Disabilities Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Work Disability in Small Firms Work Disability

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18592987

Work Disability in Small Firms

Work Disability Thesis Proposal

Is There a Problem? What is the Contribution?

ivermore, Whalen, Prenovitz, Aggarwal and Bardos (2011) explain how the connection between disability, work productivity and income benefits the whole society by reducing reliance on tax-funded support programs (p. 1). All of us have an interest in ensuring the most productivity from all workers, if stable employment for workers with disabilities frees up resources for other public or private endeavors, and turning tax consumers into tax payers will help reduce the burden for those who now pay. Given public perceptions of funding constraints and increased challenges to public services posed by an aging population majority, ensuring stable employment for everyone especially workers with disability grows more rather than less urgent over time. Even at current levels, ivermore et al. (2011) assert, "it is especially important for policymakers to have access to a wide…… [Read More]

Limitations

A major confound undermining many survey-based research claims is selection bias, where researchers impute generalizations from convenience samples without ensuring truly random selection. This study will sidestep that issue simply by avoiding claims of incidence, because copious such data already exist in general as Markesich (2008) and Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (2011) demonstrate, even if those data do not speak to workers' productivity and satisfaction in precisely the category of interest between large and small firms and disability compared to workers without. Avoiding claims of prevalence will enhance focus on qualitative inquiry as to satisfaction and productivity given the qualification that those responses indicate perceptions or intent, like perceived job fit or intent to quit or search for different employment. Claims couched in terms of perception and ex-ante intent rather than as ex-post quantitative events, will avoid the type of subjectivity Hotchkiss (2002) e.g. finds underlying much of the research on incidence or causality.

Likewise reporting perceptions of ability, performance and satisfaction seeks to avoid confounding subjectivity of language but also of disclosure, because counting disability as only those conditions with medical documentation or real accommodation in the workplace, would omit workers with invisible disability they may have declined to report. That official definitions restricted by documentation and disclosure understate incidence of disability in the workplace is not only logically coherent, but becoming more recognized as a growing body of research demonstrates (e.g. Hotchkiss, 2002, pp. 8-13, or Kukla & Bond, 2012, p. 14). Kruse and Schur (2003), for example, raise plausible doubt about comparing statistics as definitions
View Full Essay

Work Disability in Small Firms Chapter II

Words: 3770 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26039394

Work Disability in Small Firms Chapter II

Work disabled ChII Lit Review

Review of Literature Demonstrates Information Gap and Identifies Methods

This chapter justifies the problem statement and research questions, and locates the results among existing research. Copious data and analysis describes pronounced unemployment for potential workers with disabilities and lower income where workers with disabilities are employed, compared to the general U.S. workforce, extensive policy intervention notwithstanding. Fewer studies focus on workers or potential workers with disabilities in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia metropolitan statistical area, and even at the national level, very few juried reports describe productivity and job satisfaction for workers with disabilities in firms smaller than fifteen employees. Firms with fewer than fifteen employees are exempt from compliance with Title I of the ADA, but stimulating employment for workers with disabilities in these firms may improve economic self-sufficiency for this historically disadvantaged population. Conversely, if productivity and…… [Read More]

Policy disincentives probably affect productivity, satisfaction and employment.

Where consensus agrees is around a strong disincentive to work if medical costs covered by Medicaid exceed the level of income qualifying them for SSDI reimbursement. As numerous experts, administrators and disability employment program consumers testified to the 111th U.S. Congress in 2009 (U.S. Congress, 2011), once an individual earns more than a threshold that qualifies them for Medicaid coverage, they have to pay their medical costs out of pocket, and if those costs are more than the new earnings plus the SSDI transfer income, then the result is negative earnings plus often considerable effort and expense getting to work along with the labor of work itself. The result, not surprisingly, is often that potential workers with disability live off $674 per month income support in order not to lose Medicaid eligibility by earning more than qualifies them for federal health care coverage, i.e. $940 in one month (C. Bates-Harris, qtd. In U.S. Congress, 2011, p. 23-25), if total earnings become less or negative covering medical costs out of pocket, especially given exclusion from insurance for the pre-existing condition that justified Medicaid coverage in the first place before the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). PPACA made such exclusion illegal, but the results are still too new for empirical analysis as yet. The perverse incentive generated by high-enough out-of-pocket medical costs meant that a potential worker with disability had to go from earning little enough to qualify for Medicaid, to enough that they could cover those costs out of pocket and also the foregone monthly income transfer. This might often mean many thousands of dollars per year or month if disability required ongoing medical attention, a situation experts often call the "Cash Cliff" (Tremblay, Porter, Smith and Weathers, 2011, p. 19) due to the abrupt income threshold.

Extensive testimony to Congress (2011) described problems within SSDI programs themselves. Income verification requirements where employment was successfully accomplished, for example, resulted in overpayment and then reversal of awarded transfers that left workers with obligations to reimburse SSDI for in one case $115,000 where a worker with psychiatric disability had benefits retroactively revoked for the prior six years, for "sporadically, very occasionally exceeding the substantial gainful activity level by small amounts, due to his disability, and there is no dispute that he reported his work attempts" (Landry, Anderson, Lacava and Bronstein, qtd. In 111th Congress, 2011, p. 88). Another was overpaid $60,000; another over $56,000; none of these individuals have worked since, which their program administrators attributed to their
View Full Essay

True Disability There Has Been

Words: 1532 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81497618

The question is not whether the students are truly disabled but rather what constitutes a child who is a low achiever? Is there something in the pedagogy, the methodology or the manner of instruction that fails to tap into what the child is good at and expounds on that to improve learning? For those students who are non-native English speakers, is that a problem of the student or the teacher who may not be bi-lingual or impatient in his or her instruction? As suggested by Kaufman, Hallahan, ills and others, it is incumbent upon the educational system to determine a universal way to classify students as learning disabled and stop school systems from using it as a catch all for the students they find difficult to instruct.

orks Cited

Fuchs, D., & Fuchs, L. (2006). Introduction to response to intervention: what, why, and how valid is it? Reading Research Quarterly.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fuchs, D., & Fuchs, L. (2006). Introduction to response to intervention: what, why, and how valid is it? Reading Research Quarterly.

Gresham, F., MacMillan, D., & Bocian, K. (1996). Learning disabilities, low

Achievement and mild mental retardation: more alike than different? Journal of Learning Disabilities, 29, 570-581.

Hale, J., Naglieri, J., Kaufman, a., & Kavate, K (2004). Specific learning disability
View Full Essay

Intellectual Disability and Speech Impairment

Words: 747 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61059194

Intellectual Disability and Speech Impairment esources in Duval County, Florida

Today, the State of Florida is tasked with providing high quality educational services to a broad range of students with differing abilities and disabilities. To determine the current state of their educational programming, this paper provides a review of the relevant literature and Florida Department of Education's Web site concerning intellectual disabilities and speech impairments, including a full description of the disability, possible causes, possible treatments, and the teacher accommodations that are provided. Finally, a summary of the research and important findings concerning the provision of educational services to students with intellectual disabilities and speech impairments is provided in the conclusion.

eview and Analysis

Intellectual Disability

Full description of the disability. The definition provided by the State of Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) states that this condition "is defined as significantly below average general intellectual and adaptive functioning manifested during…… [Read More]

References

Intellectual disabilities. (2013). State of Florida Department of Education. Retrieved from http://www.fldoe.org/ese/ind.asp.

Morin, D., Cobigo, V., Rivard, M,. & Lepine, M. (2010, August). Intellectual disabilities and depression: How to adapt psychological assessment and intervention. Canadian Psychology, 51(3), 185-192.

Speech impairments. (2013). State of Florida Department of Education. Retrieved from http://www.fldoe.org/ese/si.asp.

Tatham, M. & Morton, K. (2011). A guide to speech production and perception. Edinburgh:
View Full Essay

Attitude Toward Disability

Words: 739 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84926722

disabilities as 'deficits.' Even though I did not harbor prejudices against the disabled or regard people who had disabilities as 'inferior,' I viewed disabilities as challenges that had to be overcome. This class has helped me see persons with disabilities as people with particular conditions or differences, not as people defined by a singular characteristic. Everyone has personal deficits and strengths, but needing 'talking books' to read a book does not make a blind or dyslexic person defined by their condition any more than someone who needs glasses to see the same text. Defining persons with disabilities as people 'with' specific conditions, such as saying that Johnny is a child 'with ADHD' rather than a 'hyperactive kid,' much as you would say someone is 'a person who wears glasses' rather than a 'glasses-wearing friend' has been helpful in changing my mindset.

Before I took this course, I also had a…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Women Disability Sexuality and the

Words: 5037 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85099237

Stocker, deaf since birth, admittedly attempted to compensate for her disability, her imperfection, through the relentless pursuit of achieving perfection physically and athletically, and even when she excelled, Stocker confesses, for a long time she remained emotionally tortured by disability for which no amount of body shaping or athletic skill in sports could change that disability (2001, p. 154). Stocker's struggle with her self-image, her identity and hers sexuality were in large part shaped by her disability.

While it is not an attempt here to disparage Stocker, or to belittle the significance of her disability; Stocker is a woman who suffered her hearing impairment from birth. Stocker suffered emotionally as a result of her disability, struggled with it for most of her life in the ways in which it impacted her self-esteem, self-image, and sexuality. So, might not a woman who acquired a disability at that point her life when…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108011400

Barker-Benfield, G.J. (2000). The Horrors of the Half-Known Life: Male Attitudes toward Women and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century America. New York: Routledge. Retrieved February 2, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108011402 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000224494

Bellerose, S.B., & Binik, Y.M. (1993). Body Image and Sexuality in Oophorectomized Women. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 22(5), 435+. Retrieved February 2, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000224494

DeFries, Z., Friedman, R.C., & Corn, R. (Eds.). (1985). Sexuality: New Perspectives. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. Retrieved February 2, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=51035002 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105657669
View Full Essay

Connecting Theory and Meaning of Disability Studies in Schools

Words: 3635 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60588925

Connecting Theory and Meaning of Disability Studies in Schools

The connecting theory application in the system of basic education has contributed to the development and establishment of a trans-disciplinary scientific strategized framework. This framework bases on the specified reverence for a considerable orientation in long-term and the engagement of decision makers in the education system on its application. The connecting theory involves work that cuts across education disciplines. This is with the aim of exposing the aspects perceived to be of outdated assumptions in the education system. This happens with their respective enrichment in the technological and social practice. The theory constitutes well-strategized research with knowledge meant for informing a scientific framework designated. This is to enable direct transformation towards the education system future with worldview fit (Fenton-Smith, & Stillwell, 2011).

The concrete developed strategic objectives aim at addressing the advancements with accuracy in understanding the aspect of science. This…… [Read More]

References

Albrecht, G.L. (2003). Handbook of disability studies. Thousand Oaks, Calif. [u.a.: Sage.

Dan Goodley & Michele Moore. (2010). Doing Disability Research: Activist lives and the academy. Retrieved from: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/cdso20

Danforth, S. (2006). Vital questions facing disability studies in education. New York: Lang.

Fenton-Smith, B., & Stillwell, C. (2011). Reading Discussion Groups for Teachers:
View Full Essay

Healthcare Reflections on Disability What

Words: 1237 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67301864

What works for one patient may not work for the next. If everyone is treated according to the way that everyone else has always been treated then it may be that no one ever gets any better.

Every child should be treated so that they have the opportunity to have the best life possible. I definitely think that it would be unethical to not treat a child who I believe could minimize the consequences of a disabling condition. Every child deserves the chance to have the best life possible and if a medical professional has the ability to make sure that this happens then they should be bound to do just that. What constitutes a successful intervention for one child may not be viewed as being successful for the next, but they will find something that is successful for them. Every child has potential and it is up to the…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Temporary Disability

Words: 976 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44988056

Temporary Disability Law

What laws apply to temporary disability at the workplace?

Temporary Disability Insurance (TDI) programs are designed to provide wage replacement for non-work-connected sickness or injury. The TDI program complements the UI program by providing benefits to individuals who do not meet the UI program's "able" to work requirement. Although Federal law does not provide for a Federal-State TDI system, the SSA and the FUTA both authorize the withdrawal of employee contributions from a State's unemployment fund for the payment of TDI. (Temporary Disability Insurance, n.d..)

Another law providing for temporarily disabled workers injured on the job is Workers' Compensation. Workers' Compensation laws are designed to ensure that employees who are injured or disabled on the job are provided with fixed monetary awards, eliminating the need for litigation. These laws also provide benefits for dependents of those workers who are killed because of work-related accidents or illnesses. Some…… [Read More]

References

Workers compensation: an overview. Retrieved from:

'Temporary Disability Insurance" Retrieved August 10, 2005 from
View Full Essay

Personal Perspectives on Living With a Disability

Words: 1156 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20166351

Personal Perspectives on Living With a Disability

The objective of this work is to examine a work in writing that provides a first-hand perspective on the psychosocial issues involved with living with a disability of a disabling illness. personal perspectives on living with a disability. Questions addressed in this study include those as follows: (1) what type of disability or disabling illness did the person have? (2) provide a description of how this disability/illness affects the individual's perceptions of his/her identity? (3) What forms of prejudice or discrimination did he/she encounter from others? How did he/she cope with it? And (4) What did you learn from this individual's account of his/her experience that would help you as a therapist in working with another individual who has a similar illness or disability?

Type of Disability or Illness

Anthony Galvez relates that in September 2005 he was diagnosed with a "non-malignant brain…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Galvez, Anthony (2010) Reversal: When a Therapist Becomes a Patient. Health and Fitness. Google Books. Retrieved from: http://books.google.com/books?id=3E1hch-CMDcC&dq=Reversal:+When+a+Therapist+Becomes+a+Patient+by+Eric+Anthony+Galvez+(PT+with+brain+tumor)&source=gbs_navlinks_s
View Full Essay

Americans With Disability Act Issues

Words: 831 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13717667

pecifically, the ADA recognizes disability that results from physical or psychological disabilities that have detrimental effects on any part of life that is considered a "major life activity." Generally, those activities are those that are, ordinarily, "basic components" of a person's life. Typical examples of "basic components" of a "major life activity" would be seeing, hearing, walking, communicating, and learning.

Title I also prohibits any form of discrimination in hiring and promotions against the disabled. American with Disabilities Act Title II requires all state and local governments and municipalities to make "reasonable accommodations" to enable the disabled fair access to their buildings and facilities, and to the equipment of their public transportation systems. American with Disabilities Act Title III establishes similar obligations on private businesses and on most other commercial facilities that are generally open to the public.

Relevance to the Modern Workplace and Health Information Management

In the modern…… [Read More]

Sources Consulted

Edwards, G.C., Wallenberg, M.P., and Lineberry, R.B. (2009). Government in America: People, Politics, and Policy. New York: Longman.

Goldfield, D., Abbot, C., Argersinger, J., and Argersinger, P. (2005). Twentieth-Century

America: A Social and Political History. New Jersey: Pearson.
View Full Essay

American With Disability Act American

Words: 1103 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95492817

The Act is not adaptable, it is not distinct in nature and it is costly to implement (eynolds, 1995). These factors have allowed the public to disregard the members of the society that were supposed to be protected by the Law. It has been difficult to distinguish the groups that are protected by the Act, to ensure the Act is understood and applicable, the Act should be refined, reworded and simplified to ensure that it is easily understood and adapted (Lande, 1998).

Employers have in a greater way been able to deny disabled people employment although the disabled person may be in a position to perform most of the responsibilities; they are not given the opportunity to prove their ability to perform. The employer refuses to hire the person not on the basis of inability to perform but because they are physically disabled (Shaw, 2008). Whenever an employee is terminated…… [Read More]

References

Shaw, K. (2008). The Disability Rights Movement -- The ADA Today. Academic Search Premier 4(2), 20-25.

Meneghello, R., & Russon, H. (2008). Creating a Movement: The First 18 Years of the ADA. Academic Search Premier. 4, 21-25.

Hermes, J. (2008). Attempt to Broaden Disabilities Act Concerns Some College Officials. Chronicle of Higher Education. 40, A23-A23

Lande, R. (1998). Disability law: Problems and proposals. Southern Medical Journal, 6, 518.
View Full Essay

American Disability Act and Affirmative Action Act

Words: 760 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43687741

American Disability Act and Affirmative Action Act

Critique of Modern Civil ights Acts

The quest to ensure that every American's civil rights are guaranteed is still being waged today. New populations of disadvantaged are continuing to be guaranteed by modern legislation the same every day benefits the majority of the population often takes for granted. Acts like the American Disability Act and the Affirmative Action Act are continuing to provide for the American people to ensure that everyone gets the same benefits and rights; although some of these acts have been more successful than others.

The American Disability Act was a monumental piece of legislation aimed at helping protect the rights of vulnerable populations. For generations, there was little vocational protection for the disabled in the work environment. This often led to wrongful termination and even a complete lack of hiring people with disabilities. In 1990, the president Bush passed…… [Read More]

References

Dale, Charles V. (2005). Federal affirmative action law: A brief history. CRS Report for Congress. Web.  http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/crs/rs22256.pdf 

U.S. Equal Opportunity Employment Opportunity Commission. (2008). Facts about the American Disability Act. Web.  http://www.eeoc.gov/facts/fs-ada.html
View Full Essay

Solutions to Help Students With Disability

Words: 1652 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60632344

JAMES' CASE STUDY

Case Study on James in IDEA

Case Study on James in IDEA

James is a six years old boy living with his parents in first grade. With his intellectual disability, he has been placed under special education classroom having 15 other students. James has some challenges related to learning due to the poor memory and delays in language development. One of the strengths that James has is that he is confident in school and is not easily frustrated. He can communicate effectively with adults but socializing with his peers is a challenge. One of the major challenges that he faces is the fact that he has low achievement in most of the academic areas. These include reading comprehension, mathematics, and written expressions. His interests are in sports, games although he is challenged by isolation from his peers. He has faced delays in cognitive, social and adaptive behavior…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Hear the Word 'Disability' Is Someone in

Words: 527 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98946216

hear the word 'disability' is someone in a wheelchair or someone whose mobility is otherwise restricted because of his or her physical condition. Upon further reflection, I would also consider someone who is blind or hard of hearing to be 'disabled.' Of course, not all disabilities are visible to the naked eye. For example, someone who is epileptic can be said to have a disability, even though when he or she is not having a seizure he or she seems normal. People who are autistic, particularly those who are high-functioning, might not seem to be disabled at all, until intimate relationships develop with the person and their social deficits become evident.

Of course, the term 'disability' is itself problematic, given that it has been taken to mean 'inferior' rather than simply 'different from most abled persons.' Everyone has a disability in some shape or fashion, even though not everyone has…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Student With Intellectual Disability

Words: 967 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55372902

IEP

Student With Intellectual Disability

Goals and IEPs: Aiden

One of the critical components of any IEP is 'goal setting.' Goals are determined for each individual student and a specific instructional plan is designed to meet those goals. Goals are usually set annually but each annual goal has a series of short-term goals designed to facilitate reaching that objective. In the case of 'Aiden,' for example, a student identified as having ADHD, the first major goal was for the student to pass all of his classes. Despite testing with a near-normal IQ, Aiden struggled with paying attention in class and often acted as a distraction to other students. His grades did not reflect his abilities because of his difficulty in focusing. Short-term goals designed to achieve this long-term objective including turning homework assignments in on time, getting a C. Or above on all in-class tests and quizzes, and making a…… [Read More]

References

Helping the student with ADHD in the classroom: Strategies for teachers. (1998). LD Online.

Retrieved:  http://www.ldonline.org/article/5911/ 

Sample IEP goals. (n.d.). netreach. Retrieved:

 http://www.netreach.net/~bhohlfeld/thohlfeld/study_skills/iepgoal.html
View Full Essay

Child With Disability

Words: 2379 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41179199

fifth of all Americans have some type of disability (United States Census Bureau, 2000).

Alarming? Yes, however, disabilities do not discriminate and people of all ages, race, and socioeconomic backgrounds can be affected or have a family member who has a disability. Disabilities in children may include, but are not limited to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Asperger's Disorder, Autism, Central Auditory Processing Disorder, Dyscalculia, Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Dysprazia, Learning Disabilities, and Nonverbal Learning Disability. While these are only a few of the ever-growing list of disabilities discovered in children, the list continues to grow as additional research is conducted to identify more disabilities in children. This paper will discuss the issues, concepts, and findings of recent literature on the important issue of children with disabilities. It will also include information on how a disabled child and the parents search for help and resources with an emphasis being on treatment and educational…… [Read More]

References

Administration for Children and Families. (2004). Head Start Bureau.

Accessed March 30, 2004, from, http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/hsb/index.htm

American Dietetic Association. (2004). Position of the American Dietetic Association: providing nutrition services for infants, children, and adults with developmental disabilities and special health care needs. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 104 (1) 97-108.

Bayerl, C., Ries J., Bettencourt M., & Fisher P. (1993). Nutrition issues of children in early intervention programs: primary care team approach. Semin Pediatric Gastroenterol Nutrition 4:11-15.
View Full Essay

Child With Disability

Words: 1710 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59146135

Inclusion of a Child With Disabilities

Child With Disability

Inclusion of a child with disabilities into a general education class

Inclusion is a right that should be provided to all children. Parents fight for access to quality education to their children even though they have disabilities. This fight has contributed to the provision of equal access to quality education opportunities and equal opportunities oach & Elliott, 2006.

The passage of the PL 94-142 lessened the fight that parents had to fight for general education. PL 94-142 made a call for education of those children who have special needs in an LE (least restrictive environment) Terman, Larner, Stevenson, & Behrman, 1996.

What constitutes the LE has led to a huge debate on how to best include those children who have disabilities into the regular education system.

Additionally, the amendments that were made to IDEA of 1996 put further emphasis on inclusion…… [Read More]

References

Berry, R.A.W. (2006). Inclusion, Power, and Community: Teachers and Students Interpret the Language of Community in an Inclusion Classroom. American Educational Research Journal, 43(3), 489-529.

Cawthon, S.W. (2007). Hidden Benefits and Unintended Consequences of 'No Child Left Behind' Policies for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. American Educational Research Journal, 44(3), 460-492.

Conyers, L.M., Reynolds, A.J., & Ou, S.-R. (2003). The Effect of Early Childhood Intervention and Subsequent Special Education Services: Findings from the Chicago Child-Parent Centers. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 25(1), 75-95.

Cook, B.G. (2004). Inclusive Teachers' Attitudes toward Their Students with Disabilities: A Replication and Extension. The Elementary School Journal, 104(4), 307-320.
View Full Essay

The Dangers of Misdiagnosing Learning Disability

Words: 2643 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57933959

Educational Diagnosis

The ethical dilemma of diagnosing a learner with a disability when there are other alternatives for support

esnik (2011) defines ethics as "norms for conduct that distinguish between acceptable and unacceptable behavior." As in research, participants have data source rights, so too in teaching/education do students, parents/guardians, teachers and staff have legal rights that should be observed and respected in the course of ethical adherence. These rights include all Constitutional rights, as Bonauto (2008) points out. Thus, students have the right to attend school in safety, without facing harassment or discrimination, and have the right to equal access under the Equal Access Act, which is a further identification of the student's right of protection against discrimination. Teachers also possess the right of non-discrimination and enjoy the right to free speech. Teachers also have something called "academic freedom" according to Hosford v. School Committee of Sandwich, which vied that…… [Read More]

References

Bonauto, M. (2008). The legal rights of public school students and teachers in Massachusetts. Gay and Lesbian Advocates & Defenders: 1-26.

Bournot-Trites, M., Belanger, J. (2005). Ethical dilemmas facing action researchers. The Journal of Educational Thought, 39(2), 197-215.

Colorado Department of Education. (2011). Guidelines for Identifying Students with Specific Learning Disabilities. Retrieved from https://www.cde.state.co.us/sites/default/files/documents/cdesped/download/pdf/sld_guidelines.pdf

Dewey, J. (2013). The School and Society and the Child and the Curriculum. IL:
View Full Essay

Intellectual Disability

Words: 1926 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84058295

Intellectual Disability

INTELLECTUALDISABILITY|

This paper will look into the subject matter of disability by examining a mental illness' mass media representation, i.e., Intellectual Disability in the movie, The Other Sister that is a 1999 romantic comedy movie. Carla Tate, a 22-year-old American female, has a mild mental deficiency. She goes back home to her rich family in California after getting a certificate from a secluded private boarding school. Carla's parents feel guilty for sending her away and Carl's greatest problem now is coping with her overprotective, snobby mother, Elizabeth. More than anything else, Carla wishes to be responsible and independent. Later on, after pursuing a course in trade school, she meets a guy called Daniel who also has mental deficiency. Carla and Daniel became close, finally having a romantic relationship (Kantor, 2014).

Case Study

The movie, The Other Sister, focuses on Carla who goes back and tries to be independent…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Kantor, J. (2014, November 18). The Other Sister. Retrieved November 25, 2016, from Prezi:  https://prezi.com/78mherbqueiz/the-other-sister/ 

Parmenter, T. (2011). Promoting Training and Employment Opportunities for People with Intellectual Disabilities: International Experience. Retrieved from: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1560&context=gladnetcollect

Rillota, F. (2012, June). Intellectual Disability. Special Education Resource Unit, 22(2), 1-46. Retrieved from http://seru.sa.edu.au/pdfs/SERUpdate%20June%202012Intellectual%20Disability.pdf

Bhaumik, S., Gangadharan, S., Hiremath, A., & Russell, P. S. (2011). Psychological treatments in intellectual disability: the challenges of building a good evidence base. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 198(6), 428-430. Retrieved from http://bjp.rcpsych.org/content/198/6/428
View Full Essay

Canadian Public Policy Education Learning Disability D

Words: 2563 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23922217

Canada Public Policy: ADHD and Education

Canadian Public Policy, Education Learning disability A.D.H.D

Struggle by Human ights Groups and Parents

Public Policy Canada: An Overview

Policy Implications

It has been estimated that almost five percent of School aged children out of population of 2.1 Million in Ontario are suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Contrasting other disabilities like autism or learning disabilities the ADHD was not in the special education previously. The students with ADHD were not included in the special education policy and thus the students and parents were suffering as they could not get the necessary interventions at School suggested by the doctor. (Andrea Golden, 2012)

ecently Education Minister of Ontario has announced to accommodate the students with ADHD and thus relaxed the parents as previously parents were spending from their pockets on theirs children with ADHD. A memorandum has been posted on the Ministry of Education…… [Read More]

References

Andrea Golden. (2012) Students with ADHD have legal right to supports in school Accessed online at http://www.thestar.com/living/article/1112930 -- students-with-adhd-have-legal-right-to-supports-in-school?bn=1

Castellanos, X.F. And Tannock, R. (2002). Neuroscience of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: The search for endophenotypes. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 3, 617-628.

Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The Constitution Act, 1982, being Schedule B. To the Canada Act 1982 (U.K.), 1982, c. 11. Ottawa, ON. Government of Canada.

Dryer, R., Kiernan, M.J., and Tyson, G.A. (2006). Implicit theories of the characteristics and causes of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder held by parents and professionals in the psychological, educational, medical and allied health fields. Australian Journal of Psychology, 58, 79-92