George Orwell Essays (Examples)

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Orwell in Why I Write

Words: 1573 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10263533

"

Orwell presents a rather romantic picture of the life of a writer. A writer is someone who is driven internally, psychically, spiritually. The desire to write might initially be due to an admiration of a famous author, or a personal affection for the Harry Potter books. Or, the desire to write might be due to a want of recognition, fame, or even fortune. Writing can be used as a weapon as with bitter letters to politicians or ex-girlfriends.

Some writing is purely journalistic in tone, whereas other writing is all fluff. With his characteristic humor, Orwell takes a dig at journalists when he states, "Serious writers, I should say, are on the whole more vain and self-centered than journalists, though less interested in money." The essay "Why I Write" is an effective piece of prose because the author is credible, and bolsters his argument with humility as well as…… [Read More]

References

Orwell, George. Animal Farm. Signet, 1996.

Orwell, George. "Why I Write." Retrieved online:  http://orwell.ru/library/essays/wiw/english/e_wiw
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Orwell Nineteen Eighty-Four by George

Words: 2110 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95090627

The book even goes beyond this assertion because in Oceania Big Brother even controlled the thoughts of the people. This made it impossible for people to rebel because rebellion cannot be carried out without ideas and the cooperation of many people.

The novel also focuses the reader to consider the power of their thoughts. In the book a government believed that though was so powerful that it created a system in which free though was discourages and even punishable unto death. Big Brother understands that thoughts lead to action and rebellious actions could threaten the authority of the government. In addition, punishing people for thinking the wrong way was designed to deter others from having thoughts that were not sanctioned by the government. This was a fear tactic used to maintain control.

Interestingly enough Orwell had great difficulty publishing many of his novels because of the thoughts that he expresses.…… [Read More]

References

Atkins J. Orwell in 1984 College Literature, Vol. 11, No. 1 (1984), pp. 34-43

dystopia. (n.d.). The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Retrieved March 26, 2010, from Dictionary.com website: http: / / dictionary. reference.com/browse/dystopia

Lyons J.O. And Orwell G. (1961) George Orwell's Opaque Glass in "1984" Wisconsin Studies in Contemporary Literature, 2 (3), pp. 39- 46

Meyers J. (1997) George Orwell. Routledge Resch R.P. (1997) Utopia, Dystopia, and the Middle Class in George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. Boundary 2, Vol. 24 (1), pp. 137-176
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Orwell Social Control Is the Cornerstone of

Words: 595 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54639354

Orwell

Social control is the cornerstone of both 1984 and Animal Farm. However, the methods of persuasion and propaganda used in these two Orwell novels differ from one another. Animal Farm exemplifies overt forms of persuasion, intimidation, and violence. A revolutionary government is created; to maintain its power, the government becomes tyrannical and overbearing. It must therefore use methods of persuasion and treachery in order to retain its control over the animals. In 1984, methods of persuasion and social control are more covert in nature. Thought crime and the thought police comprise subversive methods of undermining individuality and creating a dystopic reality. Therefore, the primary difference between the methods of persuasion and social control in Animal Farm and 1984 is that the former utilizes straightforward, almost traditional methods of oppression; whereas 1984 takes propaganda and persuasion to a whole new, sinister level.

Animal Farm represents a typical coup d'etat: the…… [Read More]

References

Orwell, G. (1945) Animal Farm. Signet Classics (Harcourt, Brace).

Orwell, G. (1949). 1984. Signet Classics (Harcourt, Brace).
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Hughes and Orwell When Looking for Similarities

Words: 1247 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91547909

Hughes and Orwell

hen looking for similarities between authors, it is not immediately brought to mind to look at Langston Hughes and George Orwell. The former was a major writer during the Harlem Renaissance. Most of his work focused on explorations of the black experience in the United States and how African-Americans were mistreated by the white majority. Orwell was an English writer and most of his writing dealt with social commentary on the dangers of fascism and totalitarian governments. However, in two works by these very different men, a parallel can be viewed. Langston Hughes' "Salvation" and George Orwell's "Shooting an Elephant" both deal with a first-person narrator who is forced by those around him into becoming an outsider, someone outside of the group opinion, and is forced to lie about his true self and his own beliefs in order to fulfill the desires of those who surround him.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Hughes, Langston. "Salvation." 50 Essays. Ed. Samuel Cohen. 3rd ed. Boston, MA: Bedford,

2011. 179-81. Print.

Orwell, George. "Shooting an Elephant." 50 Essays. Ed. Samuel Cohen. 3rd ed. Boston, MA:

Bedford, 2011. 284-91. Print.
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Shooting an Elephant by George

Words: 922 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5287631

However, when his assistance is needed by the townspeople, the two very different populations show similar responses to the bloody scene of shooting an elephant, "It was a bit of fun to them, as it would be to an English crowd; besides they wanted the meat," (Orwell, 649).

Orwell furthers this blend of modern and primitive as seen through the use of his language. The narrator describes the scene of the village as using the native terms, yet juxtaposes this with eloquent English adjectives, "It was a very poor quarter, a labyrinth of squalid bamboo huts, thatched with palmleaf, winding all over a steep hillside," (Orwell, 650). It is the description of a scene as witness from an outsider, (Rodden, 390). The narrator's response to the eastern village is combined with his own distain based on being familiar with more "civilized" representations of society. This is also apparent through the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Orwell, George. "Shooting an Elephant." Mixing the Methods.

Rodden, John. George Orwell. Transaction Publishers. 2002.

Stevens, J.P. "Shooting an Elephant: Rhetorical Analysis." Bookstove. 2008. Retrieved on October 26, 2008 at http://www.bookstove.com/Classics/Shooting-an-Elephant-Rhetorical-Analysis.72092
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Inspiration for Apple Computers George

Words: 1519 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61550091

"The rumor claiming that the commercial almost never aired is true," said Clow (www.ciadvertising.com).The Apple board "demanded that it not be aired," Clow goes on, but Apple CEO Steve Jobs insisted that it be played, and so it was. Clow says that this commercial wasn't just a parody of Nineteen Eighty-Four; "one could almost interpret this commercial as a bleak commentary on society," he writes. It shocked the "PC world into paying a little more attention to their competitors in their field," Clow asserts.

In conclusion, TV Guide called the Apple commercial "the greatest commercial of all time," according to CNN. And while Orwell's book isn't the greatest by any means, it has created an endless number of allusions and references, including the phrase "Big Brother," who, unfortunately, is with us today far more than most of us probably realize.

orks Cited

Clow, Lee. "Lee Clow: His Masterpiece." Chiat/Day Advertising.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clow, Lee. "Lee Clow: His Masterpiece." Chiat/Day Advertising. Retrieved Nov. 28, 2007, at http://www.ciadvertising.org/SA/fall_02/adv382/qwkag/assign2/master.htm.

Leopold, Todd. "Why 2006 isn't like '1984'." Cable News Network / CNN.com. Retrieved Nov. 28, 2007, at http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/0202/eye.ent.commercials.

Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. New York: Plume / Penguin Group, 2003.
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Compare and Contrast George

Words: 1448 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42131561

George Orwell. Reflections on Gandhi and Freedman Speech are taken through a point-by-point comparison and the author gives the reader a chance to see likenesses and similarities in both ideas and writing styles. There were two sources used to complete this paper.

DIFFERENT MESSAGES YET THE SAME

Throughout the years, historians and authors alike have used their skills to persuade the audience of certain truths as they see them. If we look back in history, we will find that different people often produced similar schools of thought at different times for different reasons. One of the most classic examples of this occurrence would be the Freedman Speech, by Frederick Douglass and the Reflections on Gandhi, by George Orwell. Each of these works reflect similar styles of writing, as well as similar points of admiration as well as critical thought toward the hero in question. hile Douglass and Orwell discuss heroes…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Douglass, Frederick. Independence Day Speech (Atlantic Monthly, 1866)

Orwell, George. Reflections On Gandhi. (1990),
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Big Brother Among Us George

Words: 2108 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31229773

Everyone is under suspicion, according to the eye of the camera. Everyone is treated as if they are a likely criminal. This has a negative psychological affect on the general population who are not criminals.

For those who are not criminals, they feel as if their privacy is being invaded for no reason. They are reduced to being under suspicion and scrutinized even though they are upstanding citizens. They feel as if they are being treated as a criminal and that their freedoms are being slowly eaten away one by one. More and more the general population expresses concerns about the trend toward and Orwellian world. The telescreens in Orwell's world broadcast propaganda and continually exaggerated positive production numbers and lied about the failing state of the economy. The telescreens made the economy sound like a growth economy, when it was slowly slipping away, sound familiar?

In Orwell's novel, inston…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Froomkin, D. Obama Hasn't Entirely Abandoned the Bush Playbook. February 18, 2009. the

Washington Post. < http://voices.washingtonpost.com/white-house-watch/bush-rollback/obama-hasnt-entirely-abandoned.html >. Accessed December 6, 2010.

London Evening Standard. George Orwell, Big Brother is watching your house. March 31, 2007.

< http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23391081-george-orwell-big-brother-is-watching-your-house.do > . Accessed December 5, 2010.
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Shooting an Elephant by George

Words: 760 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85748798

He still has his pride, even if his pride does not trickle down to his work. He is anything but ambivalent about the reaction he will get from the people, and so, he must shoot the elephant to save face, rather than to "serve and protect." This illustrates his ambivalence to everything but his own reputation in front of the people. However, he discovers he has lost more than just is reputation.

Finally, the narrator comes to understand that he has essentially given up his freedom in his support of the tyrannical British government. Orwell states, "I perceived in this moment that when the white man turns tyrant it is his own freedom that he destroys" (Orwell). Thus, the narrator becomes even more ambivalent about his duties because he realizes just what he has lost in protecting his reputation, supporting the empire (at least in front of the people), and…… [Read More]

References

Orwell, George. "Shooting an Elephant."
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Huxley & G Orwell Two

Words: 2815 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63572806

Whatever happened you vanished, and neither you nor your actions were ever heard of again" (Orwell, 1949, p.168).

Capitalism

Principles of mass production are very clear in the novels. Huxley for instance, applied the idea of mass production in human reproduction, since the people has abandoned the natural method of reproduction. Mass production as the conventional feature of capitalism and Huxley's novel reinforces such. He talked about the requirement of the World State about constant consumption, which is considered as foundation of its stability. Huxley apparently criticizes the commercial dependence of the world towards goods. Conditioning centers teaches people to consume. Orwell similarly provides criticism to capitalism as well: "The centuries of capitalism were held to have produced nothing of any value." The Proles are the symbols of the capitalist system as they constitute the working class who work in assembly lines.

Destruction of the concept of family

oth novels…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bessa, Maria de Fatima (2007). Individuation in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World and Island: Jungian and Post-Jungian Perspectives. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.

Beniger, James K. (1986) the Control Revolution. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 61.

Greenberg, Martin H., Joseph D. Olander and Eric S. Robbon. No Place Else: Expectations in Utopian and Dystopian Fiction. Southern Illinois: University Press, 1983. 29-97.

Grieder, Peter. "In Defense of Totalitarianism Theory as a Tool of Historical Scholarship" Totalitarian Movements and Political Religions 8.314 (September 2007) Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Grace Van Dyke Bird Library, Bakersfield, CA. 15 November 2008 (http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct-true&db=aph&an=27009808&site=ehost-live.
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Human Condition in Orwell's Animal

Words: 606 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35420768

It is simply human nature. These pigs will be the ones attempting to gain all of the power and control the rest of the population. The image of the humans and the pigs being indistinguishable points to the frailty of the human condition and it declares that this condition cannot be "fixed" and it will lead to humanity's downfall in one way or another. Power and greed only make people more power hungry and greedy. There can be no equals in this kind of society because people, regardless of we like it or not, are simply not equal. There will always be those with more and there will always be those with less. Additionally, there will always be those that want to control everything and those who allow that control to occur.

Animal Farm pokes fun at humanity but it does so with a serious stick. There are messages and…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Orwell, George. Animal Farm. New York: Harcourt Brace. 1977.
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Power and the Use of Language Orwell's

Words: 1281 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77056992

Power and the Use of Language, Orwell's 1984 And Beyond

George Orwell's 1949 dystopian novel 1984 has become almost iconoclastic in its meaning for contemporary society. Almost like the term Machiavellianism, 1984 evokes images in popular culture, along with the author's name as an adjective, and phrases that were used in the book. Even the term "Orwellian" denotes a certain type of society; phrases like "Big Brother," "Newspeak," "Thought-Police," etc. are now part of the vocabulary when describing totalitarian regimes. The novel's premise has become part of a modern archetype, imitated on television, popular music, movies, and even one of the most popular advertisements ever made, the 1984 launch of Apple's Macintosh.

Nineteen Eighty-Four focuses on a new type of society -- repressive, totalitarian, staunch, all-powerful, all knowing, oligarchical, and pervasive. The novel's main character, Winston Smith, is a simple civil servant assigned to the daily task of perpetuating the…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Orwell, G. (1990). 1984. New York: Penguin Books.

Rai, A. (1990). Orwell and the Politics of Despair. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Wain, J. (1978). Essays on Literature and Ideas. Santa Barbara: Greenwood Press.
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Shooting an Elephant by George

Words: 743 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48053240

In this case, the language, perpetrated by a few, is becoming pervasive in society, and so, it is taking over many aspects of society. However, for the most part, society seems to be resisting much of this doublespeak type of language. It is not prominent in the media, (perhaps in the government), and is seems that language, in general, is about the same as it always has been, full of slang and "fad" words, but in everyday use, doublespeak is not as common as some might thought it might be. This might make society stronger than a prevailing use of the language, but it may also mean that people like Lutz, in their zeal to remove doublespeak from the language, have actually made a difference and created more public awareness about something that needs to be changed. In this case, perhaps one person is not able to stand up against…… [Read More]

References

Lutz, William. "Doublespeak." 256-261.

Orwell, George. "Shooting an Elephant."
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Orwell vs Huxley

Words: 1337 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10434254

Brave New orld

The two books 1984 and Brave New orld reflect futuristic views that are quite different and dichotomous. Indeed, 1984 reflects a world of dystopia and punitive government while the work Brave New orld reflects one of more utopian conditions but is no less controlled and crafted by a master plan. The noted social critic Neil Postman postulates that Huxley's version of the world in Brave New orld more closely matches that of our current actual world. However, while there is some grain of truth to that, there are some facets of Brave New orld that are not in place now and the chances of that changing in the foreseeable future is practically nil in the view of the author of this report.

Analysis

First up on this report will be a compare and contrast of the two works in general terms. First off, an obvious difference between…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Huxley, Aldous. Brave new world. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006.

Print.

Orwell, George, Thomas Pynchon, and Erich Fromm. Nineteen eighty-four: a novel.

Centennial ed. New York City: Signet, 2003. Print.
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American Politics Through Film and Fiction

Words: 1927 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42200416

George Orwell's 1984 And Contemporary American Politics And Society

Orwell's novel, entitled 1984, is essentially a fictional projection of possibilities and "what if" scenarios. While it is classified as a work of fiction, the foundations of 1984 stem from the author's personal experiences and insights into the way governments and political groups manipulate and even construct the truth to suit their own ends in an effort to gain and maintain power. Due to his experiences in the Spanish Civil War, Orwell became aware that often media reports were mere fabrications of the truth and not an accurate reflection of reality. This made him skeptical about reportage in the media and information from official government sources. The future scenario that the book suggests is in fact based on an understanding of human nature, and what Orwell saw as the trajectory that power structures in the world were taking.

There are many…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bennett, John. Orwell's 1984: Was Orwell Right? Retrieved: March 17, 2005 from Institute for Historical Review. Web site: http://www.ihr.org/jhr/v06/v06p -- 9_Bennett.html

Greenberg J. (2004) Why Bush's America Feels Like Orwell's 1984.

Retrieved: March 17, 2005 from Buzzflash. Web site: http://www.buzzflash.com/contributors/04/11/con04503.html

Neisig. E. 2005. 2005 is reminiscent of Orwell's "1984" Retrieved March 18, 2005 from Daily Trojan. Web Site: http://www.dailytrojan.com/news/2005/01/20/Opinions/2005-Is.Reminiscent.Of.Orwells.1984-836138.shtml?page=2
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Newspaper Response to Orwell's 1984 to What Extent Is Resistance to Liberalism Justified

Words: 1643 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5263363

Big Brother

Combat. A French Resistance Newspaper from 1944

COMBAT: THE RESISTANCE NESPAPER

Big Brother: The Physical Embodiment and Symbol of the Party in Oceania

Big Brother's Predecessors: Hitler, Stalin and an Old British Recruiting Poster Featuring Lord Kitchener

BIG BROTHER IS HITLER AND STALIN, INCLUDING THE MOUSTACHE

By O'Brien X

Unlike the real dictators Hitler and Stalin, Big Brother does not really exist and has never existed, except as the symbol of English Socialism (Ingsoc) and the Party that controls all aspects of life in Oceania through totalitarian, police state methods. After all, a dictator with a physical body will eventually become ill, decline with age and die, Big Brother will live forever as the image of a Party that intends to remain in power forever. Its members will die off, even at the privileged Inner Party levels, but that matters no more than cutting off dead fingernails. As…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Aly, Gotz and Jefferson Chase. Hitler's Beneficiaries: Plunder, Racial War, and the Nazi Welfare State. Holt Paperbacks, 2005.

Orwell, George, Nineteen Eighty-Four. NY: Houghton Mifflin, 1949, 1989.

Spielvogel, Jackson T. And David Redles. Hitler and Nazi Germany: A History, 6th Edition. Prentice Hall, 2009.

Trotsky, Leon. The Revolution Betrayed. Dover Publications, 2004.
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Language Political or Historically Based

Words: 1090 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85876370

Note that inflated English has been more characteristic of the centuries preceding Orwell and of Orwell's own time than on the latter part of the 20th century. There has been a shift in linguistics. As linguists and historians of language have noted, the Western model of language follows the monological approach. The monological approach has roots reaching back to Aristotle who saw communication as one of rhetoric, namely persuasion, where communication was a strategy for influencing people and helping them see reason, or the truth. In this way, the 'other' became viewed as object, communication was one way (monological) and the objective was how to best seduce the other to one's way of thinking. According to some linguists, such as Alfred Taylor, this reduction culminated in reducing conversation, depersonalizing words, and converting them into ideas rather than seeing the complexity of the speaker behind the words. It also led to…… [Read More]

Source Orwell, G. Politics and the English Language, Horizon, 1946
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Boundaries Explored in Burmese Days

Words: 1263 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18341392

Kyin is aware of the boundaries that exist but he is determined to overcome them. His ambition to become a member of the European Club corrupts him. His immediate boundary is Flory's friendship with Dr. Veraswami. Veraswami comes across as one of the decent people in the novel in that he does not allow himself to become involved with the depravity that Kyin does. Veraswami expresses a selflessness in that he allows Flory to confide in him but in this act, he is crossing a boundary because he is peeking at a side of the European life he would have never known otherwise. He delights in the Europeans loyalty to one another but he is also able to see the best and worst of this culture. It is also worth noting that while he is surrounded by these boundaries, he never loses sight of his own identity.

Boundaries are flexible…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Orwell, George. Burmese Days. Gutenberg Online. Information retrieved September 17, 2009.

http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200051.txt
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Customer's Document to Make it

Words: 1419 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8909766

The elephant's death is also a symbol for the slow death of Burma. Before the arrival of the empire, Burma was free but now it struggles for its last dying breaths under British rule. The meaning of this is clear because the narrator doesn't even try to hide his feelings about the monarchy at all. The British crown is abusing and killing everyone it oppresses and it wounds their officers by making them take part in activities that make all of them go totally against their inner will.

The elephant is the most powerful symbol of all and he finally dies but with alot of agony nor is it guilty of anything but being what it is. Those under British rule are also behaving like they really are and being what they were born to be but the power of the empire is forcing them to bend and behave in…… [Read More]

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Ethical Society

Words: 306 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25782562

Martin Luther King & George Orwell

Martin Luther King and George Orwell's representations of an ethical society

Civil rights movement leader Martin Luther King and novelist George Orwell had been known for their political discourses regarding the extent of the government's responsibility to civil society. In the essay "My Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" by King and "Shooting an Elephant" by Orwell, each author's discourse contemplated the kind of ethical society that humanity should have. Their discussion centered on their experiences as members of a society where civil strife and inequality were the norm, devoid of each author's standards in an ethical (i.e., 'ideal') society. In King's "My Pilgrimage," he shared with readers the path he took and underwent in order to achieve his "intellectual odyssey to nonviolence." Citing famous works on the Enlightenment and Capitalism, such as Bentham, Mill, Rousseau, Marx, and Nietzsche, he realized that for him, an ethical society…… [Read More]

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Personalities From Times Past First-Hand

Words: 703 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1195343



orolenko tells his tale of a mob massacre of Jews in 1903 with a view of relaying the horror and injustice of the events in question. He writes from the perspective of a journalist recounting the events after having arrived in town some two months following the massacre. However, he relays the events as they occurred in a first-hand manner, telling the details as though he had been there amongst the crowd. He had gathered his information from interviews with survivors conducted soon after the events and this first-hand approach feels real and credible. He gives a convincing portrait of the madness of crowds and the bloodlust of anti-Semitism. His overarching purpose is to convince the reader of the injustice of the events, and he gathers credibility for his story by telling the story of a man who led the riots, only to repent later and commit suicide. In doing…… [Read More]

Korolenko tells his tale of a mob massacre of Jews in 1903 with a view of relaying the horror and injustice of the events in question. He writes from the perspective of a journalist recounting the events after having arrived in town some two months following the massacre. However, he relays the events as they occurred in a first-hand manner, telling the details as though he had been there amongst the crowd. He had gathered his information from interviews with survivors conducted soon after the events and this first-hand approach feels real and credible. He gives a convincing portrait of the madness of crowds and the bloodlust of anti-Semitism. His overarching purpose is to convince the reader of the injustice of the events, and he gathers credibility for his story by telling the story of a man who led the riots, only to repent later and commit suicide. In doing so he suggests that even the crowd knew it was wrong.

Orwell describes taking place in a battle against the Fascists in the Spanish Civil War, and relays details of the day as the battle raged on. He tells of the danger of the struggle and also of the excitement. Ultimately his purpose is twofold: (1) to dispel the myth of war's glory, by arguing that he risked his life only to find that the battle was a mere diversion for a larger conflict, and (2) to set the stage for showing in the next chapter of his account of how he came -- through participating in the camaraderie of soldier life, with its emphasis on equality and universal humanity -- to be a socialist.

The accounts reviewed stressed events that the authors wanted to relay in order to achieve their larger purposes. Because those events were relayed skillfully, the authors gained credibility which supported their more interpretative aims. This is, perhaps, a chief reason for writing and reading history. In the end the historian tells as much about himself as he does about his subject and the reader learns about himself as well about the past.
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Both of These Center on the Authors Experiences During the Spanish Civil War

Words: 3073 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31817238

Spanish Civil War

The famous Spanish Civil War fought from the year 1936 to 1939. This war was fought between two groups; the Republicans and the Nationalists. The Republicans were the supporters of the established Spanish republic; meanwhile the latter were a group of rebels who were led by General Francisco Franco. Franco emerged victorious in this war and ruled Spain for the next 36 years as a dictator.

After a group of generals (led by Jose Sanjurjo) of the Spanish Republican Armed Forces declared opposition against the government of the Second Spanish Republic, the war ensued. At that time the President of Spain was Manuel Azana. This group of rebels had gained support from a couple of conservative groups that included the Spanish Confederation of the Autonomous Right, Fascist Falange and Carlists (Payne, 1973).

Military units formed in urgos, Pamplona, Corodova, Morocco, Cadiz and Seville supported this group of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beevor, Antony. The Battle for Spain: The Spanish Civil War 1936 -- 1939. London: Weidenfield and Nicolson. 2006

Buckley, Ramon. "Revolution in Ronda: The facts in Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls." The Hemingway Review. 1997

Hemingway Ernest. "For Whom the Bell Tolls." New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 1940

Meyers, Jeffrey. Hemingway: A Biography. London: Macmillan. 1985
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Flew Over the Cuckoo's Next

Words: 2287 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37927156



inston is impressed by a man named O'Brien who is supposed to be very powerful member of the party, but he believes in his heart that O'Brien is actually a member of the Brotherhood which is a group dedicated to overthrowing the Party (Orwell, 1977).

inston looks to O'Brien in the same way that Bromend looks to McMurphy in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. O'Brien is someone that inston comes to admire and follow.

He is still afraid to rebel himself at first. He has thought crimes about the way he is paid to change the history books so they will fit the Party's version of history but he is afraid to speak up about his own memories which tell a completely different story.

inston uses every evening to walk through the poor neighborhoods where the lowest members of society live. They live extremely poverty stricken lives but because…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kesey, Ken (1963) One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Paperback)

Publisher: Signet; Reissue edition (February 1, 1963)

Orwell, George (1977) 1984 (Signet Classics) (Mass Market Paperback)

Publisher: Signet Classics; Reissue edition (July 1, 1977)
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Political Climate of the Novel

Words: 1039 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94093340

He even falls in love with Julia and they have an affair, something expressly forbidden by the Party, and so, it is clear throughout the book that Winston is searching for an end to the repression. In his own way, he is a rebel, even if he is a fearful one. He knows the Party and its actions are wrong, and he desperately wants to make a change, but it is impossible to topple the government, they have too much power and have instilled too much fear in the people to ever lose control. In fact, they have so much control that he even questions his own sanity. Orwell writes, "He wondered, as he had many times wondered before, whether he himself was a lunatic" (Orwell 80). He knows rebellion is right, but he questions its' sanity, which indicates the power the Party has over everyone. Ultimately, Wilson is caught,…… [Read More]

References

Orwell, George. 1984. New York: Signet, 1977.
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Cynicism and Perpetual Repression in

Words: 1269 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52863069

Each had distinct characteristics that made them endearing to the animal members in the farm. In this social order, animal farm members became idealistic and hopeful, adopting the political slogan, "Four legs good, two legs bad." However, this social order was also considered as a transitory phase in the shift of animal farm from being capitalist to totalitarian, because at this stage, Napoleon and Snowball were shown to subsist to different ideals. While Napoleon believed that a strong, peaceful, and stable animal farm was based on a strong military and massive political propaganda, Snowball believed in the provision of education and basic social services for the animals: "Until now the animals had been about equally divided in their sympathies, but in a moment Snowball's eloquence had carried them away..." This event led to the full transition of animal farm into a new social order, that of totalitarianism. In effect, Major's…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Lenhoff, a. (2001). "Animals behaving badly." Writing, 23 (6).

Lucas, S. (2000). "The socialist fallacy." New Statesman, 129 (4488).

Martin, K. (1997). In George Orwell: the critical heritage. J. Meyers (Ed.). NY: Routledge.

Rodden, J. (2003). "Appreciating 'Animal Farm' in the New Millennium." Modern Age, 45 (1).
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Treatment of Democratic Principles and Individual Action

Words: 737 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86162748

Treatment of Democratic Principles and Individual Action

George Orwell's legacy in literature can be reflected in his great novels Nineteen Eighty-Four and Animal Farm, two political satire novels that criticized the basic foundations of political systems prevalent during his time (mid-20th century), specifically, Stalinism/socialist-communist leadership that 'governed' the Soviet Union during this period of modernization. While he was known for the political nature of his novels, he has also written essay that provoked analytical thought through his deconstructive narrative of topics that seemed to be non-political. In these essays, Orwell was able to "politicize" these topics, critically exploring their nature and dynamics and contextualize his analysis in the overall political environment from which these topics emerged and prevailed. Examples of these seemingly 'apolitical' topics are sports and "good bad books," and insightfully, writing. For the discussion that follows, each topics that were given analytical treatment are represented through the following…… [Read More]

References

Orwell, G. (1995). E-text of "Good Bad Books." Accessed 19 May 2011. Available at:  http://orwell.ru/library/reviews/books/english/e_books 

____. (1995). E-text of "The Sporting Spirit." Accessed 19 May 2011. Available at:  http://orwell.ru/library/articles/spirit/english/e_spirit 

____. (2003). E-text of "Writers and the Leviathan." Accessed 19 May 2011. Available at:  http://www.george-orwell.org/Writers_and_the_Leviathan/0.html
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Symbolism in Shooting an Elephant

Words: 1022 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17153263

He hates what he has become and what he does. He confesses that he secretly roots for the Burmese and roots against "their oppressors (335). He admits he is "stuck between my hatred of the empire I served and my rage against the evil-spirited little beasts who tried to make my job impossible" (335). He is like those in oppression in that he is not free to do what he actually wants to do. His reputation is on the line and he acts to defend it. A man in his position "mustn't be frightened in front of 'natives'" (339), he writes even though he knows that in order to impress those natives, he must act of line with his conscious. He does the "right thing" (340) according to the law he did also killed the elephant "solely to avoid looking like a fool" (340). Asker asserts that wrapped within the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Asker, David Barry. Aspects of Metamorphosis. Atlanta: Rodopi. 2001.

Kenneth Keskinen, "Shooting an Elephant.' An Essay to Teach." English Journal. 1996 GALE

Resource Database. Information Retrieved March 28, 2009.

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Human Nature Is a Precarious

Words: 832 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15160350

He is unaware that it is his free will that is longing to escape. hile he is wise not to ignore his inner yearnings, he is oblivious on how to obtain his freedom. All he knows is that he is lost and he must find a way to himself. This is a personality trait that every human being is born with and when it becomes endangered the human instinct is to resist.

Resistance is not always easy as Orwell demonstrates in his novel. inston and others in the novel are met at all sides to conform but it is not so easy, as inston illustrates. The yearning of human nature is compounded with images of Thought Police, another intrusive presence that makes life unbearable. inston tells us, "At home and in bed in the darkness you were safe from the telescreen so long as you kept silent" (96-7). Again, we…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Orwell, George. 1984. New York: Harcourt Brace. 1977.
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Art and Literature

Words: 2435 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16949376

Humanities are Important:

An analysis of the Da Vinci Code, Beethoven's 9th, and 1984.

A novel by George Orwell (pseudonym), real name Eric Blair

Published in 1949

A reaction to the totalitarian state engulfing the global community

The Da Vinci Code

A (2006) film by on Howard

Based on the novel by Dan Brown

obert Langdon follows a series of clues that link Leonardo's masterpieces, the mystery of Jesus Christ, and a totalitarian regime in the guise of the Catholic Church

Beethoven's 9th Symphony

Completed in 1824 after the composer (Ludwig van Beethoven) had gone completely deaf, this -- his final symphony -- is often considered to be one of the greatest musical masterpieces of all time. The fourth movement is based on Schiller's "Ode to Joy" and invokes a chorus of universal brotherhood. If you listen long enough, you will hear the music swell into a magnificent burst of…… [Read More]

Reference List

Kyziridis, T. (2005). Notes on the History of Schizophrenia. Retrieved from  http://www.gjpsy.uni-goettingen.de/gjp-article-kyziridis.pdf 

Lief, R.A. (1969). Homage to Oceania: the prophetic vision of George Orwell. OH: Ohio University Press.

McLellan, J. (1988). The Beethoven Collection. NY: Time-Life Books.

Orwell, G. (1949). 1984. NY: Harcourt.
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Totalitarian Architecture

Words: 2679 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49196426

Fear of the Return of Totalitarian Architecture Due to Technological Advancements

This paper examines some of the different aspects of the coming worldwide technological totalitarianism and the expanding of it influence. The argument that this is both a conscious and accidental program of influential individuals and organizations carried out through the procedure of reification of philosophical beliefs which are misshapen into institutions, services, technologies policies and in the end, culture. Some experts that have explored this topic believe that by pay no attention to the costs of new technologies, what there may be some kind of loss in the bargain and that it can lean so something that is immeasurable and potentially disastrous. It is obvious that history was not or is not all the way inevitable, however, it is likewise a question of human values in connection to changes that are looked at as being natural. Although there have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carpo, Mario. "Architecture in the Age of Printing." The History of Architectural Theory. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data, 6 March 1998.

-- . "The Alphabet and the Algorithm." Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data. The MIT Press, 7 May 1995.

Giroux, Henry. Totalitarian Paranoia in the Post-Orwellian Surveillance State. 14 Feruary 2014.  http://billmoyers.com/2014/02/11/totalitarian-paranoia-in-the-post-orwellian-surveillance-state/ . 18 March 2014.

Keller, Marcello Sorce. "Why is Music so Ideological, Why Do Totalitarian States Take It So Seriously: A Personal View from History, and the Social Sciences",." Journal of Musicological Research, XXVI 2.3 (2007): 91 -- 122.
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Technology and Society -- Science

Words: 1660 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1853386

Allen is saying that all of the wonders of technology can never replace tow people connecting and trusting each other. I completely agree with these concepts and given Mr. Allen's wit and comedic sense, am thankful it was made. Finally any film made during a specific period of time can't help but reflect the values of society at the time. The open discussions about sexuality and sex make light of society's open and free attitudes about these areas of the human experience in 1973.

Why Sleeper is a Classic

Sleeper will always be a classic because it combines Mr. Allen's slapstick and vaudevillian comedic approaches while integrating his favorite music, which is jazz and ragtime. In addition the triumph of the human spirit and human emotions, as chaotic and mercurial as they can be, will always be superior to technology. The use of technology as a means to coerce and…… [Read More]

References

George O'Har. "Technology and Its Discontents " Technology and Culture 45.2 (2004): 479-485.
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Cultural Events From the Past

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79790261



Why did the airing of HG Well's novel "War of the Worlds" on the radio cause so much panic? What would it take to cause that type of panic from a Hoax like "War of the Worlds" in this day and age? First and foremost, the 1.2 million U.S. radio listeners who panicked on Halloween night, 1938, were part of a new technology that had not yet developed to the point in which the majority could critically analyze what came over the airwaves. To those early listeners, espcecially those who tuned in after the caveat about entertainment, the realism and stage-play of Orson Welles' broadcast sounded so real, and so plausible, that they could not help but believe it -- after all, it sounded like a news broadcast (Radio: Anatomy of a Panic, 1940). People have become far more cynical, and with the advent of the fantastic special effects that…… [Read More]

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Marketing Will Affect Someone's Life in the

Words: 1167 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36995691

Marketing Will Affect Someone's Life in the Future

How Marketing Will Affect a Person's Life in the Future

The growing reliance on social media as a means to communicate has created a new level of collaboration between customers and the brands they trust. This, along with several of the trends identified and analyzed in this paper, are accelerating in their impact on people globally. Over the next decades and generation, these changes will also serve to redefine the relationships between customers and brands they choose to trust. One of the most significant of all factors that is emerging today and will continue to accelerate is the critical nature of trust. This is a galvanizing thread that runs through all of the trends and observations mentioned throughout this analysis. The net or aggregate effect of all of these factors and trends will be a truer, more accurate and purified form of…… [Read More]

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Ambivalence of Dr Veraswami of

Words: 5289 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36695107

In this regard, Meyers concludes that, "As for Flory, environment has been too much for him, for he is not really alcoholic or crapulous by nature, and he regrets it when a girl from England arrives to stay at Kyauktada; she is a poverty-stricken little snob on the look-out for a husband, but he has not seen a spinster for a decade, and he succumbs on the spot whereupon his discarded Burmese mistress makes a scene in front of her and every one else, and he ends by committing suicide" (Meyers 52). hile it may seem that Flory simply got what he deserved given his wishy-washy nature and lack of fortitude when it came to standing up for his friend, Dr. Veraswami when put to the test, but the suicide of the protagonist provides a useful literary vehicle whereby Orwell advances the plot and highlights just how shallow the friendship…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aung-Thwin, Maitrii. 2003, "Brave Men of the Hills: Resistance and Rebellion in Burma, 1824-

1932." Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 34(2): 376-377.

Brunsdale, Mitzi M. Student Companion to George Orwell. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press,

2000.
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Social Democracy Pamphleteering Has a

Words: 1968 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27797329

Northrop Frye recognized this fact but believed that the satire missed its mark:

It completely misses the point as satire on the ussian development of Marxism, and as expressing the disillusionment which many men of good-will feel about ussia. The reason for that disillusionment would be much better expressed as the corruption of expediency by principle (Frye 1987, p. 10).

What links 1984 and Animal Farm most directly is that both are anti-utopian in nature, for Orwell had developed a certainty that government in a utopian society would always be corrupted and would lose sight of its principles because of expediency.

Animal Farm was written during World War II. There is evidence that he was planning a novel that would become 1984 even before he wrote Animal Farm, and there is a relationship between the two books that is not often noted:

The form each book took was very different,…… [Read More]

References

Brander, L. (1954). George Orwell. New York: Longmans, Green and Co.

Crick, B. (1986). The making of Animal Farm. In Critical Essays on George Orwell, B. Oldsey and J. Browne (eds.). Boston: G.K. Hall.

Frye, N. (1987). In George Orwell, H. Bloom (ed.). New York: Chelsea House.

Green, T.H. (1995). Liberal legislation and freedom of contract. In Sources of the Western Tradition, M. Perry, J.R. Peden, and T.H. Von Laue (eds.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
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Western Civ the Question of Leadership and

Words: 1551 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55025150

Western Civ

The question of leadership and government has always been a subject that concerned political theorists. ne of the first political theorists to brake up with the Medieval tradition regarding rulers and the ethics of government, Niccolo Machiavelli, presented his theories related to the rules a prince should follow in order to be able to govern a state and stay in power as long as possible. Machiavelli left the question of ethics completely for religious subjects and treated his topic form a rationale point-of-view destined to prescribe the best recipe for a political ruler to follow in order to succeed. Shakespeare's Richard III and George rwell's The Animal Farm present two different political regimes, the former focusing on dynastic battles in England in the fifteenth century and the latter on fictional animal characters that resemble real life characters form the early twentieth century revolutionary Russia. Despite the fact that…… [Read More]

Orwell, G. Baker, R. Animal farm: a fairy story. Signet Classic, 1996

Richard III, film, 1955.

Textbook. Machiavelli, N. The Prince
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Orwellian Actions Today in His

Words: 616 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31954648

This will lead automatically and inevitably to the near-worship of certain personalities and entities in the civic realm.

Glenn Beck is not actually an office holder, nor is he truly likely to become one (at least on a national level), and he also includes religious (specifically Christian, and even more specifically a brand of evangelical Christian) thought in many of his messages. Yet his following is also evidence of the Orwellian replacement of religious figures with civic figures, and the manner in which the state itself is becoming the focus of worship. Beck and others like him -- on both sides of the political spectrum -- attempt to make the government a matter of morality and directly codified values rather than a matter of ethicality and democratic equality. That is, these personalities insist that there are clear "rights" and "wrongs" in matters of policy that are part of moral absolutes,…… [Read More]

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Live I Live in a World Where

Words: 572 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69737901

Live

I live in a world where every day the headlines are filled with doom and gloom. In my world, a government doesn't blink at the idea of lying the country into war. And in my world there are politicians who take rewriting history to the level of art; the Ministry of Truth only wished they could be as good at political cover-ups, sanitizing and spinning the truth. When I'm channel-surfing, I see the same news story covered as exactly opposite reports. Now common sense would tell you they can't both be right; so does it come down to who spent the most money to tell their version of the truth?

And since when is it okay that our government is for sale?

We have technology whose only purpose is to kill more people more efficiently. From drones that safely kill enemies at a distance, to nuclear warheads that can't…… [Read More]

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British Literature an Elephant Shooting

Words: 461 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99532495



E.M. Forster's the Life to Come, on the other hand, is a tale divided into four parts: Night, Evening, Day and Morning. Its main character is a young missionary by the name of Paul Pinmay who is sent to spread the word of Christ to the native people. All prior attempts to proselytise these people have failed. During his attempt he meets with the tribal chief, who approaches him to learn more about "this god whose name is Love." The two then sleep together and the tribe becomes Christian.

This leads to Pinmay being appointed by the Bishop to become the minister of the new district. The chief again asks Pinmay to sleep with him, and Pinmay orders the chief not to mention the night ever again. This causes the chief to question the new religion. Eventually this relationship dissolves and the story ends with the chief killing Pinmay.

Clearly,…… [Read More]

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Turned on the Television Any

Words: 3301 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18606096

Some governments are terrified of their people: The military government that is running Burma (the junta calls the country Myanmar: Many of those who oppose the brutality of the regime refer to the nation by its former name of Burma) murders Buddhist monks who protest its policies.

The longer one thinks about this fact, the more clearly one summons up the image of the slaughter of young holy men, the clearer it will be that this is a government that will do anything that will increase its power, its control over the population, and the longevity of their regime. When one reads Orwell and thinks about Burma, one thinks that Orwell was a jolly optimist about human nature and the role of government.

And Orwell's vision of government is indeed grim one, and it gets grimmer over the course of the novel as Winston -- the protagonist who is nothing…… [Read More]