Doctor Patient Relationship Essays (Examples)

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Physician-Patient and Hospital-Patient Relationships the Importance of

Words: 1160 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14989507

Physician-Patient and Hospital-Patient elationships

The importance of the physician-patient and hospital-patient relationships

There exists a quite recommendable potential in the alliance between a patient and a physician. A patient, who puts trust in the care of a physician, establishes moral responsibilities that are weighty and definite. When the patient and the physician work together, the possibility of pursuing intervention comes into place, and the health and quality life of the patient is bound to improve. Trust is very essential and critical in the bond between the patient and the physician in the process of diagnosis and therapy.

How contract principle and breach of warranty apply to the health care setting

In the healthcare setting, legal responsibilities to break discretion may result in difficult choices. The physician has the ethical responsibility of following the law but must know how to scale this with the responsibility to the patient. It is very…… [Read More]

References

Giesen, D. (2008). International medical malpractice law: A comparative law study of civil liability arising from medical care. Tu-bingen: J.C.B. Mohr.

Lemmens, T. (2006). Law and ethics in biomedical research: Regulation, conflict of interest, and liability. Toronto [u.a.: Univ. Of Toronto Press.

Mengel, B., Holleman, L., & Fields, A. (2007). Fundamentals of clinical practice. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.

Miller, R.D. (2006). Problems in health care law. Sudbury (Mass.: Jones and Bartlett.
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Patients and Their Doctors Research

Words: 1747 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99275445

To wit, power is a huge influence in any social interaction, and in a study reported by the University of California Press (est, 2008, p. 87), men often interrupt women during conversations because men are generally viewed as the power in any male-female interaction. "Physicians interrupt patients disproportionately" in doctor-patient interactions, est writes, "except when the doctor is a 'lady'; then, "patients interrupt as much or more than physicians, and their interruptions seem to subvert physicians' authority" (est, p. 87). In other words, the stratification of male doctors having the power to interrupt is reversed when a woman is the doctor.

orks Cited

Blumer, Herbert. (1986). Symbolic Interactionism: Perspective and Method. Berkeley:

Breen, Catherine M., Abernethy, Amy P., Abbott, Katherine H., and Tulsky, James a. (2007).

Conflict Associated with Decisions to Limit Life-Sustaining Treatment in Intensive Care

Units. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 16(5), 283-289.

Donovan, Jenny L., and Blake,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blumer, Herbert. (1986). Symbolic Interactionism: Perspective and Method. Berkeley:

Breen, Catherine M., Abernethy, Amy P., Abbott, Katherine H., and Tulsky, James a. (2007).

Conflict Associated with Decisions to Limit Life-Sustaining Treatment in Intensive Care

Units. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 16(5), 283-289.
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Doctor and Patient Relationship Behavior in a

Words: 756 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80002998

doctor and patient relationship behavior in a new light. The research documented in this article attempted to describe the effect of bedside case presentations vs. conference room style presentations. The impact of the medial care was interpreted through the patients perceptions of their medical care.

The research contained in this article was premised upon the idea that a significant difference may be noticed through different doctor presentations. The dichotomy presented here was bedside presentations may be more effective than the more rigid and academic style of the conference room presentation. They wrote "Despite the potential advantages of bedside presentations for students and physicians, there has been a trend to move clinical teaching away from the bedside and into the conference room. Concern about patients' discomfort with bedside presentations appears to be one reason for this change. Studies of such presentations have focused on patients' impressions and measurements of patients' anxiety.…… [Read More]

Key Finding

The researchers of this article found that there is much ignorance about the health benefits of exclusive breast feeding in Kenya. Many of the perceived ill health symptoms appeared to be associated with a lack of exclusive breast feeding practices. The authors suggested that more needed to be done in terms of educating young mothers and caregivers in this environment to practice exclusive breast feeding methods on their infants. Too much reliance is given to "their own backyard garden, and popular and folk medicines."

Matsuyama, A., Karama, M., Tanaka, J., & Kaneko, S. (2013). Perceptions of caregivers about health and nutritional problems and feeding practices of infants: a qualitative study on exclusive breast-feeding in Kwale, Kenya. BMC public health, 13(1), 525.
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Doctors and Ethics Is There Currently a

Words: 2027 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43755870

Doctors and Ethics

Is there currently a lack of sustainable ethical behavior in the physicians' profession? Do doctors care enough and are their ethical behaviors adequate for the trust that people must put in them? hat should doctors be doing that would make their practice more ethical and would help them to provide more real care to their patients? These questions and others will be reviewed and critiqued in this paper.

"Harm in the absence of care: Towards a medical ethics that cares"

A summary of the main points

The article that will be used as the feature article was researched and written by Elin Martinsen. It is titled, "Harm in the absence of care: Towards a medical ethics that cares." In this article the writer, who is a professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Oslo in Norway, argues that in contemporary medicine and "medical ethics…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carrese, Joseph A., McDonald, Erin L., Moon, Margaret, Taylor, Holly A., Khaira, Kiran,

Beach, Mary Catherine, and Hughes, Mark T. (2011). Everyday ethics in internal medicine resident clinic: an opportunity to teach. Medical Education, 45(7), 712-721.

Daniels, Katy. (2012). Integration of ethics teaching within GP training. Education for Primary

Care, 23(2), 75-78.
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Patient Noncompliance in Patients Advanced

Words: 4937 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60710636



These studies demonstrate that there are several factors associated with patient noncompliance, regardless of the disease being treated. Medication side effects represent only one of these issues. Nurse practitioners could help to resolve many of these issues by being proactive and asking questions about side effects in patients at risk for becoming noncompliant. They may also be able to predict noncompliance in patients that are prescribed medications with known side effects. By informing the patient of the side effects and giving them practical ways to cope with them, the nurse practitioner can play an active role in helping to eliminate patient noncompliance.

Education was found to play an important role in patient noncompliance. The overall educational level of the patient was found to be important. The nurse practitioner can take positive action by being aware of the patient's overall educational background. Extra care must be taken with those of low…… [Read More]

References

Barber, N., Parsons, J., Clifford, S., Darracott, R., & Horne, R. (2004). Patients' problems with new medication for chronic conditions. Quality and Safety in Healthcare. 13(3): 172-175.

Chatterjee, J. (2006). From compliance to concordance in diabetes. Journal of Medical Ethics. 32(9): 507-510.

Chisholm, M., Lance, C. & Mulloy, L. (2005). Patient factors associated with adherence to immunosuppressant therapy in renal transplant recipients. American Journal of Health- System Pharmacy. 62 (17): 1775-1781.

Eastern, J. "Dismissing Patients Properly." 1 Jun 2006. OB/GYN News. Accessed 11 Sept. 2008. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0CYD/is_/ai_n26906768.
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Nursing Theory and Theorist Dynamic Nurse Patient Relationship Ida Jean Orlando

Words: 1571 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16641702

Ido Jean Orlando and analyzes how her contribution has impacted the nursing profession. It has 3 sources.

The field of nursing requires the utmost care on the part of nurses if they are to understand their patients. Nurses are an integral part of the medical care provision because they provide patients both physical and emotional care. Even doctors cannot succeed in reaching the level of emotional contact that nurses can achieve with their patients. According to Ida Jean Orlando, this kind of close relationship is dependent on the communication that nurses establish with the patients. This communication, whether verbal or non-verbal, plays a vital role in dealing out the most appropriate treatment as quickly as possible. Ida Jean Orlando's The Dynamic Nurse-Patient Relationship: Function, Process, and Principles, is a book that has had an immense impact on the field of nursing, popularizing Orlando's theory.

The Theorist:

Ida Jean Orlando was…… [Read More]

Sources:

Lego, S. (1999) One-to-One Nurse-Patient Relationship. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care.

Ida Jean Orlando Theorist (Accessed on 3-11-2003) http://www.uri.edu/nursing/schmieding/orlando/

Ida Jean Orlando Biography (2003)  http://www.nurses.info/nursing_theory_midrange_theories_ida_orlando.htm
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Movie the Doctor

Words: 759 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4014195

Doctor

The film The Doctor illustrates both sides of the doctor-patient relationship. Played by illiam Hurt, Jack McKee is a head surgeon who exudes arrogance until he is diagnosed with throat cancer. Not only does a brush with death change his outlook on life, but also his experience as a patient at his own hospital alters the way he treats his patients. hen Jack is forced to wait in lengthy lines, fill out tedious forms, and deal with impersonal physicians, he realizes how dehumanizing, humiliating, and frustrating it can be on the other end of the doctor-patient spectrum. McKee's behavior transforms considerably from the beginning of the film to the end, but he still manages to retain his witty sense of humor throughout. The Doctor provides a cinematic example of why doctors and other professionals caught up in the modern medical system need to respect their patients more, by including…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Doctor. Dir. Randa Haines. Perf. William Hurt, Christine Lahti, Mandy Patinkin, Elizabeth Perkins. Touchstone, 1991.
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Critcal Analysis Paper on Patient'satisfaction

Words: 1460 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78256183

patient satisfaction with the care provided by nursing staff and physicians, as well as how satisfaction can be improved through better communication among physicians and nurses, and with their patients. It will, in particular, deal with a nursing student's own clinical experience with patients and their perception of healthcare provider-patient communication. In addition, the paper will examine the student's project which considered the strategy of updating white boards in patient rooms regularly for better communication.

Ten medical surgical ward patients were interviewed during rounds by a student, who rated patient satisfaction and tried to discover some common theme. While patients expressed satisfaction with how nursing staff delivered care, they felt physicians didn't keep them informed. A number of patients were visited by two or more doctors. However, there was no communication between doctors, leading to issues such as a patient being marked "not ready for surgery" by the cardiologist, owing…… [Read More]

References

(2008). Home - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Improving Patient-Staff Communication Through White Boards - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Retrieved August 6, 2016, from http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/articles-and-news/2008/06/improving-patient-staff-communication-through-white-boards.html

(n.d.). Institute for Healthcare Communication. Impact of Communication in Healthcare - Institute for Healthcare Communication. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from  http://healthcarecomm.org/about-us/impact-of-communication-in-healthcare/ 

(2011). JBI COnNECT+. Effective communication between registered nurses and adult oncology patients in inpatient settings. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from http://connect.jbiconnectplus.org/Viewsourcefile.aspx?0=7112

(n.d.). Journal of Nursing - RN Journal. The Importance of Communication and Education toward Patient Literacy. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from http://rnjournal.com/journal-of-nursing/the-importance-of-communication-and-education-toward-patient-literacy
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Therapeutic Relationships Within the Medical

Words: 967 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86828533

The goals are what the client hopes will happen because of the care needed -- and the bond the specifics that need to be met in order to meet those goals (iddowson, 2010, 83).

The Transference/Countertransference Section -- ithin this section of the therapeutic relationship, transference and countertransference are phenomenons in which feelings between the client and caregiver are directed and redirected to one another. This has been part of clinical psychology since Jung, and may be both harmful or positive. ithin the caregiver model, it is usually heightened empathy for the patient, with the client, a feeling of greater emotional bonding to the caregiver than that of a professional relationship (iener, 2009).

The Real Relationship -- This is the ideal outcome, the real or personal relationship between client and caregiver. It may, of course, include deception on the part of the caregiver or therapist depending on the actuality of…… [Read More]

Watson, J. (1997). The Theory of Human Caring: Retrospective and Prospective. Nursring Science Quarterly, 10(1), 49-52.

Widdowson, M. (2010). Transactional Analysis: 100 Key Points and Techniques. New York: Taylor and Francis.

Wiener, J. (2009). The Therapeutic Relationship: Tranference, Countertranference. Austin, TX: Texas a&M Univeristy.
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Espoused the Statement Effective Doctors

Words: 388 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67060996

"Why? Because of their products. Product development is what interests the consumer" (Blanchard, pg. 7). Perhaps the automakers should take note.

One toy manufacturer does an excellent job of marketing to the consumer. Mattel uses an ongoing tracking program in its efforts to sell more Barbie dolls.

The last decade has seen over 40 differently featured Barbie dolls for sale in approximately 140 countries. ecently Mattel discovered they no longer had to change the features of Barbie (at least in Asian countries) because "market testing led an official from Mattel to proclaim: "Blond Barbie sells just as well in Asia as in the U.S." (Cross, Smits, 2005, pg. 874). Now it is possible for children almost everywhere in the world to be happy with their new Barbie dolls. That is a fine example of consumer-centric activities.

eferences

Blanchard, D.; (2006) Are your best practices getting the job done?, Industry Week,…… [Read More]

References

Blanchard, D.; (2006) Are your best practices getting the job done?, Industry Week, Vol. 255, No. 12, pg. 7

Cross, G.; Smits, G.; (2005) Japan, the U.S. And the globalization of children's consumer culture, Journal of Social History, Vol. 38, No. 4, pp. 873-890

Pettit, M.L.; (2008) an analysis of the doctor-patient relationship using Patch Adams, the Journal of School Health, Vol. 78, No. 4, pp 234-238
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Patient Centered Medical Homes

Words: 3042 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30529280

Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMH) are often confused as being actual "homes" for patients to be admitted in and given medical treatment and care. PCMH is actually a health care model based on which health care is provided to patients, under the supervision of physicians. The PCMH model of health care provides patients with continuous, comprehensive medical care, in order to increase the chances of achieving the goal of benefitting the patient with as much attention and medical care in order to maximize his/her health outcomes.

Over the years the PCMH model of health care has become widely adopted and preferred. This is because of the philosophy and approach that the model adopts in organizing and delivering the health care initiatives. The PCMH model is based upon delivering medical care and attention to patients with team-based health and medical experts that are focused strongly on the quality and the safety…… [Read More]

Bibliography

109-432, P.L. (2006, December 20). TAX RELIEF AND HEALTH CARE ACT OF 2006. Public Law 109-432 (109th Congress) .

Backer, L.A. (2009). Building the Case for the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Family Practice Management 16 (1), 14-18.

De Geest, S., Moons, P., Callens, B., Gut, C., Lindpaintner, L., & Spirig, R. (2008). Introducing advanced practice nurses/nurse practitioners in health care systems: a framework for reflection and analysis. Swiss Medical Weekly (138), 621-628.

NASHP. (2013, April). Medical Home & Patient-Centered Care. Retrieved from The National Academy for State Health Policy: http://www.nashp.org/med-home-map
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Patient Handoffs Majority of the Medical Errors

Words: 2315 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67770180

Patient Handoffs

Majority of the medical errors take place in the patient's handoffs. A shift among the doctors is a common practice. There are a number of old patients who approach around 16 different doctors in a year, while young patients who are healthy refer to normal physicians and to specialists as well (Philibert, 2008). In a hospital normally, less attention is given to the patient by his primary doctor, while the trainees and the hospitalists are more involved in that patient. Patients are rotated to different doctors with an average of fifteen times in a five day stay at the hospital. Young doctors often accept appointments of more than 300 patients in a month, in their initial training period just because of time pressure (Chen, 2009, p. 1).

Alteration that have been brought about in the patients care have increased the quality of the services that are offered to…… [Read More]

References

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (2010). Electronic health records overview. Retrieved from http://www.cms.gov/EHealthRecords/

Chen, P.W. (2009, September 3). When patient handoffs go terribly wrong. The New York Times. Retrieved from  http://www.nytimes.com 

Decision support systems may reduce inappropriate medical tests. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.theexigencegroup.com/news/intelligence / article:decision-support-systems-may-reduce-inappropriate-medical-tests-/

Encinosa, W.E., & Bae, J. (2011). Health information technology and its effects on hospital costs, outcomes, and patient safety. Inquiry, 48, 288-303. doi:10.5034/inquiryjrnl_48.04.02
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Doctor's Fees Health Care Is One of

Words: 730 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43283028

Doctor's Fees

Health care is one of those fundamental rights we should be able to expect as citizens of a country that concerns itself with the well-being of its citizens. Sadly, however, this is the one area that sadly lacks in providing even half of citizens with an adequate basis of health throughout their lives. Many things have been blamed for this state of the situation. At the top of the list of reasons is funding. Government simply does not have sufficient funding to provide all citizens with the health care they need. However, when considering the government's interference in the health care field, critics have increasingly questioned the wisdom and effectiveness of such effectiveness. Doctor's fees, for example, are being regulated by the government. But what are the effects of such regulation on the quality of care received? It appears that doctors whose fees are regulated fail to provide…… [Read More]

References

Levy, T. (2010, Jul/Aug). Why Doctors Don't Want Free-Market Medicine. The Freeman., vol. 60, Iss. 6. Retrieved from: http://www.thefreemanonline.org/features/why-doctors-don%E2%80%99t-want-free-market-medicine/

McClintock Greenberg, T. (2010, Jan 29). Should the Government Regulate our Health? Huffington Post. Retrieved from:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tamara-mcclintock-greenberg/should-the-government-reg_b_441493.html 

Salter, B. (2000). Change in the Governance of Medicine: The Politics of Self-Regulation. In "Regulating Doctors" The Institute for the Study of Civil Society. Retrieved from: http://www.civitas.org.uk/pdf/cs01.pdf
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Patient Perceptions the Literature Review

Words: 1775 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94483043



Most of the literature deals with healthcare issues experienced in the United States or Europe. hat small amount of literature there is available on healthcare in Malaysia seldom has anything to do with the clinic(s) in specific. This study could help, in some small measure, to alleviate that problem.

orks Cited

Chowdhury, N., (1999) the Power of Towers, Fortune, Vol. 139, No. 7, pp. 110-112

Kurokawa, I., Takami, M., Cheriex, H., (1999) Futuristic flight plan - the Kuala Lumpur International Airport was designed for the new millennium, Lighting Design + Application, Vol. 29, No. 8, pp. 42-45

Manson, L.A., Baptist, a.J., (2002) Assessing the cost-effectiveness of provider-based status, Healthcare Financial Management, Vol. 56, No. 8, pp. 52-59

Romano, M., (2006) Physicians in pain, Modern Healthcare, Vol. 36, No. 4, p. 40

Shameen, a., (2004) Malaysia: Coining it in Kuala Lumpure - Start-up ECM Libra has capitalized on strong markets, hard…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chowdhury, N., (1999) the Power of Towers, Fortune, Vol. 139, No. 7, pp. 110-112

Kurokawa, I., Takami, M., Cheriex, H., (1999) Futuristic flight plan - the Kuala Lumpur International Airport was designed for the new millennium, Lighting Design + Application, Vol. 29, No. 8, pp. 42-45

Manson, L.A., Baptist, a.J., (2002) Assessing the cost-effectiveness of provider-based status, Healthcare Financial Management, Vol. 56, No. 8, pp. 52-59

Romano, M., (2006) Physicians in pain, Modern Healthcare, Vol. 36, No. 4, p. 40
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Patient Guide to the Internet

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63679863

There is also relevant information for specific sectors of society such as women and seniors. The MedlinePlus Magazine includes several links to asthma information. The bottom of the page includes links that contain information such as disclaimers, copyright, and privacy information. It also contains links that provide information on the contributors of information to the Website. The privacy statement clearly provides visitors and subscribers with the assurance that their information will not be shared. All the information on the site is therefore provided on the basis of full disclosure, both of the information itself and on information providers.

This Website is therefore very reliable, and also includes information on a myriad of other health topics, which will be helpful for Amy if she wants more information on her other conditions as well.

Suspicious Website: http://www.asthmaanswersonline.com/cures-asthma/

This Website indicates that asthma can in fact be cured. Prominently displayed at the top…… [Read More]

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Relationships and Expectations

Words: 673 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35110679

elationships and expectations form one of the three main domains of the PEN-3 model. These three factors, perceptions, enablers, and nurturers, refer to the cultural component of health-seeking behaviors. The relationships and expectations domain can inform healthcare workers about how to encourage health-seeking behaviors in patients, and is a culturally sensitive approach. The PEN-3 concept shows how culture is a major determinant of both individual and public health.

Perceptions refer to the individual's perceptions about health, disease, medication, doctors, and healthcare systems. The perceptions are related directly to the cultural values, beliefs, and norms that are already embedded in the community. Individual and collective group health behaviors may be strongly determined by perceptions. For example, is there a perception that heart disease is not a serious problem in the African-American community? Or, is there a perception that healthcare is too expensive, or that doctors are too paternalistic? Perceptions might also…… [Read More]

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010) A Closer Look at African-American Men and High Blood Pressure Control: A Review of Psychosocial Factors and Systems-Level Interventions. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved November 1, 2011 from  http://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/docs/African_American_Executive_Summary.pdf 

Perez, M.A. & Luquis, R.R. (2008). Cultural Competence in Health Education and Health Promotion. John Wiley & Sons.

US Department of Health & Human Services [USDHHS], Maternal Child Health Bureau [MCHB] (2009). Core Concepts in Cultural Competence. Retrieved November 1, 2011 from  http://support.mchtraining.net/national_ccce/case0/home.html
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Patient's Rights and Responsibilities Why

Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73896830

2).

A Patient's Rights

There are a number of lists to go by when it comes to the patient's "Bill of Rights," including a patient's rights under the Affordable Care Act. In the American Cancer Society "Patient's Bill of Rights" it begins with the right every patient has to "…accurate and easily-understood information about your health plan, health care professionals, and health care facilities' (www.cancer.org). Of course a patient also has the right to choose health care providers and when it comes to emergency services, a patient has a right to be "…screened and stabilized using emergency services" when injured or seriously ill; so that when one's health is in jeopardy, access to emergency services can be a vital and stabilizing experience (www.cancer.org).

A patient also has the right to be part of decisions regarding what treatment is appropriate, and a patient has a right to be respected and treated…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Cancer Society. (2011). Patient's Bill of Rights: What is the Patient's Bill of Rights?

Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://www.cancer.org.

Torrey, Trisha. (2010). Patient's Responsibilities. About.com. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from http://patients.about.com.
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Nurse-Patient Relations the Main Focus of This

Words: 2161 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77240679

Nurse-Patient Relations

The main focus of this essay is going to concern the nurse-patient relationship idea, and why it is important. This was chosen because the researcher desired to achieve a better accepting of how a helpful nurse-patient relationship can be advanced and even from different theorists who have discovered this idea. In this essay, the researcher sets out to demonstrate what they have learnt regarding the nurse-patient relation concept and how this connection can utilized in the clinical practice setting. T The nurse patient connection, according to a study done by Press Gamey Associates Inc., creates the quality of the care experience and generates an influential influence on patient gratification. Nurses will a lot of their time with patients. Patients see nurses' relations with people among the care team and make their own conclusions about the hospital founded on what they are observing. Furthermore, nurses' approaches toward their vocation,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berdes, C. & . (2001). Race relations and caregiving relationships: A qualitative examination of perspectives from residents and nurses aides in three nursing homes. Research on Aging, 23(1), 109-126.

Biering, P. (2002). Caring for the involuntarily hospitalized adolescent: The issue of power in the nurse-patient relationship. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, 16(2), 65-74.

Heijkenskjold, K.B. (2010). The patients dignity from the nurses perspective. Nursing Ethics, 6(3), 313-24.

LaSala, C.A.-B. (2007). The role of the clinical nurse specialist in promoting evidence-based practice and effecting positive patient outcomes. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 38(6), 262-70.
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Care Issler Is a Patient Who Recently

Words: 1314 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36359617

Care:

Issler is a patient who recently moved with his daughter-in-law who is no longer married to his son. As part of her interest in helping to take care of Mr. Issler, she noticed that he was pale and diaphoretic after a two and a half hour flight. The daughter-in-law took him to an emergency room where he was attended to by a cardiologist and set a follow-up check up for an echo cardiogram next week. Mr. Issler has complained of congestive heart failure and a history of deep vein thrombosis. The cardiologist recommended that he seeks out a primary care provider and check up of his thyroid. As the primary care provider, the patient has also expressed his uncertainties on whether he has hyper of hypo thyroidism though he has been under thyroid medication for several years. In addition to being very pale, he has a large bag of…… [Read More]

References:

Bray, D.L. (n.d.). Thyroid Storm and the AACN Synergy Model. Journal of Nursing. Retrieved from  http://rnjournal.com/journal-of-nursing/thryoid-storm-and-the-aacn-synergy-model 

Drewes at. al. (2012, October). The Effectiveness of Chronic Care Management for Heart Failure: Meta-Regression Analyses to Explain the Heterogeneity in Outcomes. Health Services Research, 47(5), 1926-1959.

Hardin, S. & Hussey, L. (2003, February). AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care Case Study of a CHF Patient. Critical Care Nurse, 23(1), 73-76. Retrieved from  http://ccn.aacnjournals.org/content/23/1/73.full.pdf 

Kaplow, R. & Reed, K.D. (2008). The AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care: A Nursing
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Psychological Research and Patient-Practitioner Interaction the Work

Words: 830 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24737591

Psychological Research and Patient-Practitioner Interaction

The work of Like and Zyzanski (2002) reports that patient-practitioner transactions in the ambulatory setting have gained in importance in the research as there is "empirical support for our anecdotal, common-sense notions that clinical encounter experiences are a major determinant of outcomes such as the patient's satisfaction with the encounter. The study is reported to examine the issue of patient-physician encounter and asks the questions of: 1) Is there a relationship between fulfillment of patient requests for services and patient satisfaction with the clinical encounter? And (2) What degree of satisfaction is explained by the qualities of the encounter as compared to the characteristics of the patient, physician, and system of health care? (Like and Zyzanski, 2002) A study of 144 adult patients and their physicians was conducted and it is reported "at least 19% of the variance in patient satisfaction could be attributed to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Feinberg, J. (1988) The effect of patient -- Practitioner interaction on compliance: A review of the literature and application in rheumatoid arthritis. Patient Education and Counseling. Vol. 11 Issue 3, June 1998.

Hellstrom, O., Lindqvist, P. And Mattsson, B. (1996) A Phenomenological Analysis of Doctor-Patient Interaction: A Case Study. Patient Education and Counseling. Vol. 33, Issue 1. 20 Nov 1998.

Heritage, J. And Maynard, DW (2006) Problems and Prospects in the Study of Physician-Patient Interaction: 30 Years of Research Annual Review of Sociology Vol. 32: 351-37.

Kaplan, SH, Greenfield, S, and Ware, JE (1989) Assessing the Effects of Physician-Patient Interaction on the Outcomes of Chronic Disease. Medical Care. Mar 1989; Vol.27, No.3.
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Role of Nurse as Patient

Words: 960 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95621203

(Hummelvoll, 1996, p. 13)

The professional relationship that the client has with the nurse is often one of the most fundamental of all the relationships the client has in his or her life. The nurse can act as an advocate between the client and other health care professional as well as an advocate for the client with his or her own family. The holistic needs of the client are often met through this and other relationships, when they are strong, consistent and productive.

A an authentic caring relationship between clients and nurses. This relationship stimulates mutual empowerment and helps the client pass through the conglomerate of not easily accessible helping systems in the United States. The purpose of this reciprocal and chosen partnership is to increase the client's safety and quality of life. Here too, empowerment is a means to better health, with the nurse acting as the client's advocate,…… [Read More]

Resources

Hummelvoll, J.K. (1996) "The Nurse-Client Alliance Model." Perspectives in Psychiatric Care. 32/4, pp.12-17.

Vuckovich, P.K. (2000) "The Ethics of Involuntary Procedures." Perspectives in Psychiatric Care. 36 / 4. p.111.
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Nursing Client Relationships and How the Study

Words: 4324 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72371497

nursing client relationships and how the study is a valid research for practitioners. It has 26 sources in Harvard Style.

esearch titles must be limited to fifteen words. In this case the author has exceeded the limitation by one count which is negligible. The importance of relevance of the title to the body of the research is that it must collaborate with the core study area. In the first line the author has already specified the relationship of the nurse-client at the beginning and categorizes it as a "partnership" whereas the title of the study must not reveal the results or even the anticipated results.

Authors and Abstracts

The authors T. Hostick and F. McClelland both the authors indicate in their abstract that the article aim in establishing nursing behavior when they are engaged in a nurse-client relationship. The abstract though is limited in expressing the content of the study…… [Read More]

References

Hostick, T. & McClelland, F. 2002, Partnership: a co-operative inquiry between Community Mental Health Nurses and their clients. 2. The nurse-client relationship. Journal of Psychiatry and Mental Health Nursing 9, 111-117.

Beyea, S.C. 1997, Research utilization begins with learning to read research reports, Research Corner, AORN, February. Accessed on 29-9-2003 at http://www.aorn.org/journal/research/rc297.htm

Author not available, 2003, Reading Nursing Research to Critique a Study and to Summarize Findings for Use in Practice, Available at http://classes.kumc.edu/son/NURS460smith/460critiquingreseach.html

Forchuk, C. 1989, Establishing a Nurse-Client Relationship. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing vol.27,no.2. Available at http://willmar.ridgewater.mnscu.edu/library/338271.htm
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Nursing Philosophy Patient Centered

Words: 1185 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30973463

Nursing Philosophy

Perhaps the most fundamental tenet of my nursing philosophy is the administration of care in an intrinsically empathetic manner which benefits the patient. I unequivocally believe in patient-centered care and that nurses who are able to maintain this component of their practice as their primary goal are able to produce the greatest efficacy in administering to patients. Moreover, with all of the concerns of the contemporary healthcare market, including various facets of financial and technological concern, the shortage of various practitioners, and innovations in precision medicine, it is easy to forget that the most vital component of the health care industry is the patients themselves. Quite simply, patients have the most to gain and lose from the health care system. Therefore, I readily believe that keeping those patients as the center of the care delivered by me and others within my profession is the best way we can…… [Read More]

References

Andrist, C., Nicholas, P. and Wolf, K. (2006). The Evolution of the Environment Paradigm in Nursing. A history of nursing ideas (pp. 97- 108). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Bourdeau, M. Auguste Comte. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2015/entries/comte/ 

McEvoy, L., Duffy, A. (2008). Holistic practice -- a concept analysis. Nurse Education in Practice. 8, 412-419.

Zborowsky, T. (2014). The legacy of Florence Nightingale's environmental theory: nursing research focusing on the impact of healthcare environments. Health Environments Research & Design Journal. 7(4), 19-34.
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Patient's History Taking Is a

Words: 1273 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60508163



Critique

The article was written quite comprehensively and gave enough information about the different aspects of history taking. The way all the different components of the history taking process were split up and explained in more detail was very helpful. It was noted that the entire information in this article was present in a rather organized way. This organized way of presenting the details helped in teaching the history taking process and left less ambiguity. One thing that could have been improved is that common mistakes in the history taking process should have been mentioned. Surely with the amount of research done on this topic, the common mistakes and questions would have been figured out. If the commonly made errors are highlighted in these articles, then those errors are less likely to be repeated by other nurses as well.

This article did interest me as it provided me with a…… [Read More]

References

Crumbie, A. (2006). Taking a History. In: Walsh, M. eds. (2006). Practitioners: Clinical Skiiis and Proffesional Issues. 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Butterworth-Heinemann, pp. 14-26.

Dougias, G., Nicoi, F. And Robertson, C. (2005). Madead's Ciinicoi Examination. 11th ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.

Kurtz, S., Benson, J., Draper, J. And Silverman, J. (2003). Marrying content and process in clinical method teaching: enhancing the Calgary-Cambridge guides. Academic Medicine, 78 (8), pp. 802-809.

Lloyd, H. And Craig, S. (2007). A guide to taking a patient's history. Nursing Standard, 22 (13), pp. 42-48.
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Patient Autonomy

Words: 1416 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85670763

Patient Autonomy

The concept of patient autonomy, as opposed to medial paternity, is one that has gained much ground in recent years; "... about 30 years ago, issues began to appear that were difficult to solve using traditional ethics. New medical and reproductive technologies, research controversies, and a societal ethos that questioned all authority posed difficult questions." (Czaplyski, Larry, 2002)

At issue in this paper is the meaning and significance of patient autonomy and the way in which is relates to medical paternity. As the discussion will outline, the case for patient autonomy is not only ethically valid but also essential for the moral and practical balance in the medical profession. Underlying this view is the fact that the issue of patient autonomy does not exist in isolation or in the medical field alone - but relates to other issues and ethical problems in the society at large. These larger…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bernstein Maurice, (2004) Social/Political Paternalism vs. Patient Autonomy.

Retrieved October 4, 2004 from Bioethics Discussion Blog: Web site: http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2004/07/socialpolitical-paternalism-vs.-patient.html

Bradley, Gerard V. (1989). "Does autonomy require informed and specific

Refusal of life-sustaining medical treatment." Issues in Law & Medicine, December 22, 1989. Czaplyski, Larry. (2002)
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Patient Is a 35-Year-Old Male He Was

Words: 2109 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70723968

patient is a 35-year-old (male?), he was diagnosed with diabetes twenty five years ago at the age of ten years old, he claims that this is hereditary in his family. He has one sister who has Type 2 diabetes and a brother who has type 1 diabetes. He manages his diabetes and other illnesses from home and through a medical clinic; for most of his life he has known he has diabetes and manages to regulate it through insulin shots, glucose tablets as well as through the right nutrition, however he claims that this is difficult and there are most days where he experiences draw backs. Many complications have arisen from his diabetes. This patient was selected because of the certain case he has in regards to his diabetes and other complications which had developed from it. His treatment and management also includes an extensive study. At the young age…… [Read More]

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Doctor Various Intervening Factors in

Words: 628 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69905964

However, working as a doctor does not always imply having to operate tiny devices through even tinier body parts.

Working as a doctor gives you the chance to become closely attached to your patients. There are little professional relationships in this world that involve people leaving their lives in the hands of complete strangers. It certainly is a unique feeling when you know that someone turns to you in hope that you will relieve them of their suffering.

A doctor is not one that goes to work knowing exactly what he or she would be doing for the rest of the day. A doctor's life entails a great deal of adventures and extreme emotions, as the job is full of the unexpected. A good reason for one to consider a career as a doctor would be that this particular job resembles no other, and that it presents people with the…… [Read More]

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Patient Analysis for a Nurse Practitioner

Words: 2113 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58240668

1. Subjective
Patient’s chief complaint, reason for visit
Ms. Richards arrived complaining that she was experiencing severe anal pain, so much so that using a tissue was also proving impossible. She claimed the pain began a couple of days earlier and has aggravated considerably since.
History of Present Illness
Ms. Richards arrived complaining of anal pain which commenced a couple of days earlier and has aggravated since. With regard to her intimate relationships, Ms. Richards states that though she has a boyfriend, their relationship isn’t serious as the two are also seeing other people. According to internal assessment reports, patient has normal hair distribution, an intact perineum, and intact urethral meatus without any discharge or inflammation. However, patient experiences unbearable pain on vaginal opening palpation, redness, and edema. Further, a mass has been identified on the right, with spontaneous, dark-yellow, smelly secretion with palpation over the Bartholin's glands.
Physical examination…… [Read More]

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Patient and Coworker

Words: 341 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58254297

Communication Discussion Board Response

I would have to respectfully disagree with the idea that communication is mainly about being clear in one's verbal and nonverbal language. A nurse can clearly communicate how to follow a healthy diet to a diabetic -- or the need to stay clean to a drug addict -- but unless the nurse comprehends the patient's own view of his or her situation, such as the real medical need to follow the diet or the dangers of drug abuse, communication has not transpired in an effectual fashion. It is just as important that the nurse understand the patient's body language, to assess whether he or she is listening, and to ask the patient to restate the treatment plan, and to repeat what he or she feels about his or her condition.

Discussion

You make a very important point that the process of communicating with patients isn't about…… [Read More]

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Relationships and Expectations

Words: 516 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62322483

Christy had some preconceived notions about Roamni people and their motivations, habits, and lifestyle. Being proactive rather than reactive is the best way to deal with different cultural practices and beliefs. Christy could educate herself regarding the cultural practices of bathing, cleanliness, eating etc. This information is available on the internet. Typically when faced with medical condition that a nurse, aide or physician is unfamiliar with it is a common practice to research it. This practice should extend to dealing with certain cultural groups one has not encountered. Obviously, she should have changed the water, sponge, and washed herself after touching the patient's lower body in clear view of the patient's relatives. Perhaps a better approach would have been to offer the patient's family the opportunity to participate in the care of the patient and perform some of these functions or to ask them how she should care for the…… [Read More]

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Patients and Nursing

Words: 900 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94082455

Health Screening

Biographical Data

Cathy is a 17-year-old female. She is suffering from a certain amounts of loneliness and depression (DSM-IV). This is because her mother died in Iraq 10 years ago when serving in the Army eserves. She is currently living with her uncle and often deals with these issues from not being able to talk to her mother. She never knew her father and has no way to contact him. To account for them, she hides her feelings by turning to social networking sites as a way to connect with others. In the process, she places her entire life history for everyone to see and often takes pictures of herself. At the same time, she was elected class President and hides these feelings by being engaged in variety of activities (such as: Future Business Leaders of America and track). Yet, underneath it all, she feels like the world…… [Read More]

References

Ackley, B. (2013). Nursing Diagnosis Handbook. Maryland Heights, MO: Elsiever.

Ladwig, L. (2013). Mosby's Guide to Nursing Diagnosis. Maryland Heights, MO: Elsiever.
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Patient Specific Assessment and Alarm Fatigue

Words: 2771 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17727235

Alarm Fatigue

Theories in nursing generally center on the relationship of four concepts -- nursing, environment, person and health. These concepts are interrelated and impact one another in diverse ways, often seen in issues of nursing when problems arise that require analysis. The issue of alarm fatigue is one problem in nursing that touches on each of these four concepts. Alarm fatigue can be defined as exhaustion that occurs for nurses when they are exposed to many alarms throughout their shift, which causes "sensory overload" and the nurses to develop a "non-existent response to alarms" (Horkan, 2014, p. 83). Complacency and dissension can follow in the nursing workplace as too many alarms for nurses can render them unresponsive.

Alarms are needed in nursing because they alert nurses and care providers to emergency situations that require immediate action and intervention, especially in the intensive care unit. However, nurses and staff work…… [Read More]

References

Despins, L., Scott-Cawiezell, J., Rouder, J. (2010). Detection of patient risk by nurses:

a theoretical framework. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(2): 465-474.

Horkan, A. M. (2014). Alarm fatigue and patient safety. Nephrology Nursing Journal,

47(1): 83-85.
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patient centered care in healthcare nursing

Words: 4617 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92870872

Introduction

Patient-centered care is the goal of many healthcare organizations, but the ability of an organization to deliver patient-centered care is influenced by a number of factors both internal and external. Business practices, regulatory requirements, and reimbursement all can impact patient-centered care in any healthcare organization. Promoting patient-centered care requires an organizational culture committed to this paradigm, which also needs to be embedded in the mission and values of the organization.

Executives and administrators create the organizational culture that promotes patient-centered care. All leaders in the organization are responsible for using patient-centered practices and communications styles in their interactions with patients and their families. Furthermore, administrators oversee the policies and procedures that directly impact the culture of care. Analyzing areas of weakness within the organizational structure and culture via established assessments like the Patient-and Family-Centered Care Organizational Self-Assessment Tool, it is possible to create multidisciplinary teams that promote the organization’s…… [Read More]

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Relationship of Eating Disorders Self-Esteem

Words: 6071 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52017394

These suppositions allow the researcher to view the world from a certain perspective while ignoring other perspectives. The researcher in this study assumes that his subjects are logical human beings who have a rationale point-of-view. Their thinking is valid and reasonable and their approach is more or less along the lines of scientific thinking. In addition, we assume that commonsense thinking and scientific thinking are more or less identical in nature. With these assumptions in mind, we take a post-positivism philosophical foundation; as in line with Trochim (2000) post-positivism is the outright denial of positivism (which argues that the laws of the nature are perfunctory and therefore deductive reasoning can be the only suitable approach to comprehend nature) and presupposes that day-to-day human and scientific reasoning are more or less the same and in order to understand reality, researchers have to use not only deductive but also inductive reasoning (Trochim,…… [Read More]

References:

Bailer UF, Frank GK, Henry SE et al. (2005). Altered brain serotonin 5-HT1A receptor binding after recovery from anorexia nervosa measured by positron emission tomography. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62, 1032-1041.

Bloks H, Hoek HW, Callewaert I et al. (2004). Stability of personality traits in patients who received intensive treatment for a severe eating disorder. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 192, 129-138.

Bulik CM, Klump KL, Thornton L. et al. (2004). Alcohol use disorder comorbidity in eating disorders: a multicenter study. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 65, 1000-1006.

Byrne, B. (2000) Relationships between Anxiety, Fear Self-Esteem, and Coping Strategies in Adolescence. Adolescence. 35. 137.
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Ethical Issues Arising From Doctors Relationships With Drug Companies

Words: 1528 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12109375

Doctors Drugs

Although the Affordable Health Care Act represents a step in the right direction towards encouraging all Americans to avail themselves of medical services, the bill fails to address the root causes of problems in the system. The American health care system is flawed because it is a for-profit model that places profits far ahead of patients. When profits come ahead of patients, the result is an inability to fulfill the ethical duties of being a health care worker. A progressive transformation of the American health care system would systematically undo the nefarious link between corporate interests and the interests of health care.

The relationship between doctors and drug companies has been well established and well documented. Major news media resources like The Atlantic, as well as professional peer-reviewed journals like the New England Journal of Medicine cover stories addressing the potential ethical conundrums inherent in a cozy connection…… [Read More]

References

Campbell, E.G. (2007). Doctors and drug companies -- Scrutinizing influential relationships. New England Journal of Medicine 2007;357: 1796-1797.

Carollo, K. (2010). Pay dirt: hundreds of doctors earned big money from drug companies. ABC News. 25 October, 2010. Retrieved online:  http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Wellness/drug-companies-payments-doctors-revealed-database/story?id=11929217 

"Let the Sunshine In," (2013). The Economist. Mar 2, 2013. Retrieved online:  http://www.economist.com/news/business/21572784-new-efforts-reveal-ties-between-doctors-and-drug-firms-let-sunshine 

Moynihan, R. (2003). Who pays for the pizza? BMJ 2003; 326:1189.
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Impact of ACA From Organizational and Patients

Words: 1470 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78069405

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act/Impact of ACA from the Organizational and the Patients view

Impact of the Affordable Care act (ACA) on the population that it affected

Impact of the economics of providing care to patients from the organization's point-of-view

How will patients be affected in relationship to cost of treatment, quality of treatment, and access to treatment?

Ethical implications of this act for both the organization and the patients

Impact of the Affordable Care act (ACA) on the population that it affected

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), as initially passed, mandated Medicaid expansion, for covering a majority of low-income, as-yet-uninsured American citizens and immigrants (with legal residency in the U.S. for a minimum duration of 5 years). The United States Supreme Court, however, in the historic National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, 132 S. Ct. 2566 (2012), maintained that the obligatory Medicaid expansion proved to be unconstitutionally…… [Read More]

References

ACA. (2015). The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Retrieved on 13th September, 2015 from http://www.dpc.senate.gov/healthreformbill/healthbill52.pdf

Howard, P. (2015). The Impact of the Affordable Care Act On the Economy, Employers, and the Workforce. edworkforce.house.gov. Retrieved on 13 th September, 2015 from http://edworkforce.house.gov/uploadedfiles/02.09.11_howard.pdf

Kengmana, R.T. (2015). An Ethical Perspective on the Affordable Care Act. MA: Psych Central. Retrieved on 13th September, 2015 from http://googleweblight.com/?lite_url=http://psychcentral.com/about/feedback&lc=en-IN&s=1&m=101&ts=1442202299&sig=APONPFlqjqQURNK5jFIewCvXRMJzyhz8zA

NCIOM. (2015a). Examining the Impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in North Carolina. Chapter 7: Quality. Retrieved on 13th September, 2015 from https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.nciom.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Final-Ch7-Quality-FINAL.pdf&ved=0CCYQFjABahUKEwjv_JDfr_XHAhVIB44KHfLKAPg&usg=AFQjCNEdTlwW2QuvqN5Rn6qM31poi4lBUA
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Consent and Framework of the

Words: 1528 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51083250

103)."

Refeences

http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27277229

Bohme, C. (2000). The Wages of Seeking Help: Sexual Exploitation by Pofessionals. Westpot, CT: Paege Publishes. Retieved Mach 8, 2008, fom Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27277229 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=94803861

Baaten, E.B., & Handelsman, M.M. (1997). Client Pefeences fo Infomed Consent Infomation. Ethics & Behavio, 7(4), 311-328. Retieved Mach 8, 2008, fom Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=94803861 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=11241547

Holmes, C.A. (1998). Thee Is No Such Thing as a Theapist: An Intoduction to the Theapeutic Pocess. London: Kanac Books. Retieved Mach 8, 2008, fom Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=11241547 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=23330078

Redleaf, a., & Baid, S.A. (1998). Behind Closed Doos: Gende, Sexuality, and Touch in the Docto/Patient Relationship. Westpot, CT: Aubun House. Retieved Mach 8, 2008, fom Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=23330078 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=94802088

Thon, B.E., Rubin, N.J., Holdeby, a.J., & Shealy, R.C. (1996). Client -- Theapist Intimacy: Responses of Psychotheapy Clients to a Consume-Oiented Bochue. Ethics & Behavio, 6(1), 17-28. Retieved Mach 8, 2008, fom Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=94802088… [Read More]

references for Informed Consent Information. Ethics & Behavior, 7(4), 311-328. Retrieved March 8, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=94803861 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=11241547

Holmes, C.A. (1998). There Is No Such Thing as a Therapist: An Introduction to the Therapeutic Process. London: Karnac Books. Retrieved March 8, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=11241547 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=23330078

Redleaf, a., & Baird, S.A. (1998). Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship. Westport, CT: Auburn House. Retrieved March 8, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=23330078 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=94802088

Thorn, B.E., Rubin, N.J., Holderby, a.J., & Shealy, R.C. (1996). Client -- Therapist Intimacy: Responses of Psychotherapy Clients to a Consumer-Oriented Brochure. Ethics & Behavior, 6(1), 17-28. Retrieved March 8, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=94802088
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Ethics Values and Decision-Making in Nursing Practice

Words: 1664 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60942488

Ethics, Values and Decision-Making in Nursing Practice

RIGHT FROM WRONG

A nurse's primary tasks are monitoring the patient's vital signs, administering medications, and helping doctors treat and perform procedures (Williams, 2012). Oftentimes and in many cases, these technical skills must be guided by certain and pertinent moral and ethical principles. This ethical and moral component of her overall responsibility is so important and critical that a code of ethics was created by the American Nurses Association to guide her in inevitable ethical dilemmas (Williams). These ethical dilemmas can include the clash between the principle of confidentiality and the concept of reasonable limits, between two or more ethical principles involving confidentiality, and the influence of culture on values.

. Importance of Ethical Theory to Nursing

In 1991, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations or JCAHO expressed the mandate that institutions shall address ethical issues in patient care and requires…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Badzek, L.A. et al. (1998). Administrative ethics and confidentiality/privacy issues. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing: American Nurses Association. Retrieved on June 14, 2012 from http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/tableofContents/Vol131998/NO3Dec1998/PrivacyIssues.aspx

Kotak, D and Lawson, a. (2008). Patient confidentiality and the intensivist. Vol 9 # 2

Journal of the Intensive Care Society: the Intensive Case Society. Retrieved on June

15, 2012 from http://www.journal.ICS.ac.uk/pdf/0902178.pdf
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Healthcare Law

Words: 1774 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68014946

Third Party Patient

The Doctrine of Apparent Agency

Scenario:

June, a 34-year-old divorced woman diagnosed with severe anorexia, is hospitalized. Her doctors feel she may need to be placed on a feeding tube soon to save her life. Initially June agreed to the feeding tube. However, in the evening (before the tube has been placed), she became combative, disoriented, and refused to have the feeding tube placed. Her mother and father insisted that the feeding tube be inserted despite her refusal to allow it. Her ex-husband wishes to uphold June's decision. The hospital administrators seek risk management for legal counsel.

Explain how the Patient Bill of ights applies to this situation.

The Patient Bill of ights articulates U.S. federal law on the doctor-patient relationship, and is consistent with laws on informed consent where licensed professional practice respective to patient well being is in order. Confidentiality of patient record is perhaps…… [Read More]

References

Bullough, B. ed. The Law and the expanding nursing role. New York, NY: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1980.

Callahan, Joan, ed. Ethical Issues in Profesional Life. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Patient Bill of Rights (2010). NIH. Retrieved from: http://www.cc.nih.gov/participate/patientinfo/legal/bill_of_rights.shtml

How is shared decision-making different from informed consent? (2010) American Cancer Society. Retrieved from: http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/FindingandPayingforTreatment/UnderstandingFinancialandLegalMatters/InformedConsent/informed-consent-shared-decision-making
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Becoming a Nurse

Words: 693 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10384482

Nurse

The nursing career differs from the medical field in that nursing is solely focused on the care and advocacy of the patient. Nurses are the intermediaries between doctor-patient relationships; they are the bridges that enable patients to understand the situation regarding healthcare and healthcare practices. Nurses depend on the human responses and the human condition in order to better care for the patients. They are responsible for further interactions with patients as well as their families and communities (American Nurses Association). This is the broad scope that the American Nurses Association basically defines the nursing career (American Nurses Association). Nurses not only assist physicians and doctors when it comes to certain diagnoses and treatments, they also are taught to genuinely care for the patients that transcend the medicine.

Nurses have the ability to fill a myriad of fields, one of which includes being a caregiver or the one responsible…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Association. Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, p. 7. 2004.

American Nurses Association. Nursing's Social Policy Statement. Second Ed, p. 6. 2003.

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition, Registered Nurses. Web. Retrieved on May 28, 2011. .

Glicksman, Allen, Joan Klein and Irene Warner Maron. Caregiver Nursing Protocol: Integrating Nursing Intervention With Social Work Services. Philadelphia Corporation for Aging. 2005. Web. 28 May 2011. .
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Ethics and Medicine

Words: 2188 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70905381

Moral Medicine, and a Doctor's Duty to the World

The 18th chapter of On Moral Medicine talks about the way medical professionals build their identity as practitioners and how the form relationships with other professionals and with patients. The author uses four unique terms to define his ideas on the four things these relationships can be based on: covenant, contract, code, and philanthropy. Using these concepts, he explores the current and the ideal relationships which define the medical field and experience. In the end, the author finishes by suggesting a change in the way doctor-patient relationships are conceived, but from the evidence of his own work one can see that he may not push this revolution far enough.

The idea of a covenant in this context is the idea of a deep commitment that transforms those who make it. Covenants are usually made through the exchange of gifts and responsibilities,…… [Read More]

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Incentives Increase the Quality of

Words: 11168 Length: 41 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71622257

In this way, any concerns that could come up and be problematic will be avoided and the information contained in the study can be accepted as being reliable, valid, and unique.

As has been mentioned, limitations are too often overlooked in studies, and it is often impossible to find all of the limitations that are contained in a study and spell them out for all to see. However, that does not mean that the limitations that are noticed should be overlooked. As long as they are legitimate, the more limitations that are discussed in the research the more significant the research will be found to be, since any weaknesses that it might have will be noted and dealt with. It is for this reason that this particular section will detail the limitations that this study faces.

The main limitation of this study, other than the biases of the researcher, is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Armour, B.S., Pitts, M.M., Maclean, R., Cangialose, C., Kishel, M., Imai, H. & Etchason, J. (2001). The effect of explicit financial incentives on physician behavior. Archives in Internal Medicine, 161, 1261-1266.

Berwick, M. (1996). Payment by capitation and the quality of care. JAMA, 335, 1127-1230.

Campbell, S.M., Koland, M.O. & Buetow, S.A. (2004). Defining quality of care. Social Science and Medicine, 51, 1611-25.

Devettere, R.J. (2000). Practical decision making in healthcare ethics: Cases and concepts. Washington DC: Georgetown University Press.
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HR Communications Integration Management Active

Words: 3577 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24985688

At the primary level of active listening are administrative personnel, especially at hospitals, who need to direct patients to the correct physicians for their ailments. Administrative personnel at doctors' offices are also important, as these personnel are often engaged in decision-making processes regarding the length of appointments and the care that is needed.

6. oles, responsibilities and relationships of project team members

The team leader will administer the responsibilities of each team member, as well as collocating the data gathered during interviews. The team leader will also determine the final format and content of the report.

Several roles will cover the various interviews to be conducted. Physicians, nurses, administrators, and patients will be interviewed. Within these groups, the type of illness and cultural context should also be investigated. Where doctors operate in a multi-cultural context, the potential exists to investigate the effectiveness of active listening, or its absence, can be…… [Read More]

References

Butow, P., Cockburn, J., Girgis, A., Bowman, D., Schofield, P., D'Este, C., Stojanovski, E. And Tattersall, M.H.N. (2007). Increasing oncologists' skills in eliciting and responding to emotional cues: evaluation of a communication skills training program. Psycho_Oncology. Retrieved from: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/Resources/Research%20Centres/CHERP/publications/Previous%20pdf%20papers/PsychOncCUES%20paper.pdf

Fassaert, T., Van Dulmen, S., Shcellevis, F., Van der Jagt, L. And Bensing, J. (2008). Raising positive expectations helps patients with minor ailments: A cross-sectional study. BMC Family Practice, Iss. 9. Retrieved from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2296/9/38/

Fassaert, T., Van Dulmen, S., Schellevis, F. And Bensing, J. (2007, June). Active listening in medical consultations: Development of the Active Listening Observation Scale (ALOS-global). Patient Education and Counseling Vol 68. Retrieved from: http://igitur-archive.library.uu.nl/fss/2008-0714-200810/bensing_2007_active.pdf

Ferguson, W.J. And Candib, L.M. (2002). Culture, language, and the doctor-patient relationship. University of Massachusetts Medical School. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1060&context=fmch_articles&sei-redir=1#search=%22active%20listening%20doctor%20patient%20relationship%22
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Complexities of Culture and Counseling

Words: 2436 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57159570

Culture and Counseling

In her book The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, author Anne Fadiman recounts the life and death of a little Hmong girl living in Merced, California. Lia Lee had what Western doctors call epilepsy, and which the Hmong have a far more lyrical explanation that lends itself to the title of Fadiman's book. The most common neurological disease, epilepsy can be frightening and potentially debilitating. However, in cultures around the world and throughout time, from the Hmong to the ancient Greeks, epilepsy opens pathways to creativity and an increased understanding of the universe. Thus, as Fadiman points out, many epileptics become shamans. When Lia Lee first started having epileptic seizures, her mom Foua, speaking not a word of English, rushed her to the Merced Community Medical Center. There, doctors tended to the eight-month-old child as best they could under the circumstances. Because all she was…… [Read More]

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Dying Profession of Independent Physicians

Words: 2852 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15294076

Independent Physicians

The Dying Profession of Independent Physicians

In the past, it has always been the case that physicians were, for the most part, independent contractors who had working agreements with certain hospitals in their region. However, that is not the case anymore. Physicians are increasingly joining healthcare organizations because the costs of remaining autonomous are too strenuous. It does not matter that independent physicians, on average still make more than their group counterparts because there are too many advantages to joining a healthcare group. The primary advantage being the fact that the individual is no longer solely responsible for such tasks as billing and scheduling. Although joining a group may be advantageous in some ways, it is troubling in others. Patient care is sometimes lessened because, as with the government sponsored socialized medical practices that exist in other countries, the patient may have to wait longer for care and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berman, Micah. "The 'Quality Health Care Coalition Act': Can Antitrust Law Improve Patient Care?" Stanford Law Review 53.3 (2003): 695-717. Print.

Biz Times. "Independent Physicians are a Vanishing Breed." Biz Times: Milwaukee Business News, 8 August 2008. Web.

Chufo, Veronica. "Independent Docs Vanishing: As Healthcare Costs Rise, Many Physicians are Joining Healthcare Systems to Pool Resources, but is That Trend Best for Patients?" Daily Press, 15 June 2009. Web.

Figliuolo, Michael L., Paul D. Mango and David H. McCormick. "Hospital, Heal Thyself." The McKinsey Quarterly (2000): 91-95.
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Duty to Treat

Words: 2350 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68550476

goal of their ethical calling, physicians, nurses and other health care workers are obliged to treat the sick and potentially infectious patients and, in so doing, they are to take some personal risk (Murray 2003). This was the bottom line of the assessment and stand made by Dr. Henry Masur and his colleagues at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID), particularly during the outbreak of dread global SARS in Canada and Hong Kong last year. They also referred to other epidemics, such as the HIV / AIDS.

Masur emphasized that this primary goal and obligation is voluntary and sets the medical profession apart from other professions, precisely because of the involvement of some personal risk in fulfilling that obligation. esides physicians, medical professionals are nurses, dentists and health workers. Records of the first SARS outbreaks in Toronto and Hong Kong showed that a huge 50% of those…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Katz, Laura L. And Marshall B. Paul. When a Physician May Refuse to Treat a Patient. Physician's News Digest, 2000. http://www.physiciansnews.com/law.202.html

Levin, Aaron. Doctors Willing But Not Ready to Treat Deadly Bio-terror Agents. Health Behavior News Service: Center for the Advancement of Health, 2003. http://www.cfah.org/ubns/news/bioterror09-17-03.cfm

Murray, Terry. Health Care Staff Have a Duty to Treat. The Medical Post: Rogers Media, 2003. http://www.medicalpost.com/mpcontent/article.jsp.jsessionid=NJCJNDCEAGHH?content=20020515_09

Schulman, David I. The Dentist, HIV and the Law: Duty to Treat, Need to Understand. Dental Treatment Consideration, 2000. http://www.hivdent.org/dtcblaa082001.htm
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Ethics Psychology Has a Professional

Words: 1811 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97371740

This means that the decision I make in this scenario must be guided by sincere questions concerning the validity of my practice and the importance of alternate ambitions such as my desire to make a foray into the screenwriting profession. It is thus that I have decided the costs are simply too high to maintain the current relationship which I have with my patient.

Therefore, the only appropriate measure is for me to immediately cease my counseling relationship with the patient. In order to ensure that the patient does not lose his access to the treatment which he requires, he will be referred to one of my respected colleagues. It is believed that the necessary cost of breaking from this established doctor/patient relationship will be outweighed by the benefits of removing myself from a situation in which objectivity has been lost.

Upon separating form the patient thusly, I would make…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Fisher, C.B. (2008). Decoding the Ethics Code. Sage Publications.

Holcomb, W.R. (2006). Thinking Correctly About Ethics: A Review of Ethical Practice in Forensic Psychology. Psychology Critiques, 51(48), 1554-1556.

Jordan, A.E. & Meara, N.M. (1990). Ethics and the Professional Practice of Psychologists: The Role of Virtues and Principles. Professional Psychology Resource Press, 21(2), 107-114.

Koocher, G.P. & Keith-Spiegel, P. (1998). Ethics in Psychology. Oxford University Press.
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Analyzing the Data Analysis

Words: 743 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15790536

recordings, what would you define as the unit for analysis? hy? How many data units (in rough estimates) are you likely to get based on this decision? Does the estimated number of data units seem adequate? hy or why not?

Through the analysis of the recordings, I would define communication as the measure for analysis. The reason being, efficacious doctor communication is vital to constructive doctor-patient relationships and proposes better health results. In addition, doctor communication is deemed the strongest and most reliable forecaster of patient assessments and evaluations of doctors (Quigley et al., 2014). Proper communication skills, together with deliberation and requisite time to effectively listen and offer apparent and clear explanations are some of the characteristics that patients expect for, the most, in physicians. As a result, the reports of doctor communication from patients are deemed to be the consistent and assertive predictor of general doctor assessments for…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Quigley, D. D., Elliott, M. N., Farley, D. O., Burkhart, Q., Skootsky, S. A., & Hays, R. D. (2014).

Specialties differ in which aspects of doctor communication predict overall physician ratings. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 29(3), 447-454. http://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-013-2663-2

Roberts, M. J., Campbell, J. L., Abel, G. A., Davey, A. F., Elmore, N. L., Maramba, I., ... Burt, J. A.

(2014). Understanding high and low patient experience scores in primary care: analysis of patients' survey data for general practices and individual doctors. BMJ, 349, g6034. http://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g6034
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Physicians Today Is it a Profession or Craft

Words: 1255 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36164580

Physicians today - is it a profession or craft?

Dating back to the era of Hippocrates, who is also known as the father of medicine, a physician's advice was followed without question. Hippocrates, born in 460 B.C, fought with the superstitious beliefs of that time, and observed that fresh air, good diet, cleanliness and most importantly, plenty of rest, helped in fast recovery. Through history, we come to learn that the oath physicians undertake today, before their medical practice, was formulated during that time, reflecting their sincerity and humbleness towards the noble profession. Naturally, therefore, a physician of that era was viewed in a paternalistic manner and the prevailing culture was definitely one of passive and submissive acceptance. (Oath and Law of Hippocrates, 1910)

Through time, there has been a considerable mutation of the image society has towards doctors. There are several reasons that attribute to reason this change. In…… [Read More]

REFERENCES:

General Medical Council, . (2001). Good medical practice. Retrieved from  http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/a_z_guidance.asp 

F. Allen, David. (1976, Feburary 13). The ethical responsibility of the physician. The Yale Journal Of Biology And Medicine, 49, 447-454.

Collier, P.F., Oath and Law of Hippocrates (1910). Harvard Classics Volume 38 (Online) gopher..//ftp.std.com//00/obi/book/Hippocrates/Hippocratic.Oath (June 25, 2011).

Illich. I, "Medical Namesis" 45 pp. Pantheon Books, Random House, New York, 1976.
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Ethical Principles to Follow When Treating Jehovah S Witnesses

Words: 2851 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50317507

Ectopic Pegnancy and the Jehovah's Witness

It is impotant to be awae of cultual and eligious beliefs within a community, especially as a health cae povide, because when dealing with patients fom within that community thee can be tensions that aise if the teatment violates a pinciple of the cultual/eligious community. This would be the case wee a membe of Jehovah's Witness community to come into the hospital with the symptom descibed in the case study in which the woman has ectopic pegnancy. Because it is a tenant of the Jehovah's Witness community to eject blood tansfusion, it is impotant that a hospital have a back-up plan fo such cases so as to be able to pactice "bloodless medicine" in ode to save the lives of patients like the 25-yea-old woman in the case scenaio (Ratcliffe, 2004). This pape will discuss the impact of teating Jehovah's Witnesses when the teatment…… [Read More]

references and the Right to Forgo Life-Saving Treatments. Social Theory and Practice, 41(4): 716-733.
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Personal Statement of a Mexican

Words: 1097 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18898496



As I have expanded my work efforts at the hospital, I have realized more and more that the human element in such relationships is irreplaceable. While technology may shape the future of the human race, only humanity can touch individual lives. Even the greatest advances in medical knowledge and techniques require similar progress in healthcare accessibility, better education about health issues, and strong doctor-patient relationships. Spending time watching the doctors and talking to patients convinced me that, in addition to my research in technology, I wanted to work directly with people who are in need of help.

I am excited to be back on my original path towards medicine, and am confident that my computer science skills will add much value as I research medical technology. My work at the hospital has shown me that there is much room for improvement in the medical industry, particularly when it comes to…… [Read More]

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Technology Decision Making Effect of Technology Decision

Words: 2527 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72232227

Technology Decision Making

Effect of technology decision making

Technology has been growing over a period of years due to globalization. All individuals, organizations, and even the society as a whole have been affected by the information and communication uprising. This has even changed their lifestyles. The Information is readily available in the computers mostly through internet technology and telecommunications. The Organizations are able to build their information systems in a variety of formats. A System may be defined as a sequence of functional components which are connected by communication links showing or demonstrating purpose and objective directed performance (Kampov 2010). However, it is important to analyze and discuss systems, informatics theories and DIK model. The paper will also discuss the role of expert system in nursing care, use of decision aids and also the decision support systems. There will be discussion on how the effect of technology on decision making…… [Read More]

References

Bahamonde L., DuMouchel W, Shea S . (2003). A meta-analysis in16 randomized controlled trials for evaluating computer-based clinical reminder systems in preventive care for ambulatory setting. J Am Med Inform Asso. c;3:399-409

Greenes R.A. (2009). Informatics and a health care strategy for the future -- general directions. Studies In Health Technology AndInformatics [Stud Health Technol Inform], Vol. 149, pp. 21-8; PMID: 19745469

Hart J. K, Newton B. W, Boone S.E. (2010).University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic healthrecord and medical informatics training for undergraduatehealth professionals. Journal Of The Medical Library Association: JMLA [J Med Libr AssocVol. 98 (3), pp. 212-6.

Kampov J. (2010). Survey of biomedical and health care informatics programs in the United States. Journal of Medical Library Association.
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Truth to Tell

Words: 417 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96957299

Telling Patients the Truth

In regards to the permissibility of deception on the part of Sokol, the writer (2006) ultimately argues that "withholding…information from…patients would be ethically permissible and, more generally, that honesty is not always the best policy" (p. 19). Sokol reaches this conclusion by evaluating a real life case study in which a daughter is willing to donate her kidney to an individual whom she believes is her father. However, while medically evaluating the former for compliance with kidney transplant criteria, the doctors determined that the pair cannot be biologically related. The critical determinant in Sokol's conclusion (2006) is that "The testing was not done to establish paternity and, from a medical point-of-view, the findings do not preclude…donating" (p. 19). Essentially, the author utilizes this case study to reason that informing the patients of this situation could provide too many unnecessary complications which could negatively impact the kidney…… [Read More]

References

Higgs, R. (1985). On telling patients the truth. In Bioethics: An Anthology. Ed. Helga Kuhseand Peter Singer. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. 2006.

Sokol, D.K. (2006). Truth-telling in the doctor patient relationship: a case analysis. Clinical Ethics. 1.3.
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U S Healthcare Quality to Analyze and Compare

Words: 2225 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29067337

U.S. Healthcare

[QUALITY]

To analyze and compare the U.S. healthcare, internationally, it is important to know what really constitutes a good health care system. The U.S. Institute of Medicine describes this quality as, "the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge." This system, in its broad sense, should comprise of two main branches of preventative and curative medicine, both of which should cover different aspects of health, such as travel medicine, school health, occupational health, mental health, reproductive health and so on. Furthermore, a well established health care system does not act independently but in co-ordinance with other industries, such as the agricultural industry. Therefore, since a well developed nation has better access to proper sanitation, housing and adequate nutrition, it is more likely to have a better developed health care system. Other factors,…… [Read More]

References

Atrash, H.K., Alexander, S., & Breg, C. (1993, Feburary 05). Maternal mortality in developed countries: not just a concern of the past Obstetrics and Gynecology, 15(3), Retrieved from http://www.inamay.com/?page_id=86

Docteur, E. & Berenson, R.A. (2009, August). How does the quality of u.s. health care compare internationally?. Timely Analysis Of Health Policy Issues, Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/uploadedpdf/411947_ushealthcare_quality.pdf

Health care for all: a frameworkfor moving to a primary care-based health care system in the United States. (2011). American Academy Of Family Physicians, Retrieved from Kurt, H. (2008). A success story in american health care: eliminating infections and saving lives in michigan. Healthreform.gov

Mark A., S., McGlynn, E.A., & Brook, R.H. (1998). How good is the quality of health care in the United States? The Millibank Quarterly, 76(4), retrieved from  http://www.milbank.org/760401.html
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VA Mental Health System Prof

Words: 856 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3627655

)

Greenberg et al. sought to investigate whether the community-based model coupled with the implementation of service-line delivery of mental healthcare to local veterans would improve upon its previous numbers. Mental health services at 139 Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs) were studied over a 6-year period. Four areas of concern were measured: 1) the continuity of care veterans received for their mental health issues; 2) recidivism after discharge; 3) the community-based model as compared with the traditional inpatient hospital care model; and 4) the maintenance of proportionate funding being that the program is almost exclusively taxpayer-supported (Greenberg 1013). In other words, could a publicly-funded entity adequately take care of its patients' mental health issues just as well or even better than private, commercialized healthcare facilities?

Chapko et al.'s study found that the community-based models fared better at responding to geographically-specific areas and its veterans, producing more personalized care…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chapko, Michael K., Steven J. Borowsky, John C. Fortney, Ashley N. Hedeen, Marsha Hoegle, Matthew L. Maciejewski, and Carol VanDeusen Lukas. "Evaluation of the Department of Veterans Affairs Community-Based Outpatient Clinics." Medical Care, Vol. 40, No. 7 (July 2002) pp. 555-60. Print.

Greenberg, Greg A., Robert A. Rosenheck, and Martin P. Charns. "From Profession-based Leadership to Service Line Management in the Veteran's Health Administration: Impact on Mental Health." Medical Care, Vol. 41, No. 9 (Sept. 2003), pp. 1013-23. Print.

Oliver, Adam. "The Veteran's Health Administration: An American Success Story?" The Milbank Quarterly, Vol. 85, No. 1 (2007), pp. 5-35. Print.
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Rapport and Professional Boundaries the

Words: 2951 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31352564

The counselor should address issues at the time they occur with the patient and:

acknowledge importance of feelings, emphasize the provider-patient relationship and the importance of maintaining objectivity"; and finally "emphasize that the rejection of a requesting behavior does not imply a lack of caring." (arbour, 2007)

If the boundary issues affect the ability of the counseling in providing objective and compassion care, the counselor should seek professional counseling for self and possibly for the patient and their family. (arbour, 2007)

The work of Michael Liimatta entitled: "Issues of Personal oundaries in Counseling: Part I" states that many times the phrase 'professional distance' is taken by people to mean cold and uncaring but in reality 'professional distance' is quite opposite of uncaring and is actually a strategy geared toward protecting the client from the counselors loss of objectivity." (Liimatta, 2001)

IV. Maintaining the Delicate alance between Rapport and Professional oundaries…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anastasi, a. (1988). Psychological testing (6th ed.).(New York: Macmillan)

Barbour, Lise Taylor (2007) Fast Fact and Concept #172: Professional-Patient boundaries in Palliative Care. End-of-Life Physician Education character. American Journal of Psychotherapy, 28, 194-207.

Claiborn, W. (1982). The problem of professional incompetence. Professional Delrojo, James (2004) Six Tips for Building and Maintaining Rapport. Counseling and Therapy. Online available at http://www.enhancedhealing.com/articles/view.php?article=862

Dubin, S. (1972). Obsolescence or lifelong education: A choice for the professional.
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Social Media in Healthcare

Words: 729 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95797978

Social media/technology in healthcare within the forum/blog online setting is the next step in online communication. Although many have had problems identifying social media as the new platform for communication, it has grown on its own into one of the main methods of communication, advertising, and discussion for consumers and businesses. Friends discuss things over Facebook and share their lives on Instagram and snapchat. Translating that into the healthcare setting can invite people working in healthcare to expand their networks and promote research and new treatment methods they believe will change the face of healthcare. "Many social media tools are available for health care professionals (HCPs), including social networking platforms, blogs, microblogs, wikis, media-sharing sites, and virtual reality and gaming environments" (Ventola, 2014, p. 491).

The HON Code of Conduct for medical and health Web sites has several principles that may muddy the waters when it comes to introducing social…… [Read More]

References

Eschenbrenner, B. & Nah, F. (2015). Social Media in Health Care. Lecture Notes In Computer Science, 76-85. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20895-4_8

US,. (2013). Top 5 Ways Social Media is Used by Healthcare Professionals. The University of Scranton Online. Retrieved 19 July 2016, from http://elearning.scranton.edu/resource/business-leadership/top-5-ways-social-media-is-used-by-healthcare-professionals

Ventola, C. (2014). Social Media and Health Care Professionals: Benefits, Risks, and Best Practices.Pharmacy And Therapeutics, 39(7), 491. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4103576/

Wiener, L. & Kazak, A. (2015). Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: A Quick Reference on the Psychosocial Dimensions of Cancer Symptom Management (p. 345). Oxford University Press.