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Mysticism and Madness the Relationship
Words: 1309 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29343300
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However, unlike the madman, the mystic is forced to reconcile a lifetime of perceiving life as an individual with the idea of being a messenger for divinity.

Finally, mystics and madness are alike in that they are perceived as being irrational, in part because of their desires. Madmen are irrational because they lack reason and the ability to verbalize their own condition. In fact, madmen may be so labeled because of their inability to communicate their feelings. Madmen are characterized by discrepancies between their internal states and their external realities. However, according to Rumi, that perspective is one that is shared by almost every member of society when confronted with desire. The saying "love is blind" encapsulates the idea that desire can cause one to abandon rational thought.

If earthly love is enough to cause a person to abandon rational thought, it is no surprise that mystics are also perceived…

Religion -- Color and Sound
Words: 1133 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39245349
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Like Khan, Huxley focused on the sensations of the person (himself) having the mystical experience. During his experience, Huxley felt he had no impairment in his mind or gaze, an intensity of vision without an outer and imposed substance to induce the hallucination, and had a sense that his impetus of motion or will was impaired into a state of stasis (a direct contrast with Khan's focus on the ability of music to provide motion to parallel the nature of the divine). Above all, Huxley called his sense of harmony through visual means mystical because his visual experience eliminated any sense of division inner/outer divide in perception. As he looked at the flower, and Huxley felt he was becoming the flower.

This stands in direct contrast to Kepler's schema of harmony, which is dependant upon perceptions of distinction from outside, as an observer perceives defined opposites. Kepler's definition of harmony…

Psychology Definitions Psychosis Loss
Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 85134043
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Know the predominant features of each personality disorder = Such knowledge will help the therapist to identify assistance strategies ahead of time, which can be modified as necessary.

Know about the link between borderline personality disorder and suicide attempts = an awareness of this link will help the therapist to identify warning signs and provide assistance in a timely way.

Know that group therapy is useful for treatment of avoidant personality disorder = Knowing this avoids the intuitive tendency to reinforce the patient's avoidance.

Patients with which disorder are most likely to seek treatment on their own? Depression sufferers are most likely to seek treatment for their condition.

Problems in using the DSM-IV-TR to diagnose personality disorders = the main concern is that some guidelines are very specific. Some personality disorders may overlap or display atypical symptoms.

Chapter 14

Are boys or girls more likely to have a diagnosable psychological…

Impressions of War the Most
Words: 6472 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55535844
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" There is a more calm feeling to his description. This is not to say that the author was portraying war as being a patriotic act, but the author was not as graphical in his describing what the soldiers were seeing and going through. The reader is more connected to the actions of the poem and not the fact that someone is dying. He ends his poem by referencing "hell" and the reader is left wondering whether the hell that he is referring to the war that is being left behind, or to dying itself.

3) Rites of Passage Activity

In speaking to my grandmother, I was able to find out what it was that she took when she first left her home. At the age of sixteen, she was married to my grandfather and was getting ready to start her knew life as a wife and very soon, as…

Psychiatric Evaluation Adam First Describe
Words: 1059 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 96588028
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It seems sound to recommend that Adam stop taking Concerta, because it might aggravate underlying bipolar symptoms.

Strattera not stimulating, but it can have side effects, like prolonged erections, and it is also a fairly new drug. It should be prescribed with caution. It is still uncertain whether Adam's conduct disorders are due to his unstable home environment, and not due to any biological factors. Prescribing Strattera seems like a normal course of therapeutic action, but should not be regarded as a panacea.

Question

If you were the clinician, counselor, or therapist, what would be the primary issue you would want to address?

To be diagnosed with ADHD, the individual should exhibit the symptoms in two environments, and Adam's behavior seems to primarily assert itself in the home. With support, he seems functional in school, and he is substantially less functional at home than at school or with his peers.…

Berkeley's Primary Argument for the
Words: 1474 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 66587674
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The real fire that burns you is the fire that is produced by God as the natural regulatory forces of nature. While the fire that is hallucination is fire that is conjured through the ideation of finite spirits such as other individuals. Real fire, since it is a subjective creation of God, has the ability to burn us, while illusionary fires do not have that inherent ability. Therefore all objectives that are not perceived by other human beings are perceived by God and have an existence within the world.

Berkeley's fundamental argument about reality and matter is that they are all sensory perceptions. However, since God creates ultimate harmony within the world and moreover provides a system in which we live in, his rules applies to all objects that we possess and use. Therefore, although arsenic in itself is nothing more than an idea, it is an idea that is…

Competency of Offender Evaluating an Individuals Competence
Words: 1644 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53263105
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Competency of Offender

Evaluating an individuals competence to stand trial can become a daunting task when hideous crimes have been committed. From a forensic psychologist's point-of-view, complete unbiased, non-judgmental, and purely scientific fact must be considered when providing such an evaluation (Greene & Heilbrun, 2011). In the given case, many things are to be taken into consideration before being able to fully judge the extent of the disturbance in the offenders state of mind.

In order to make a complete judgment about the offender's competency to stand trial, there are a couple of things that I would like to ask him or know more about in order to make a better decision about the issue. I would want to know what his actions were a couple of weeks or days before he committed his crimes. This would give me an idea of how he was behaving before committing the crimes,…

References:

Elkins, J.R. (2010). Criminal Law. In West Virginia University: College of Law. Retrieved August 8, 2011, from

Greene, E., & Heilbrun, K. (2011). Wrightman's Psychology and the Legal System. Wadsworth: Cengage Learning: Belmont, CA.

Ewing, C.P., & McCann, J.T. (2006). Minds on trial: Great cases in law and psychology. Oxford University Press: New York, NY.

Kapardis, A. (2010). Psychology and law: A critical introduction. Cambridge University Press: New York, NY.

Notorious for Mistaking Plagiarism for
Words: 818 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 64011930
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Whenever possible, the relative should be informed regarding the existence and cause of the state of confusion. This is particularly so in the case when relations are asked to be involved in the care of the disturbed patient. The relatives should then be informed why and how their involvement is beneficial and how they may practically assist nurses in calming the agitated individual.

As regards wandering and agitated patients, they need to be carefully and closely watched in order to ensure that they do not wander out of the bounds of the circumscribed domains.

Persuasion and distraction is preferred to restraints or sedation and the relatives of the patient can be involved in helping the nurse deal with the agitated patient. The causes of agitation should be traced and seen to. These may include need for relieving oneself, hunger, or thirst.

Confused speech may also be a mark of the…

Scientific Inquiry Into Extraterrestrial Life
Words: 2388 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 83384088
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Furthermore, he argues, a technological culture is not an inevitable feature of human evolution. If other cultures had achieved ascendancy, then science and technology would not have emerged as a reference point for measuring intelligence. SETI's requirement for an almost identical technology, although scientifically understandable, is based on an impoverished concept of intelligence.

According to Munevar, the development of a scientific culture, with access to radio communication, is highly contingent, requiring a number of lucky breaks from the environment and human natural and social history. In this context Munevar cites the development of mammalian intelligence. It is widely believed that the dinosaurs were wiped out by the immediate effects of an asteroid or cometary impact or possibly volcanic eruption. But mammals who survived the years of darkness caused by the dust of the impact or eruption then evolved to occupy the niche held by the dinosaurs. If the dinosaurs had…

Works Cited

Lamb, D. Discovery, Creativity and Problem Solving, Aldershot: Ashgate. 1991

Lamb, D. Crop patterns and the greening of Ufology, Explorations in Knowledge, XI, 2: 12-46. 1994

Munevar, G. Radical Knowledge, Aldershot: Avebury. 1981

Munevar, G. Extraterrestrial and human science, Explorations in Knowledge, VI, 2: 1-8. 2005

Counseling Assessment Candy Barr Client
Words: 2228 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 44900672
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This writer would like to know if Ms. Barr ever felt the need to cut down on drinking or to stop and couldn't. This writer would like to know if Ms. Barr takes any other drugs or medication in order to sleep or make her feel better and if so how much, and how often.

Mental Health Symptoms:

Mental Status: This writer would like to ask Ms. Barr if she ever thought of harming herself or someone else. If yes, did she have a plan and when was the last time she thought about harming herself or someone else? This writer would like to know if she has ever harmed anyone intentionally. If yes, does she have a plan and when was the last time she harmed someone else. This writer would observe if Ms. Barr's physical characteristics such as clothing, hair color, eye color, mannerisims, interaction with her and…

Case Presentation and Verbatim
Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34126104
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Susan Marx is a 31-year-old, right-handed, Caucasian woman who has completed 12 years of education. She was referred for complaints of depressed mood for the past month. hen asked why she referred herself she responded, "I am very depressed and cannot motivate myself to do anything." She also reports experiencing feelings of extreme sadness, hopelessness, lack of appetite, difficulty sleeping at night, decreased energy, some suicidal thoughts, and feeling as if everything she does is of no consequence.

Presenting Problem

Marx reported that her depression began following being terminated from her position as a secretary for an attorney. She reported that she had a "romantic" affair with her employer, who decided to end the relationship and then terminated her. Since then she is quite depressed and does not have the energy to clean her apartment which is becoming quite messy. She sits on the couch and watches television all day…

We must also not think of Ms. Marx as simply a victim, but her pathology also is also one of manipulation. Often individuals with personality disorders maintain pathogenic belief systems are complicated and characterized by conflict and are seemingly inconsistent (McWilliams, 1999). In the case of the borderline patient it is often assumed that the core underlying belief system is one of being abandoned or unsupported. While this is often a central core belief of borderline patients, an often overlooked and competing belief is one of manipulation or "I can manipulate people into being there for me." These beliefs of being able to manipulate others are often, like the core fear of abandonment, not explicit beliefs, like " The world is round" but more implicit beliefs that a manifest in intrapersonal behavior. Thus, the borderline patient is often known for their tendency to play people against one another in order to get them to take sides. The motivation for this is always to get someone, usually an easy target, to side with them and buy into their pathology. In Ms. Marx case she appears to try to get men attached to her by using sex and this can be a powerful tool in keeping them close to her. These core conflicting beliefs, that one can manipulate others into siding with them and at the same time believing that others are unconcerned about them, must both be addressed in order for treatment to be successful.

Ms. Marx demonstrates the tendency of many borderline patients to experience a dilemma based on the aforementioned core beliefs, when they get close to a person they will often become very anxious and panic because of fears of control or being engulfed by another; however, when they feel separated from others they experience anxiety and panic because of fears of abandonment. This often leads to a series of brief and intense relationships wherein Ms. Marx does not feel comfortable being close or apart.

Another issue with borderline patients is often with identity integration; borderline patients are

Hearing Voices Patients Therapists in an
Words: 4695 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 37526528
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Jung and auditory hallucinations

Meyer (2003), in a discussion of Jungian symbolism in the movie, Spider-Man, notes that both masks and voices are essential to the movement of heroic characters through the plotline. Meyer is not, however, a psychologist, nor even an anthropologist; rather, she is a write about communications. Still, her work on Spider-Man tied several of the movie's themes to Jungian thought.

Halifax's work goes farther in bringing Jungian thought into the mainstream of psychological study. His work with shamans and shamanic ritual, important subjects to Jungians, posited aspects of schizophrenia in the initiatory journey of the shaman. Halifax cited Julian Silverman's conclusions in which schizophrenia was characterized as a disorder in which the "individual withdraws form society and the outer world and becomes preoccupied by internal processes with a resulting disintegration of the personality. The symptoms, broadly described, include autism and unreal ideation, disturbed perception and thinking,…

WORKS CITED

Ardery, Philip. "Ramifications of Julian Jaynes's Theory of Consciousness for Traditional General Semantics." ETC.: A Review of General Semantics 61, no. 1 (2004): 83+. Database online. Available from Questia,  http://www.questia.com/ . Internet. Accessed 21 July 2005.

Bemak, Fred, and Lawrence R. Epp. "Transcending the Mind-Body Dichotomy: Schizophrenia Reexamined." Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development 41, no. 1 (2002): 14+. Database online. Available from Questia,

Case Study of a Schizophrenic Patient
Words: 2376 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 58489141
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Mental Health Case Study Connect

Key issues in this Case Study

A review of patient information reveals the following major issues;

Schizophrenia Disorder: This seems to be in relation to her daughter (aged one) being placed in a foster care facility by the Department of Family Services.

Substance/drug abuse: Patient overdosed on prescribed medicines -- Quetiapine and Sodium Valproate (nearly two weeks' dosage). She smoked an average of ten cigarettes a day, consumed marijuana, used intravenous (IV) amphetamine, and overindulged in drink for several years previously.

Suicidal tendency/attempts: Patient admits to consuming nearly two weeks' dosage of Quetiapine and Sodium Valproate (prescribed drugs) with suicidal intent; she also resorted to cutting her left wrist using a sharp knife. Old scars on her wrists are proof of earlier suicide attempts, as are overdosing on medicines, running at moving cars, and an attempt to swim at night in the sea.

Unipolar disorder…

References

ANMC, 2006. National competency standards for the registered nurse, Melbourne: Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia.

Cancro, R. & Lehmann, H. E., 1980. Schizophrenia: Clinical Features. In: Comprehensive textbook of psychiatry, III. Michigan: Williams & Wilkins.

Lehman, A. F. et al., 2010. Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Schizophrenia. 2nd ed. s.l.: American Psychiatric Association.

Nanda Nursing, 2012. Nursing Interventions for Schizophrenia. [Online]

Fictional Case of Ms Jean
Words: 3573 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38755970
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A diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder is usually determined through the observation and evaluation of the person's own self-reported experiences. No form of testing, including laboratory tests can determine if a person has this kind of disorder. It is only through analysis of the person's behavior and communication can a psychiatrist identify the disorder.

Major Depressive Disorder tends to exhist in people who have had depression for quite some time or have had recurring depression. Although it is difficult to identify it can be determined and identified. Treatment usually involves cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Mood- Incongruent psychotic features is a term used to describe the characteristics of psychosis. The psychosis usually consists of delusions and hallucinations. They tend to be consistent with an elevated mood such as experienced in Bi-Polar disorder or in depression such as Major Depressive Disorder.

Something such as Schizophrenia is a Mood-Incongruent Disorder. Mood- Incongruent psychotic features tend…

References

Fink M, Taylor MA: Catatonia: A Clinician's Guide to Diagnosis and Treatment. Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press, 2003

Fink M, Abrams R, Bailine S, et al.: Ambulatory electroconvulsive therapy. Task Force Report of the Association for Convulsive Therapy. Convulsive Ther 12:42-55, 1996

Husain M, Rush AJ, Fink M, et al.: Speed of response and remission in major depressive disorder with acute ECT: a Consortium for Research in ECT (CORE) report. J Clin Psychiatry (in press)

Kantor SJ, Glassman AH: Delusional depressions: natural history and response to treatment. Br J. Psychiatry 131:351-360, 1977

Dlb and Patient KM
Words: 2028 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18937120
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medication for patient named KM is Prothiaden. Prothiaden is used to treat depression as well as limit the feelings of anxiety in those taking it. The case file indicates a normal MI and no previous diagnosis of neurological disorders like Parkinson's disease. Patient KM has complained of depression and anxiety related to the passing of her mother. Progressive functional and cognitive decline has presented ever since mother died four years ago.

Although the patient worked until the age of 60 as an accountant, within the last 18 months patient has experienced fluctuations in mood, confusion, mild word finding difficulties and spatial disorientation. She also has visual hallucinations and violent dreams. She experienced recent falls and a slowing of motor skills. These symptoms extend to the inability to carry out motor sequences with either hand or double alternating hand movements. Although she can detect shapes well, she has poor ability in…

References

Armstrong, M., Litvan, I., Lang, A., Bak, T., Bhatia, K., Borroni, B., Boxer, A., Dickson, D., Grossman, M., Hallett, M., Josephs, K., Kertesz, A., Lee, S., Miller, B., Reich, S., Riley, D., Tolosa, E., Troster, A., Vidailhet, M. and Weiner, W. (2013). Criteria for the diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration. Neurology, 80(5), pp.496-503.

Ballard, C., Jacoby, R., Del Ser, T., Khan, M., Munoz, D., Holmes, C., Nagy, Z. and Perry, E. (2004). Neuropathological Substrates of Psychiatric Symptoms in Prospectively Studied Patients With Autopsy-Confirmed Dementia With Lewy Bodies: American Journal of Psychiatry: Vol 161, No 5. American Journal of Psychiatry, [online] 161(5), p.843. Available at:  http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.161.5.843  [Accessed 19 Sep. 2015].

Burke, A., Yaari, R., Tariot, P., Dougherty, J., Fleisher, A. and Brand, H. (2012). The Shadow People. The Primary Care Companion For CNS Disorders.

Ciro, C., Hershey, L. and Garrison, D. (2013). Enhanced Task-Oriented Training in a Person With Dementia With Lewy Bodies. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67(5), pp.556-563.

Abnormal Psych in Media Disorganized
Words: 2856 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 7654120
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This confusion would have been intolerable for him, creating disorganized patterns of thought. Out of this disorganization developed delusion. The boy came to imagine that the father killed the mother.

Another way cognitive (and psychodynamic) approaches explain the genesis of schizophrenia is by reference to childhood trauma. Things such as abuse, divorce, a domineering mother, or witnessing murder are seen as major factors in schizophrenic development (Koehler & Silver, 2009, p. 225). Traumatic events lead to dissociation from parents and from reality. Other related factors are stress, fear, anxiety, and social isolation that lead to schizophrenia. In other words, it is how the person is embedded in extreme and dysfunctional social relations that may shape their development. Here Spider's malady would be discussed in terms of intense family strife. There is evidence for severe marital tension in the film, exemplified by the man's having an affair. Combined with poor family…

Works Cited

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.). Washington, DC: author.

Beck, A.T., Rector, N.A., Stolar, N., & Grant, P. (2009). Schizophrenia: Cognitive theory, research, and therapy. New York: Guilford Press.

Bellack, A.S., Mueser, K.T., Gingerich, S., & Agresta, J. (1997). Social skills training for schizophrenia: A step-by-step guide. New York: Guilford Press.

Chavez, M.G. (2009). Group psychotherapy and schizophrenia. In Psychotherapeutic approaches to schizophrenic psychoses: Past, present and future, eds Y.O. Alanen, M.G. Chavez, A.-L. Silver, & B. Martindale, pp. 251-266. London: Routledge.

Schizophrenia John Nash John Nash
Words: 1613 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71389348
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In addition, they both realize that stress can make his condition worse, and work to reduce stress on him. That would also be an important part of his treatment today. In the movie, it may have helped Nash that his imaginary "controller" wanted him to do things he could not agree with, such has harming his wife "because she knew too much." In the movie, the little girl appears and holds his hand, and then it dawns on him -- the little girl never ages. She can't be real. The controller can't be real. It is hard to know whether these events really happened in this way; his story is presented as a movie, and Nash's perceptions may have altered even the events that help him resist the draw of his hallucinations.

John Nash's story demonstrates also that hallucinations serve a purpose for the patient's personality. As a secret code…

Bower, Bruce. 1996. "The birth of schizophrenia: a debilitating mental disorder may take root in the fetal brain." Science News, May 29.

Humphrey-Beebe, Lora. 2003. "Theory-based research in Schizophrenia." Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, April.

Thompson, Paul, Ph.D. 2002. "Brain Deficit Patterns May Signal Early-Onset Schizophrenia." Psychiatric Times, August. (Thompson, 2002)

Security Consulting Firm
Words: 3345 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 26764992
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Critical Pathway: Chronic enal Failure

Advanced Pathophysiology

egents Online Degree Program

Critical Pathway: Chronic renal failure

Chronic renal failure is often occasioned by chronic kidney disease, immune disorder, trauma among other conditions. It does not have any specific symptoms and might include feeling unwell generally and experiencing a reduced appetite. It is diagnosed following screening of individuals who are identified to be at risk of kidney problems, like individuals with diabetes or high blood pressure and others who have blood relative with chronic kidney disease. It always seems complex when trying to come up with the right diagnosis for a patient.

M.A. is a 60-year-old man who has a stage V chronic kidney disease mainly as a result of diabetic nephropathy and a 12-year of type 2 diabetes. He has symptomatic peripheral vascular insufficiency, and 3 years ago he had undergone coronary artery bypass 3. Within the ten months that…

References

Ahern J, Kruger DF, Gatcomb P, Petit W, Tamborlane W.,(1989). The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT): the trial coordinators perspective. Diabetes Educ 15:236 -- 281

Bassilios N, Launay-Vacher V, Khoury N, et al. (2001) Gabapentin neurotoxicity in a chronic haemodialysis patient. Nephrol Dial Transplant.

Blum RA, Comstock TJ, Sica DA, et al.(1994). Pharmacokinetics of gabapentin in subjects with various degrees of renal function. Clin Pharmacol Ther;56(2):154-159

Brawek B, Loffler M, Dooley DJ, Weyerbrock A, Feuerstein TJ.(2008) Differential modulation of K (+)-evoked (3)H-neurotransmitter release from human neocortex by gabapentin and pregabalin. Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol.:376(5):301-307

Beauty Myth Naomi Wolf's the
Words: 3357 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 88048648
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olf did not choose this word arbitrarily. She is well aware of it portents and the fact that it is loaded with meaning for women, albeit unconsciously for many. It is guilt she is attempting to highlight for them, and guilt that she attempting to free them from by pointing out that its source is both external and patriarchal. Ironically, she adds yet another layer of guilt whilst doing so - Are you doing enough to be free of the patriarchal clutches? Have you realised that the world is yours for the taking? The sleight-of-hand of her prose is as illuminating as it is frustrating; olf wants women to free themselves from media-inspired guilt by loading themselves down with the guilt of not reacting enough against what she claims are aggressors and inhibitors of strength, peace and health. That she was successful in this endeavour is self-evident; the book's sales…

Works Cited

Wolf, N. The Beauty Myth. New York: HarperCollins, 2002.

Schizophrenia Symptoms Clinical Picture Schizophrenia
Words: 935 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 60611311
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There are five kinds: hebephrenic (disorganized), catatonic, paranoid, undifferentiated, and residual. The disorganized kind is marked by confusion and inappropriate or absent emotional reaction with silliness and inappropriate laughter often present. The catatonic type shows gross motor changes, which may involve a stupor or markedly agitated movements. Paranoid schizophrenics develop an organized set of delusional beliefs supported by auditory hallucinations. If the person is schizophrenic but doesn't fit one of those categories, it is called undifferentiated.

In addition, schizophrenia is broken down into Type I and Type II. Type one shows primarily positive symptoms while Type I shows primarily negative symptoms. Type I patients typically have better adjustment prior to onset of the illness than Type II's, and are more likely to improve over time. Type I is also most closely linked to biochemical disturbances while Type II is tied to structural abnormalities in the brain.

Clinical explanations for schizophrenia:…

Analyzing Odyssey Dante Frankenstein
Words: 3056 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 95647040
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Depression in Adolescence

Depression in Adolescents

The link between symptoms, etiology, core biochemical processes, treatment outcome, and treatment response of affective (mood) disorders is yet to be adequately understood for allowing their categorization, such that it meets universal approval. Still, one has to make an attempt in this regard, and researchers propose a potentially-acceptable one, derived from extensive consultation.

In case of affective disorders, the basic disturbance is an affect (mood) change, typically extreme elation or depression (without or with related anxiety). An overall activity level change generally accompanies this change of mood, and a majority of other related symptoms either will be conveniently recognized in the context of these changes, or will be secondary to them. Most disorders have a tendency of repetition, and the commencement of individual bouts is usually linked to stressful circumstances or occurrences.

The key criteria of classification of affective disorders have been selected for…

References

Algon, S., Yi, J., Calkins, M.E., Kohler, C. And Borgmann-Winter, K.E. (2013). Evaluation and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Psychotic Symptoms. Current psychiatry reports.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500659/ 

Christie, A. (2007). Childhood anxiety: Occupational disruption. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 54(2),31-39. Available at  http://www.cin.ufpe.br/~fbcpf/PAMPIE/childhood%20anxiety%20Occupational%20disruption.pdf 

Halverson, J. L. (1994-2016). Depression Differential Diagnoses. Medscape.  http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/286759-differential 

Lewis, A. J., Bertino, M. D., Skewes, J., Shand, L., Borojevic, N., Knight, T., Lubman, D.I., Toumbourou, J.W. (2013, Nov 13). Adolescent depressive disorders and family based interventions in the family options multicenter evaluation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Available at:  http://trialsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1745-6215-14-384

Analyzing Depression in Adolescent
Words: 3055 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45960897
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Depression in Adolescence

Depression in Adolescents

The link between symptoms, etiology, core biochemical processes, treatment outcome, and treatment response of affective (mood) disorders is yet to be adequately understood for allowing their categorization, such that it meets universal approval. Still, one has to make an attempt in this regard, and researchers propose a potentially-acceptable one, derived from extensive consultation.

In case of affective disorders, the basic disturbance is an affect (mood) change, typically extreme elation or depression (without or with related anxiety). An overall activity level change generally accompanies this change of mood, and a majority of other related symptoms either will be conveniently recognized in the context of these changes, or will be secondary to them. Most disorders have a tendency of repetition, and the commencement of individual bouts is usually linked to stressful circumstances or occurrences.

The key criteria of classification of affective disorders have been selected for…

References

Algon, S., Yi, J., Calkins, M.E., Kohler, C. And Borgmann-Winter, K.E. (2013). Evaluation and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Psychotic Symptoms. Current psychiatry reports.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500659/ 

Christie, A. (2007). Childhood anxiety: Occupational disruption. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 54(2),31-39. Available at  http://www.cin.ufpe.br/~fbcpf/PAMPIE/childhood%20anxiety%20Occupational%20disruption.pdf 

Halverson, J. L. (1994-2016). Depression Differential Diagnoses. Medscape.  http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/286759-differential 

Lewis, A. J., Bertino, M. D., Skewes, J., Shand, L., Borojevic, N., Knight, T., Lubman, D.I., Toumbourou, J.W. (2013, Nov 13). Adolescent depressive disorders and family based interventions in the family options multicenter evaluation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Available at:  http://trialsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1745-6215-14-384

The Present Paper Has the
Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 49351072
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The man is carrying a white piece of paper as well. He seems to be sort of monk. Now the strange bird becomes a metaphor for this character. The viewer can understand that the monks have the role of carrying the message of god on earth. On a closer look, the bird can be interpreted as a birdman. The fact that the birdman is wearing skates means that he is unable to fly on the one hand and that the ground on which he is walking is slippery. The ideas of instability and fear are suggested.
We see a street which passes through hills and valleys and ending in an open area where mountains can be see. In this background we can see fantastic characters such as a fish with a tower on its back. Another character resembles a human but has a strong grotesque yet funny appeal to it…

Biopsychosocial Analysis of Nina Sayers
Words: 1400 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18992263
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Nina Sayers

Biopsychosocial Analysis of Nina Sayers

Academic Institution

Nina Sayers, the protagonist in the film the Black Swan, displays a plethora of dysfunctional symptoms and a dissent in the psychosis in the film. The following is a biopsychosocial analysis of the character as she is betrayed in the film.

Biological. The film offers very little in the way of direct biological evidence to build a case that there is a significant biological component to Nina's difficulties; however, biological factors can be inferred based on the symptoms she displays. Perhaps the strongest indicator of biological contributions to Nina's problems is the film's portrayal of Nina's mother, Erica. Erica presents as being a borderline psychotic herself. In order to ward off her own anxieties, insecurities, and the loneliness of age she identifies with her daughter's youth, beauty, and drive. Erica's sense of herself and daughter is fused into a single entity…

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

Disorders -- V. Washington, DC: Author.

Sadock, B.J. & Sadock, V.A., (2007). Kaplan and Sadock's Synopsis of Psychiatry:

Behavioral Sciences/Clinical Psychiatry (10th edition). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams.

The Case Study of Rosa
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Psychiatric Evaluation

Demographic Information

osa odriguez

163 E. 174th street Bronx NY 10463

Phone (Home/Cell): *** Phone (Work): ***

Date of Birth: 11/11/1954

Social Security #: 050-44-5555

Guardianship (for children and adults when applicable): Not Applicable

Marital Status: Widowed

Family Members: Patient has three sons and one sister.

oberto odriguez, 25, M, Son

Juan odriguez, 27, M, Son

Steven odriguez, 22, M, Son

Felicia ivera, 57, F, Sister

Employer: etired

Occupation: etired Nurse

Emergency Contact Information

Felicia ivera

Phone ***

elationship to Patient: Sister

Current Providers: Medicare and Aetna

Primary Medical Practitioner: Dr. Yomaris Pena

Phone ***

Patient does not give permission to contact provider.

Other Behavior Health Specialists or Consultants Specialist: None

Presenting Problem (include onset, duration, intensity)

Patient has been experiencing depressive symptoms and potentially suicidal thoughts. Depressive symptoms first appeared when her husband died around 7 years ago. They only transformed into depression when she received the…

References

Bhatia, R., Hartman, C., Kallen, M., Graham, J., & Giordano, T. (2010). Persons Newly Diagnosed with HIV Infection are at High Risk for Depression and Poor Linkage to Care: Results from the Steps Study. AIDS Behav, 15(6), 1161-1170.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10461-010-9778-9 

Cruess, D., Minor, S., Antoni, M., & Millon, T. (2007). Utility of the Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic (MBMD) to Predict Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) Medication Regimens Among HIV-Positive Men and Women. Journal Of Personality Assessment, 89(3), 277-290.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00223890701629805 

Heitz, D. (2014). People with HIV Suffer from Depression Caused by Shame, Trauma, Substance Abuse. Healthline. Retrieved 26 November 2015, from  http://www.healthline.com/health-news/hiv-patients-suffer-from-depression-090214 

Mayoclinic.org,. (2015). Depression and anxiety: Exercise eases symptoms - Mayo Clinic. Retrieved 27 November 2015, from  http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/in-depth/depression-and-exercise/art-20046495

Schizophrenia on the Mind and Body an
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Schizophrenia on the Mind and Body

An Analysis of the Etiology of Schizophrenia and Its Impact on the Mind and Body

Perhaps no other human condition has received so much publicity, but remains so misunderstood by the general public as schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is widely believed to be associated with multiple personalities and other acute symptoms that would make sufferers readily apparent; however, the reality of the condition is that people can have schizophrenia and never know it. However, while much has been learned about the disease and its etiology over the last hundred years, much remains unclear about who is at risk and precisely how the disease progresses. Nevertheless, a number of efficacious treatments have been identified, and today, some schizophrenics recover completely or sufficiently enough to lead normal and productive lives. This paper provides an overview of schizophrenia and its incidence, the etiology of the disease and its symptoms,…

Works Cited

Alanen, Yrjo O. And Sirkka-Liisa Leinonen. Schizophrenia: Its Origins and Need-Adapted

Treatment. London: Karnac Books, 1997.

Beebe, Lora Humphrey. (2003). Theory-Based Research in Schizophrenia. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 39(2):67.

Bigelow, Llewellyn B. et al. Schizophrenia and Manic-Depressive Disorder: The Biological

Two Views of the Mind Body Problem
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Descartes

Cartesian dualism emerges from Descartes's approach of radical skepticism. Wanting to know what can be determined to be absolutely true, Descartes begins by doubting all sensory perception as fundamentally external and liable to interference. Just as we understand that hallucination exists as a real phenomenon -- whereby we might "see" an object that is not really there -- we may come to understand that all the evidence obtained from eyesight may not necessarily be a valid representation of the external world. Indeed, we do not even have to refer to the pathological category of hallucination to understand what it would mean to find sensory evidence to be deceptive. In his recent book on hallucinations, the noted neuroscientist Dr. Oliver Sacks (2012) makes reference to "dreams, which one can argue are hallucinations of a sort" (xiii). Anyone who has had a vivid dream knows that they contain visual, auditory, and…

References

Churchland, PM. (1988). Matter and consciousness: A contemporary introduction to the philosophy of mind. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Descartes, R. (1999). Discourse on method and Meditations on first philosophy. 4th ed. Trans. D. Cress. New York: Hackett.

Sacks, O. (2012). Hallucinations. New York: Knopf.

Near-Death Experiences -- Real or
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The writer goes on, "Then I saw a light and everything stopped. It was as if the light communicated to me everything I had done wrong and it showed me what love it" (www.near-death.com). Maybe that "light" was his conscience? Meanwhile, another person who claims to have had a NDE recalls that in 1970 he was a 24-year-old "with serious psycho-emotional problems." Right there at the opening of his narrative any reader with an investigative tendency would wonder how believable someone is going to be who had psycho-emotional issues at 24.

But he goes on, saying the room "was flooded with light from overhead" and he was engaged in a "new dimension of psychic communion" with a hippie couple who had given him the LSD. He went into a "trance" and was "truly" born again, "without even the need of Jesus." If this sounds like a person was on an…

Works Cited

Crislip, Mark. "Near Death Experiences and the Medical Literature." Skeptic 14.2

(2008): 14-16.

Dieguez, Sebastian. "NDE Experiment." Skeptical Inquirer 33.5 (2009): 44-49.

Evans, John M. "Near-Death Experiences." The Lancet Vol. 359 (2002): 2116.

Fisher King Was a 1991 Movie That
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Fisher King was a 1991 movie that starred Robin illiams and Jeff Bridges and was directed by Terry Gilliam. The movie provided a unique insight into the world of abnormal psychology. It depicted accurate per trails of a few psychological disorders and psychosis that were brought on by a single stressor for both of the leading roles as well as a plethora of disorders by lesser characters brought on by life. Neither illiams nor Bridges earned grandiose Hollywood awards for their roles and the movie itself did not rake in billions, but it does serve as a very good example of just how delicate human nature is and what can happen to each and every one of us without a moment's notice. At the time of the stressor in this movie, Bridge's character was on top of his game in the world of radio and was about to 'add a…

Works Cited

About.com. "Depression." 2009. Retrieved on November 18, 2009, from  http://depression.about.com/cs/brainchem101/a/brainchemistry.htm .

Quicksilver. "The Fisher King: starring Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges." Dir. Terry Gilliam. 1991. Retrieved on November 18, 2009, from  http://ipb.quicksilverscreen.com/lofiversion/index.php/t100510.html .

Schizophrenia.com. "Schizophrenia." 2009. Retrieved on November 18, 2009, from  http://www.schizophrenia.com/disease.htm .

Schizophrenia While All Mental Illnesses Continue to
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Schizophrenia

While all mental illnesses continue to carry some sort of stigma, perhaps no mental illness is more widely misunderstood than schizophrenia. In fact, prior to the introduction of some of the more modern medications, it was virtually impossible to live a normal life if one had a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The complex interplay of symptoms experienced by most schizophrenics lent those patients the classic air of madness. Moreover, the combination of hallucinations, delusions, and disorganized thought contributed to the air of dangerousness (see APA, 2000). While the mentally ill, as a whole, are no more dangerous to themselves or others than the general population, the reality is that an individual with schizophrenia could be much more dangerous than the population as a whole. Moreover, there was no standard treatment of the patient with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia crosses all races and cultures, so that a wide variety of cultural treatments contributed…

References

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-

IV. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.; 2000.

Bentall RP. Prospects for a cognitive-developmental account of psychotic experiences. Br J. Clin

Psychol. 2007;46(Pt 2):155 -- 73.

Psycho Auditory Imagery in Terms of Auditory
Words: 608 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6191806
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Psycho Auditory

Auditory Imagery

In terms of auditory imagery of music and environmental sounds, what area of the brain is involved in the comparisons of pitch in imagery? (b) Research regarding the manipulation of auditory images of melodies has shown that activation of the posterior parietal cortex was correlated with what variable?

The part or area of the brain that is crucial for comparison of pitch in imagery is the Auditory Cortex. Auditory Cortex has two distinct areas: primary auditory cortex and peripheral cortex. These two areas play unique roles in comparison of the pitch in imagery. In the manipulation of auditory images of melodies has shown that activation of the posterior parietal cortex was correlated with vision. Activation of the posterior parietal cortex experiences correlation with the extent or strength of the vision of an individual.

With respect to the content of dreams, what sort of auditory imagery is…

Schizophrenia Affects the Brain Person & Family
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Schizophrenia Affects the Brain, Person, & Family

This paper looks at the how schizophrenia affects the brain, the person, & the family, also looking at the history of the subject and its role within society. Bibliography cites four sources

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is one of a range of mental conditions that is widely misunderstood. May see it as a relatively recent disease, and the term has only been in use for about a century. However the condition is not new. This disease, which is one of the most disabling of the range of metal conditions, can be traced back for millennia. The first documented cases appears to have occurred in Ancient Egypt, where a discretion of the condition is described in the Eber papyrus, in the Book of Hearts (kasha, 1999). The condition was not understood in detail, and the treatment was usually incubation, this was an achieved by spending the…

Okasha A, (1999), Mental Health in the Middle East: An Egyptian Perspective. Clinical Psychology Review, 19, 8, 917-33

RXlist, (2002), [online] accessed at  http://www.rxlist.com/ 

National Institute of Mental Health, (2002), [online] accessed at www.nimh.nih.gov

What Is Schizophrenia
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etiology of schizophrenia and the ways in which researchers, psychologists, philosophers, and different cultures in different ages have attempted to understand the disease. It also examines the prevalence of schizophrenia on both a global and domestic front and discusses it in terms of individual patients according to age, gender and ethnicity. Finally it examines the disease from the standpoint of diagnostic criteria as well as evidence-based treatments and what the dropout rate of each might signify. It concludes by asserting that researchers may benefit from approaching schizophrenia from a sociological perspective since the psychosocial therapy appears to have the best clinical results and lowest dropout rate among the various treatments available.

Schizophrenia

Introduction

Eugene Blueler first used the term "schizophrenia" in the early 20th century as a means of re-defining what earlier psychologists had described as a form of dementia. Blueler's term described a "split mind" -- a phenomenon that…

Reference List

Bhugra, D. (2005). The global prevalence of schizophrenia. PLoS Med, 2(5): 151.

Castle, D., Wessely, S., Der, G., Murray, R. (1991). The incidence of operationally defined schizophrenia in Camberwell, 1965-1984. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 159: 790-4.

Hofstede, G., Minkov, M. (2010) Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind,

3rd ed., NY, McGraw-Hill.

Schizophrenia
Words: 694 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: White Paper Paper #: 25772009
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Psychological Disorders and Their Treatment

Schizophrenia is a chronic brain or psychological disorder that causes the sufferer to experience hallucinations, have paranoid delusions, engage in confused speech, have trouble thinking clearly, and lose the ability to function in a normal manner. According to the DSM-V (2013), the diagnosis criteria for schizophrenia states that these symptoms must last at least in duration for 6 months and there should be at least one month in which the symptoms are active and are negatively affecting the person’s life—i.e., the individual’s ability to work or socialize. While the WHO (2017) notes that there are more than 20 million people all over the world who suffer from schizophrenia, it is a treatable disorder. This paper will discuss the disorder, its symptoms and treatments that are available.

The symptoms of schizophrenia include: hallucination, paranoid delusions, exaggerated or distorted perceptions, beliefs or actions, confused or disordered thinking,…

Women Who Kill Their Children
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hen their state of denial lifts, they are often wracked with remorse for what they've done.

The final circumstance that Resnick lists is uncommon but not unheard of among mothers who kill their children: spousal revenge. Though this is rare among women, one recent case that highlights it is the case of an Ontario mother, Elaine Campione, who drowned her two daughters in the bathtub, allegedly to keep her ex-husband from getting custody and to inflict intense suffering upon him. She even made a video only minutes after the murders, asking her ex-husband if he was "happy now" (CTV News 2010).

ith all of these circumstances potentially leading parents, especially mothers, to murder their children, legal prosecution and defense of these cases can be difficult -- at times, heart-wrenching. In the cases of mothers who have killed their children, the great majority of the defenses center around pleas of insanity.…

Works Cited

Child Abuse Prevention Network.  http://child-abuse.com/ . Accessed 1 February 2011.

Jones, a. (2009) Women Who Kill. New York: The Feminist Press of the City College of New York.

Meyer, C., Oberman, M. And White, K. (2001). Mothers Who Kill Their Children. New York: NYU Press.

National Council for the Prosecution of Child Abuse.  http://www.ndaa.org/ncpca_home.html . Accessed 1 February 2011.

Screw at Its Most Superficial
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She is in the stereotypical subservient housemaid role, and she does not divulge her sexual identity either.

Sexual knowledge is also intimately equated with death in Turn of the Screw. The title suggests at once the screws in a coffin but also the sexual act. The governess sees ghosts instead of fulfilling her desire to have sex with the father of the children she hawks over. hile the governess seems assertive at times, brave enough to look into the eyes of a stranger and a ghost, she is also too timid to directly confront the father of the children. His request that she never contact him seems ridiculous, given Flora and Miles are his children. The fact that the governess obeys the orders at all shows that she lacks the internal conviction and self-confidence to assert herself. Feminist theories of identity formation therefore lend a considerable amount of insight into…

Works Cited

James, Henry. Turn of the Screw. Biblios. 2010.

Norton, R. (1999). "Henry James's the Turn of the Screw," Gay History and Literature, 1971, 1999, updated 20 June 2008 .

Parkinson, E.J. "Apparitionists vs. Non-apparitionists: 1934-1948." Chapter 3 in the Turn of the Screw: A History of Its Critical Interpretations 1898-1979. Retrieved online:  http://www.turnofthescrew.com/ch3.htm

Psychological and Schizophrenia Individuals Suffering
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Only a minority of studies have found advantages in social adjustment (four of 16) or employment (three of nine, and these jobs represented mostly sheltered rather than competitive employment)."

A psychological aspect of schizophrenia involves the intervention of patients with the use of cognitive behavior therapy or CBT. Such treatment is used for those whose psychotic symptoms constantly occur despite consumption of medication. The objective of CBT is for schizophrenics who do not respond to their medication and to have their episodes of delusions and hallucinations or other distress to be decreased. As well, CBT's goal is to reduce the risk of relapse and social dysfunction. Bustillo (2001) noted such therapy centers on "rationally exploring the subjective nature of the psychotic symptoms, challenging the evidence for these, and subjecting such beliefs and experiences to reality testing."

n a study led by Kuipers, it was discovered that CBT schizophrenics demonstrated a…

In a study led by Kuipers, it was discovered that CBT schizophrenics demonstrated a significant decrease in their symptoms compared to standard treatment. In an investigation led by Tarrier, CBT has reduced incidences of patients' delusions and hallucinations compared to the results of supportive counseling and routine care. As a result, eleven out of thirty-three patients who received CBT reduced the aforementioned symptoms by 50%, and were maintained at the twelve-month follow-up. In Drury's study, CBT's effect with antipsychotic medicine on acutely psychotic inpatients recovered from their psychotic episodes more rapidly and complete. At their nine-month follow-up, 95% of CBT patients had minor or no incidences of hallucinations and delusions. However, those in the control group, 44% of schizophrenics experienced minimal aforementioned symptoms and episodes. In a study led by Buchkremer, it compared four types of interventions, two of which were CBT, to routine care. Such treatment was given over eight months, assessed after one year, and follow-up of two years. It was shown the group that received CBT with individual and family psychoeducational therapy experienced reduced hospitalizations.

In a study led by Sensky, CBT helped improve the negative and depressive symptoms of schizophrenia. As well, such stance was maintained for at least nine months post treatment. In another investigation led by Kemp, CBT treatment involving motivational interviewing techniques with adherence to the consumption of antipsychotic medication displayed improvements in patients' demeanor toward drug treatment and understanding of their illness compared to those who didn't receive such intervention.

Lewis (2005) described motivational interviewing aimed at psychotic symptom control, substance misuse, and family intervention is that is has, "been used to treat uncomplicated substance dependence. Patients are encouraged to explore the problems of their substance misuse causes and the ways in which it prevents them achieving their goals. They are also encouraged to explore how they could address these problems, including reduction in substance

Indians of North America
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ceremonies of the Hopi tribe of the American Southwest, and the Assiniboine of the Northern Plains. The Assiniboine engage in the Sun Dance as one of their major ceremonies, while the Hopi engage in the Snake Dance as one of theirs. These dance ceremonies share many commonalities, but they contain major differences, as well. The Hopi were largely agricultural, living on mesas devoid of much moisture, while the Assiniboine were hunters, subsisting off the buffalo of the plains. These differences make up the disparity in their ceremonies, and they are important clues to their identity and way of life.

The Hopi Nation is one of the oldest Native American tribes in North America. They can trace their history in Northern Arizona, where their reservation is located, back to the 12th century, but they believe their history goes back much further than that. They are believed to have migrated to the…

Art Noveau Absinthe Dangerous Drug
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Breaux's development proved that thujone was not the ingredient that caused hallucinations in the drink (Adams).

Despite the legal issues surrounding its use, absinthe as a tool for inspiration is a topic yearning for much discussion. The Parisian artists such as Van Gough that used absinthe for inspiration no doubt thought that their creativity was a result of the hallucinations that it inspired. Marilyn Manson even developed his own brand of Absinthe, which can be purchased online. Other than Manson, modern artists such as Trash ednesday have produced songs about or inspired by the drink. Trash ednesday's album is even called "Absinthe Mind" ("Trash ednesday"). Is the fact that the drug is so overtly referenced as an inspiration for art and music by both modern artists and artists of the past feeding into a culture of acceptance regarding mind-altering substances? Some would suggest that this is true, while others would…

Works Cited

Adams, Paul. "Barely Legal: American Absinthe Passes the Taste Test." Wired. 19 July

2007. 12 April 2009.

"The History of Absinthe." Liqueurs de France. n.d. 12 April 2009.

Paranoid Schizophrenia This Work Details
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(Walsh & Meyersohn, 2001, p. 188)

Therapeutic Interventions

Therapeutic interventions, as has been mentioned are frequently multifaceted. Nursing interventions can be associated with the disease treatment or can be in support of other diseases the individual has that need treatment, i.e. when and individual is hospitalized for illness or injury the diagnosis and therapeutic evidence of PS is absolutely essential to support and understand as incompliance can be global and "new" therapeutic relationships can be met with extreme distrust. Education is essential as PS patients still have some (greater or lesser) cognitive impairment and may not give appropriate clues as to how well he or she understands or intends to comply with treatment interventions. Nurses in a psych or medical setting must be careful how they word everything and how they educate patents about their treatment. Expected outcomes are dependant on severity but many people with PS can and do…

References

Bond, G.R., & Meyer, P.S. (1999). The Role of Medications in the Employment of People with Schizophrenia. The Journal of Rehabilitation, 65(4), 9.

Higgins, P.B. (1995). Clozapine and the Treatment of Schizophrenia. Health and Social Work, 20(2), 124.

Hilsenroth, M.J., Fowler, J.C., & Padawer, J.R. (1998). The Rorschach Schizophrenia Index (SCZI): an Examination of Reliability, Validity, and Diagnostic Efficiency. Journal of Personality Assessment, 70(3), 514-534.

Mayo Clinic "Paranoid Schizophrenia Definition"  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/paranoid-schizophrenia/DS00862

Portrait of a Schizophrenic the
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The audience is realized to find that he has been dreaming, but the dread remains for both he father and the son. Early on in genetics was given some effect in diagnosis of schizophrenia:

In a classic 1966 paper, Leonard Heston compared foster children who were separated at birth from their schizophrenic biological mothers and foster children who were separated at birth from their psychologically healthy biological mothers. Schizophrenia appeared only in a subset (about 16%) of the children whose biological mothers had schizophrenia, a finding which suggested that rather than bad parenting, genetics plays a powerful although only partial role in the emergence of schizophrenia. (Parens, 2004)

But there are also environmental factors cited as well.

The way we perceive the world is created in large part by our nurturing environment. Highly critical parenting is one of the factors cited in those with schizophrenia as well as more serious…

References

Ackerson, B.J. (2003). Parents with Serious and Persistent Mental Illness: Issues in Assessment and Services. Social Work, 48(2), 187-195

Davidson, L. & Stayner, D. (1997). Loss, Loneliness and the Desire for Love: Perspectives on the Social Lives of People with Schizophrenia. The Psychiatric Journal, 20 (3), (Winter), pg. 3-12

Harrop, C., & Trower, P. (2003). Why Does Schizophrenia Develop at Late Adolescence? A Cognitive-Developmental Approach to Psychosis. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons

Meuser, Kim T. (1996) Helping Families Manage Severe Mental Illness. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Skills, 1 (2) pg. 21-42

Jesus Resurrect Was Jesus Resurrected
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It is clear that the Roman and Jewish authorities were concerned about the development of the early church. Craig points out that, had the tomb been occupied, it would have been an easy matter for those authorities to indicate Jesus' dead body as a means of disproving the notion that he resurrected. However, there is no evidence to suggest that they did so.

In his second rebuttal, Ludemann reiterates his disbelief that a supernatural resurrection could have occurred. Then, he goes on to say that he will offer an alternative explanation for the events. He believes that Paul's experience with Jesus, which Ludemann has previously explained away as a vision, does capture the nature of all of the disciples' experience with a post-mortem Jesus. He also reiterates the point that the Gospels are not reliable as a historical source given how far removed they were from the events in question.…

Works Cited

Copan, Paul and Ronald K. Tacelli (eds). Jesus Resurrection Fact or Figment: A Debate between William Lane Craig and Gerd Ludemann. Downers Grove, IL: Intervarsity Press, 2000.

Schizoaffective Disorder Is a Mental
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The exact regimen depends on the type and severity of symptoms, and whether the disorder is of depressive or bipolar type. Medications are usually prescribed to alleviate psychotic symptoms, stabilize mood and treat depression, while psychotherapy can help curb distorted thoughts, teach social skills and diminish social isolation. ("Schizoaffective Disorder," 2006)

Medication: Medications generally include antipsychotic drugs prescribed to alleviate psychotic symptoms, such as delusions, paranoia and hallucinations. Mood-stabilizing medications are prescribed in bipolar disorder, which help to level out the highs and lows of manic depression. Anti-depressants such as citalopram (Celexa), fluoxetine (Prozac) and escitalopram (Lexapro) are normally prescribed for depressive subtype schizoaffective disorder, as they are likely to alleviate feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or sleeplessness and lack of concentration. (Ibid.)

Psychotherapy and Counseling: Although there has been far less research on psychotherapeutic treatments for schizoaffective disorder than in schizophrenia or depression, the available evidence suggests that cognitive behavior…

References

Brannon, G.E. (2005). "Schizoaffective Disorder." E-Medicine. Retrieved on April 18, 2007 at  http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic3514.htm 

Facts About Schizoaffective Disorder." (2001). Family Social Support Project at UCLA. Retrieved on April 18, 2007 at  http://www.npi.ucla.edu/ssg/schizoaffective.htm 

Grayson, C.E. (2004). "Schizoaffective Disorder." Mental Health America. Retrieved on April 18, 2007 at  http://www.nmha.org/go/information/get-info/schizophrenia/schizoaffective-disorder 

Schizoaffective Disorder." (2006). Mayo Foundation for Medical Educational and Research. Retrieved on April 18, 2007 at  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/schizoaffective-disorder/DS00866

Near-Death Experiences Specifically it Will
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Most people who have near-death experiences say they have changed their lives in many positive ways. Blackmore notes, "Again and again NDErs describe how different are their priorities, hopes and fears, after their experience" (Blackmore, 1993, p. l25). Most people say their lives change very positively after they have a near-death experience. One woman said, "Before my experience, I guess I was like most people struggling with a better self-image. But I really experienced how precious and how loved I am by God -- the light -- and I am constantly reminded of that in my daily life" (ing & Valarino, 1998, p. 189). For those who live through near-death experiences, they are meaningful, and many point to a time during the experience when they made the choice to turn back and go on living. In addition, while other memories fade with time, the near-death experience remains vivid and quite…

References

Blackmore, S.J. (1993). Near-death experiences. Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Books.

Osis, K., & Haraldsson, E. (1997). What they saw: At the hour of death (3rd ed.). Norwalk, CT: Hastings House.

Peters, L. (1994). The internal mystery plays: The role and physiology of the visual system in contemplative practices. Re-vision, 17(1), 3-13.

Ring, K., & Valarino, E.E. (1998). Lessons from the light: What we can learn from the near-death experience. New York: Insight Books.

Features and Comparison of Various
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e., unreasonable expectations of especially favorable treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations" (DSM-IV, 2000));

d) has no empathy for those he has taken advantage of, such as family members (asking for a loan), landlords (failure to pay rent on time), investors (when the company goes "belly up" (DSM-IV, 2000)).

orks Cited

American Psychiatric Association (2000) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Fourth Edition. Desk Reference. (ashington, DC: American Psychiatric Association).

Assumptions held by BPD Sufferers." BPD Central ebsite. Retrieved November 20, 2003 at http://www.bpcentral.com/resources/basics/assumptions.shtm

Bardi, Jason Socrates. "Molecules on the Mind." News & View section. Vol. 3, Issue 5, Feb. 10, 2003. The Scripps Research Institute eb site retrieved November 24, 2003 at http://www.scripps.edu/newsandviews/e_20030210/sutcliffe.html

Borderline Personality Disorder - Fear: A Roller-Coaster Ride." Retrieved November 20, 2003 at http://www.borderlinepersonality.ca/borderrollercoaster.htm

From the Inside Out by a.J. Mahari)

Diagnostic Criteria for Narcissistic Personality Disorder

http://wave.prohosting.com/healnpd/DSMIV.html

http://www.upcmd.com/dot/diseases/00186/disease_definition.html

Dysthymia Symptoms." Retrieved…

Works Cited

American Psychiatric Association (2000) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Fourth Edition. Desk Reference. (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association).

Assumptions held by BPD Sufferers." BPD Central Website. Retrieved November 20, 2003 at http://www.bpcentral.com/resources/basics/assumptions.shtm

Bardi, Jason Socrates. "Molecules on the Mind." News & View section. Vol. 3, Issue 5, Feb. 10, 2003. The Scripps Research Institute Web site retrieved November 24, 2003 at  http://www.scripps.edu/newsandviews/e_20030210/sutcliffe.html 

Borderline Personality Disorder - Fear: A Roller-Coaster Ride." Retrieved November 20, 2003 at  http://www.borderlinepersonality.ca/borderrollercoaster.htm

Beautiful Mind Managing Schizophrenia the
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In one way, it can seem that Nash has low communication competence. For example, he does not have good relationships with his classmates, his workmates, or his students. However, there are various signs that this is related more to a lack of social skills than an inability to communicate. This is seen towards the end of the film where Nash is seen tutoring and teaching students. In these interactions, it is seen that Nash is an effective communicator. At the same time, Nash can seem impatient and also seems to behave in unexpected ways. Again though, this is related to Nash's inability to understand social expectations and act based on these expectations. In Nash's mind, it appears that he considers his only focus as being able to explain and teach mathematics, with no regard either for personal relationships or for social standards. Nash is shown tutoring students and it is…

Works Cited

Beautiful Mind. Dir. Ron Howard. Universal Pictures, 2001.

Duality of Character in Nathaniel Hawthorne and
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Duality of Character in Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe

In Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story, "Young Goodman Brown," and in Edgar Allan Poe's story, "The House of Usher," there are main characters who have several characteristics in common. The main character in Hawthorne's story possesses a duality of character and undergoes a life-changing experience. The title character in Poe's story has a similar duality of character; he, too, undergoes a transformational experience that may be seen as representing duality of character as well. Both stories have a dreamlike quality that adds to the atmosphere of the story; it also leads the reader to question whether the events have actually occurred, or if they were somehow the products of a hallucination or dream state, perhaps even supernatural in nature.

In Nathaniel Hawthorne's story, "Young Goodman Brown," the title character is a young, newly married Christian man who lives in Salem, Massachusetts…

Works Cited

Harmon, William, and Holman, Hugh. A Handbook to Literature, Eleventh Edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: 2009. Print.

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "Young Goodman Brown." In Literature: Reading Fiction, Poetry,

Drama, and the Essay, Second Edition, ed. Robert DiYanni. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1990. 93-102. Print.

Poe, Edgar Allan. "The House of Usher." Retrieved electronically on July 23, 2012 from . Web.

Cult Films
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Cult Films

oth Rosemary's aby and I Walked with a Zombie are movies that have explicit elements of what we might more commonly think of as "horror" films. On the other hand, however, both rely so heavily on atmospheric tension and are so laden with strange ambiguity and "arty" moments that they seem to transcend the genre. Given the large following behind both movies as well, they are often just as likely to be described as "cult films" as horror movies. Indeed, it is important to realize that what makes cult movies a genre in their own right is not simply a lack of box office performance or else a devoted fan following. Indeed, cult movies share many other characteristics and a most typically marked by an otherworldly strangeness and an overriding sense of oddity. Often, these films are controversial and in certain ways they seem to transcend their genre…

Bibliography

Cult Films." Filmsite.org. Retrieved September 2, 2003, at  http://www.Filmsite.org/ .

Siegel's 1956 Film Version of the Invasion
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Siegel's 1956 film version of The Invasion of the Body Snatchers uses a number of realistic techniques like undistorted camera angles, and shots of mundane activities and locations to establish the rationality and logic of the daytime world of small-town California. As the movie begins to shift into the nightmarish world of the alien invasion, the shots become increasingly distorted, dark and gloomy, showing the slip into the subconscious, emotional existence. Here, the movie begins to adopt a moral stance, as we see that the main characters are truly at their most human as they live through the overt terror and emotion of the night time distortions of logic and reality. It is in the daytime world of logic that they can explain away the loss of their humanity to the aliens, but in the nighttime their humanity is revealed as the emotional, subconscious mess that defines them. As the…

Works Cited

Invasion of the Body Snatchers. 1956. Director: Don Siegel. Producer: Walter Wanger.

Starring: Kevin McCarthy, Dana Wynter, King Donovan, Carolyn Jones, and Larry

Gates.

Effects of Domestic Violence on Children
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Domestic Violence on Children

Many people throughout the world have traditionally believed that women's natural roles were as mothers and wives and considered women to be better suited for childbearing and homemaking than for involvement in the public life of business or politics. This popular belief that women were somehow intellectually inferior to men, based in large part on religious authority, has led many societies throughout the world to limit women's education to learning domestic skills and relegating them to a second-class citizen status. By and large, the world has been run by well-educated, upper-class men who controlled most positions of employment and power in these societies and to a large extent continue to do so today. While the status of women today varies dramatically in different countries and, in some cases, among groups within the same country, such as ethnic groups or economic classes, women continue to experience the…

References

Bagley, C. (1992). Development of an adolescent stress scale for use of school counsellors. School Psychology International 13, 31-49.

Beitchman, J., Zucker, K., Hood, J., DaCosta, G., Ackaman, D. & Cassavia, E. (1992). A review of the long-term effects of child sexual abuse. Child Abuse and Neglect, 16, 101-118.

Belsky J. & Vondra J. (1989). Lessons from child abuse: The determinants of parenting. In D. Cicchetti & V. Carlson (Eds.), Child maltreatment: Theory and research on the causes and consequences of child abuse and neglect (pp. 153-202). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Briere, J.N. (1992). Child Abuse Trauma. Theory and Treatment of the Lasting Effects. Newbury Park, CA:Sage.

Appelfeld Wiesel Kosinski
Words: 1218 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90554870
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adenheim resort is the usual resort of the frivolous 20s and 30s, with cafes, casinos, entertainment locations, etc. The middle class Jew that comes here is in no way different from any middle classed individual that wants to relax during the holiday, close to his family and friends, involved in vacation activities, chatting to the other members of the community on holiday, enjoying the parks and leisure activities in the resort.

In this sense, I am not sure that being a Jewish guest in the resort is much differentiated from being a non-minority guest here. Perhaps this is the entire sense of Appelfeld's work: in a year when the Second World War is due to start, in a period when Jewish persecutions are already at a significant level, with ghettos formed across Europe and with serious limitations on Jewish activities, one can still enjoy a quiet holiday as a Jew.…

Bibliography

1. Appelfeld, Aharon. Badenheim, 1939. Dalia Bilu translation.

2. Wiesel, Elie. Night. Chelsea House Pub. 2001. 190 pages

3. Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. Transaction Large Print. 2000

4. Bowden, Tom. Review in The Education Digest. On the Internet at http://www.eddigest.com/html/AAppelfeld.html

Facts About Schizophrenia
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Schizophrenia in Neuropsychology

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a rare but complex type of mental disorder which often has life-altering ramifications. Even though less than 1% of people all over the world are at risk of developing schizophrenia those who do may end up suffering from hallucinations, delusions and end up having difficulties in occupational and social situations they are in. with the knowledge of the symptoms and risk factors of the disorder which includes the onset of manifestation of the symptoms one can be able to spot the warning signs of this disorder.

Schizophrenia distorts the way a person thinks, expresses their emotions, acts, perceives reality and relates to other people. Those who have chronic schizophrenia have a problem when it comes to their functioning in the society, at their places of work, in schools and even within their relationships. Schizophrenia can leave an individual that is suffering from it frightened…

References

Sajatovic M, Mullen JA, & Sweitzer DE. (2006). Schizophreniform Disorder;Diagnostic Features. Retrieved April 30,2014 from  http://www.health.am/psy/schizophreniform-disorder/ 

Ford, J, Krystal, J & Mathalon, D.(2009).Oxford Journals Schizophrenia Bulletin Vol.33,Issue 4.Pp 848-852. Retrieved April 30, 2014 from  http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/content/33/4/848.full 

Krans, B.(2010). Understanding Schizophrenia. Retrieved April 30,2014 from  http://www.healthline.com/health-slideshow/schizophrenia 

Medwire News.(2011). MRI highlights neural basis for schizophrenia deficits in social cognition. Retrieved April 30, 2014 from  http://www.medwirenews.com/47/95129/Psychiatry/MRI_highlights_neural_basis_for_schizophrenia_deficits_in_social_cognition.html

Film Sarah and James by Nikowa Namate
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film Sarah and James by Nikowa Namate offers an opportunity to reflect on the deeper themes in light of several film theories including Freudian theory, Queer theory, and an understanding of realism, naturalism, and kitchen sink drama. This essay will offer a nuanced and thorough analysis of my role in the filmmaking experience. In Sarah and James, I played the role of James, one of the title characters. As the title of the film suggests, though, James is not the only protagonist. The interplay between James and his sister Sarah is the foundation of the film, which addresses the way mental illness impacts intimate relationships. Moreover, I was in charge of lighting during the production of Sarah and James and will discuss elements related to lighting during the production of the film. This essay will hinge on the application of realism, naturalism, Freudian theory, and queer theory to my experience…

References

Brians, Paul. "Realism and Naturalism." 13 March, 1998. Retrieved online:  http://public.wsu.edu/~brians/hum_303/naturalism.html 

Cash, Justin. "Kitchen Sink Drama." The Drama Teacher. Retrieved online:  http://www.thedramateacher.com/kitchen-sink-drama/ 

Dietrich, Richard Farr. British and Irish Drama 1890 to 1950: A Critical History. Retrieved online:  http://chuma.cas.usf.edu/~dietrich/britishdrama1.htm#Realism 

Hanson, Ellis. "Introduction: Out Takes." Out Takes. Duke University Press, 1999.

Analyzing Psychology of Trauma
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Psychology Dual Diagnosis: Substance elated Disorders and Co-Occurring Disorders

The abuse of substances and the dependence on it are considered to be two separate types of disorders. This is according to the DSM-V use of the terms. The DSM-V is a manual that is made use of by professionals in the field of medicine and mental health. They specifically refer to this manual when they are diagnosing disorders related to the mental health of a patient and the use of substances. Through the use of this manual, there is a standard way of diagnosing disorders (ockville, 2005). Substance use disorders are often found to exist with co-occurring disorders. This report highlights the assessment and treatment of substance related disorders and the co-morbid disorders.

Introduction

The abuse of substances and the dependence on it are considered to be two separate types of disorders. This is according to the DSM-V use of…

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Substance-related and addictive disorders. Retrieved from  http://www.dsm5.org/documents/substance%20use%20disorder%20fact%20sheet.pdf 

Bierut, L., Dinwiddie, S., Begleiter, H., Crowe, R., Hesselbrock, V., Nurnberger, J.,. . ., & Reich, T. (1998). Familial transmission of substance dependence: alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and habitual smoking: a report from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism. Archives of General Psychiatry. 55(11), 982-8. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9819066 

Brunette, M. F., Mueser, K. T., & Drake R. E. (2004). A review of research on residential programs for people with severe mental illness and co-occurring substance use disorders. Drug Alcohol Rev, 23,471-481.

Collins, R. L. Blane, H. T., & Leonard, K. A. (1999). In OttP. J., Tarter, R. E., Ammerman, R. T. Sourcebook on substance abuse: Etiology, epidemiology, assessment, and treatment. Boston: Allyn and bacon, pp.153-165.

Risk Management Plan for Paul
Words: 3505 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49725085
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isk management is aimed at determining possible problems beforehand in order to plan and invoke risk-handling activities, as required, across the project's or product's life, for mitigating negative effects on attaining objectives. The process of risk management constitutes a key part of technical and business management systems; it is constant and forward-thinking. isk management must deal with problems that threaten the attainment of key aims. A constant risk management strategy is adopted for successfully predicting and reducing risk elements, which critically affect a venture. A sound risk management plan entails timely and forceful risk identification by way of participation and collaboration of concerned stakeholders. Effective leadership is required across all concerned stakeholders for cultivating an environment conducive to honest and uninhibited discovery and analysis of risk. While technical problems constitute a major concern in the early stages as well as all through the course of the project, risk management has…

References

Allnutt, S., O'Driscoll, C., Ogloff, J. R., Daffern, M., & Adams, J. (2010). Clinical risk assessment and management: a practical manual for mental health clinicians.

Andrews, D. A., & Bonta, J. (2010). Rehabilitating criminal justice policy and practice.Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 16(1), 39.

Andrews, D. A., Bonta, J., & Wormith, J. S. (2011). THE RISK-NEED-RESPONSIVITY (RNR) MODEL Does Adding the Good Lives Model Contribute to Effective Crime Prevention?. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 38(7), 735-755.

Douglas, K. S., Hart, S. D., Webster, C. D., Belfrage, H., Guy, L. S., & Wilson, C. M. (2014). Historical-Clinical-Risk Management-20, Version 3 (HCR-20V3): Development and Overview. International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, 13(2), 93-108.

Analyzing Capital Punishment Issues
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Capital Punishment

Solitary confinement represents one among the best means of keeping modern-day prisoners from communication and conflict, but has the most injurious effects on their health. Individuals imprisoned in conditions of solitary confinement demonstrate more psychotic behavior compared to normal prisoners; this includes higher rate of suicides (Thesis Statement). After a prisoner loses his/her mental capacity of understanding the reason for his/her imprisonment or punishment, subjecting him/her to solitary confinement is pointless. If one loses one's ability of understanding punishment, the consequences associated with one's actions become irrelevant and have no value. Thus, solitary confinement is crueler than capital punishment.

Lately, the subject of whether or not solitary confinement constitutes greater torture for prisoners than capital punishment (or death penalty), is gaining popularity (Writer Thoughts). The debate has reached a juncture where the favored option is capital punishment.

Solitary Confinement/Capital Punishment Background

During the early part of the 19th…

References

Berke, Jeremy. "Famous U.S. Judge Admits There's a Punishment That's Just as Bad as the Death Penalty -- If Not Worse." Business Insider. N.p., 19 Jan. 2016. Web. 3 Mar. 2016. .

Biggs, Brooke. "Solitary Confinement: A Brief History." Mother Jones. N.p., 2 Mar. 2009. Web. 3 Mar. 2016. .

"Introduction to the Death Penalty." Death Penalty Information Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2016. .

Keim, Brandon. "The Horrible Psychology of Solitary Confinement." Wired. N.p., 10 July 2013. Web. 2 Mar. 2016. .

Mental Health Case Study Depression
Words: 2894 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 50384493
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Demographics

Patient is a Hispanic male, aged 31. He is the father of one son, aged 10. The patient is Puerto ican, and was born and spent his childhood in Puerto ico. He came to live in the U.S. at age 11. He now lives in Brooklyn, New York. The patient is separated from the mother of his son. His son lives with his mother. The patient currently lives alone and is unemployed.

Chief Complaint

The chief complaint of the patient is that he is "feeling down and alone recently," and that he also feels separated from his family: "I also haven't seen my son for a while." Clearly he is depressed about his living situation, his prospects, and his health.

History of Present Illness

The patient's present illness is related to drug abuse, of which the patient has a considerable history. Essentially, the patient reports that over the past…

References

Beck, J. (2011). Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond. NY: Guilford Press.

Hewitt, J. P. (2009). Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology. Oxford University

Press.

McKay, D. et al. (2015). Efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for obsessive-

ADHD Diagnosis Treatment
Words: 1493 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88308539
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Volume 2 Case Number 21
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects clients across the lifespan, although it is more common in children. Data from the Center for Diseases Prevention and Control (CDC) indicates that approximately 6.1 million children in the US had ADHD in 2016 (CDC, 2019). In some cases, however, ADHD is not detected early and progresses into adulthood, where it affects an individual’s ability to run a household, maintain employment, and care for children. The presenting client is a 30-year old female diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), poly-substance abuse, and long-standing schizoaffective bipolar-type disorder. The client reports involvement in criminal activity, impulsiveness, hallucinations, difficulty managing anger, persecutory ideation, poor academic performance, and self-mutilatory behavior. This text seeks to develop an individualized treatment plan for the client with co-occurring ADHD and PTSD.
Questions to Ask the Client
Clinical interviews are crucial for effective treatment. A fundamental question to…

References
APA (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) (5th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychiatry Association.
ADDA (2015). Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale: Symptom Checklist Instructions. Attention Deficit Disorder Association. Retrieved from  https://add.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/adhd-questionnaire-ASRS111.pdf 
CDC (2019). Data and Statistics about ADHD. Center for Diseases Prevention and Control (CDC). Retrieved from  https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/data.html 
CMS (2016). Stimulant and Related Medications: US Food and Drug Administration – Approved Indications and Dosages for Use in Adults. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Retrieved from  https://www.cms.gov/Medicare-Medicaid-Coordination/Fraud-Prevention/Medicaid-Integrity-Education/Pharmacy-Education-Materials/Downloads/stim-adult-dosingchart11-14.pdf 
Dalgaard, S., Kvist, A., Leckman, F. J., Nielsen, H., & Simonsen, M. (2014). Cardiovascular Safety of Stimulants in Children with Attention –Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: a Nationwide Perspective Cohort Study. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 24(6), 302-10.
Kolar, D., Keller, A., Golfinopoulos, M., Cumyn, L., Syer, C., & Hechtman, L. (2008). Treatment of Adults with Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 4(2), 389-403.
Smucker, W., & Hedayat, M. (2001). Evaluation and Treatment of ADHD. American Family Physician, 64(5), 817-30.

Shakespeare Feminism Is One of
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A broader music discourse of English culture of early modern is reflected in the use of music dramatically with unrelenting relations between excess, music and feminine (Dane 435). Christian and platonic thought presents music ideologies which are conflicting and are being contented by the British writers of the early modern: Semantic indeterminacy and sensuous immediacy are presented by music and also the divine order earthly embodiment presented by music. A feminism depiction is seen here whereby the Pythagorean harmony is the positive aspect of music or its masculine aspect and the cultural dissonance is the negative attribute or the feminine aspect. The marginalities are expressed through the singing of Ophelia which is allowed to be not only literal but also dissonance figuratively. Jacobean and Elizabethan stages gender types inspires Ophelia representation. omen's song cultural constructions is problematic through Ophelia singing which lets the 'woman out', her disturbing feminine energy must…

Works Cited

Adelman, Janet. "Man and Wife Is One Flesh: Hamlet and the Confrontation with the Maternal

Body." Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare's Plays, Hamlet to The Tempest. By Adelman. New York: Routledge, 1992. 11-37.

Aguirre, Manuel. "Life, Crown, and Queen: Gertrude and the Theme of Sovereignty." Review of English Studies 47 (1996): 163-74.

Dane, Gabrielle. "Reading Ophelia's Madness." Exemplaria 10 (1998): 405-23.