatonal

An evaluaton of the projects feasblty

An examnaton of the socal-cultural mpact of the eco-toursm

Brazl has a sanctuary of the fnest natural resources ("fauna & flora") n the world, and therefore toursm s n ascendence, and demands for md-class hotels are on the ncrease. The development of eco-toursm n specfc areas s antcpated due to partnershp wth local bankng ntutons; local government nterest and regulatons; and a general growth of awareness of the tenson between the tourst dollar, the envronment and local cultures.

Research Methods

Prmary research (ntervews and questonnares) wll be conducted to analyze the feasblty of the project. Secondary research wll be carred out, n the form of a…… [Read More]

i) Adventurers set out to discover other lands (e.g., Captain Cook) ii) People traveled for scientific research (e.g., Darwin) iii) People traveled for business (trade) iv) People traveled in order to visit friends and family (social), v) People traveled for leisure (relaxation) vi) People travel as Eco-Travelers (learners).

The development of tourism has influenced people and society, and has created thousands of organizations, at many levels: national and international, governmental or non- governmental. Tourism has thus led to the creation of million of jobs worldwide, in what is today is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. Tourism has led people to confront different attitudes and to admire eclectic cultures. In addition, to be able to understand these cultures, society at large has had to adapt to the pluralism of cultures by learning languages other than their own, different types of gastronomy and music, and also by adopting a greater tolerance of different religions.

Accordingly to Kaluf (2001), the development of tourism has been worldwide, and has been sustaining a growth of 20% over last five years: 5% in mass tourism and an incredible 15% in
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Democracy and Pluralism

Words: 1974 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44669207

Critically assess the extent to which deliberative democracy, neo-conservatism and/or neo-liberalism promote and/or restrict democratization for groups that are excluded and marginalized. Please refer to the debates presented in the attached readings to make your points and cite your sources.

Civil society may make up a place for democratization, owing to its ability to enable individuals to decide on living their public life and resolving common issues. Individuals who consider deliberation to be the soul of democracy ought to be drawn to a broad form of public domain. Postmodernists, who hold rather divergent views, conceptualizing democracy with regard to agonistic regard formed via identity and difference negotiations, ought to similarly be drawn to pluralism. Democrats ought to support, in general, a state complete in key elements, as appropriately organized exclusion may prove beneficial to democratization and democracy, even from excluded parties' standpoint. All historical decisions taken by governments to ensure…… [Read More]

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Diversity Cultural and Individual Diversity

Words: 1510 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41505131



eferences

Black, J.S., & Porter, L.W. (1991). Managerial Behaviors and Job Performance: A Successful Manager in Los Angeles May Not Succeed in Hong Kong. Journal of International Business Studies, 22(1), 99+. etrieved March 27, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000126798

Business Case for Diversity. etrieved March 27, 2009, from http://www.chubb.com/diversity/chubb4450.html

Clarke, .D. (2005, September). Workplace Bias Abounds: New Study Confirms the American Workplace Has Much Farther to Go to Achieve True Diversity. Black Enterprise, 36, 38. etrieved March 29, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5011221717

Hicks, D.A. (2003). eligion and the Workplace: Pluralism, Spirituality, Leadership. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. etrieved March 29, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=110647891

Madden, ussell SHATTEING THE GLASS CEILING. etrieved March 29,

2009, from http://home.earthlink.net/~rdmadden/webdocs/Shattering_the_Glass_Ceili.html

Mor Barak, M.E. (2000). The Inclusive Workplace: An Ecosystems Approach to Diversity Management. Social Work, 45(4), 339. etrieved March 29, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001074518

Stretch, J.J. (2006). Managing Diversity: Toward a…… [Read More]

References

Black, J.S., & Porter, L.W. (1991). Managerial Behaviors and Job Performance: A Successful Manager in Los Angeles May Not Succeed in Hong Kong. Journal of International Business Studies, 22(1), 99+. Retrieved March 27, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000126798

Business Case for Diversity. Retrieved March 27, 2009, from http://www.chubb.com/diversity/chubb4450.html

Clarke, R.D. (2005, September). Workplace Bias Abounds: New Study Confirms the American Workplace Has Much Farther to Go to Achieve True Diversity. Black Enterprise, 36, 38. Retrieved March 29, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5011221717

Hicks, D.A. (2003). Religion and the Workplace: Pluralism, Spirituality, Leadership. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved March 29, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=110647891
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People's Children Cultural Conflict in the Classroom

Words: 982 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42224878

People's Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom, by Lisa Delpit

Lisa Delpit's piece's first part entitled "Controversies Revisited" started off with an example of her point-of-view where there is language diversity in the classroom seen between white teachers and children of color. Through this experience, Delpit found that children may know that there is a difference in the codes of how people speak, they may not know how to properly express these codes or reproduce them, however they definitely know that they exists. Delpit stresses on page 48 that there is a need for educators to be sensitive about the codes in which they speak for the better learning facilitation of children from all sorts of different cultural backgrounds. Delpit stresses her main point that teachers need to be able to embrace the languages brought about by different students from all different cultures by giving them a way to express…… [Read More]

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Modern Age Cinema and Pluralism in the Arts

Words: 978 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 411744

Whitney collection, what qualities do the art works seem to have in common?

When you look at the Whitney collection from the year 2000, it is clear that that all of the artists are reflection of a sense of realism in the various works. As, they are taking everyday events and are depicting them in such a way, that they are giving the audience a sense of appreciation for what many people see regularly.

A good example of this can be seen by comparing the works of Doug Aitken with John Coplans. In the Doug Aitken's photograph, he is illustrating an everyday event by highlighting a single shopping cart sitting in a parking lot. As, everyone has: went home and Aitken is showing how this is part of everyday life in America. This is giving the viewer a sense of appreciation for the kinds of images that we see everyday,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Doug Aitken." Whitney Collection, 2011. Web. 23 Jun. 2011

"John Coplans." Whitney Collection, 2011. Web. 23 Jun. 2011.

"Whitney Collection." Whitney Collection, 2011. Web. 23 Jun. 2011

http://whitney.org/Collection/PatSteir/200122
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Literature and History

Words: 8876 Length: 32 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51478975

tomorrow / Bright before us / Like a flame. (Alain Locke, "Enter the New Negro," 1925)

rom the 1920's Alain Leroy Locke has been known as a prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Through his writings, his actions and his education, Locke worked to educate not only White America, but also the Negro, about the beauty of the Negro heritage. He emphasized the idea that no single culture is more important than another. Yet it was also important to give sufficient attention to one's own culture and its beauty. This was Locke's philosophy of cultural pluralism.

The White heritage has enjoyed prominence for a large part of American history. During the colonization period, the Whites have emphasized their own superiority while at the same time ensuring that people of other ethnic heritages knew in no uncertain terms their own inferiority. This gave rise to a nearly monocultural America, where all…… [Read More]

Furthermore Locke's writings are lauded for their cultural and historical importance rather than their literary style. Being very prominent in educational and artistic circles I find this hard to believe. Certainly a man who has been educated in the highest of quality schools should be able to produce something of purely literary merit.

Despite these issues which are admittedly a matter of opinion, it is very significant that Locke's influence extends to modern literary circles in this way. Locke's influence in the areas of education, culture and empowerment also remain to this day in terms of recognized Black culture and the promotion of cultural pluralism. The ALLS has been officially recognized by the American Philosophical Association in a letter from Secretary-Treasurer, William Mann, on November 26, 1997.

Locke's influence thus reaches far beyond his lifespan in order to not only empower and inspire, but also to enlighten and to entertain. Locke was the epitome of the New Negro.
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Rabbit in the Moon Along

Words: 3346 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83928762

While America prides herself on her multiculturalism and acceptance of those from all lifestyles and cultures that is not always the case, as the readings and personal experiences clearly indicate.

America has been multicultural or multiethnic for centuries, white Americans still are the majority in most areas, and their ideals, beliefs, and even prejudices dominate all of society. To fit in, immigrants must assimilate to the predominate way of thinking, acting, and feeling, even if it is against their own cultural values and beliefs. Thus, they may actually have to engage in cultural pluralism, or acting one way with their own ethnic members while acting another way in white society. There are numerous examples of this every day in society, such as the encounter the author of "A Different Mirror" had with the cabdriver. onald Takaki's family had probably been in the country longer than the cabdriver's had; yet the…… [Read More]

References

Author "Chapter 10: Japanese-Americans."

Chapter 11: "Chinese, Filipino, Korean, Vietnamese, and Asian-Indian-Americans."

In the White Man's Image. Prod. Christine Lesiak and Matthew Jones. American Experience, 1993.

Ly, Kuong C. "Asian: Just a Simple Word." Human Architecutre: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge. Vol. II, Issue 2, Fall 2003/Spring 2004. 119-124.
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Buckanan Deconstructing America Patrick J Buchanan Is

Words: 1025 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25363528

Buckanan

Deconstructing America

Patrick J. Buchanan is a conservative political leader in the United States. The article Deconstructing America was published in his 2007 book, Day of Reckoning. Buchanan says "America is today less a nation than an encampment of politics and power.." Although the rhetoric surrounding the creation of the nation did focus on themes such as equality, democracy, and diversity, in practice there were certainly more superficial ideologies at play.

"The United States, the greatest republic since Rome and the British Empire may be said to have risen from that three-cornered for the Jamestown settlers began to build the day they arrived. But that republic and that empire did not rise because the settlers and those who followed believed in diversity, equality, and democracy (Buckanan)."

The settlers were in no way worried about equality within their own groups or especially with the natives. The pilgrim's societies were based…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Buckanan, P. Deconstructing America. 2007. Print.

Renshon, S. "Multiculturalism in the U.S.: Cultural Narcissism and the Politics of Recognition." 8 February 2011. Center for Immagration Studies. Online. 29 July 2014.

Scruton, R. "MULTICULTURALISM, R.I.P." December 2010. The American Spectator. Online. 29 July 2014.

Taylor, S. "The Challenge of 'Multiculturalism' In How Americans View the Past and the Future." The Journal of Historical Review (2013): 159-164. Online.
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Business Change What Do the

Words: 1301 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40505868

Finally, Change in approach is a more tactical answer to Change Character. It is using specific techniques to engender change within and organization or population (Chapman, 2005).

Discuss the difference between business development based on problem solving vs. business development-based learning. Within any organization, individuals tend to see themselves as cogs in the wheel, not really making much of a difference to the success or failure of the organization as a whole. It is really at the micro level that change (learning, evolution, etc.) takes place. The enemy is not external; it is falling into an internal rut and seeing only the short-term, instead of broadening the picture. Learning is not easy; people, and therefore organizations, are sometimes resistant to movement. However, thinking about one's position within an organization as a critical part of the whole, dedicating oneself to team learning, "suspending assumptions and entering into genuine thinking together" allows…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Annacchino, M. (2007). The Pursuit of New Product Development. Burlington, MA: Butterworth.

Bradley, F. (2003). Strategic Marketing In the Customer Driven Organization. New York: Wiley.

Chapman, A. (2005, January). Change Management. Retrieved September 2010, from Businessballs.com:  http://www.businessballs.com/changemanagement.htm 

Frappaolo, C. (2006). Knowledge Management. Mankato, MN: Capstone Press.
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Educational Evaluations in Culturally Diverse

Words: 7024 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51600783

This view is reflected in increasing calls for financial equity among schools, desegregation, mainstreaming, and standardized testing for teachers and students alike; it has been maintained that by providing the same education to all students, schools can equalize social opportunity (Bowman, 1994).

This latter position is typically followed up with the use of a particular curriculum designed to support the approach. In this regard, Bowman suggests that, "Knowledge is thought to exist in the collected wisdom of a canon, and education is the transferral of established wisdom to the learner" (p. 218). Unfortunately, when educators attempt to impose a "one-size-fits-all" curriculum on a diverse study body, there are bound to be problems -- particularly for those students who are already marginalized through language and other socioeconomic constraints.

Furthermore, in many ways, the public schools are unique in that they have been assigned the responsibility of communicating what American society regards…… [Read More]

References

Artiles, A.J., Higareda, I., Rueda, R., & Salazar, J.J. (2005). Within-group diversity in minority disproportionate representation: English language learners in urban school districts. Exceptional Children, 71(3), 283.

Banks, J.A. (1994). An introduction to multicultural education. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Bowman, B.T. (1994). The challenge of diversity. Phi Delta Kappan, 76(3), 218.

Breitborde, M.L. (1993). Multicultural education in the classroom. Childhood Education,
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Culture on Developmental Psychopathology the

Words: 1059 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37459682

" (Weiss, Goebel, Page, Wilson and Warda, 1998)

However, it is stated that 7% of the children in the study "had scores indicating risk for mental health problems and 14$ showed enough symptoms to warrant substantial clinical concern." (Weiss, Goebel, Page, Wilson and Warda, 1998) it is reported that the study was focused on the determination of the degree to which behavioral and emotional problems may be related to the family's financial status, cultural heritage, degree of acculturation, and family functioning." (Weiss, Goebel, Page, Wilson and Warda, 1998)

Results stated in the work of Weiss, Goebel, Page, Wilson and Warda (1998) are stated to suggest that "...as a group, Latino preschoolers are quite well adjusted, experiencing a range of emotional and behavioral problems typical for their age group. However, a small proportion of the sample demonstrated behaviors indicative of substantial mental health problems. oys seem more likely to warrant clinical…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Hoagwood, Kimberly and Jensen, Peter S. (1997) Developmental Psychopathology and the Notion of Culture; Introduction to the Special Section on 'The Fusion of Cultural Horizons: Cultural Influences on the Assessment of Psychopathology in Children and Adolescents. Applied Development Science 1997. Vol. 1 No.3.

Parron, Delores L. (1997) the Fusion of Cultural Horizons; Cultural Influences on the Assessment of Psychopathology on Children. Applied Development Science 1997. Vol. 1 No.3.

Weiss, S.J., Goebel, P., Page, a., Wilson, P. And Warda, M. (1998) the Impact of Cultural and Familial Context on Behavioral and Emotional Problems of Preschool Latino Children. Child Psychiatry and Human Development Vol. 29.
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Ethnic Conflict in Xinjiang An

Words: 3057 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29028426

In this sense, "During the 1950s and 1960s, especially after the falling-out between hina and the former Soviet Union, the hinese government actively relocated Han hinese to frontier provinces such as Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, and Heilongjiang, in order to consolidate the border in light of possible military threat from the Soviets"

. Therefore, the decision to intervene in the ethnic composition of the region was not only a choice related to the national identity of the country but also to geostrategic aspects.

After the end of the old War, the region remained of importance for hina form the perspective of the national identity as well as crucial natural resources, which include oil reserves. From this perspective, massive investments have been conducted in the region, stating the official reason to be the reduction of the disparities between the regions of hina. In this sense, "Rich in natural gas, oil, and warm…… [Read More]

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Race Ethnicity and Difference

Words: 1901 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24718824

ace and Ethnicity

Multiculturalism

Grade Course

What is multiculturalism?

Multiculturalism is an ideology which is defined in different ways following in the varying paradigms of one's culture and knowledge. However, it is generally explained as a system of beliefs which recognizes and appreciated diversity of groups in a society or in any organization. In t his regard, it also acknowledge these difference particularly the socio-cultural disparity thereby stressing upon its impact in a culture as it empowers the whole society. Multiculturalism is all about recognizing the difference and respecting them. In other words, this points out to the equal treatment of every human being regardless of any distinction based on color, race, religion, gender and culture. It aims at safeguarding and building up the integrity and dignity of these differences so that they are tolerated and celebrated (osado C, 1997).

Background

Multiculturalism is feature of globalization as well as post…… [Read More]

References

Banting K. 2006. Immigration, multiculturalism and the welfare state. Ethics and International affair. Vol. 20, No.3. Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affair.

Benwell, B. And Stokoe, Elizabeth. 2006. Discourse and Identity. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Brooker, P. 1999. Concise Glossary of Cultural Theory, London: Hodder Arnold.

Cohen D. 2007. Violence Is Inherent in Islam - It Is a Cult of Death. The Evening Standard. 18.
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Asian Pacific American Experiences

Words: 1941 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27251595

Korean-American

ith this dramatic increase in population and the racial unrest that resulted in the destruction of Korean businesses during the Los Angeles civil unrest, Korean-Americans have emerged as one of the visible ethnic groups in the country. However, aside from the Los Angeles riots, most Americans continue to define people of Korean ethnicity with a bevy of stereotypes - kimchee, churches and grocery stores.

For many Korean-Americans, however, being "Korean," "Korean-American" or "Asian-American" remains a fluid category, with constantly shifting meanings. Some locate the definitions in the places where they were born or where they grew up. Others define the categories by the way they look.

Still others, like the Park family, define being Korean through language.

This paper uses a series of interviews to evaluate the Park family's perceptions of their ethnicity. It compares and contrasts how Father Park and Mother Park's definitions differ from the experiences of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hurh, Won Moo. "Majority Americans' perception of Koreans in the United States: Implications of Ethnic Images and Stereotypes." In Ho-Young Kwon, ed. Korean-Americans: Conflict and Harmony. Chicago: Covenant Publications, 1994.

Jenkins, Richard. Rethinking Ethnicity: Arguments and Explorations. London: SAGE Publications, 1997.

Jenkins, Richard. Social Identity. London and New York: Routledge, 1996.

Jo, Hye-Young. "Locating Ethnic Identity and Language Among Second Generation Korean-Americans." The Review of Korean Studies. 3(2), December 2000. available online at http://review.aks.ac.kr/review3_2.htm. March 26, 2003.
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Communication Issues of Interracial Friendships

Words: 1266 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18451896

Popular culture differs from what was once referred to as "high" culture ("Popular Culture" 2000). High culture distinguished and continues to distinguish itself from popular culture by subordinating the latter. However, a tremendous shift in academia has led to the critique of both "high" and "low" culture and a subsequent merging of the two ("Popular Culture" 2000).

Also known as "mass" culture, popular culture can be considered crude even as it shapes politics and policy ("Popular Culture" 2000). According to Chito Childs & Laudone (2004), popular culture is uniquely responsible for the shaping of values, beliefs and norms surrounding interracial friendships, interracial relationships, and race relations in general. Films that depict interracial couples "tend to reinforce the existing racial hierarchy, rendering interracial relationships problematic," (Chito Childs & Laudone 2004, p. 1). Popular culture is part mirror for social realities and part shaper of those realities.

One exception to the generally…… [Read More]

References

Question 1

Chito Childs, E. (2009). Fade to Black and White: Interracial Images in Popular Culture. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Chito Childs, E. & Laudone, S. 2004-08-14 "Interracial Images: Popular Cuture Depictions of Black-White Couples" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA, Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p108369_index.html

Dolby, N. (2001). Constructing Race: Youth, Identity, and Popular Culture in South Africa. Albany: SUNY Press.
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Ethnic Racial Groups Looking at History From a

Words: 1876 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60819386

Ethnic/acial Groups

Looking at history from a purely anthropological standpoint, no one is actually native to North America. esearch concludes that this is true whether the particular research bases its findings on Darwinism or Judeo/Christian/Muslim beliefs. Life began somewhere in the area of the world now known as the Middle East. However, some people are more native, as a result of having lived in North America the longest, than others. After the original colonists arrived across the land bridge many thousands of years ago, it is debated who showed up next, but it was probably some European Vikings out for a short fishing trip. Columbus was a late comer, and he realized that people had already colonized the land he "discovered." It was not until everyone else had arrived in America, that Africans were brought over to work the land in chattel slavery. Three groups Native Americans (American Indians used…… [Read More]

References

Abernathy, D. (2002). The dynamics of global dominance: European overseas empires, 1415-1980. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Chavez y Gilbert, D.A. (2007). Cowboys and Indians are family after all. Retrieved from  http://www.nmhcpl.org/First_American.html 

Parrillo, V.N. (2011). Strangers to these shores: Race and ethnic relations in the United States. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Ltd.
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Multicultural Literature

Words: 2417 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46128341

Multicultural Literature

what is multicultural literature? What are the characteristics of quality multicultural literature?

Within the latter part of the twentieth century, a pattern referred to as multiculturalism acquired popularity in American education (Almerico et al., 2006). Gay (1994) within an intensive research of the very commonly used meanings of multicultural literature recognized 13 particular explanations involving the idea and mentioned that a number of factors had been typical out of all definitions for the reason that all of them concur that the content material of multicultural literature ought to include:

Cultural pluralism, ethnic identities, unequal division of resources as well as

Opportunities along with other socio and political issues arising from extended track records of oppression

Multicultural education like a school of thought, a strategy for education transformation, along with a collection of particular subject material within just educational courses. (p. 3)

In her own book, Affirming Diversity, Nieto…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Almerica et al. 2006:

The authors in this research carried out a content evaluation of children's literature college books to find out the way the phrase multiculturalism had been interpreted within just the perspective of children's literature. They established the way the idea had been outlined, the degree to which various subcultures within the America had been depicted, the quantity of textual content dedicated to every depicted cultural group, and also the quantity of suggested trade books for every group.

HMC 2008:

• The racial foundation involving the classroom has and also will continue to transform.
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Education Inequity

Words: 1767 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71936461

Educational Inequity

Culture and education are inherently linked (Adams, 1992; Gay, 2000, Jones 2004; Wlodkcowski & Ginsberg, 1995 in: Guo and Jamal, 2007) In order to understand impact of diversity in the educational setting, Guo and Jamal write that it appears necessary to "first define some key terms, including culture and cultural diversity. Culture can be defined as a dynamic system of values, beliefs and behaviors that influence how people experience and respond to the world around them. For many, cultural diversity can be referred to as 'distinctions in the lived experiences, and the related perception of and reactions to those experiences that serve to differentiate collective populations from one another." (Marshall, 2002, p. 7)

Culture plays a key role in forming the manner in which students learn and communicate,"…how they relate to other students and instructors, their motivation levels, and their sense of what is worth learning." The extent…… [Read More]

References

Adams, M. (1992). Cultural inclusion in the American college classroom. In L.L.B. Border & N.V. Chism (Eds.), Teaching for diversity. New Dire

Banks (Eds.), Multicultural education: Issues and perspectives (pp. 229-250). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Banks, C.A.M. (2005). Improving multicultural education: Lessons from the intergroup education movement. New York: Teachers College Press.

Banks, J.A. (1997b). Approaches to multicultural curricular reform. In J.A. Banks & C.A.M.
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Tokenism the Role and Experiences of Minority Teachers in Predominantly White Schools

Words: 5102 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25952668

Tokenism: The ole and Experiences of Minority Teachers in Predominantly White Schools

The Problem and Its Setting

Anticipated Findings

The past generation has seen the integration of America's public schools. Such integration has presented challenges and opportunities not only for the Minority students now enrolled in predominantly White schools, but also for the Minority teachers who find themselves assigned to those same schools. While opening up new horizons for many Minority educators, the purposeful placing of Minorities in majority White schools has also raised the issue of tokenism. The question remains as to whether these Minority teachers are being treated equally with their White counterparts, and whether their assignment to mostly White schools is based upon real ability and genuine need, or whether such assignments are merely reflective of well-meaning social policy gone awry. Many capable Minority teachers find themselves to be victims of the same sort of discrimination that…… [Read More]

References

1. Bush, Laura. (2002). "Troops to Teachers Available to Reserve Components: America Needs You!" URL:

http://www.defenselink.mil/ra/documents/articles/TroopstoTeachersReserveComponents.pdf.

2. Donaldson, K.B. (1996). Through Students' Eyes: Combating Racism in United States Schools. Westport, CT: Praeger.

3. Gibson, Rich. (1992). "Let's Create Schools for Real Change." Partisan Education: Taking Sides in the Schools. Alexandria, Va. 1997: Renaissance Community Press. URL: http://www.pipeline.com/~rgibson/partisan/section2.html.
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Racism in the United States

Words: 847 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4245311

" (Fredrickson, p562)

In his view, the disadvantages (still) faced by many African-Americans is the result of some degree of institutionalized and unacknowledged racial and ethnic hierarchies.

Meanwhile, many minority groups that have achieved relative success have done so through one-way assimilation while accepting the price of cultural erosion. Fredrickson's vision of the best scenario is very much in-line with public policies and stated goals of American society:

"Of the four models of American ethnic relations, the one that I believe offers the best hope for a just and cohesive society is a cultural pluralism that is fully inclusive and based on the free choices of individuals to con-struct or reconstruct their own ethnic identities." (Fredrickson, p572)

Conceptual Complications:

The views advanced by Fredrickson, though benevolently motivated, may suffer from the conceptual incompatibility of two underlying elements. Specifically, the contemporary mainstream public position on race relations and cultural diversity proposes…… [Read More]

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Orhan Pamuk's My Name Is

Words: 1684 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91680297

" But Pamuk's techniques force the reader to come to the conclusion that an artistic identity must fuse both past and present, have some flexibility and personal style, yet innovate with the demands of modernity terms of the way tradition is presented. This is the implied counsel of Pamuk's story. Learn from the past, as he urges readers to do by writing a historical narrative. However, do not slavishly follow or copy the past, or lock the self away from outside influences, including those influences of other religions and cultures. Pamuk suggests that a unilateral idea of estern selfishness is not sustaining, and he provides instruction for esterners how to view the concept of the self to understand Islam, but ultimately a modern artist cannot live blind like Osman, blind to the presence of other points-of-view, however beautiful Osman's art may have been. Utter self-annihilation in art and in life…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Pamuk, Orham. My Name is Red. Translated by Erdaq Goknar. New York: Vintage, 2002.

Orham Pamuk, My Name is Red, translated by Erdaq Goknar, (New York: Vintage, 2002), p.3

Pamuk, p.322

Pamuk, p.323
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Namesake and Metamorphosis the Namesake

Words: 4321 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14254449

Being away from one's family is hard; it takes time to get used to it. The newly married woman did know how to face this difficult situation and no one to counsel her on the subject.

The wife moved away from her parents' house, then she got two children a boy and a girl. The choice they made for the boy's name was unfortunate. They called him Gogol, like the Russian writers his father admired so much and this name would provide countless occasions for his peers in America to make fun of him. He will later struggle to change it into a neutral old American name, Nike and will finally succeed. Despite that, his family will continue to call him Gogol.

Gogol is a suburban male teenager caught between his Indian roots and his American birthrights. Gogol and his Indian-born parents must somehow strive to keep a balance between…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Bloom, Harold. Franz Kafka's the Metamorphosis. Chelsea House. (New York, 1988).

Eisner, Pavel. Franz Kafka and Prague. Golden Griffin Books. (New York, 1950).

Kafka, Franz. The Metamorphosis. (Kessinger Publishing, 2004).

Lahiri, Jhumpa. The namesake. (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2004).
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Acculturative Stress and Psychological Wellbeing of African Missionary Nuns Working in the USA

Words: 6281 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41172358

acculturative stress of African Catholic Missionary Nuns (ACMN) serving in the United States. This chapter is divided into five parts. The first part explains the meaning of acculturation and adaptation experiences specific to missionaries. This part emphasizes (1) different perspectives from social and behavioral scientists examining the phenomenon of acculturation (2) different theoretical models describing the stages of acculturation (3) dissimilarities between immigrants and missionary immigrants and what makes the two unique. The second part of this chapter examines the emotional and psychological distress missionaries experience as a result of acculturative stress. The third part focuses on coping strategies and resilience of missionaries. The fourth part introduces the existing literature in the area of acculturative stress of missionaries, emphasizing on limited empirical research in this subject and the necessity for further research in this area of study.

Part One: Background and Overview

Different Social and Behavioral Scientific Perspectives Concerning Acculturation.…… [Read More]

References

Akomolafe, F. (2011, July). The sad tale of African immigrants in Europe. New African, 508, 94-

99.

Andrews, L. (1999). Spiritual, family, and ministry satisfaction among missionaries. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 27(2), 107-118.

Arthur, L.B. (1999). Religion, dress and the body. New York: Berg.
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America as a Multinational Society

Words: 3513 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55099431

In years before, America was a collection of Chinese, Germans, Italians, Scots, Croats, etc., all craving freedom. Today, even the simple concept of an English-speaking nation is fading off the continent. In the past, immigrants were taught in English in the public schools. In America today, children are taught in German, Italian, Polish, and 108 other languages and dialects. Most of these schools are funded by 139 million federal dollars. "The linguist's egalitarian attitude toward dialect has evolved into the multicultural notion that dialect as a cultural feature is part of one's identity as a member of that culture."

Due to their ethnic or cultural heterogeneity, multiethnic societies in general are more fragile and have a higher risk of conflicts. In the worst case such conflicts can cause the breakdown of these societies. Recent examples of this were the violent breakdown of Yugoslavia and the peaceful separation of Czechoslovakia. Forced…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cruz, Barbara C. Multiethnic Teens and Cultural Identity: A Hot Issue. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishers, 2001.

Dawisha, Adeed. Arab Nationalism in the Twentieth Century: From Triumph to Despair. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002.

Francis, Samuel. "The Other Face of Multiculturalism." Chronicles. April 1998.

Huggins, Nathan I. Revelations: American History, American Myths. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
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Gypsy Roma Healthcare in the United States Today a Culture Sensitivity Issue

Words: 4402 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27826360

Gypsies, otherwise known as Roma, came to the Americas with the very earliest settlers. Throughout the course of the past 500 years, the Roma, their preferred name, have held on to their traditions and practices. Historical written record says that the Portugese exported Gypsies to South America. According to legend, the Portugese did the same thing in what is now South Carolina, long before the English came to settle the area.

The long tradition of Gypsies in the United States is almost as interesting as the origination of Gypsises as a people. Gypsies originated in India over 1000 years ago, migrating to Europe in the Middle Ages. No one knows for sure how or why they began to wander the globe as they have. Today, there are more than twelve million Roma located in many countries around the world. ecause the Romani are almost never included on official census counts,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cheverly, MD; Gypsy Lore Society, 1994.

Patrin timeline of Romani History" http://www.geocities.com/Paris/5121/timeline.htm

Bunce, C. "Travelers are the Unhelathiest People in Britain." British Medical

Journal. 19 October 1996
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Analyzing the Counselling Topics

Words: 2851 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85552348

Counseling

The difference between law and ethics in counseling

In practice, ethics entails grasping and incorporating principles and standards of specific professional organizations. Ethical codes for professionals in the mental healthcare field aim at outlining the responsibility and professional conduct expected of them (Jennings, Sovereign, Bottorff, Mussell, & Vye, 2005). Graduate students have to establish their understanding of ethics theory and apply it in practice, before entering professional practice. As stated by Laureate Education (2010), modern practice involves applying conventional theoretical models to therapeutic processes involving clients. Moreover, it is responsible for uniting mental healthcare professions, as every profession inducts identical conventional approaches or procedures for guiding practice. The inverse is represented by post-modern practice.

Legal practice standards and ethical standards are different. Usually, legal standards relate to standard professional practices within a particular professional community, whereas ethical standards are often idealistic. The following aspects are included under legal standards:…… [Read More]

References

ACA. (2005). 2005 ACA code of ethics [White Paper]. Retrieved from American Counseling Association: http://www.counseling.org/Files/FD.ashx?guid=ab7c1272-71c4-46cf-848c- f98489937dda

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. (2000). Chapter 4 -- Therapeutic Issues for Counselors. In C. f. Treatment, Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP). Rockville (MD): Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (U.S.); .

Diaz, A., Neal, W. P., Nucci, A. T., Ludmer, P., Bitterman, J., & Edwards, S. (2004). Legal and ethical issues facing adolescent health care professionals. Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, 71(3), 181-185.

Dolgoff, R., Loewenberg, F. M., & Harrington, D. (2009). Ethical decisions for social work practice (8th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson.
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Reality of the Concept Euromanager

Words: 2122 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65759642

" (Bawer, 2005) Thus, culture and a higher cost of going out both come into play. Europeans have more health care and social services than Americans, but they still also pay more in taxes. True, they have better public transportation as well -- but gasoline (in this oil-exporting nation) costs more than $6 a gallon.

Bawer's greatest complaint was his lack of ability to have an exciting nightlife at a decent cost, something he said that was easier in supposedly poorer Spain. But this highlights how European nations still differ in terms of what they value, either wine with friends, or a more frugal and 'saving' standard of living. However, Bawer was correct in the sense that culture and cost may fuse, when comparing Europe as a whole to other nations, as while the private-consumption figure for the United States was $32,900 per person, the countries of estern Europe (again…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bawer, Bruce. (17 Apr 2005) "We're Rich -- you're not, end of story." The New York Times. Sunday Week in Review. Retrived 17 Apr 2005 at http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/17/weekinreview/17bawer.html?

Economist. (9 Jan 2004) "Plenty of crying over spilt milk." Economist Global Agenda. Retrived 17 Apr 2005 at http://www.economist.com/agenda/displayStory.cfm?story_id=2327955

Laroche, Lionel (2004) "The Cultural Differences between the European Union and North America and their Impact on Transatlantic Business." ITAP International. Retrived 17 Apr 2005 at http://www.itapintl.com/culturaldifferenceseuna.htm
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Immigration and Society Views From

Words: 3458 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92184928

Alien Nation is organized onto fifteen chapters, divided into three parts:

(1) Introduction;

Part I: Truth: (2) the View from the Tenth Circle; (3) the Pincers; (4) How Did it Happen? (5) Why Did it Happen? (6) So What?

Part II: Consequences: (7) Immigration Has Consequences: Economics; (8) Immigration Has (More) Consequences: Economics II; (9) Immigration Has Consequences: Cultural, Social, Environmental...; (10) Immigration Has Consequences: Political Power; (11) Immigration Has Consequences: A Less Perfect Union; (12) Immigration Has Consequences: The War against the Nation-State; (13) Doing the ight Thing? The Morality of Immigration;

Part III: Shipwreck and Salvage: (14) What, Then, Is to Be Done? (15) Conclusion: The Bowels of Christ?

Brimelow commences his book by seeking the genesis of the immigration problem and finds that it is linked to the massacres conducted by totalitarian regimes. To better explain, the author of Alien Nation… believes that the rulers of the…… [Read More]

References:

Brimelow, P., 1995, Alien Nation: Common Sense about America's Immigration Disaster, Random House

Lind, M., 1995, the Next American Nation: The New Nationalism and the Fourth American Revolution, Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group

Reilly, J.J., the Next American Nation: The New Nationalism and the Forth American Republic, http://www.johnreilly.info/tna.htm last accessed on September 1, 2009

1995, Alien Nation: Common Sense about America's Immigration Disaster, National Vanguard Magazine, Edition of November-December, No. 115
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Perception of Racism

Words: 2840 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77088300

Perception of acism and Colour Students

Historically, ethnic minorities are at a disadvantage in comparison to their White counterparts in real society. Living in poverty also plays a role in being considered a disadvantaged individual. According to Boyle (2008) and the 2006 U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey, 25.3% Black/African-Americans, 21.5% Hispanics, and26.6% Native Americans and Native Alaskans live under the poverty line (Boyle 2008).In comparison, 10% of Whites and Asians live under the poverty line (Boyle 2008). The percentage of Black/African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans and Native Alaskans living under the poverty line is doubled in comparison to Whites and Asians. For every one White or Asian individual living under the poverty line, there are two more Black/African-Americans, Hispanics or Native Americans and Native Alaskans that are living under the poverty line.

There is no coincidence that individuals living under the poverty line also live in areas where schools lack…… [Read More]

References

Alon, S. & Tienda, M. (2007). Diversity, opportunity, and the shifting meritocracy in higher education. American Sociological Review, 72(4), 487-511.

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954).

Cancian, M. (1998). Race-based verses Class-based affirmative action in college admissions. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, 17(1), 94-105.

Dee, T.S. (2004). The race connection: Are teachers more effective with students who share their ethnicity? Education Next, 4(2), 52-59. Retrieved from ERIC database.
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Marshall Plan and the Post

Words: 6775 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17805296



Thus, paramount American interests were to be presented as being really the interests of the Europeans themselves. It would be a situation wherein America was simply helping along people who were, at present, unable to adequately help themselves. The concept had much in common with the goals of many charity or self-help organizations - people grow and are transformed by learning to help themselves. They are given assistance so as to be enabled to learn the skills and life ways necessary to improve their own conditions. Naturally, everything that was in the "real" interests of Europeans would also be in the interests of the United States. The more similar the peoples of the two continents could become, the more readily Europeans could identify their own aspirations with those of the American people, the closer would be the bond between the two sides. In effect, the new post-ar Europe would be…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5024806711

Adelman, Carol. "Foreign Aid: Effectively Advancing Security Interests." Harvard International Review 29.3 (2007): 62+.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108516904

Agnew, John, and J. Nicholas Entrikin, eds. The Marshall Plan Today: Model and Metaphor. London: Routledge, 2004.
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Analyzing the Role of Youth in the Political Changes in Egypt in 2011

Words: 2849 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46781117

Egyptians of all classes and ages took part in the protests, united in demands and ambitions such as improved wages, improved conditions of working, and political freedom. However, it was the surprising figures of young individuals who took part in the demonstrations that provided drive to the revolt. The young individuals were also key to maintaining the uprising given that numerous meet in Tahrir (Liberation) Square in Cairo as well as other cities across the nation. Egyptian youth are actually the faces behind this leaderless uprising; the revolution was generally impelled by their skill in utilizing social media to gain attention (oudi-Fahimi, El Feki & Tsai, 2011). The new youth backed, and at times, instigated by women is now an aware global citizen, refusing to bear the inability of its rulers to be with the times and provide means of development and rapidly changing economic and social paradigms.

Apart from…… [Read More]

References

Aday, S., Farrell, H., Lynch, M., Sides, J., & Freelon, D. (2012). Blogs and bullet II-New media and conflict after the Arab spring (No. 80). Peaceworks. United States Institute of Peace. Retrieved May 31, 2013.

Al-Natour, M. (2012). The role of women in the Egyptian 25th January revolution. Journal of International Women's Studies, 13(5), 59.

Auer, M. R. (2011). The policy sciences of social media. Policy Studies Journal, 39(4), 709-736.

Frederiksen, M. (2011). The key role of women in the Egyptian revolution. Retrieved March 01, 2016, from http://www.marxist.com/key-role-of-women-in-egyptian-revolution.htm
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Jezebel the Historical and Biblical

Words: 3278 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73262096

In other words she is seen in this light as a double threat to the country.

Consequently, she interferes in the issues and "frames" Naboth in a clever and callous plot. She succeeds in enlisting others in the community to support her actions against Naboth and he is accused of blaspheming against God and going against the King. She encourages the King to kill Naboth and to "...take him out and stone him to death." As a result Naboth is murdered and Jezebel is seen as being a cold and manipulative figure who will go to any lengths to achieve her ends.

However, from a more pragmatic historical perspective some scholars question the iblical text. As one study states,

The fantastical tale of Naboth's death... stretches the reader's credulity. If Jezebel were as hateful as the Deuteronomist claims, surely at least one nobleman in Jezreel would have refused to assist…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Atkinson J. Jezebel.  http://latter-rain.com/eschae/jezebel.htm . (Accessed 9 May 2008)

Kings 18:4. IBS. (Accessed 9 May 2008)

Biblos com. (Accessed 9 May 2008).

Courteau, Sarah L. "Was the Lady a Tramp?." The Wilson Quarterly, Autumn 2007, 92+. Database online. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5023471656.Internet.(Accessed 11 May 2008).
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Sociology Prospectus How America Came

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50802602

It also makes note of the fact that the census of 2000 marked the first time that it was possible for a respondent to choose more than one race. This article is particularly interesting as it speculates on a future when it is no longer possible to separate people into minorities on the basis of race, simply because of cross culturalism.

an Juan, E. "Asian-American melting pot" Asia Times. June 14, 2005. This short article states there is an automatic prejudice against Asians within the United tates, laughing at the idea of any kind of homogeneity of the Asian-Americans and referring to both near and far history in which Asians have been discriminated against in the United tates. The author deals with the stereotype of Asians as the "model minority" and decries the change of something once considered to be exotic into a "plain American pie" the author is strong…… [Read More]

Shinjo, Iwao. "Learning multiculturalism from yesterday, today and tomorrow." Multicultural Education Summer 2003. This teacher's journal gives an interesting look into how multiculturalism may be taught in our schools, specifically to a group of fourth graders. Some of the insights gained on essentially a report on the implementation of a project give a bird's eye view into how multiculturalism is being deployed, and is it effective in its goal.

Okin, Susan Moller. "Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women?" Princeton New Jersey, University Press. 1999. A controversial paper on the feminist view of multiculturalism, somewhat extreme in its ideas. Okin compares the place of women in the multicultural society to that of puppets subjected to the whims of men. She has particularly strong feelings about the place of religion in multiculturalism, stating it is all in essence patriarchal and as such demeaning to women.

Zayd, Nasr Hamid. "Modernity, democracy are only for the privileged." Qantara Feb. 21, 2003. This Egyptian scholar reviews the idea of multiculturalism from a worldwide perspective, describing the pros and cons, as well as its impact on business and Third World Countries alike. He makes the interesting observation that it would seem the dominant world culture is one based on capitalism, wondering if this is inevitable or inherent. It describes the cultural reversion of Muslim nationalists as a response to the fear of losing ethnic identity, but then admits that much of the reversion in Islamic republics has not been based on a reasonable form of government but rather reactivity. It poses the idea that human rights and democracy are not rights, but only available for the privileged.
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American School the Idea of the Culture

Words: 1811 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51632872

American School

The idea of the culture wars is introduced here, and these culture wars begin to illustrate just how our continued dependence on the dominant Protestant Anglo-American culture has formed and influenced America's schools throughout out history. The chapter also introduces the concepts of racism and democracy, and demonstrates how these two opposite ideals often live together in our culture. The "culture wars" grew over the whites perceived "superiority" over other cultures in our country, and eventually, the dominant culture in America became the Protestant Anglo-American culture, and this dominance continues today.

The concept of education in colonial times is discussed in this chapter, along with early education's relationship to religion in the schools. It also shows the differing attitudes people of the times had about children, and how the idea that schools and educational theories could influence national thought was first introduced. The chapter also discusses the social…… [Read More]

References

Spring, Joel. The American School 1642-2000, 5th edition. New York: McGraw Hill, 2001.
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Hispanics or Latinos

Words: 1722 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48649609

Labels: Latinos or Hispanics

Labeling people by their race is often a controversial subject of debate in political and social circles. Why classify people as Hispanics, Latinos or African-Americans when they can all be simply called Americans by virtue of them being citizens of the United States. However it appears that there is some political gains to be made by the use of ethnic labeling and often this kind of classification is very damaging or restricting. For example a person who comes from a Spanish speaking family and is labeled a Latino is expected to behave in certain race-specific manner. he/she is expected to be really 'hip', an expert in salsa or other forms of dancing, not really good in academics, coming from a poor family and supporting a certain political party. But what if that one individual wants to defy all these restricting attributes because he/she is not a…… [Read More]

References

Lind, Michael- The Diversity Scam. The New Leader; 7/1/2000;

Irving Lewis Allen: Unkind Words: Ethnic Labeling from Redskin to Wasp. Bergin & Garvey. New York 1990.

Abigail Bucuvalas: Interview with Assistant Professor Mica Pollock, "When Race Matters":

http://www.gse.harvard.edu/news/features/pollock10012003.html
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Illegal Immigrants in the U S

Words: 2196 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39582268



So who is an American and what an America can or cannot do are questions which are critical to the issue of legalizing immigrants. Does being an American mean you cannot show allegiance to any other country? The images of people raising and waving Mexican flag had enraged many but it need not have. It should be accepted that people who come from different countries would forever hold in their hearts a deep respect and love for their homeland. However to put the interests of home country ahead of your adopted country or to work in a way that benefits the home country but not the new country would definitely cause serious concern. It would be definitely foolish to direct or guide the behavior of illegal immigrants regarding countries and allegiance, but they should be expected to not work against the interests of their adopted land. That is fair and…… [Read More]

References

Johnson, Leahy Colleen. Growing Up and Old In Italian-American Families, page 223, 1985

Michael T. Lempres. "Getting Serious about Illegal Immigration." National Review 46.3 (1994): 52.

Ted Hayes. "Illegal Immigration Threatens U.S. Sovereignty, Economy and Culture." Insight on the News 16.36 (2000): 46.

Michelle Malkin. "Dismissing the Dangers of Illegal Immigration." Insight on the News 18.32 (2002): 46.
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Religion Is Jesus the Only Savoir Is

Words: 1909 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2051126

eligion

Is Jesus the Only Savoir? Is onald H. Nash's opportunity to develop a passionate and well-developed argument answering yes: yes, Jesus is the only Savoir. However, Nash does not rest on the reader's understanding or experience of faith to make his case. The author takes a different approach, using logic and reason to explain that at least to a believer in Christ, there can be no other paradigm other than Christian absolutism. According to Nash, pluralism by its very definition violates the tenets inherent in the New Testament. It is therefore impossible for a theologian, especially a Christian one, to be a pluralist.

Nash's scapegoat, for better or worse, is John Hick. Hick is a theologian who has succumbed to the temptation of thinking pluralistically and who attempts to show that Jesus is in fact not the only savior. Nash picks apart Hick's argument by revealing the logical fallacies…… [Read More]

References

Bible: New International Version (NIV)

Johnsey, Allen. "A Critique of Is Jesus the Only Savior?" Nov 5, 2006. Retrieved online: http://www.mainstreetmission.com/index.php?p=1_76_A-Critique-of-Is-Jesus-the-Only-Savior-

Johnson, Keith E. "John Hick's Pluralistic Hypothesis and the Problem of Conflicting Truth-Claims." Retrieved online:  http://www.leaderu.com/wri/articles/hick.html 

Nash, Ronald H. "Is Jesus the Only Savoir?" Christian Research Institute. Retrieved online:  http://www.equip.org/articles/is-jesus-the-only-savior/
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Buddhist Theology as a Buddhist

Words: 1548 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16459683

.."

Even secular thinkers understand this concept, as demonstrated by popular Personal Development guru Stephen Covey's principle of "Seek First to Understand, Then Be Understood."

In understanding-based communication, disagreements would no longer express judgment and authority, but trust and compassion. Trust that the other person has your best interests at heart and compassion for the other person who shares your suffering. Although doctrine and theology will inevitably present itself as an issue of importance, the simple willingness and ability to listen and understand is the most important skill for us to develop right now.

eferences

Majesty and Meekness: A Comparative Study of Contrast and Harmony in the Concept of God, Craman.

Understanding Buddhism, Jacobson.

Buddhism and the Contemorary World, Jacobson

Beyond Ideology: eligion and the Future of Western Civilization, Smart

The Faces of Buddhism in America, Prebish and Tanaka

The Different Paths of Buddhism, Olson

The Transformation of American eligion,…… [Read More]

References

Majesty and Meekness: A Comparative Study of Contrast and Harmony in the Concept of God, Craman.

Understanding Buddhism, Jacobson.

Buddhism and the Contemorary World, Jacobson

Beyond Ideology: Religion and the Future of Western Civilization, Smart
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Art Analysis ART21 After Reviewing the Artists

Words: 968 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25242092

Art Analysis: Art21

After reviewing the artists from Art21, the artists chosen are Pierre Huyghe and AI Weiwei as the subjects of this paper. The pieces the paper will be "This is not a time for dreaming" by Huyghe and "Forever" by Weiwei. Both pieces are installation pieces although the artists are not classified under the same grouping on the Art21 website. Weiwei is listed as "Featured in Change" and Huyghe is listed as "Featured in omance." Though they are not featured or classified in the same group, their respective groups are related. There are several different kinds of people in the world for whom change is romantic. Weiwei is a renowned activist as well as renowned artists. Artists typically have a deep passion within that they express via their art. Therefore, Weiwei could see the connection between romance and change. For the native Parisian Huyghe, romance may very well…… [Read More]

References:

Art21, Inc. (2012) Explore Artists. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists . 2012 July 10.

European Graduate School. (2012) Pierre Huyghe -- Biography. Available from: http://www.egs.edu/faculty/pierre-huyghe/biography/. 2012 July 11.

Wines, Michael. (2009) Ai Weiwei, China's Impolitic Artist. The New York Times, Available from: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/28/world/asia/28weiwei.html?pagewanted=all. 2012 July 12.

Pierre Huyghe, "This is not a time for dreaming," 2004.
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Diversity in the United States Diversity Has

Words: 1071 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66647540

Diversity in the United States

Diversity has contributed to America's culture ever since the country was founded. In the beginning, the country consisted of various immigrant groups who brought their individual beliefs, religious practices, unique craftsmanship and inventiveness from all over the world. The United States was considered a melting pot because of its inherent diversity due to the vast immigrations from all over the world. However, even despite the vast amount of immigration and the concept of the melting pot, the country has always had to struggle to appreciate the advantages that diversity has provided for the country. Inequality and racism has been a persistent issues with the American society.

Today the country is still struggling with similar problems despite the fact that major struggles for equality have manifested. Diversity in the United States today includes many more different types of groups who are still struggling for their acceptance…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Keita, G. (2007, April). U.S. diversity breakthroughs and challenges. Retrieved from American Psychological Assoication: http://www.apa.org/monitor/apr07/itpi.aspx

Leweling, V. (1997, May). Official English and English Plus: An Update. Retrieved from Center for Applied Linguistics: http://www.cal.org/resources/digest/lewell01.html

United States Census Bureau. (2008, August 14). An Older and More Diverse Nation by Midcentury. Retrieved from United States Census Bureau: https://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb08-123.html
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Roadblocks to Israeli Democratization Roadblocks

Words: 1816 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40467407

However, the complexity of minority issues goes beyond boundary lines. The history of Israel is different from that of other nations in the region. Israel is the homeland of the ancients Jews and the only place that they can truly call home.

The nationalism of Israel in 1948 created a long-awaited Jewish Nation-state (Homami, p. 1). They wanted a place where they were the majority rather than a minority in a Muslim world. Like any other minority in the Middle East, they wanted their own place and community. The establishment of Israel gave the Jewish sector political power, but dynamics of the Middle East means that others will feel oppressed when another gains power. The formation of Israel meant that the Jewish minority had gained power, a concept that is inconceivable among the Sunni majority that rules the rest of the region.

In conclusion, those that oppose democratization do so…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Farques, P. "Demographic Islamization: Non-Muslims in Muslim countries." SAIS

Review, vol.21, no.2, Summer-Fall 2001.

Ibrahim, Saad.Sects, Ethnicity, and Minority Groups in the Arab World. Cairo: Ibn

Khaldoun Center, 1994.
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Third World Development What Are the Growing

Words: 4296 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75221729

Third World Development

What are the growing problems of ethnic tensions and violence in the developing world?

It is impossible to state all of the growing problems of ethnic tension and violence in the developing world, because old tensions are constantly being revived. Because most instances of ethnic tension do not lead to large-scale violence, when violence does erupt, it can be a surprise, even to seasoned observers. Of course, it is not always a surprise. Currently, Africa is the area most plagued by ethnic tension and resultant violence. Africa's conflict death tolls far surpass those on other continents, despite the minimization of violence in Africa (Shah, 2010). Moreover, Africa has a huge number of refugees and internally displaced people (Shah, 2010). The legacy of colonialism and the artificial boundaries it established among different ethnic groups make Africa ripe for growing ethnic tension (Shah, 2010). Moreover, the fact that many…… [Read More]

References

The African Center for Women. (2002). The African gender and development index and the African women's report 2002/2003. Retrieved from http://www.uneca.org/eca_programmes/acgd/cwd/en_meeting3/en_agdi.htm

Bage, L. (2001, May 15). The challenge of ending rural poverty. Retrieved July 10, 2011, from the International Fund for Agricultural Development website: http://www.ifad.org/events/op/ldc_e.htm

Cartwright, P., Delorme, C., and Wood, N. (1985). The by-product theory of revolution: Some empiral evidence. Public Choice, 46(3), 265-274.

Conan, N. (2011, February 7). The elements of a successful revolution. Retrieved July 11,
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Accounting America Was Not Founded as a

Words: 1876 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7176595

Accounting

America was not founded as a Democracy or as a Monarchy, for the educated and landed founding fathers felt assured that neither would provide the nation with rights for all and privilege for the few. America was founded as a Republic, and one might add as an ogliarchic republic at that. Those with the right gender, race, and wealth were represented through their while others were represented through the votes of their betters. Today, nearly-universal sufferage (age and past misbehavior are both barriers) assures that these factors do not determine whether a person can vote -- but an argument can still be made that the majority of the political process is determined by wealth. "The creators of America's constitution and government were among the wealthy aristocrats of their day. When they created their new government, the founders excluded democracy to the extent politically possible at the time. ..The great…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bernstein, A. (1998) "Republican and Democratic -- The Identical Party? The Two Major Parties Are Becoming Dangerously Alike -- in Their Opposition to Individual Rights." Capitalism Magazine, Nov. 6. http://www.capmag.com/article.asp?ID=2020

Gitlin, T. (2000) "The Renaissance of anti-intellectualism." The Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 8. Archived at: http://chronicle.com/free/v47/i15/15b00701.htm

Grinning Planet. (2004) "INJECTING A SHOT OF REBEL YELL INTO OLD GLORY"  http://www.grinningplanet.com/2004/11-11/direct-democracy-plutocracy-article.htm 

Morgan, D. (2000) "Mercenaries For Big Business: Corporate Funding of Think Tanks Raises Question of Credibility" San Francisco Chronicle, Feb 16. Archived at: http://www.commondreams.org/views/021600-102.htm
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Pluralist's View of Salvation

Words: 4023 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43654088

Jesus the Only Savior?

Part I Pluralism

It must first be noted that the author, Ronald H. Nash, was a Calvinist/aptist philosopher and apologist and a professor on theology and history for more than four decades. He earned many more honors and occupied more positions than will open him to questioning as to his vast knowledge of the theological discipline.

His book introduces the philosophies surrounding salvation, i.e., exclusivism, inclusivism and pluralism. The first Part of the book discusses pluralism, which argues that all religions offer all men a way to salvation. Nash replies most adequately to the repudiation of pluralism, as presented by John Hicks, its most influential proponent, and inclusivism. Pluralists, like Hicks, and inclusivists wage ferocious attacks against the long-held iblical doctrine of Christianity that Jesus Christ is the only way to salvation, as explicitly stated in John 14:6. Pluralism holds that there are many paths to…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Boston Collaborative Encyclopedia of Western Theology, 2008

Nash, Ronald H. Is Jesus the Only Savior? Paperback. Michigan: Zondervan Publishing

House, 1994

Nash, Ronald H. Is Jesus the Only Savior? Kindle Edition. Amazon Digital Services,
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Political Science - Domhoff Shapiro

Words: 2546 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21981158

Putnam (2000) suggests that trust already exists within societies, when clearly there is evidence that it does not exist, and that people are not confident in who is in control (Domhoff, 2005). Putnam (2000) argues that it is important to have a strong and very active and aggressive civil society within the United States to consolidate democracy. Many of the traditions of independent civic engagement have been lost according to Putnam, and are now replaced with passivity among the peoples of the United States; far too often civic engagements rely on the "state" making civil societies as described by Putnam (2000) weak and incapable of developing. Putnam's idea of social capital is the view that social capital is a resource that is ingrained in norms and in social trusts, and it is these norms and trusts that help facilitate collaborative actions and help communities cooperate so they can achieve mutual…… [Read More]

References

Dahl, Robert Who Governs? 2005. Democracy and Power in an American City, Second edition. Boston: Yale University Press

Domhoff, William G. 2005. Who Rules America? Power, Politics and Social Change.

New York: McGraw Hill: Higher education

Putnam, Robert D. 2000. Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American
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Viet Nam War and Its Comparison to

Words: 3472 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89847448

Viet Nam War and its comparison to several social theories. Using the war as a measuring stick theories are examined and held against the war to see how the war could be applied to each theory. The writer explains a short history of each theory and then examines how the war holds up using that particular theory.

The Viet Nam War was arguably the most controversial war that America has ever been involved in. It sparked social movements that had never before been seen. It pitted the young against the old, the conservative against the liberal and the rich against the poor in ways that threatened to tear the nation in pieces. Until Viet Nam, service personnel had been considered heroes, worthy of the nation's admiration. During the Viet Nam war those who served often came home to being spit on, and having things thrown at time. Until Viet Nam…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Rational Choice and Deterrence Theory

Sociology of Deviant Behavior

http://www.umsl.edu/~rkeel/200/ratchoc.html

The Theory of Hegemonic Stability
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Educational Philosophy and the Nature

Words: 5286 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25649946

Here the emphasis is on complete neutrality, the child being exposed to all different ways of thinking and believing (Cahn, p. 421). In the end the child will make his own choice as to what is best. Such complete freedom; however, rests upon a notion that children might indeed make incorrect choices; ones that are base don incomplete knowledge of the real world. The need to make rational choice requires that some limitations be placed on children's own personal developmental choices and possibilities (Cahn, p. 423). The author's own notion of the Democratic State is largely derived from this last concept. Education must be divided between a concept of absolute individual choice and societal necessity. Societal necessity demands that children be allowed enough choice for free and individualized expression, while at the same time being prohibited from choosing lifestyles that take as their express point-of-view the idea that they are…… [Read More]

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Environmental Policies Give an Example

Words: 7072 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3648279

The 1980s (the period when onald eagan was the U.S. President) witnessed a series of government measures targeting environmental regulations. This resulted in public outrage against the anti-environmental policies of the government leading to a renewed interest in nature clubs and groups and the formation of radical groups who led strong movements to protect the environment. (vii) the post- eagan resurgence (1990s onwards) - President Bush and President Clinton did not take the radical stance of their predecessor. However, President George W. Bush has taken many measures which have weakened the environmental movement instead of strengthening it. This includes opposing curbs on greenhouse emissions via the Kyoto Protocol, supporting oil drilling in the ANW or Arctic National Wildlife ange, weakening clean air standards and lifting the ban on logging in forests.

3) How does economics determine the public's opinion regarding environmental issues? Discuss the values of the dominant social paradigm…… [Read More]

References

Bocking, Stephen. Nature's Experts: Science, Politics, and the Environment. Rutgers University Press. 2004.

Palmer, Mike. Pathways of Nutrients in the Ecosystem - Pathways of elements in ecosystem. http://www.okstate.edu/artsci/botany/bisc3034/lnotes/nutrient.htm

Redclift, M. R; Woodgate, Graham. The International Handbook of Environmental Sociology. Edward Elgar Publishing, 2000.

Schmidtz, David; Willott, Elizabeth. Environmental Ethics: What Really Matters, what Really Works. Oxford University Press U.S., 2002.
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Improving Group Productivity the National Call Center

Words: 2831 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83976034

Improving Group Productivity

The National Call Center for the Veteran's Administration (VA) Education Department employs over 700 people, which can be called upon to answer incoming calls from veterans. Within the four regional offices, there are employees of various positions, including Case Managers, Educational Liaison Representatives, application processors, and leaders who verify compliance, productivity, etc. With all employees being called upon to answer incoming calls, each employee needs to be aware of changes on an immediate basis, which can incorporate over 50 changes on a given day. As a result of work demands on all employees in different roles of the organizational structure, adequate training programs are of extreme importance in ensuring employees are properly trained, contain clear definitions of expectations in the various roles, and support teamwork within the groups to provide for efficiency in operations as well as performance goals and objectives.

A key component to the process…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anthony, L. (2013). How do I Improve Team Communication? Retrieved from Chron:  http://smallbusiness.chron.com/improve-team-communication-3077.html 

Archibald, R.D. (2013). nlocking a Project Team's High-Performance Potential Using Cognitive Readliness: A Research Study Report and Call to Action. PM World Journal, vol 11, issue XI, 1-46 Retrieved from http:/;/pmworldjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/pmwj16-nov...unlocking-high-performance-FeaturedPaper.pdf.

Fisher, R. (2005). Intergroup Conflict. Retrieved from Colorado University: http://www.colorado.edu/conflict/peace/example/fishint.htm

GI Bill. (2013, Nov 22). Retrieved from U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: http://gibill.va.gov
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Fat of Our Souls the

Words: 1679 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32880599

As a final chapter, this is a good culmination of the supporting points the author uses throughout her work.

In every book chapter, the author provides compelling evidence for the various ways in which medicine is used to accomplish not only physical health goals, but also economic and social ones. Each individual uses the medical direction he or she deems to be most appropriate to his or her specific social and economic concerns. At the start of the book, for example, the Western doctor and his medicine were used to get closer to the Methodist church leader and potential membership in this church. Although I do feel the book makes its point well, I do not believe that medical systems really merits their status as primary vehicle towards secondary goals. Instead, there is an entire networks of primary and secondary resources to accomplish both. I feel the book could have…… [Read More]

References

Crandon-Malamud, L. (1991). From the Fat of Our Souls: Social change, Political Process, and Medical Pluralism in Bolivia. The Regents of the University of California.
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Interest Groups it Is Easy

Words: 1556 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21757243

During the last week of the Convention the delegates added a few refinements, raised some serious concerns, and discussed what they agreed to over the four months of deliberations. Mason expressed the wish that "the plan had been prefaced by a Bill of Rights." Elbridge Gerry supported Mason's unsuccessful attempt to attach a Bill of Rights. Randolph joined Mason and Gerry and declared that he too wouldn't sign the Constitution. And the delegates wondered whether or not the power to create a national university was implied within the meaning of the necessary and proper clause. Rising Sun Chair" Constitutional Convention). With that, the term "American" has no racial insinuations for virtually all Americans trace their roots from distinct nationalities, races and ethnic groups and this complication alone can cause innumerable perplexed things. But because of the fact that America had evolved into its present status, all sorts of studies need…… [Read More]

(2003). "Popular Sovereignty."  http://www.basiclaw.net/Principles/Popular%20sovereignty.htm . (Accessed April 15, 2010).

Lloyd, Gordon. "Constitutional Convention." http://teachingamericanhistory.org/convention/intro.html. (Accessed April 15, 2010).

Lind, Michael. 2004. "Are We still a middle-class nation" http://www.newamerica.net/publications/articles/2004/are_we_still_a_middle_class_nation (Accessed April 15, 2010).
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Nurse Theorist the Roy Adaption Model

Words: 3386 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64933693

Nursing Theorist: Sr. oy Adaptation Model

The oy Adaptation model for Nursing had its beginning when Sister Callista oy happened to get admitted in the Masters Program of pediatric nursing in the University of California, Los Angeles, in the year 1964. At that time, Sr. Callista was familiar with the idea of 'adaptation' in nursing, and it must be mentioned that Sr. Callista's adviser at that time was Dorothy E. Johnson, who believed firmly in the need to define nursing as a means of focusing the development of knowledge, for the practice of nursing. When Sr. Callista oy started working with children in the pediatric ward of the hospital, she was quite impressed with the basic resiliency of the small children who had been admitted into the wards for treatment. This was why when the first seminar in pediatric nursing was called for; Sr. Callista oy proposed that the basic…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

"Callista Roy's Adaptation Model" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/callistaroy Accessed 28 October, 2005

'Case Study" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/casestudy.html Accessed 28 October, 2005
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Personhood an Interdisciplinary Look at the Individual

Words: 5434 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24383626

person within the Christian worldview. Specifically it will discuss technology, the environment, and the media as it relates to my personal Christian worldview. As noted in this course, understanding a worldview can help a person understand other people and all their roles in today's society. Today's culture is broad, and influenced by a variety of sources, from scientific to religious, and they combine to create a contemporary Christian worldview in others and myself. Personally, my worldview is one of balance between my Christian beliefs and scientific study and analysis, which may be fairly common for a modern Christian worldview.

First, it is necessary to define worldview and what it is. A worldview encompasses every aspect of life, so understanding it is crucial in decision-making and living life to the fullest. It is really a wide-ranging perception of the world around us, formed using a Christian viewpoint. In other words, it…… [Read More]

References

Editors. (2009). About us. Retrieved 22 June 2009 from the Evangelical Climate Initiative Web site: http://christiansandclimate.org/about/.

Gibson, T.S. (2004). Proposed levels of Christian spiritual maturity. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 32(4), 295+.

Holy Bible. New King James Version.

Schmeltekopf, D.D. & Vitanza, D.M. (Eds.). (2006). The future of Baptist higher education. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press.
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Elaine Graham's Transforming Practice Pastoral Theology in an Age of Uncertainty

Words: 4411 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75473831

Elaine Graham's

Transforming Practice: Pastoral Theology in an Age of Uncertainty

Major Schools of Thought and Actors

In Transforming Practice: Pastoral Theology in an Age of Uncertainty, Elaine L. Graham addresses Traditional, Postmodern, Empirical, Liberation and Feminist perspectives on Theology and ultimately on Pastoral Theology. In order to address these perspectives, Graham traces the historical development of each, current theological realities, and prospective "horizons." The result is an extensive review of the Pastoral Theolog (y)(ies) of the Church and its faith communit (y)(ies), viewed very strongly through the feminist pastoral perspective.

As presented by Graham, the Traditional perspective is built on Scripture that is rife with patriarchy and an overarching patriarchal hierarchy. hile providing conventionally binding values and norms, the Traditional perspective is decidedly male-centered: traditionally-based pastoral theology tended to focus on the traits of a good male pastor and was essentially restricted to the pastoral ministry of ordained males.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Graham, Elaine L. Transforming Practice: Pastoral Theology in an Age of Uncertainty. London: Mowbray, 1996.
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biculturalism and how to create multiple Identities

Words: 2014 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53421669

A number of studies have been done in recent years to explore the unique effects of a bicultural identity, how a bicultural identity is formed, and what forms a bicultural identity will take. Research integrates assimilation theories as well as social constructionism. The reasons for the emerging literature include improving psychological health and well-being, improving social and cultural health, and also reducing or eliminating racism and negative stereotyping. Elashi, Mills & Grant (2009) point out "83% of Muslim individuals reported an increase in implicit racism and discrimination following September 11th," making the Muslim-American cultural, ethnic, and religious cohort one of the most important populations in America to understand through sociological data (Elashi, Mills & Grant, 2009, p. 379). Discrimination may be related to the dominant or white culture's fear of non-integration of existing or new immigrants and perceived threats to an imaginary cohesiveness of the dominant culture -- something that…… [Read More]