Eric Schlosser Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Schlosser Fast Food Nation

Words: 2025 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31701015

Schlosser: Fast Food Nation

The fast food industry has been infused into the every nook and corner of American Society over the last three decades. The industry seen to have originated with a few modest hot dog and hamburger of Southern California have been perceived to have extended to every nook and corner of the nation, marketing an extensive range of food products to which affordable customers are found widely. Fast food is presently provided at restaurants and drive-through, at stadiums, airports, zoos, high schools, elementary schools and universities, on cruise ships, trains, and airplanes, at K-Marts, Wal-Marts, gas stations, and also at hospital cafeterias. As per an estimate the total expenditure of Americans on fast food during 1970 was about $6 billion. (Introduction: Fast Food Nation - The Dark Side of the All-American Meal)

The expenditure had a massive increase to about $110 billion in 2000. Americans presently perceive…… [Read More]

References

Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser: A Book Club Reading Guide. Retrieved from http://www.bookbrowse.com/reading_guides/detail/index.cfm?book_number=769 Accessed on 25 May, 2005

Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal by Eric Schlosser. Retrieved from http://www.readinggroupguides.com/guides3/fast_food_nation1.asp Accessed on 25 May, 2005

Introduction: Fast Food Nation - The Dark Side of the All-American Meal. Retrieved from  http://www.nytimes.com /books/first/s/schlosser-fast.html Accessed on 25 May, 2005

Rosenberg, Matt. T. Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser. February 2, 2001. Retrieved from  http://geography.about.com/library/misc/blffn.htm  Accessed on 25 May, 2005
View Full Essay

Decline of the American Diet

Words: 5127 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39593950

The meat comes from a local independent packing company that doesn't buy beef that has been injected with growth hormones; the buns are from a bakery in Pueblo, Colorado; and two hundred pounds of potatoes are "peeled every morning in the kitchen and then sliced with an old crank-operated contraption." The cooks make $10 an hour, and all other employees earn $8.00 an hour. hen asked why the Conway family provides health insurance for all full time employees, Rich Conway said, "e want to have healthy employees."

The author also calls for changes in the way the U.S. Congress oversees advertising, asserting on page 262 that Congress "should immediately ban all advertisements aimed at children that promote foods high in fat and sugar." The justification for that ban would be that 30 years ago, congress banned cigarette ads from TV and radio, because of course cigarettes were seen as a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Robbins, John. (2001). The Food Revolution: How Your Diet Can Help Save Your Life and Our

World. Boston: Conari Press.

Schlosser, Eric. (2001). Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal. New York:

Houghton Mifflin Company.
View Full Essay

Fast Food Nation the Ramifications of Technology

Words: 612 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42477659

Fast Food Nation

The Ramifications of Technology on Health Care and elfare of Animals and Meatpacking orkers in "Fast Food Nation" by Eric Schlosser

In the book "Fast Food Nation" by Eric Schlosser, newfound information about the behind-the-scenes operations of fast food establishments such as the well-known McDonald's, had been discussed critically. In revealing the 'hidden operations' behind the production of merchandise associated with the fast food industry such as meat production, Schlosser was able to convey his message that technology had been more of a detriment than beneficial to consumers of these fast food establishments.

In arguing his position that the fast food industry was detrimental to consumers, he provided examples in which the technology of machinery had led to developments that only increased the chances of dangerous diseases to spread and thrive and worsened the conditions in which meatpackers worked. Moreover, these detrimental effects of technology had important…… [Read More]

Work cited

Schlosser, E. (2002). Fast Food Nation: the dark side of the all-American meal. NY: Perennial Books.
View Full Essay

American Politics

Words: 1888 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13772449

Food Nation is the kind of book that you hope young people read because it demonstrates far better than any social studies class the need for government regulation, the unchecked power of multinational corporations and the importance of our everyday decisions.

USA Today

Despite international concerns with the Cold War and Senator McCarthy's accusations, the 1950s were an exciting change for many Americans. A large number headed out to the suburbs to newly designed housing. National roads started sweeping across the cities and towns. Soon, another change came about on these roads: the arrival of fast-food restaurants, which have epitomized America ever since. People just have to is drive up to the window and order their meals; within minutes they are fed and content. Yet, there are always two sides to an issue, especially when big money is involved. According to the book Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser, fast-food…… [Read More]

Reference

Schlosser, Eric. Fast Food Nation. New York: Harper Collins, 2002.
View Full Essay

Obesity Is When a Person Has an

Words: 1778 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5029382

Obesity is when a person has an unhealthy amount of body fat. It causes a person to be overweight in all aspects of the body. There is a lot of body fat due to being overweight. It is important for every human being to have some body fat. However too much fat can lead to a lot of health problems. There are a lot of factors which contribute to obesity. Experts believe that the high calorie diets of our time are to blame for majority of the cases. A lot of people eat food such as burgers, nuggets, ice cream, cake, chips, candy and other various types of snacks. These snacks are full of fats and calories. Eating fatty foods contributes to obesity. Obesity is also linked to the genetics of a body. It can occur if a person has obesity in the family.

Fast Food's link to Obesity

People…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser, 2000

2. Mayo Clinic: Obesity www.cnn.com/mayo

3. BBC Health: Why fast food makes you fat, October 2003

4. Overweight and Obesity, Healthy People 2010: Leading Health Indicators and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
View Full Essay

Mass Culture and Popular Culture and Studying Bestsellers Books

Words: 1710 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51172227

Mass Culture and Popular Culture and Studying Bestsellers Books

This paper takes into account the differences in the best sellers written in the 1980's and in the 1990's. It also focuses on the themes of the best sellers from the two decades and what makes them appealing to the society.

Mass culture and popular culture and studying bestsellers books

In this day and age, books are being written with a motive to inculcate motives, teaching the readers a lesson every time they open the book.

Good books always serve as a constructive way to provoke idle thoughts. Women started writing as a profession back in the early 1800's. They started off writing articles for magazines, containing information on fashion, science, household tips, and covering other domestic issues. These magazines trained every woman with the proper code of etiquette, style and manner of dressing nicely even motivated women from the lower…… [Read More]

References

Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed

Dave Pelzer, A Child Called it

Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation
View Full Essay

Reefer Madness Sex Drugs and

Words: 696 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39794418

S. is the world's leading producer of pornographic media. The Reagan dministration was obsessed with prosecuting pornographers, and eventually convicted one of the industry's earliest producers, a man named Reuben Sturman, on charges of tax evasion. Ironically, the dministration claimed to worship dam Smith and free enterprise -- except, of course, when it conflicted with its ideals of Christian morality.

Republican administrations have felt less uncomfortable with the prospect of illegal labor, as Schlosser's chronicles of the conditions of strawberry pickers illustrate. Children, men, and women work at the back-breaking labor for $6.75-$10 a day (Schlosser 2003, p. 92). gain, hypocrisy is evident -- the same right-wing advertisers who created the Willie Horton ad campaign that defeated Michael Dukakis have fought unionization of the migrant workers, and local authorities have refused to set up low-income housing (Schlosser 2003, p. 106). The market rewards only efficiency, Schlosser muses: "every other human…… [Read More]

Attitudes about sexuality are even more hypocritical. For example, the United States has some of the strictest rules in the world about what can be said and shown on television, yet the U.S. is the world's leading producer of pornographic media. The Reagan Administration was obsessed with prosecuting pornographers, and eventually convicted one of the industry's earliest producers, a man named Reuben Sturman, on charges of tax evasion. Ironically, the Administration claimed to worship Adam Smith and free enterprise -- except, of course, when it conflicted with its ideals of Christian morality.

Republican administrations have felt less uncomfortable with the prospect of illegal labor, as Schlosser's chronicles of the conditions of strawberry pickers illustrate. Children, men, and women work at the back-breaking labor for $6.75-$10 a day (Schlosser 2003, p. 92). Again, hypocrisy is evident -- the same right-wing advertisers who created the Willie Horton ad campaign that defeated Michael Dukakis have fought unionization of the migrant workers, and local authorities have refused to set up low-income housing (Schlosser 2003, p. 106). The market rewards only efficiency, Schlosser muses: "every other human value gets in the way," in the case of these workers (Schlosser 2003, p. 108).

It is especially interesting to read this book in light of the recent failures of the free market system to regulate itself. Supposedly, the dangers and costs of illegal enterprises should be too great for the producers -- yet these industries remain wildly popular, and laws have proved ineffective in curtailing their growth. This is partially due to the powerful nature of the demand for drugs, sexuality, and money, but also because of the piecemeal nature of legislation designed to curb 'vices.' On one hand, big tobacco supports candidates in Congress, while Congress passes stringent laws regarding the drug trade in marijuana. On one hand, pornography is condemned and limited through zoning legislation, yet it is widely available on the internet. On one hand, businesses grow rich because of the low wages they pay illegal workers, yet the politicians who support tax breaks for those businesses are also vociferously anti-immigration. Schlosser selects three, seemingly unrelated industries and demands that Americans look at all of them through the same lens, and confront America's collective, blind hypocrisy.
View Full Essay

Hindering Society Is Our Industrial

Words: 660 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91270817

" In one supreme irony, as McDonald's makes Americans less healthy, McDonald's as a company is dependant on poorly-paid workers who receive few benefits, including healthcare. The workers are disposable as the food and the packaging they assemble for McDonald's patrons. It is in the company's interest not to keep them employed for long, so they remain part-time employees without real healthcare. They learn no skills and do not improve their promotional prospects. And often the only food they can afford, lacking adequate facilities or time to prepare a meal, is a McDonald's meal.

The slaughterhouses where the processed meats that go into McDonald's hamburgers are just as mechanized as McDonald's drive-through, only the cows that move through their doors do not exit intact. Yet the fate of the human executors of these cows is almost as terrible. Working conditions in slaughterhouses and meat-processing plants are dangerous. The workers are…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Jungle Upton Sinclair Describes Horrific Conditions Within

Words: 616 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70032724

Jungle, Upton Sinclair describes horrific conditions within the meatpacking plants, and writes of men falling into tanks and being ground up with animal parts and then made into lard (Sinclair pp). He writes that it was Jurgis's job to slide the cows into the trap, calves and all, and on the floor below they took out these slunk calves and butchered them for meat and even used the skins (Sinclair pp). Sinclair describes that cattle that came in hurt, with broken legs, or had died from causes no one knew, were called 'downers,' and the packing house had a special elevator upon which they were raised to the killing beds, where they were handled with businesslike nonchalance and eventually scattered here and there with the rest of the meat so that they could not be identified (Sinclair pp). The author also described that there was never any washing of the…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Schlosser, Eric. "The Chain Never Stops." Mother Jones. July/August 2001.

Sinclair, Upton. The Jungle. Retrieved October 30, 2005 from:

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/Literature/Sinclair/TheJungle/
View Full Essay

Total Rewards What Incentivizes Workers

Words: 2062 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22757811

McDonald's: Total ewards

Introduction to and purpose of the organization

Historically, the fast food industry as a whole has a very high rate of employee turnover. Employees tend to be quite transient in their loyalties to these organizations, in part because fast food corporations often make very little investment in their workers and strive to give employees minimal benefits and pay. McDonald's has struggled in recent years with criticism for how it treats its employees. "A reliance on cheap labor has been crucial to the fast food industry's success. It's no accident that the industry's highest rate of growth occurred during a period when the real value of the U.S. minimum wage declined by about 40%…The chains are willing to put up with turnover rates of 300 to 400% in order to keep their labor costs low. It doesn't really matter to them who comes or goes, since this system…… [Read More]

References

Getting to know us. (2014). McDonald's. Retrieved from:

 http://www.aboutmcdonalds.com/mcd/our_company.html 

Interview with Eric Schlosser. (2012). Readers Read. Retrieved from:

http://www.readersread.com/features/schlosser.htm
View Full Essay

Compensation The Changing Face of

Words: 2076 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11466763

Offering benefits such as healthcare and even stock options to lower-level employees, a compensation strategy also pursued by Starbucks (a company both literally and figuratively 'green' in its image), is another example of a policy that can benefit both the company and employees -- employees enjoy greater security, while the companies reduce the high rate of workplace turnover that is endemic to the service industry at companies like McDonald's. In fact, as Eric Schlosser observed in Fast Food Nation, fast food companies have often deliberately made life unpleasant for lower-level employees, to reduce the need to offer them promotions, benefits, and higher pay, on the theory that it is easy to train a new worker to operate a cash register. "How can workers look to this industry as a career…when it pays them the minimum wage and provides them no health benefits" (Schlosser 2001, p. 88). hole Foods and Starbucks…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Benefits." Google website. February 8, 2010.

http://google.com/international/en/jobs/lifeatgoogle/benefits/

"Careers." Whole Foods Market. February 8, 2010.

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/careers/benefits_us.php
View Full Essay

Pizza Hut in Egypt and

Words: 3946 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17777304

This is largely due to the fact that, despite the constant sense of rejection of western influence among the older generation, the young generation of Muslim teenagers is more and more interested in the American lifestyle and every product that suggests a part of American culture. Dahlia Zayed, Regional Marketing Manager for TNS Middle East & Africa supports this point in her article "Fast food still sells in Egypt" arguing that the mirage of the American culture has made the society change. At the same time however, it is pointed out that the main part was played by the campaigns that tried to promote precisely the idea that companies have oriented their products according to the special needs of the Muslim religion which rejects pork meat or different other spices that otherwise make the basis of Pizza Hut products. This adaptability is important in a world of competition because it…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barry Mike John W. Slocum Jr. "Slice of Reality: Changing Culture at Pizza Hut and Yum! Brands, Inc." Organizational Dynamics, Vol. 32, No. 4, pp. 319-330, 2003.

Craig S. Smith. "The Market McDonald's Missed: The Muslim Burger." Clichy-sous-Bois Journal. The New York Times International. 2005. (4 March 2008)  http://www.nytimes.com /2005/09/16/international/europe/16halal.html?_r=2&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

Fenlon, Brodie. "China: Better Rich Than Red. Leashing the Economic Dragon." The Toronto Sun Toronto, Canada, Nov. 29, 2002. (4 March 2008)  http://www.worldpress.org/Asia/895.cfm 

FoxNews. "Pakistani Youths Set Pizza Hut on Fire to Protest Cleric's Death." Fast Food Jihad. 2006 (4 March 2008) http://www.jihadwatch.org/archives/012274.php
View Full Essay

Decision to Purchase Use or Consume the

Words: 2869 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47197822

decision to purchase, use or consume the product of a particular brand is not simply a utilitarian decision that focuses on what goods a consumer wants, it is also a matter of the consumer's self-image. The customer asks himself, perhaps subconsciously, is he "the type of person" who eats at McDonald's, or uses Bayer aspirin? From there, the customer makes a decision to use, or not use, the product. However, the answers to these questions are less than simple. They are intricately and intrinsically connected to brand image and perception. Consumers are willing to put more money and resources into things that make them feel good about themselves. Companies want to leave their customers feeling good about their purchasing decision, with a raised self-image. However, what makes a person feel good about herself changes as values and society change. More than any other industry, this may be true about food…… [Read More]

References

Adamson, R. 3 May 2002. "Fast Food Nation." Salon Magazine. Accessed 23 February, 2011

Design Woo. (5 October 2010) McDonald's Redesign: a New Era for Fast-Food Restaurants. Design Woo. Accessed 23 February 2011

Gino F, Norton, MI, & Ariely D. (2010). The counterfeit self: The deceptive costs of faking it. Psychological Science, 21(5), 712-20

HEHER, A. 6 October 2009. Burger King plans "edgy, futuristic" remodel of restaurants. The Huffington Post. Accessed 23 February 2011
View Full Essay

Causes for the Popularity of

Words: 1101 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47551676

"In toy stores, children can become accustomed to food brands early by buying a Hostess bake set, Barbie's Pizza Hut play set or Fisher-Price's Oreo Matchin' Middles game. and, for budding math whizzes, there is a series of books from Hershey's Kisses on addition, subtraction and fractions" (Barboza, 2002).

Of course, the most notorious innovation in fast food, even more so than the Happy Meal, targeted at children, is the Supersized Meal. For people without children, for people for whom taste is not much of an issue, the issue of value often trumps everything. Supersizing means increasing the size of the cheapest parts of the traditional combo meal, the potatoes (starch) and the soda (high fructose corn syrup, cheaper even than real sugar). For only pennies more, people can get much larger portions, but because people tend to eat more food when more food is placed before them, this causes…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barboza, David. (5 Aug 2003). "Fast Food Industry Zeroes in on Children

International Herald Tribune. Retrieved 3 Apr 2007 at  http://www.rense.com/general39/fast.htm 

Schlosser, Eric. (3 Sept 1998). "Fast-Food Nation: The True Cost of America's Diet."

Rolling Stone. Issue 794. Retrieved 3 Apr 2007 at  http://www.mcspotlight.org/media/press/rollingstone1.html
View Full Essay

Researching a Call for Action

Words: 1208 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24638629

com. (2006) Nutritional information database retrieved 13 Dec
2006 at


Fitday.com. (2006) Nutritional information database retrieved 13 Dec 2006
at
< http://fitday.com/>

Severson, Kim. (13 Dec 2003) "New York Gets Ready to Count Calories."
The New York Times. Retrieved 13 Dec 2006 at


Schlosser, Eric. (2005) Fast Food Nation. New York: Harper Perennial.

"Supersize Me." (2004). Directed by Morgan Spurlock.

"Overweight and Obesity."(2006) CDC: Council for Disease Control.
Retrieved 13 Dec
2006 at… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Tainted Meat Recalls of Tainted Meat by

Words: 1118 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37087402

Tainted Meat

Recalls of tainted meat by government authorities

Consumers don't know when and where it's being recalled from III. The Solution -- Disclosure

The Case Against Disclosure

hy Disclosure, ethically, is the right thing to do.

"Tastes like (the California State Legislature is being) Chicken"

Public threats to health and safety in the food industry pose unique ethical quandaries for public health officials. On one hand, full disclosure seems to be the best option. No one wants people, especially children, becoming ill, from tainted food. Even from a capitalist's potentially self-interested perspective, nothing was worse for the fast food industry when a child died from e.coli poisoning from a Jack n' the Box hamburger. Eric Schlosser's landmark Fast Food Nation, the expose of the hamburger and fast food industry was the result, and sales of the chain have been plummeting since the revelation.

However, on the other hand, no…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lee, Mike. (October 2, 2004)"Recall data to remain secret: Bill to release details on retail sales of possibly tainted meat vetoed by governor." The Sacramento Bee. Retrieved on October 3, 2004 at http://www.sacbee.com/content/business/story/10948904p-11866241c.html

Schlosser, Eric. (2001) Fast Food Nation. Houghton Mifflin, 2001.

USDA treats those details as confidential business information and says secrecy is the key to getting cooperation from meat companies.
View Full Essay

Perception Smell Taste and Sight

Words: 2825 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64663348

In the same way, if one were to intentionally color the inside of a piece of apple a dark brown color, a color that is generally associated with rotten apples, then one would not taste it. In essence, this means that at times, one sense would effectively overwhelm the others, so that eventually, this sense would overtake the others. (Fields, 2004)

In this particular case of the brown apple, the sight of the brown color in the apple would overwhelm the other senses of smell and taste, until such time that one would feel tempted to throw the apple away rather than take a risk and taste it. This means that the sense of sight can prove invaluable to a person as far as tasting the food is concerned; it is the sense of sight that one may rely on to warn us that the food has gone bad, or…… [Read More]

References

Aitkin, Thomas Johnstone. (1838) "Elements of physiology"

Scott, Webster and Geary.

Brillat-Savarin, Jean; Brillat-Savarin, Anthelme. (2002) "The Physiology of taste"

Courier Dover Publications.
View Full Essay

Shopping as an Addiction

Words: 2280 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71025576

Addictive Virus" -- later to become the thirteenth chapter of their bestselling book Affluenza -- John De Graaf, David ann, and Thomas H. Naylor engage in a highly rhetorical comparison of addictive shopping to physical addictions such as alcoholism and drug addiction and behavioral addictions like compulsive gambling. It becomes clear shortly into their paper that their purpose is largely alarmist and moralistic, rather than medically or therapeutically intended: none of the authors has any medical or psychiatric credentials. I hope by addressing three aspects of their paper -- their rhetorical strategy, their shifts in focus, and in particular their examples presented as evidence, particularly their closing example -- that I may show the ways in which their thoughts actually confuse rather than clarify issues of behavioral addiction.

The title alone of the essay gives, in miniature, a fair taste of De Graaf et al.'s rhetorical strategy: the phrase "the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boyer, Peter J. "The Deliverer: A Pizza Mogul Funds a Moral Crusade." The New Yorker Feb 19, 2007. Accessed 10 Feb 2011 at: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/02/19/070219fa_fact_boyer#ixzz1DejZemmm

De Graaf John, Wann, David, and Naylor, Thomas H. "The Addictive Virus." In Maasik, Sonia and Solomon, Jack, Signs of Life in the U.S.A.: Readings on Popular Culture for Writers. Sixth Edition. New York: Beford St. Martin's, 2008. 71-5.
View Full Essay

Why In-N-Out Should Expand East

Words: 893 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49627286

In-N-Out Burger is a beloved institution on the est Coast because of its high-quality ingredients; its fresh, made-to-order taste, and the popularity of its not-so-secret menu which gives loyal patrons a sense of being part of an 'in' crowd when they order from the restaurant. This paper will argue that In-N-Out Burger is an ideal addition to the Atlanta burger culture: the chain can capitalize upon the frequent calls to bring In-N-Out to the East Coast, as well as outflank all of its likely competitors. "In-N-Out, founded on the est Coast in 1948, is that rarest of chain restaurants: one with a cult following. Exalted both by hamburger fans and those who normally shun fast food, it has built its reputation on the rock of two beliefs: fast food should be made from scratch, and the whims of the customer should be entertained" (McNichol 1).

In-And-Out

The fast food industry…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alt, J. Kenji-Lopez. "In-N-Out vs. Five Guys vs. Shake Shack. Serious Eats. 18 May 2011.

22 Jun 2014.http://aht.seriouseats.com/archives/2011/05/in-n-out-vs.-five-guys-vs.-shake-shack-the-first-bi-coastal-side-by-side-taste-test.html

Gottfredson, Mark & Aspinall, K. "Innovation vs. Complexity: What Is Too Much of a Good Thing?" Harvard Business Review. November 2005. 22 Jun 2014.http://hbr.org/2005/11/innovation-versus-complexity-what-is-too-much-of-a-good-thing/ar/1

McNichol, T. "The secret behind a burger cult." The New York Times. 14 Aug 2002.
View Full Essay

What Are the Different Types of Cuisine in America

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49468677

American Cuisine

As Davis, McBride et al. (2008), cuisine is "a form of cultural expression in the same way that sculpture and dance are" (p. 2). Thus, if we think about American culture and the cuisine that best expresses the American experience -- we are, unfortunately, hit with one obvious example: fast food. This lamentable fact is not meant to redirect attention away from the regional cuisines found all over the nation -- it is merely the one single overwhelming piece of evidence that underscores everything that America is: giant, monolithic, corporatist, disconnected from nature, and global. Today, fast food is the same thing: it is the cultural expression of our country in the form of cuisine.

But, fortunately, it is not the only cuisine that America has. One should consider that fast food is a 20th century development, born out of the post-War halcyon days of easy credit, booming…… [Read More]

References

Davis, M., McBride, A. et al. (2008). The State of American Cuisine. The James Beard

Foundation: 1-13.

Glickman, D. (2000). Upfront: ... Eating in the 20th century. Food Review, 23(1): i.
View Full Essay

Ethical Principle

Words: 557 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48485204

Ethical Principle

Fast Food Nation" is an excellent treatise on the growth of the fast food business in North America. Schlosser points out many of the serious concerns that have arisen with our newest eating habits and dietary choices. Today, one of the most dangerous epidemics we are witnessing is growing obesity among the young. This can be directly attributed to our 'fast food' fetish Schlosser also explains the disconcerting 'short cuts' being taken to meet the high-demand for this high-speed "eat-on-the-run" lifestyle. After reading this book, you will think twice before you ever again drop in to that local 'burger' joint for lunch or dinner.

It is interesting how we seem to be prepared to sacrifice every aspect of our requirements for survival. First we polluted the air, then the water, then the soil, and now we are tampering with and threatening our food supply. Maybe humans are actually…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Ling Peter Jefferson and the

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54838044

Our palates have become so trained to enjoy this type of artificiality since childhood we can no longer appreciate the real foods themselves. While food preservation might be helpful in some instances (such as MRE) and in some limited instances such as fortifying cereals with vitamins to guard against malnutrition, numbing our palates to the extent that fast food and processed food becomes addictive has had an undeniably negative impact upon our health in the form of the fast food industry.

Kolbert, Elizabeth. "Unchartered Territory" pg 136

This essay is more partisan than the others. I want you to each to lead one of the opposing viewpoints readers could express in response to Kolbert on the discussion board. I want you to ask questions about the charter school system and Kolbert's assertions about this particular group of schools. I also want you to question Kolbert's position that the charter school…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Sociology Mcdonald's There Are Numerous

Words: 3325 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98388060

Accordingly, the significance of the application of the conflict perspective to American food is that its accuracy is so blatantly valid that it has progressed almost unnoticed through our nation's history. Out of the philosophical roots of Marx, conflict theory has evolved and broadened its scope; today, it is most commonly used to evaluate the legal system, but the core conflict remains that between the proletariats and the owners of the means of production. In this way, the conflicts surrounding the exponentially expanding fast food industry reach between the working class and the social elite. McDonalds's, in particular, represents one of the most glaring examples of how the social elite in society have managed to package, sell, and justify their prominent position in American society to the masses.

The central premise of social conflict theory is that individuals and groups within society generally use their power -- as much of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Amaladoss, Michael. "Global Homogenization: Can Local Cultures Survive?" 2006. Available:

http://www.sedos.org/english/amaladoss2.html.

Berger, Peter L. Invitation to Sociology. New York: Anchor Books, 1963.

Diamond, Jared. Guns, Germs, and Steel. New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 1999.
View Full Essay

Count Includes Cover Page Abstract Table Contents

Words: 1956 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90401512

count includes cover page, abstract, table contents, list references appendices; place supporting material exceeds word limit appendices.

Ray Kroc's organizational process of 'McDonaldization' and the birth of the American franchise

One of the great ironies of McDonald's is that a company whose name is synonymous with standardization was actually quite a unique invention when it was born in the mind of the great innovator and entrepreneur Ray Kroc. Kroc was so successful at patenting his formula for creating cheap, predictable burgers, fries and milkshakes that his company's golden arches became an icon of Americana. The word McDonaldization has come to refer to the extent to which "the principles of the fast-food restaurant are coming to dominate more and more sectors of American society as well as the rest of the world," in the words of sociologist George Ritzer (Waters 1998). Rationalization, efficiency, predictability, calculability, and control, according to Ritzer, are…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Keel, Robert. 2010. The McDonaldization of society. Sociology Home Page. Accessed:

 http://www.umsl.edu/~keelr/010/mcdonsoc.html [April 22, 2011]

Kuratko, D.F. (2009). Entrepreneurship: Theory, process, practice. 8th edition. Mason, OH:

South Western Cengage Learning.
View Full Essay

Hedge Fund Management Technique the

Words: 9602 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55417163



2.3: Theme I: This study's first theme defines hedge funds and presents a synopsis of their history.

2.: Theme 2: Ways hedge funds compare to mutual funds are noted in this section, this study's second theme.

2.5: Theme 3: segment denotes techniques hedge funds utilise in investing.

2.6: Theme : A number of ways rising and falling markets impact hedge funds, this section's theme links to the thesis statement for this thesis/Capstone.

2.7: Analysis: The analysis section presents a number of pertinent points retrieved from the reviewed literature.

CHAPTER III: DISCUSSION; CONCLUSIONS; RECOMMENDATIONS

3.1: Introduction: This final chapter's introduction reviews the original study aim and objectives presented at the start of this thesis/Capstone, relating to hedge funds techniques. This section also recounts this study's thesis statement.

3.2: Discussion: During this segment, this researcher relates final considerations regarding hedge funds techniques, cross-referencing several points the reviewed literature noted. This researcher also…… [Read More]

4. The Investment Advisers Act.

The Securities Act of 1933, (SEC):

…oversees the mutual fund industry's compliance with specific regulations, including, the Internal Revenue Code which set additional requirements regarding a fund's portfolio diversification and its distribution of earnings, and the National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc. (NASD) oversees most mutual fund advertisements and other sales materials. In addition, mutual funds must have directors who are responsible for extensive oversight of the fund's policies and procedures. For virtually all funds, at least a majority of their directors must be independent from the fund's management.
View Full Essay

McDonald Fast Food

Words: 2227 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74992724

Fast food is a phenomenon that has become part of the American way of life during the past few decades. However the convenience of fast foods has resulted in major health issues in the country, as well as in the rest of the world. The prevalence of fast food in American society is evident from the fact that "Americans now spend more money on fast food than they do on higher education, personal computers, software or new cars. They spend more on fast food than on movies, books, magazines, newspapers, videos and recorded music ? combined." (Schlosser Eric. 1998)

It is now become common news that obesity has become a major health concern in both developed "Westernized" and less developed countries around the world. One of the major factors that have been blamed for this increase in obesity and obesity related diseases is fast food -- often termed 'junk food."…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adams. M. The real reason why processed meats are so dangerous to your health. 2005. Accessed August 25, 2005. http://www.newstarget.com/011148.html

(This is an extremely useful article as it covers some of the main reasons why fast food products are detrimental to health. The article was particularly good at outlining the negative aspects of processed foods.)

Berlau, John. "Big Food Fight: When Big Tobacco Was Taken Down by a Rash of Lawsuits, Consumers Were Assured That Other 'Bad' Products Wouldn't Be Targeted. But the Fast-Food Industry Appears to Be Next." Insight on the News 15 July 2002: 12+. Questia. 27 Aug. 2005 .

(An important article that deals not only with the health issues facing the fast food industry but also with the legal aspects and the comparison between the tobacco and fast food industries.)
View Full Essay

Taylorism and Fordism Have Been

Words: 1896 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48506264



If it has, how has it? If it hasn't, how much is it left?

Fordism thus remains. It remains in worker surveillance, to guard against morality and time theft. It remains in the increased bureaucratization of the global economy, as multi-million dollar conglomerates dominate the world. It remains in the modern emphasis on productivity, rather than training in franchises. It also remains in the developing world, where the poor with little hope of mobility, labor for the rich. And it remains at companies that invest little in worker training like al-Mart.

If it is a combination of both? (Recommend to choose this)

Fordism has given the world many benefits -- affordable goods, particularly technological goods that would be prohibitively expensive without mass production. However, companies such as Google that strive to maximize efficiency, create a corporate culture and climate that permeates every facet of employee's lives, yet still makes an…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brody, David Review of Michael J. Piore and Charles F. Sabel.

The Second Industrial Divide: Possibilities for Prosperity. Reviews in American History. Vol. 13. No. 4. Dec. 1985, pp. 612-615.

Dunn, Bill. Global Restructuring and the Power of Labour. Palgrave, 2004

Ehrenreich, Barbara. Nickel and Dimed. Holt, 2002.
View Full Essay

Quality Management Compare and Contrast

Words: 1069 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4995469

"In India, there are no Big Macs because the Hindu people don't eat beef. However, they have the Maharaja Mac, which a Big Mac is made of lamb or chicken meat. There is also a vegetarian burger, the McAloo Tikki" (Adams 2007). However, despite the fact that McDonald's must face what may seem like insurmountable challenges, like selling its 'burgers' in a nation like India where a high percentage of the population is vegetarian or does not eat beef for religious reasons, it still holds to the same quality standards of standardized operating and assembly procedures. This enables the McDonald's style to be exported across borders, even when accommodations must be made.

Meyer similarly keeps a tight reign upon quality control at his organization. But it is quality that his obsession, not that "French fries had to be exactly 0.28 inches thick" (Schlosser 2005). While, "the McDonald's operations manual today…… [Read More]

References

Adams, Beatrice. (2007). McDonald's strange menu items across the world. Trifter.

Retrieved October 15, 2011 at http://trifter.com/practical-travel/budget-travel/mcdonald%e2%80%99s-strange-menu-around-the-world/

Collins, Glenn. (2009). The accidental empire of fast food. The New York Times.

Retrieved October 15, 2011 at  http://www.nytimes.com /2009/12/16/dining/16Shake.html?pagewanted=all
View Full Essay

U S Government Legalize Marijuana The

Words: 4538 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76963709

There is much more to the issue and how it is addressed than that (Seamon, 2007). These states are:

Alaska

California

Colorado

Hawaii

Maine

Maryland

Michigan

Montana

Nevada

New Mexico

Oregon

Rhode Island

Vermont

Washington (Seamon, 2007)

Criticisms of Decriminalization

Gateway Drug

The war on drugs has been in the news for some time now, and marijuana has been included in that war. It continues to be listed as important in the speeches of many politicians, and it continues to be at the forefront of a great many debates about how our tax money should best be spent (Gray, 2005; Pacula, 2003b). One of the main concerns of the war on drugs, however, does not deal with what politicians think about it. Rather, it deals with what police think about it. Police are, after all, the ones that are out there on the streets every day, trying to fight the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anslinger, H.J. & Tompkins, William F. n.d. "The traffic in narcotics." Drug Library. Retrieved at http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/people/anslinger/traffic/appendix1.htm

Austin, James. 2005. "Rethinking the Consequences of Decriminalizing Marijuana." Washington, DC: The JFA Institute.

Brazaitis, Tom. 2002. "U.S. Should Concede Defeat in the War on Drugs." Media Awareness Project. Retrieved at  http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v02/n1827/a09.html?397 

Clements, Kenneth, et al. 2005. "Two Short Papers on Marijuana, Legalisation and Drinking: (1) Exogeneous Shocks and Related Goods: Drinking and the Legalisation of Marijuana; and (2) Notes on Projections of Alcohol Consumption Following Marijuana Legalisation." Perth, Australia: The University of Western Australia Working Paper no. 05-14. Perth, Australia: The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
View Full Essay

Spencer Education for the New

Words: 1339 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7065914



Granted it is argued that not all new employment opportunities are managerial in nature, but even if the 20% figure frequently quoted regarding the percentage of managerial occupations open today, competent lower-level employees who can deal with problems and the public in a creative fashion and perform the secondary and tertiary activities in a manner to make customers want to return cannot be undervalued. Reduced job security also makes it a moral and social imperative for government educational paradigms to focus on making an investment in people, not viewing people work products. Even if not all workers entering the workforce can be classified as "knowledgeable workers," all workers have to have some knowledge to do their job and to learn new knowledge at their job every day. The knowledge of learning from experience can be fostered in quality adult education programs that are not merely technical in nature. Basic skills…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Atwood, Jim. (2007. Jun 26). Learning, or learning how to learn. Coding Horror. Retrieved 6 Oct 2008 at http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000895.html

Loher, Steve. (2005, Dec 2005). At Google, cube culture has new rules. The New York Times. Retrieved 7 Oct 2008 at  http://www.nytimes.com /2005/12/05/technology/05google.html

Schlosser, Eric. (1998). Fast-food nation: The true cost of America's diet. Rolling Stone

Magazine. Retrieved 7 Oct 2008 at  http://www.mcspotlight.org/media/press/rollingstone1.html
View Full Essay

Threats to Hank's Lifestyle Development Has Taken

Words: 660 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39104898

threats to Hank's lifestyle.

Development has taken over grazing land. Another issue is that environmentalists demanding that practices like Hank's be made illegal (Schlosser 134). Also, the race track nearby is disturbing the animals, among other things. The text describes other threats, including: "rising land prices, stagnant beef prices, oversupplies of cattle, increased shipments of live cattle from Canada and Mexico, development pressures, inheritance taxes, health scares about beef" (136).

How are Hank's problems similar to the problems faced by ranchers 100 years ago?

hen the Industrial Revolution occurred, natural land was taken over so that factories could be built. The ranchers and farmers had to learn to live with this. Also, this was the time when the country was dealing with large trusts who controlled whole industries.

How does the meat packing industry keep the price of cattle low?

The meat packing industry keeps the price of cattle low…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Schlosser, Eric. Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal. Boston: Houghton

Mifflin, 2001. 133-47. Print.
View Full Essay

Guidebook for Living in Modernity

Words: 2176 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4673206

Living in Modernity in Three Easy Steps

Perhaps it is only appropriate that a so-called guidebook to living in modernity is not in fact a book at all, but only a relatively brief overview, encompassing six to nine pages of text, easily condensed for the reader's evaluation into three easy steps. It is short. It can be potentially read and interpreted by a variety of individuals with varying levels of literacy. It is democratic and addresses the reader as part of a collective, but not as someone who is of a particular gender or social or professional hierarchy. It is friendly to those whose attention spans have been shortened by the Internet and the mass media, yet it also creates a program that is inspirational in nature, to the reader's sense of improving the self. It wishes the reader to become a better self, just like everyone else in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Charon, Joel. (2000). Ten Questions: A Sociological Perspective. New York: Wadsworth.

Queer Eye for the Straight Guy." (2003). NBC Television Show.

Ritzer, Geroge. (2002). McDonaldization of Society. Pine Forage Press.

Schor, Juliet. (1998). The Overspent American: Why We Want What We Don't Need.
View Full Essay

Yum Brands

Words: 2118 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18349916

Aspects such as weight reduction, disease reduction, and overall peak performance will be emphasized (Jeffery, 2006). Sponsoring many of Australia's more popular sporting events with the products would also be very beneficial. Placement of these products will occur within all of the Yum! Brands locations. As mentioned above, two strengths of the company are its global positioning in regards to its brand, and its overall depth of franchises (McGinley, 2004). With more locations than any of its competitors in emerging markets, the company has a distinct competitive advantage relative to its peers in the industry. By effectively utilizing this franchise to unveil its healthier product segment, Yum! Brands can capitalize on its location density. The locations are also very useful in regards to cross selling many of the newer health option that customers may not be aware off. By placing the new products in all of its location simultaneously the…… [Read More]

References:

1) Barrett, Patrick (January 22, 1997). "KFC." Marketing Magazine

2) Chapman, Michelle (28 February 2011). "Taco Bell to fight meat filling claims via TV ads." The Daily Breeze. Associated Press

3) Cyrek, Christopher (October 20, 2009). "Pizza Hut going after wings market." Dallas Business Journal (Dallas, Texas: American City Business Journals, Inc.).

4) Ghanawi, Nadine (December 31, 2012). The Internationalization of KFC. GRIN Verlag. p. 1. ISBN 978-3-656-34256-4
View Full Essay

New Jim Crow Essay

Words: 1730 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: Array

New Jim Crow
Michelle Alexander, the author of The New Jim Crow, is a professor at Union Theological Seminary, a New York Times columnist, and civil rights lawyer and advocate.  I believe that the motive she had in writing her book was to explain how Jim Crow still exists in America even though people sometimes choose not to see it.  It exists today in hidden and not-so-hidden ways, as it is part of the power structure that still dominates America.  The prison industrial complex is just one example of how Jim Crow still exists, as Alexander shows.  Her aim is to draw attention to the mass incarceration system that is based on racial prejudice and unite people to oppose it:  “If we want to do more than just end mass incarceration—if we want to put an end to the history of racial caste in America—we must lay down our racial…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Sugar and Power The Sweet History of

Words: 1080 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64626863

Sugar and Power:

he Sweet History of Sugar in the Modern Era

Chef's Name

"he story can be summed up in a few sentences," asserts Sydney Mintz, Professor at Johns Hopkins University, "in 1000 A.D., few Europeans knew of the existence of sucrose, or cane sugar. But soon afterward they learned about it; by 1650 in England the nobility and the wealthy had become inveterate sugar eaters, and sugar figured in their medicine, literacy, imagery and displays of rank" (Mintz, 1985). Mintz goes on to say that "by no later than 1800, sugar had become a necessity- albeit a costly and rare one- in the diet of every English person, by 1900 it was supply nearly one-fifth of the calories in the English diet" (Mintz, 1985). he history of sugar, as captured by this short excerpt from Sweetness and Power: he Place of Sugar in Modern History, illuminates the evolution…… [Read More]

The history that Mintz has provided of sugar is more than just that- it provides a microcosm of all food products in the world and forces the reflection and perhaps the further examination of ingredients of recipes that people prepare themselves or get at restaurants. There is a story behind everything and it has taught me to take that a step further, and examine the power of the story behind each ingredient. In that story, the food that is prepared may tell an even more significant story and create a journey through time in simply one bite.

APA Formatted Citation:

Mintz, Sydney W. (1985). Sweetness and power: the place of sugar in modern history. New York, New York: Penguin Books.