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We have over 779 essays for "Health Advocacy"

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Health Prevention Programs

Words: 2666 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 64756401

Health Promotion Lesson Plan

The concept of health promotion is thought of as "the science and art of helping people change their lifestyle to move toward a state of optimal health" (Dunphy et al., 2011, p 25). Serious heart conditions can be prevented, which is why it is so important to utilize community education techniques in order to help try to warn community members of the complications before they occur. This current lesson plan works to create three separate community lesson plans, based on specific age ranges. The age 18-29 focuses primarily on the use of social media and health advocacy efforts in association with the American Heart Association. For ages 30-49, there is also a focus on these two, combined with more community oriented issues, and for 50-60, there is much more of a focus on financial training along with community organized workshops.

Prevention has become a major issue…… [Read More]

References McLeod, Saul. (2010). Erik Erikson. Developmental Psychology. Simply Psychology. Web.  http://www.simplypsychology.org/Erik-Erikson.html
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Healthcare Promotion Prevention and the

Words: 3190 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80129421

Nurses, who have first hand knowledge and understanding of how to live healthy and how to take proper care of themselves, are far better equipped to teach others about these concepts. Certain populations can benefit greatly from prevention, especially those who are prone to specific types of diseases or conditions.

One of the most common behaviors that leads to many chronic and often very damaging health conditions is smoking. Smoking can cause a multitude of diseases and conditions from emphysema to heart disease to lung cancer (Chapman, 2007). The list goes on and on. But smoking is 100% preventable and nurses need to understand not only how to treat these smoking-related diseases but how to more importantly discourage and prevent people from smoking in the first place. Many nurses agree that this behavior leads to many of the worst case scenarios for people with pre-existing chronic conditions. It is therefore…… [Read More]

References

Chapman, Simon. (2007). Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control: Making Smoking

History. Blackwell Publishing, New York, NY. Pp. 55-56.

Chung, Daniel C. (2008). "Stool DNA Testing and Colon Cancer Prevention: Another Step

Forward." Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 149, No. 7. pp. 509-510.
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Health Related Websites

Words: 1447 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42635982

Healthcare Websites

Soda Consumption and its link to obesity in California

The soda sugary drink consumption has increased tenfold along with its availability. California Center for Public Health Advocacy (CCPHA) confirms that the overall exposure and consumption of soda and sugary drinks amongst children is extremely harmful. The even recently released fact sheets that supported the related harms as well as their concerns towards increasing soda consumption. After reading the article, it became quite clear that the increase in the soda consumption was an after-shoot of the media promotions of unhealthy diets and junk consumption. Increasing attractive advertisements also gave the food industry the opportunity to exploit the increased attractiveness and thus penetrate the market for huge profits.

CCPHA also pointed out the trends of limited physical activities that were also decreasing the overall health of the children. This is also a major concern and makes me realize the overall…… [Read More]

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Advocacy Proposal How Advocacy Affects

Words: 1258 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56979893



Lewis, Cheek & Hendricks (2001) support developmental advocacy as a framework from which counselors can promote the health and well-being of patients in a dynamic forum. Kiselica & obinson (2001) point out the community outreach programs may be beneficial for clients but also the counseling profession. This notion is supported by other research including that of Myers, Sweeney & White (2002) who suggest that professional associations can create venues for counselors to share knowledge, training and standards, as well as provide advocacy advancement and help the profession remain credible (394).

Though advocacy programs in the past have focused primarily on the needs and abilities of school counselors and educational representatives, counselors must broaden their perspectives so advocacy may now include all branches of the counseling field. This may require additional training and resources, but will help strengthen the credibility and success of the profession. Advocacy efforts will also help raise…… [Read More]

References

Akos, P. & Galassi, J.P. (2004). "Developmental advocacy: Twenty-first century school counseling." Journal of Counseling and Development, 82(2): 164

Hart, P.J., & Jacobi, M. (1992). From gatekeeper to advocate: Transforming the role of the school counselor. New York: College Entrance Examination Board.

House, R.M., & Martin, P.J. (1998). Advocating for better futures for all students: A new vision for school counselors. Education, 119, 284-291.

Kiselica, M.S., & Robinson, M. (2001). Bringing advocacy counseling to life: The history, issues, and human dramas of social justice work in counseling. Journal of Counseling & Development, 79, 387-397.
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Healthcare for Mentally Impaired Patients Probing What

Words: 3532 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 69380077

Healthcare for Mentally Impaired Patients

Probing what information is available about the current status of placement or accommodation and level of personal healthcare available to mentally impaired and emotionally disturbed individuals, it is clear that the analysis is as diverse as there are different mental illnesses. While statistics on managed care treatment for people with severe and disabling mental illnesses are sparse, it is evident that the financial responsibility to care for and house these patients is enormous.

According to Dr. David Satcher, the Surgeon General (1999), approximately 20% of the U.S. adult population has a mental illness. He says, "These illnesses include anxiety disorders, mood disorders, anorexia nervosa, and severe cognitive impairment. More serious mental illnesses include ipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mental illness accounts for 15% of overall burden of disease -- more than malignant cancer and respiratory diseases -- and as far back as 1996 the direct cost…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Boulard, G. (2000, April). Forgotten Patients the Mentally Ill. State Legislatures, 26, 12. Retrieved February 13, 2004, from Questia database,  http://www.questia.com .

Callahan, D. (1993, October) Minds and hearts: priorities in mental health services.

The Hastings Center Report.

Fox, M. & Kim, K. (2004, January) Evaluating a Medicaid Home and Community-based Physical Disability Waiver. Family and Community Health. Vol 27: 37.
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Health Program Bronx Racial Disparities in the

Words: 1214 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91586564

Health Program Bronx

Racial Disparities in the Healthcare System

America's healthcare system is one of the most visible indicators of the broad array of social, economic and racial inequalities that still impact American life. For racial minorities such as African-Americans and Latinos, health outcomes are disproportionately worse than they are for white patients. This denotes a core inequality that goes to the root of our society. Outreach, education and advocacy programs such as the one described here in relation to minority populations living in the Bronx helps to provide a valuable case demonstration of this public health issue.

Collaborating Organizations:

The pressing racial issues that are evidenced in our imbalanced healthcare system serve as the impetus for the agenda and actions taken up by the REACH Bronx organization. This action-group is actually described as a coalition of groups and demonstrates the considerable push from a wide variance of parties to…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Calman, N. (2005). Making Health Equality a Reality: The Bronx Takes Action. Health Affairs, 24(2).

Institute for Family Health (2011). Bronx Health REACH -- Making Health Equity a www.institute2000.org/bhr/.

National Cancer Institute (2009). How to Evaluate Health Information on the Internet: Questions and Answers. Cancer.gov.

U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (2011). Health Literacy Online: A Guide to Writing and Designing Easy-to-Use Health Web Sites. www.health.gov/
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Advocacy Letter to Whom it May Concern

Words: 801 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60246075

Advocacy Letter

To whom it may concern,

Greetings, my name is Nurse, and I am writing to you at The New York Methodist Hospital in regards to a brewing public health crisis here in Brooklyn, NY. I am the primary care taker of the K. family that lives in this region and who is experiencing rather difficult circumstances surrounding the issue of public health. The purpose of this letter is to bring to your awareness the immediate need of your involvement towards helping the health conditions of the local environment by explaining the current circumstance I have experienced with the K. family.

A little background about the case: MK is an unemployed middle aged women who has been recently diagnosed with type I diabetes and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Her 21-year-old, daughter, LK and her one-year-old son a live in a cramped one bedroom apartment here in Brooklyn. Both MK and LK…… [Read More]

Works Cited

New York Methodist Hospital. Web page. Viewed 1 Dec, 2012. Retrieved from  http://www.nym.org/Services/Family-Care/index.aspx 

Global Health Risks, Report 2009. World Health Organization. Retrieved from  http://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/GlobalHealthRisks_report_full.pdf
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Health Reforms Health Rearms for a Long

Words: 2156 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48876678

Health eforms

Health earms

For a long time, the Health Care concern has been a centre of discussion in the society as well as among the representatives in a bid to find out which would be the best way to cushion Americans from the ever increasing burden of having to take care of themselves medically. Efforts have been made but still there is no single solution to the issue hence a combined effort between the citizens and the government is very essential in ensuring that the ultimate goal is achieved and each American has adequate Health care assurance. This is the aim of the Health eforms that was passed into law at the behest of the current president, Obama.

Provisions of the Health eform

There are several benefits that the Health eforms are expected to bring to the American population in general. One of the central changes is the fact…… [Read More]

References

Ben LaBolt, (2010). Senator Obama Introduces Bill to Strengthen Emergency Medical Care

Systems. Retrieved November 13, 2011 from http://www.emsvillage.com/articles/article.cfm?id=2185

Bill Atkinson, (2010). What Obama's health care bill means for EMS. Retrieved November 13,

2011 from  http://www.ems1.com/ems-advocacy/articles/779154-What-Obamas-health-care-bill-means-for-EMS/
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Healthcare Lobbyists Drugmakers Hospitals and

Words: 1614 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 91197596

Each of these was included in the initial Senate bill, but was struck from the final Senate version. Despite the victories, the group isn't ready to pledge support for health reform bills. The AMA will not endorse any legislation unless Congress gets rid of the mandated payment cuts of more than $200 billion over 10 years in the government's Medicare program for the elderly. The cuts are part of Congressional action that was passed in 1997 in order to cut costs in the Medicare program, but have never gone into effect. There are also several hospitals, insurers, pharmaceutical manufacturers and advocacy groups that are withholding final support. Most of these groups have pledged support to health care reform in principle while working privately through lobbyists to protect their industries (Eaton and Pell, 2010).

Healthcare lobbyists range from very large companies and corporations to very small groups who are all looking…… [Read More]

References

BREAKING: Health care lobby invests in reform summit. (2010). Retrieved March 1, 2010, from Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington Web site:

 http://www.citizensforethics.org/node/44211 

Eaton, Joe and Pell, M.B. (2010). Lobbyists Swarm Capitol to Influence Health Reform.

Retrieved March 1, 2010, from the Center for Public Integrity Web site:
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Health Care Communication Background- Within the Modern

Words: 1223 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78556054

Health Care Communication

Background- Within the modern nursing paradigm, there must be a clear link between a health outcome and the process that helps ensure those outcomes. Typically, outcomes are classified in terms of preventability, impact, severity and an overall holistic view of the client's safety issues. Positive behaviors that impact individuals either rescue or protect patients from potential or actual events. This is also part of the issue with modern communication and dissemination of information to patients, stakeholders, and the community (Burns and Grove, 2005).

At the heart of healthcare as an institution is, of course, the need to care for the sick and the injured. However, in the contemporary model of healthcare, effective communication during a crisis is not only important, but also vital. Communication by healthcare professionals takes the concern and worry out of the situation; offers a quicker resolution, makes better control of information possible, earns…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Alligood, et.al. (2002). Nursing Theorists and their Work. Philadelphia: Mosby.

Burns, N. And Grove, S. (2004). The Practice of Nursing Research. St. Louis:

Elsevier.

D'Antonio, P., et al., eds., (2007). Nurses Work: Issues Across Time and Place. New York:
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Health Care Legislative Bill

Words: 1387 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5151645

Healthcare Legislative Bill

The expanded and improved Medicare for all Acts

The Expanded and mproved Medicare for All Act was introduced to the House of Representatives in 2009 and seeks to lobby for the implementation of a common single-payer health care system throughout the United States o0f America. The bill if enacted would require that all medical care costs be paid for automatically by the government instead of private insurances for the same. The move will significantly alter the role of private insurance companies as merely offering supplemental coverage especially when the kind of medical care sought is not all that essential (McCormick, 2009).

With the Expanded and mproved Medicare for All Bill, the country's national system will be paid for through taxes and the monies that will replace the regular insurance premiums. Proponents of the bill argue that by eliminating the need for private insurance companies in the national…… [Read More]

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science, (2010), Insuring America's Health: Principles and Recommendations

The American Journal of Medical Practices, (2011), The Impact of single-payer Medicare

Program, New York
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Healthcare the Impacts of Case

Words: 4123 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 44424148

"Studies of the relationship between managed care penetration in the health care market and expenditures for Medicare fee-for-service enrollees have demonstrated the existence of these types of spill over effects" (Bundorf et al., 2004).

Managed care organizations generate these types of spillover effects by increasing competition in the health care market, altering the arrangement of the health care delivery system, and altering physician practice patterns. Studies have found that higher levels of managed care infiltration are linked with lower rates of hospital cost inflation and lower physician fees are consistent with competitive effects. "Other studies demonstrate the impact of managed care on delivery system structure including hospital capacity, hospital admission patterns, the size and composition of the physician workforce and the adoption and use of medical equipment and technologies. More recent evidence has linked market-level managed care activity to the process, but not the outcomes of care" (Bundorf et al.,…… [Read More]

References

Altman, D.E. And L. Levin. (2005). The Sad History of Health Care Cost Containment as

Told by One Client. Health Affairs, 24(1).

Bodenheimer, T. (2005). High and rising health care costs. part 1: Seeking an explanation.

Annals of Internal Medicine, 142(10), 847-54.
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Healthcare Addressing Racial and Ethnic

Words: 713 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 7121072

esearch has shown that good communication amid patients and health care providers is directly connected to a person's happiness, treatment adherence and affirmative health results (Cultural Competency for Health Care Providers, 2007).

The goal of a lot of provider-oriented health it tools is to make relevant patient information flawlessly and unmistakably accessible to providers at the point of care. In so doing, these tools can decrease clinical indecision related to blurred or mistaken patient information that may be found in a handwritten medical record. In the nonexistence of desired information or in the presence of blurred or uncertain data, providers may undervalue patient precise information while at the same time overweighting their own medical viewpoints, suppositions, prejudices, or stereotypes about certain kinds of patients. If apparent and precise patient information is accessible to the clinician, the utilization of this information should augment, getting rid of the need for relying on…… [Read More]

References

Cultural Competency for Health Care Providers. (2007). Retrieved March 13, 2011, from Web

site:

http://www.cvahec.org/documents/CulturalComptencyforHeatlhCareProviders2007_11.8.

07.pdf
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Health Maintenance Organization Impact on

Words: 13949 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 80930377

" (AAF, nd)

The Health Maintenance Organization further should "…negotiate with both public and private payers for adequate reimbursement or direct payment to cover the expenses of interpreter services so that they can establish services without burdening physicians…" and the private industry should be "…engaged by medical organizations, including the AAF, and patient advocacy groups to consider innovative ways to provide interpreter services to both employees and the medically underserved." (AAF, nd)

One example of the community healthcare organization is the CCO model is reported as a community cancer screening center model and is stated to be an effective mechanism for facilitating the linkage of investigators and their institutions with the clinical trials network. It is reported that the minority-based CCO was approved initially by the NCI, Division of Cancer revention Board of Scientific Counselors in January 1989. The implementation began in the fall of 1990 and the program was…… [Read More]

Principles for Improving Cultural Proficiency and Care to Minority and Medically-Underserved Communities (Position Paper) (2008) AAFP -- American Academy of Family Physicians  http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/policy/policies/p/princcultuproficcare.html 

Volpp, Kevin G.M. (2004) The Effect of Increases in HMO Penetration and Changes in Payer Mix on In-Hospital Mortality and Treatment Patterns for Acute Myocardial Infarction" The American Journal of Managed Care. 30 June 2004. Issue 10 Number 7 Part 2. Onlineavaialble at:  http://www.ajmc.com/issue/managed-care/2004/2004-07-vol10-n7Pt2/Jul04-1816p505-512 

Darby, Roland B. (2008) Managed Care: Sacruificing Your Health Care for Insurance Industry Profits: Questions You must ask before joning an HMO. Online available at: http://www.rolanddarby.com/br_managedhealth.html
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Health Care -- Philosophy of Graduate Nursing

Words: 516 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89487080

Health Care -- Philosophy of Graduate Nursing Education

In many senses, the nurse practitioner (NP) takes the profession of nursing to the next level. While the treatment of illness important, the NP also has broader focus of total well-being, including wellness, rights, education and preventative medicine for the patient, his/her family, and local, state, national and global communities. Consequently, in addition to treating the physical ailments of a patient, the modern NP must be clinically and intellectually excellent, an eternal student and teacher who fulfill numerous roles in nearly every health care situation.

A crucial aspect of nursing is the caregiver's relationship with the patient. Patient education is an important aspect of nursing and when carried over to the NP role, patient education greatly improves treatment because the patient has a greater understanding of the reasons for treatment and is likelier to effectively participate in treatment. A NP is a…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Public Policy Lessons in

Words: 1557 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14442640

But due to the ineffective allocation of resources, while money was spent on his care when his blood sugar was 'out of control,' and when he began to develop blindness and other symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes, he did not receive the consistent but relatively low-care necessary to reduce the causes of his inability to manage his condition. Conclusion Healthcare operates within the market system, and is subject to opportunity costs like any other good or service. However, overall the healthcare system does not operate upon the principles of efficiency, often due to the bureaucracy of the healthcare system and its methods of reimbursement and prioritizing acute over primary care.

eferences

Gawande, Atul. (2009, June 1). The cost conundrum: What a Texas town can teach us about health care. The New Yorker. etrieved February 2, 2011 at http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/06/01/090601fa_fact_gawande#ixzz1CpZ4jbV

Gawande, Atul. (2011, January 24). The hot spotters. The New Yorker. etrieved February…… [Read More]

References

Gawande, Atul. (2009, June 1). The cost conundrum: What a Texas town can teach us about health care. The New Yorker. Retrieved February 2, 2011 at  http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/06/01/090601fa_fact_gawande#ixzz1CpZ4jbVR 

Gawande, Atul. (2011, January 24). The hot spotters. The New Yorker. Retrieved February 2,

2011 at  http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/bios/atul_gawande/search?contributorName=atul%20gawande 

Gibson, Jennifer, Douglas K. Martin, & Peter a Singer (2004). Setting priorities in health
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Health Care Bill Formulation Oral

Words: 3227 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15017313

The research thus concludes the essence of having quality and effective legislation addressing the aspects of overall oral health of the people.

Additionally, the Canadian Dental Association also relates several issues of the overall body health to the oral health of the individual. In view of the article on the relation "oral health -- good life," the article gives information on the essence of good oral health, indicating some of the illnesses of ill oral health (Chattopadhyay, 2011). In this article, the relation between the ill oral health and the overall health of the body is that the mouth is the ingress to the body. Therefore, an individual with ill oral health is at the highest risk of having infection that affects the whole body system severely. According to this article, it emphasizes the need for dentists-patient relation as the dentists is the only person with the skill, expertise and…… [Read More]

References

Chattopadhyay, a. (2011). Oral health epidemiology: Principles and practice. Sudbury, Mass:

Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Ramseier, C.A., & Suvan, J.E. (2010). Health behavior change in the dental practice. Ames,

Iowa: Wiley-Blackwell.
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Healthcare Systems Across the World

Words: 2794 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67937246



Access and Availability

The biggest problem in terms of access to healthcare is in rural areas. Our investigation found that there are very few if any rural clinics or healthcare facilities.

Access to healthcare is also limited to those that can afford insurance or qualify for Medicare or Medicaid. The unemployed and the poor are at a major disadvantage when it comes to gaining access to healthcare. The location of healthcare facilities is limited to the larger municipalities.

Accountability

The entity that is responsible for the healthcare system is the United States Government. In addition, Puerto ico has a governor and a cabinet in place to ensure that the appropriate laws are carried out. The entity that makes laws concerning healthcare is outside of the country but the entity that enforces these laws is inside the country. Services are evaluated by state run entities and agencies of the United States…… [Read More]

References

The World Factbook -- Puerto Rico. Retrieved November 8, 2004 from;  http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/rq.html#People 

Puerto Rico: Estimated Number of Persons Living with AIDS at the End of 2002. Retrieved November 8, 2004 from;  http://www.statehealthfacts.kff.org/cgi-bin/healthfacts.cgi?action=profile&area=Puerto+Rico&category=HIV%2fAIDS&subcategory=Persons+Living+with+AIDS&topic=All+Ages 

HIV / AIDS Among Hispanics. Retrieved November 8, 2004 from;  http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/PUBS/Facts/hispanic.pdf 

Puerto Rico: Total Number of Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes, 2002. Retrieved November 8, 2004 from;
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Health Industry Professional Boards

Words: 1697 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27638401

Healthcare professionals offer their services to the community whilst taking care to fully respect people's dignity. Doctors need to earn public confidence by dedicating their skill all equally, and to the best of their ability. A number of professional organizations supporting doctors in ensuring public safety exist, two of which are the ANA (American Nurses Association) and the AMA (American Medical Association). In this paper, the two aforementioned organizations' standards and functions will be analyzed.

A clear identification of the professional boards

The ANA represents its 3.6-million-strong registered nurse (RN) workforce's interests. Its goal is attempting to advance the profession of nursing through the promotion of superior practice standards (American Nurses Association, 2016). Meanwhile, the AMA represents a professional organization chiefly engaged in publishing studies geared at advancing public health, in addition to advocating for licensed doctors' interests. It participates in the areas of Obamacare implementation, healthcare IT, Medicare/Medicaid, improvements…… [Read More]

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Advocacy From the Margins

Words: 1760 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99153533

Advocacy From the Margins: Identifying Opportunities to Facilitate Social Services Delivery to the Disadvantaged

Across North America, women account for slightly more of the population than men, yet their earnings and opportunities for career advancement remain far less than their male counterparts. Certainly, some of these disparities are based on biological reasons involving the need for women to care for young children, but many other gender-based factors that marginalize women are founded on religious grounds or spurious rationale that has historically favored men in many world societies. Given the enormous numbers of people who are involved and affected by the outcome of advocacy efforts it is therefore important to identify opportunities to facilitate the delivery of social services that are by definition scarce in a fashion that is timely and effective. To this end, this paper provides a review of the relevant literature to compare advocacy from the margins to…… [Read More]

References

Black's law dictionary. (1991). St. Paul, MN. West Publishing Co.

Bromley, V. & Ahmad, A. (2006). Wa (i)ving solidarity: Feminist activists confronting backlash.

Canadian Women's Studies, 25(3,4), 61-72.

Chinn, P.L. (2008). Peace and power: Creative leadership for building community. Burlington,
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Advocacy Training in Counselor Education

Words: 2700 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52453618

This was prepared by a specialist on the subject and would probably cut down incidences of the disease. (Advocacy Group Issues Guides for Diagnosing ADHD) There are some communities who need constant help and one of them is the Latino community and the help from counselors and advocacy is certainly welcome. Victims in the Latino community suffer due to their language barrier and immigration status. (Counseling and eferral Services for the Latino Community)

III. New Framework for Advocacy in Counseling/Counselor Education Programs

A. Identifying injustices or need to improve conditions within profession:

There has been a finding that developmental framework is required for a developmental framework as the foundation for any type of counseling. This has been noted by different experts and they have stated "that career guidance and counseling services would be greatly improved if theory and research could identify those traits and trends of development observed in adolescence...…… [Read More]

References

Advocacy Group Issues Guides for Diagnosing ADHD" (28 May, 1997) Education Week.

Retrieved at  http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/1997/05/28/35add.h16.html?querystring=advocacyAccessed  30 August, 2005

Counseling and Referral Services for the Latino Community" Retrieved at http://www.consejo-wa.org/domesticviolence.htm. Accessed 30 August, 2005

Counselors" (2004) U.S. Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved at  http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos067.htm . Accessed 30 August, 2005
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Advocacy Plan Billy's Case Has Societal Issues

Words: 1015 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 50084030

Advocacy Plan

illy's case has societal issues of family, school, and peers. Family is the biggest societal factor because it is the first place children start their learning processes. Where illy's family was abusive, "dysfunctional families subject kids to stresses that lead to risky behaviors" (McWhirter, McWhirter, McWhirter, & McWhirter 2013). illy has learned to handle his problems with anger. eing placed into foster care, he was also subjected to other cultures and beliefs different from his own, which can cause some frustration. illy is of the Hispanic culture that places high value on family. eing removed from the biological family, even for safety reasons, still violates the cultural values and can cause fear, frustration, and more pain.

illy's history of school issues can be coming from "physical consequences…that can have psychological implications, such as cognitive delays or emotional difficulties" (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2008). Abuse can affect the cognitive…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Christle, C.N. (n.d.). Prevention of antisocial and violent behavior in youth: A review of literature. Youth Antisocial and Violent Behavior, 1-77 Retrieved from  http://www.edjj.org/focus/prevention/plr.pdf .

Gateway, C.W. (2008). Long-term consequences of child abuse and neglect. Retrieved from U.S. Departmnet of Health & Human Services: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/factsheets/long_term_consequences.cfm

McWhirter, J.M. (2013). At Risk Youth, 5th Ed. U.S.: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.

Sherman, A. (n.d.). Amy Sherman's blog for Florida's at risk children. Retrieved from Invisible Children:  http://www.invisiblechildren.org/tag/potential-roadblocks
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Healthcare for Women Health Care

Words: 1442 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29507577

As a woman enters her geriatric years, many unique problems are also faced. Her post-menopausal period leaves a woman with increased risk of osteoporosis, and hormone-replacement therapy may need to be considered or dismissed depending upon the needs and wellness of the individual women. Additionally, increased risk for obesity begins nearly at the adolescent period, when women's hormone loads change and often activity of childhood decreases. The incidence of obesity and overweight among women perpetually increases with every year of life. ("Overweight, Obesity Threaten U.S.," 2002, p. 8)Obesity and overweight, as one of the most significant conditions associated with several chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, increased risk of stroke and hypertension should be developed as a lifespan issue, as the needs of intervention and prevention change as women age and go through various stages of life.

While women have functional characteristics that require specialized health care,…… [Read More]

References

Blackwell, Daria, 2002. Women in the Healthcare Industry Reaching for the Top. Medical Marketing & Media, Dec2002, Vol. 37 Issue 12, p44, 8p.

Fleming, Carl, 2004. Healthcare Access: Conflicts of Interest Presented by Managed Care Icu Bedside Rationing and Their Impact on Minorities and Women. Georgetown Journal of Gender & the Law, Spring2004, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p663-676.

Heyman, B., & Henriksen, M. (2001). Risk, Age and Pregnancy: A Case Study of Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing / . New York: Palgrave.

Lueck, T.L., & Chang, H. (2002). Tribune's 'WomanNews' Gives Voice to Women's Issues. Newspaper Research Journal, 23(1), 59.
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Health Politics What Is the Role of

Words: 3149 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 37669681

Health Politics

"What is the role of Congress in policy making process"?

Policy is a plan to identify goal or possible course of actions with administrative or management tools to accomplish these goals. n the other hand, policy is the authoritative decision made by the U.S. executive, legislative, judicial branch of government to influence the decision of others. Government is a key player in decision-making process and congress plays important roles in decision-making . In the United States, both House of Representatives and House of Senate fulfill the congressional policy responsibilities, and congress plays important role in health policy, which includes obesity prevention measures or health insurance program. Congress is an important arm of government that makes law. Important strategy that congress uses to make policy preference is by passing a bill into law. Typically, the congress could make a decision to pass or not to the policy of the…… [Read More]

Oregon Department of Human Services.(2008). The impact of federal policy on Oregon's health care reform efforts: Opportunities and barriers within Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program. Medical Assistance Programs.

Waller, M. (2005).Block Grants: Flexibility vs. Stability in Social Services. Brookings Institution Policy Brief.

Zuckert, M.P. (2002). Launching Liberalism: On Lockean Political Philosophy. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas.
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Healthcare Reflections on Disability What

Words: 1237 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67301864

What works for one patient may not work for the next. If everyone is treated according to the way that everyone else has always been treated then it may be that no one ever gets any better.

Every child should be treated so that they have the opportunity to have the best life possible. I definitely think that it would be unethical to not treat a child who I believe could minimize the consequences of a disabling condition. Every child deserves the chance to have the best life possible and if a medical professional has the ability to make sure that this happens then they should be bound to do just that. What constitutes a successful intervention for one child may not be viewed as being successful for the next, but they will find something that is successful for them. Every child has potential and it is up to the…… [Read More]

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Advocacy in Human Services Professions

Words: 812 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52022045

Advocacy Human Services

One of the most important components in the field of human services is advocacy, which is also regarded as an essential requirement for code of ethics and accreditation standards for human service-related professions. Given the significance of advocacy, several human service organizations have developed standards to guide advocacy practices in human services and social work. Examples of such organizations include the National Organization for Human Services, the National Association of Social Workers, and the Council for Standards in Human Service Education (Snow, 2013). However, advocacy in human services practice is governed by certain principles and is geared towards accomplishing certain purposes that enhances its effectiveness. The use of these principles and purpose of advocacy is attributable to its impact on social change, especially within the context of social work and practice.

Advocacy is basically defined as an active process that focuses on helping people achieve something they…… [Read More]

References

Fayoyin, A. (2013). Advocacy as a Strategy for Social Change: A Qualitative Analysis of the Perceptions of UN and Non-UN Development Workers. Journal of Social Sciences, 35(2), 181-193.

Snow, K.C. (2013). The Importance of Advocacy and Advocacy Competencies in Human Service Professions. Journal of Human Services, 33(1).

Thackeray, R. & Hunter, M. (2010, July 1). Empowering Youth: Use of Technology in Advocacy to Affect Social Change. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 15(4), 575-591.

Pennsylvania State University. (2016, April 14). When Social Change Fails. Retrieved from Penn State University website: https://sites.psu.edu/aspsy/2016/04/14/when-social-change-fails/
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Alternatives to the Migrant Health Problem

Words: 1659 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 86948152

Policy Options and Alternatives of the Migrant Health Problem

Though immigrants and families experience the very same health issues as the rest of the population, many factors such as: poverty, migrancy, occupational hazards, inferior living conditions, and cultural and linguistic barriers faced by these individuals lead to development of unique health issues. As a consequence, the average migrant life expectancy is 49 years, a low figure compared to the country average (75 years) (Cunningham, 2006).

Description of existing policy gaps

There are several barriers to receiving Medicaid coverage that are faced by migrants. While some issues impact low-income groups in general, several issues are inflamed by migrant characteristics, such as their unstable incomes, migratory patterns and immigrant status.

Many migrants aren't entitled to receive Medicaid coverage. One of the significant obstacles is that states, under the existing law, cannot provide low-income, non-disabled adults, who don't have any dependent children, with…… [Read More]

References

California Primary Care Association, (2002). Policy Options Related to the Medicaid Portability for Migrant Farmworkers Project, Sacramento, CA.

Cunningham, P. (2006). What Accounts for Differences in the Use of Hospital Emergency Departments in Communities Across the United States? Health Affairs web exclusive, July 18.

Hansen, E. & Donohoe, M. (2003). Health Issues of Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 14, No. 2. DOI: 10.1177/1049208903251513

Rosenbaum, S. & Shin, P. (2005).Migrant and Seasonal Farm workers: Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care. Kaiser commission on Medicaid and the uninsured.
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Dealing With Migrant Health Problem Through the Kingdon Model Framework

Words: 678 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 71444737

Migrants' Health Problem and the Kingdon Model Framework

Migrants and other transient and underserved groups confront similar health problems as other disadvantaged groups, like the poor and new immigrants (MCN, 2014). Their health conditions proceed from food shortage or improper nutrition, infection, poor hygiene and an overall lack of resources. Their low income and dissimilarity with the culture are made worse by their migratory status and the health risks and other risks that accompany their unstable situation. They and their dependents are subjected to frequent and serious health risks more than the general American population. Their situation has not been adequately addressed because of the lack of sufficient adequate studies. Existing knowledge has mostly been gathered and formed from self-reporting efforts and recall of the migrants on their illnesses. Most of these self-reported recollections centered on social barriers, which stand on the way of the delivery of health care to…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Kubiak, S.M. et al. (2005). It's not a gap, it's a gulf. Vol. 1 # 2, Best Practices in Mental Health:

Lyceum Books, Inc.

Unti, R.A.G. (2015). Public health advocacy. Oxford Bibliographies. Retrieved on July 31,

2015 from  http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199756797/obo-9780199756797-0028.xml
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Alternatives to the Migrant Health Problem

Words: 5085 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 65098065

Migrant Health Problems

Understanding the Migrant Health Problem

Currently access to health and social services for the majority of migrants is based on their legal status. Needless to say undocumented migrants have little or no access to health care services. One's legal status is one of the prerequisite conditions for one to receive sufficient care. Additionally, accessibility, availability, acceptability and quality of such services depends on various factors such as financial, gender, structural, linguistic, social, cultural and geographical factors. Furthermore, various beliefs and myths or knowledge about ill health and one's health status prevent migrants from engaging or getting into national health systems.

Causes of the Migrant health problem/Impact on communities

Low health literacy levels within migrant communities are a huge barrier and deter many migrants from wanting to engage health care professionals (Becker, 2003). This situation is the same within many migrant communities regardless of a migrant's socio-economic status…… [Read More]

References

Becker, G. (2003). Socioeconomic Status and Dissatisfaction with Health Care among Chronically Ill African-Americans. American Journal of Public Health, 93(5), 742.

Carrasquillo, O., Carrasquillo, A. & Shea, S. (2000). Health Insurance Coverage of Immigrants Living in the United States: Differences by Citizenship Status and Country of Origin. American Journal of Public Health 90 (6): 917-923.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP), (2013).Division of Tuberculosis Elimination. Retrieved fromhttp://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/populations/default.htm

Howie, W. O. (2009). Mandatory reporting of medical errors: crafting policy and integrating it into practice. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 5(9), 649-654.
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Healthcare Has Been Changing Over

Words: 2237 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 98624790



educed costs for medical education would be the second to last alternative that would be likely to be effective. First, reducing the costs of medical eduction, through tax incentives and tuition caps, may make the medical field more attractive to some students; however, even with these in place, the costs would still be so significant that many potential future doctors would be still turned off from the profession. In contrast, free medical education would likely be very effective in recruiting students to pursue the medical profession. This would likely be especially attractive to good students who weren't good enough to receive significant scholarship money to help offset their education. However, this would be the most expensive alternative to implement for the United States. This cost could be offset by the service these doctors give, in exchange, for government-run medical facilities, but the infrastructure alone to this type of innovative plan…… [Read More]

References

Fox, R. & Abrahamson, K. (Oct-Dec 2009). "A critical examination of the U.S. nursing shortage: Contributing factors, public policy implications." Nursing Forum, 44(4). p. 235-244.

Ganley, B. & Sheets, I. (Jul 2009). "Educational innovations: A strategy to address the nursing faculty shortage." Journal of Nursing Education, 48(7). p. 401-405.

Medical student debt. (2011). Retrieved January 9, 2011, from  http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/about-ama/our-people/member-groups-sections/medical-student-section/advocacy-policy/medical-student-debt.shtml .

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (No date). Retrieved January 9, 2011, from  http://dpc.senate.gov/healthreformbill/healthbill04.pdf .
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Health Medical

Words: 1491 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 96447520

healthcare problems facing this nation is that of migrant workers, primarily those from Mexico, who work both legally and illegally on this side of the border. While other immigrant populations are also underinsured and under-treated --most notably Asians -- the Hispanic problem is by the far the most significant because of the shear numbers and the structural poverty which create stagnant population pools too large to ignore.

By allowing this problem to continue, we face the more direct health threat of the Mexican migrant worker population becoming a breeding ground for infectious diseases that can spread quickly into the general population. While humanitarian reasons alone should call for our involvement in solving this problem, we should be aware that the problem is an economic one as well. The Mexican workers, especially since the passage of NAFTA, have become an intergral part of the U.. workforce in that they are performing…… [Read More]

Sources

Hahn, Kaye (1998) "Health Related Issues and Challenges of Women and Children In a Migratory WorkForce." Online at Medical College of Georgia Available: http://gain.mercer.edu/grha/migranthealth.PDF.(1/11/03)

Lanzendorfer, Joy Silent Suffering North Bay farm workers face a healthcare crisis." Online at Metro PublishingFrom the May 30-June 5, 2002 issue of the North Bay Bohemian. Available:  http://www.metroactive.com/papers/sonoma/05.30.02/farmworkers-0222.html .(1/11/03)

Pinkerton, James. (May 2002). "Health Care: Crisis at the Border." Online at the Grande Valley Bureau Houston Chronicle. Available:  http://namiscc.org/Advocacy/2002/BorderCrisis.htm .(1/12/03)

Stanley, Eduardo. March 27, 2001."Farm Worker Survey Uncovers Health Problems, Abuses." Online at New California Media. Avaialble:  http://www.ncmonline.com/content/ncm/2001/mar/centralvalley.html .(1/10/03)
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Health System Management and the Use of New Grad Program for Reducing Turnover

Words: 2457 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 39644169

Reducing Turnover in New Graduate Residence Program

Introduction- The process of recruiting and training, particularly in high-impact fields like healthcare, has become increasingly complex and expensive. Turnover is the rate at which an organization gains or loses employees. High turnover means that more employees are leaving more rapidly, which can be harmful to productivity and finances. Real costs of hiring including recruitment time, opportunity costs, and investment in both the new employee and the staff in Human Resources. Indirect costs include training, loss of production, reduction of performance levels, overtime due to inexperience, etc. In fact, this issue is so important that in for-profit organizations, the cost of employee turnover is estimated to be about 150% of the total payroll and benefit package (Rothwell, 2012). One needs to also understand the high costs of post-employment; drug-screening, physical exams, orientation, learning curve, coaching from others, etc. Staff time is difficult to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Nurses' job satisfaction well below average. (2012, March 5). Retrieved from Medical Express:  http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-03-nurses-job-satisfaction-average.html 

The Real Costs of High Turnover. (2012, October). HRNNewsdaily. Retrieved from:

http://hrnewsdaily.com/the-real-costs-of-high-turnover/

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2013, January). Researcha dn Data. Retrieved from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:  http://www.ahrq.gov/
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Healthcare for Runaway Adolescents Teenagers

Words: 2119 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 35760527

sufficient health care for runaway teenagers is a topic of grave concern to most in the medical and social professions, both nationally and in the state of California. With limited treatment options, higher risks of STD's, HIV, and other diseases, improper prenatal care, and a lack of community care options, runaway teens receive grossly inadequate health care. This paper will address those concerns, specifically in the state of California, as well as offering possible solutions to the problem, and will examine the role of the registered nurse in the solutions presented.

It is important to note that the life of a runaway teenager is filled with health risks and danger. Marie and Cheri are just one example. They were 13 when they ran away from home in an attempt to escape a drug addicted father who sexually abused them. With only $200 between them, their food supply and housing was…… [Read More]

References

Advanced Practice Registered Nurses Council. (2004). Information on APRNs. APRNs. Retrieved from Advanced Practice Registered Nurses Council on March 03, 2003. Web site: http://www.scnurses.org/A_P_Council/aprns.asp

American Civil Liberties Union. (May 14, 2003). Letter to the House Urging Opposition to the Musgrave Amendment to HR 1925, the Runaway, Homeless, and Missing Children Protection Act. Retrieved from American Civil Liberties Union website on March 3, 2004. Web Site:  http://www.aclu.org/news/NewsPrint.cfm?ID=12643&c=225 

California Board of Registered Nurses. (Fall, 2003). What is the RN Scope of Practice? The BRN Report, 15(2), 7-9.

California Office of the Attorney General. (2002). 2002 Reports of Missing Children by County. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Justice.
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Healthcare as an Institution Is of Course

Words: 1070 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34774822

healthcare as an institution is, of course, the need to care for the sick and the injured. However, in the contemporary model of healthcare, effective communication during a crisis is not only important, but also vital. Communication by healthcare professionals takes the concern and worry out of the situation; offers a quicker resolution, makes better control of information possible, earns the trust of the public and individual families; and keeps the flow of information consistent and accurate, thus averting potential external problems. Based on my current experience in the nursing field, I realize that to advance my professional goals, as well as contribute soundly to the profession, I must expand my educational experience and am therefore seeking entrance into the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing.

I believe I am well-qualified and motivated to undergo this program. Currently, I am a master's prepared Neonatal Nurse Practitioner…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Management for Eldercare Advocacy Organization

Words: 2580 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85588350

Planned change in the eldercare advocacy organization

In the coming years, many countries will experience a dramatic shift in healthcare infrastructure due to an expanding elderly population size. However, the changes may vary across countries depending on many factors such as the kind of social welfare available in each country, the political environment which determine policies, the level of healthcare available and individual expectations in each country. Due to this wide variance, the innovations within this space will also vary greatly. What this means to the healthcare manager is that managing innovations becomes very hard (Shlutz, Andre & Sjovold, 2015 p 42). This also impacts on performance management which is fast gaining popularity in the public sector as a means to improve on accountability. Unfortunately, it has been cumbered by a series of challenges in its implementation; this is in spite of the frameworks developed over the last couple of…… [Read More]

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Health Officer

Words: 604 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25402927

American Public Health Association Advocacy and Policy page that resonated the most with me was the process that this organization outlines for shaping public health policy. On the one hand, it was encouraging to see that this organization has issued a number of ways for virtually anyone to take action and attempt to affect the public health processes that influence this country. There are a variety of alerts that one can be a part of and which reach policymakers, as well as calendar dates pertaining to the organization's own public health initiatives. There is even information about taking trips to Washington D.C. And meeting with members of Congress. Perhaps the most interesting aspect about all of these avenues, however, is that they do not take account for the power of money. It is quite easy for any citizen to express his or her needs to policy makers regarding the sort…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Problems and Solutions to US Immigrants

Words: 1669 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 14622190

Migrant Health Problem

Presently, access to social and health services for most migrants is determined by their legal status. Undocumented migrants have least possible access to health services. Legal status is one of the preconditions for ability involved in receiving adequate care. Further, the availability, acceptability, quality and accessibility of such services is dependent on different influences such as cultural, social, linguistic, structural, gender, geographical and financial factors. From this, different knowledge and beliefs about ill health and healthy status deter migrants from engaging national health services.

Health literacy within such awareness senses entitlements individuals to availability and care services that pose barriers to using similar services (Becker, 2003). The situation also shows dependence on various migrants irrespective of the existing legal or socio-economic statuses. The nature of mobility makes it difficult to establish the available providers of health care service. Temporary and seasonal workers prefer delaying care until there…… [Read More]

References

Becker, G. (2003). Socioeconomic Status and Dissatisfaction with Health Care among Chronically Ill African-Americans. American Journal of Public Health, 93(5), 742.

Carrasquillo, O., Carrasquillo, A. & Shea, S. (2000). Health Insurance Coverage of Immigrants Living in the United States: Differences by Citizenship Status and Country of Origin. American Journal of Public Health 90 (6): 917 -- 923.

Huang, J., Yu, S. & Ledsky, R. (2006). Health Status and Health Service Access and Use among Children in U.S. Immigrant Families. American Journal of Public Health 96 (4): 634 -- 640.

Okie, S. (2007). Immigrants and Health Care -- At the Intersection of Two broken Systems. The New England Journal of Medicine: 525 -- 529.
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Healthcare Reform Rests on Changes to Nurse Roles

Words: 1648 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86533978

Evolution of Nursing oles in an Enlarged National Health Care System

The Affordable Care Act enables the provision of health insurance to 30 million people above the coverage figures prior to the enactment of the law. Because of this precipitous rise in the number of health insurance members, access to care as a function of the availability of primary care providers has been a leading issue in the transition to the nation-wide system of health care insurance. Public health models and nursing practice arrangements are changing in order to meet the immediate and anticipated care needs that have been brought to bear on the health care systems.

Public Health and Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHCs)

From the earliest days of public health, the roles of nurses have been embedded in the social, educational, and political needs of communities. Health education has functioned as a springboard to community organizing, patient advocacy,…… [Read More]

References

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (2005, January). CMS.gov. Retrieved from  http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Medicare-Fee-for-Service-Payment/ACO/index.html 

Kulbok, P.A., Thatcher, E., Park, E., & Meszaros, P.S. (2012, May). Evolving public health nursing roles: Focus on community participatory health promotion and prevention. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing (OJIN), 17(2). DOI: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol17No02Man01. Retrieved from  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Vol-17-2012/No2-May-2012/Evolving-Public-Health-Nursing-Roles.html 

National Conference of State Legislatures. (2012, September). The Medical Home Model of Care. Retrieved from  http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/the-medical-home-model-of-care.aspx 

Reid, R., Haggerty, J., & McKendry, R. (2002, March). Final Report. Defusing the confusion: Concepts and measures of continuity of healthcare. Canadian Health Services Research Foundation, the Canadian Institute for Health Information, and the Advisory Committee on Health Services of the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Deputy Ministers of Health. Retrieved from http://www.hpm.org/Downloads/Bellagio/Articles/Continuity/cr_contcare_e.pdf
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Advocacy Facebook for Gays and Lesbians in

Words: 1715 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28190921

Advocacy: Facebook for Gays and Lesbians in Canada Today

A growing number of organizations of all types are providing a broad range of social services to the gay and lesbian communities throughout Canada and many of these have used the media to help them achieve their goals. For instance, the group "Dykes on Mykes" has produced a radio show since 1987 to promote community awareness of the challenges facing the gay and lesbian communities in Canada (Macphee & Hogan, 2006). Likewise, Willson, Green, Haworth-Brockman, and Beck (2006) report that they partnered with the Prairie Women's Health Centre of Excellence (PWHCE) in Winnipeg and Saskatoon using a strategy known as "photovoice" to provide impoverished Canadian women with the opportunity to share their experiences using their own words and photographic records of their lives. In the photovoice approach, "Participants are given cameras and training in how to use them; they then photograph…… [Read More]

References

'The irreverent raging grannies: Humour as protest. (2006, Summer/Fall). Canadian Woman

'Studies, 25(3, 4), 141-148.

Bersten, R. (2008). Marginalia: Living on the edge. Gay and Lesbian Issues and Psychology

Review, 4(1), 9-10.
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Advocacy Nursing

Words: 647 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Creative Writing Paper #: 93087419

Nurse Advocacy

After sixteen years of working as a nurse, I realized more fully the impact my profession and the people in it have on public health, public safety, social norms related to health, and public policy. This MSN program has effectively prepared me for the next stage of my career as a nurse advocate who actively participates in public policy development and public health initiatives. I have been strongly influenced by issues related to nurse advocacy throughout the course of my career. This program has highlighted areas in which nursing practice can be applied to helping members of my community empower themselves with knowledge, with the resources available to them to improve their health choices, and improve quality of life for all members of my community.

When I started the program, I was a nurse. I was an experienced nurse who was confident with my role in the hospital,…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Advocacy Team & Technology

Words: 2602 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17378209

The healthcare industry has widely adopted IT solutions in the development and maintenance of information systems for this sector. These information system applications will go a long way in boosting medical care goals by reducing costs significantly, increasing efficiency in the process and achieving a zero error. With this, client satisfaction will be realized. At the core of this is the electronic medical records (EHR) which is representative of all the health information of an individual that is available in a database and can be shared across healthcare service providers (Rouse, 2016). Also integral to this system are two components; mobile health (mHealth) and telehealth (telemedicine). Though the two are interconnected, they have a slight difference. Telehealth includes home monitoring of health conditions through desktops, laptops and other online material (Terry, 2016), while mobile health is restricted to mobile devices.

Considering the impact of electronic medical records (EHR), it is…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Organizations Are Complex Bureaucracies

Words: 787 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36690041

Part of the reason that capitalism provides greater choice for the consumer is that there is fervent competition and therefore choice. There is impetus for the market to provide products and services that the consumer wants, that are of such quality that they are coveted. Thus, the market regulates itself -- if products and services are subpar, they go out of business. Why should this not be the same for medical care? There are really only two ways to control rising health care costs. Either the government steps in and regulates prices and moves towards a more socialized form of medicine (which seems anathema to so many), or the market is opened to more competition. Competition for the healthcare dollar is not bad -- and as long as the consumer has choices it will drive to keep prices reasonable for appropriate care (Control Health Costs With Competition, 2010).

Part 4-…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Driving for Quality in Acute Care. (2009). Retrieved August 2011, from Office of the Inspector General: http://oig.hhs.gov/fraud/docs/complianceguidance/RoundtableAcuteCare.pdf

Control Health Costs With Competition. (2010, February 24). Retrieved August 2011, from Marketplace:  http://marketplace.publicradio.org/display/web/2010/02/24/pm-reich-commentary/ 

Costs of War. (2011). Retrieved August 2011, from Watson Institute: http://costsofwar.org/article/caring-us-veterans

Partnership for Patients. (2011). Retrieved August 2011, from Leapfrog Group:  http://www.leapfroggroup.org/
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Healthcare and proper managment

Words: 827 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 18094349

Patient safety is a very important element with the overall healthcare system. egulations and new initiatives set forth by the Affordable Care Act have created much elevated culture of safety. As a result, facilities must now alter the manner in which they deliver and administer treatment to patients. A culture that once focused on transactions and bloated costs has now been replaced with one predicated on safety. Creating a culture of safety is no easy task however. In fact, it can be particularly difficult when older employee habits have been deeply engrained in the daily processes of work. To create a culture of safety, management must first communicate its expectations to all stakeholders involved. Communication is an integral aspect of patient safety. Communication is important because it sets the overall tone within the organization. Communication regarding expectations is particularly potent when top-level management is heavily involved. Consistent emphasis on quality…… [Read More]

References:

1. Clinton HR, Obama B (2006). "Making patient safety the centerpiece of medical liability reform." N. Engl. J. Med. 354 (21): 2205 -- 8

2. Kraman SS, Cranfill L, Hamm G, Woodard T (December 2002). "John M. Eisenberg Patient Safety Awards. Advocacy: the Lexington Veterans Affairs Medical Center." Jt Comm J. Qual Improv. 28 (12): 646 -- 50
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Advocacy Strategy Anti-Violence Work Anti-Violence Work Is

Words: 2355 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3148198

Advocacy Strategy: Anti-Violence ork

Anti-violence work is really about helping a lot of women discover their strong areas and their they consider the truth for their lives. Most women contemplate should they stay, should they go or even if they need to go, whatever it maybe the movement is to make sure that women are safe. The author makes the point that it is so much easier doing the work over the years because it has given her the confidence needed with the gained experience. This essay discusses the issue of how the anti-violence work needs some support and help in aiding violence against women. Also finding solutions to violence and abuse on a level that is broader and societal.

Critique of an Advocacy Strategy

Introduction

Domestic Violence denotes to the use of emotional or physical force or danger of physical force, which does comprise of sexual violence in close…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arvay, M.J. (2001). Secondary Traumatic Stress and Trauma Counselors: What Does the Research Say?." International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling, 15-17.

Brzozowski, J.A. (2004). Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile. Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

Figley, C.L. (2002). Treating Compassion Fatigue. New York: Brunner-Routledge,.

Martin, S. (2006). Bearing Witness: Experiences of Frontline Anti-Violence Responders. Canadian Woman Studies, 11-15.
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Advocacy in Nursing

Words: 1483 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99797539

Nurse as Patient Advocate

Persons who choose nursing as a profession do so because they have a deep sense that they want to help others. Most do not do it because of pay incentives. Those who choose nursing for that reason are soon disillusioned by the long hours, physical and mental fatigue that go along with it. People choose nursing because they have a need to help those in need. hen they become nurses however, the role that they play is often defined by a large, bureaucratic system and they sometimes find that they must choose between their sense of doing what is right for the patient and conforming to the rules of the system.

Nurses traditionally served as helpers to the doctors, performing mundane tasks to free the doctor for other things.. Doctors make the decisions and give the orders. Nurses follow the orders that the doctor gives. Sometimes…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brophy, Mary S. Sheeran (2001). Nurse Advocacy in the neonatal unit: Putting theory into Practice. Journal of Neonatal Nursing. Volume 7 (1). p. 10-12.

Hewitt, Jeanette (2002). A Critical Review of the Arguments Debating the Role of the Nurse Advocate. Journal of Advanced Nursing. Volume 37 (5). March 2002. p. 439-435.

Keffer, M. Jan. (1996). Nurse Advocate: Advocate for Whom? Nursing. Volume 5 (2) April 1996. p. 129-126.
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Healthcare Discrimination Against Minorities and Corporate Issues

Words: 5615 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 82554464

healthcare services, many people could encounter some form of discrimination on the basis of their race, gender, or even sexual orientation. Discrimination in healthcare may seem like it is not something that is a major issue. However, it absolutely does come up in many situations, states and environments. hether based on gender, religion, race or sexuality, discrimination happens at overt or implied levels all of the time. In other situations, there are huge disparities in healthcare outcomes from one group to another and many experts say that this can only come from systemic or sporadic instance of racism from the healthcare sphere, from society in general or a combination of the two. hile most people get very good care, there are situations where the healthcare and/or government sectors fall short. It is important to note that although people are not always aware of this; there are various laws that seek…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cornell Law School. (n.d.). 11 U.S. Code Section 507 - Priorities. Retrieved from www.law.cornell.edu:  https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/11/507 

Cornell Law School. (n.d.). 18 U.S. Code Section 152 - Concealment of assets; false oaths and claims; bribery. Retrieved from www.law.cornell.edu:  https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/152 

lawschoolcasebriefs.net. (2002). Access Now, Inc. v. Southwest Airlines Co. Retrieved from www.lawschoolcasebriefs.net:  http://www.lawschoolcasebriefs.net/2013/12/access-now-inc-v-southwest-airlines-co.html 

State of California. (n.d.). California Corporations Code. Retrieved from www.leginfo.ca.gov: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/.html/corp_table_of_contents.html
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health public policy analysis

Words: 3527 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 36245673

Introduction

Since 1986, the World Health Organization has promoted a Healthy Communities/Healthy Cities initiative, also known as the Alliance for Healthy Cities, with hundreds of participating municipalities across the world (Hancock, 1993; World Health Organization, 2018). The purpose of the Alliance for Healthy Cities is to encourage local governments to incorporate health promotion into all areas of public practice, economic policy, and urban development (World Health Organization, 2018). Goals of the Healthy Communities/ Healthy Cities approach include reducing public health risks including obesity, and promoting healthy lifestyles, public safety, and health equity. The success of Healthy Cities programs and policies directly depends on the empowerment of nurses at all levels of practice, including community-based nurses. Because each community presents different needs, goals, and challenges, nurses in each community can collaborate with partners and stakeholders to promote and reach realistic public health goals.

Healthy Communities: Relevance to the Nursing Profession

The…… [Read More]

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Health Disparities in Diabetes

Words: 1110 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 97336371

Diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease that leads patients affected to seek the help of medical professionals throughout various stages and time frames. From surgery to patient education to physical therapy, diabetes treatment can be a daunting task that may require complex, multi-faceted effort. Such effort can lead to sever disparities in treatment and in prevalence of the disease. For example, if patient education is at the forefront of chronic disease management and prevention, then it stands to ask if patient education or lack thereof, is creating the kinds of health disparities seen in diabetes. The patients receiving the information on diabetes and lifestyle choices to prevent diabetes, may reduce their chances of developing diabetes versus those that do not receive the information. What kinds of health disparities arise in diabetes as a result of lack of access to information?

Lack of access to information can occur for several…… [Read More]

References

Abdool, R., Szego, M., Buchman, D., Justason, L., Bean, S., Heester, A., . . . Kaufman, H. (2016). Difficult healthcare transitions. Nursing Ethic, 23(7), 1.

Balogh, R. S., Lake, J. K., Lin, E., Wilton, A., & Lunsky, Y. (2014). Disparities in diabetes prevalence and preventable hospitalizations in people with intellectual and developmental disability: a population-based study. Diabetic Medicine, 32(2), 235 -- 242.

Gaskin, D. J., Thorpe, R. J., McGinty, E. E., Bower, K., Rohde, C., Young, J. H., . . . Dubay, L. (2014). Disparities in Diabetes: The Nexus of Race, Poverty, and Place. American Journal of Public Health, 104(11), 2147-2155. doi:10.2105/ajph.2013.301420

Lindberg, C., Fagerstrom, C., Sivberg, B., & Willman, A. (2014). Concept analysis: patient autonomy in a caring context. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 70(10), 2208-2221. doi:10.1111/jan.12412
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Advocating Health

Words: 689 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33056149

Health Technology Advocacy

The greatly expanded possibilities that are allowed by technology in today's world, has provided a tool for professionals in the health care industry to greatly expand their effectiveness and efficiency. The internet and all the sub-technologies that have spawned from this development are central in any application of modern day communication technology.

Specifically, the use of social media, via smartphone technology can be used to combat the greatest threat to collective health. The extraordinary lack of preventative health measures are at the root cause of the exploding costs and energies dedicated to health care in today's confusing and complex approaches to taking care of both our minds and bodies. While some attention is paid to diet, exercise and hygiene, mental hygiene is often ignored as a preventative measure to good behavior, good choices, which leads to good health.

The constant bombardment of information thorough social media through…… [Read More]

References

Galer-Unti, R. (2010). Advocacy 2.0: Advocating in the digital age. Health Promotion Practice, 11(6), 784 -- 787.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Indeed.com (nd). "Health Policy Advisor." Viewed 7 July 2014. Retrieved from  http://www.arnoldporter.com/jobs.cfm?u=HealthPolicyAdvisor&action=view&id=579 

Rock, M. et al. (2011). A media advocacy intervention linking heath disparities and food insecurity. Health Education Research, 26, 6, June 2011.
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Laws on Healthcare

Words: 1301 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 13171090

Health and Legislative Issues

All Americans have the desire of having a healthcare system which is capable of delivering world-class security together with financial security. The system in place should always be accessible and one that impacts the economy positively. Successful healthcare reforms will lead to a maximization of the choices available for consumers put a restrain to the ever increasing medical care costs and make healthcare accessible to more and more Americans. There are a number of organizations that have consistently urged the president and congress on building on the existing systems which strengths in order to achieve health reform solutions that are workable in a bipartisan manner. However, there are some healthcare legislative issues that come up and have effects on various stakeholders such as legislators, consumers and other healthcare professionals. This paper will look at one of the current health legislative issues, who is affected most by…… [Read More]

References

Mears, B.(2012). Health care's big four issues: What the justices are tackling. Retrieved March 12, 2014 from  http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/17/politics/health-care-issues/ 

ANA.(2010). Nursing Beyond Borders: Access to Health Care for Documented and Undocumented Immigrants Living in the U.S. Retrieved March 12, 2014 from  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/Policy-Advocacy/Positions-and-Resolutions/Issue-Briefs/Access-to-care-for-immigrants.pdf 

Goodman, J., (2012). The Impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on Job Creators and the Economy. Retrieved March 12, 2014 from  http://www.independent.org/issues/article.asp?id=3385 

American College of Emergency Physicians, (2013). The Ethics of Health Care Reform: Issues in Emergency - Medicine - An Information Paper. Retrieved March 12, 2014 from  http://www.acep.org/Content.aspx?id=80871
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Formulation of Health Policy

Words: 725 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56670625

Health Policy and Law Formation:

The process of legislation is characterized with some similarities and differences depending on the specific lawmaking body and the manner through which policymakers are elected and their respective functions and work. Generally, this legislative process includes drafting the bill, introduction of the bill to the respective house, discussions regarding it, any amendments, voting, and enactment into law or vetoed. In addition to undergoing this process, the formation of a public policy or law experiences various challenges depending on the specific state and municipality where the policy is formed.

In relation to public health policy, such laws originate from various sources before proceeding to policy development, which follows several stages. Some of these major stages in policy development include problem identification, setting of agenda, formation of the policy, implementation of the policy, policy evaluation, and policy termination or change. On an issue of health promotion or…… [Read More]

References:

Evans, C.H. & Degutis, L.C. (2003, December). What it Takes for Congress to Act. American

Journal of Health Promotion, 18(2), 177-181.

Megerian, C. & Renshaw, J. (2011, June 24). N.J. Assembly Passes Landmark Employee Benefits

Overhaul. Retrieved June 19, 2014, from  http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2011/06/assembly_passes_landmark_emplo.html
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Better Health Through Rewards and Punishments

Words: 713 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42476683

Health Care Trends

With the passage of the Affordable Care Act the personal health of every American has become an important issue. While most health care funds are spent treating diseases and other health problems, there has recently been a push toward focusing on prevention of health problems. For example, "chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes are now responsible for more than 75% of health care costs." (Berman, 201, p.328) But as these health problems are almost entirely preventable a focus on prevention could save a great deal of money that would be better spent elsewhere. Therefore many Americans are beginning to endorse policies that prevent health problems before they start. Some of these ideas involve incentives to reward people for healthy behavior while others involve penalties to punish those who do not. However, research indicates that punishments are not as effective as incentives when it…… [Read More]

References

Blacksher, Erika. (2008). "Carrots and Sticks to Promote Healthy Behaviors." Hasting

Center Report. Retrieved from  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1353/hcr.0.0002/abstract 

Berman, Micah. (Fall 2011). "From Health Care Reform to Public Health Reform."

Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics, vol. 39 (3). Retrieved from  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1748-720X.2011.00603.x/abstract
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Effects on Public Health of Health Care Reform

Words: 5200 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40260343

Health Care eform Effecting Public Health United States

Healthcare reform is an integral part of the United States healthcare system. Below is an evaluation of the effects healthcare reform has had on healthcare in the U.S. Internet sources as well as peer-reviewed journals will be looked at so as to see the effects.

The cost of healthcare has been on the rise. Issues of healthcare quality ought to be paid attention to and healthcare access equity improved upon (Health Care Transformation). Given these causes, while some differences exist on what reforms to carry out, a majority of Americans hold the belief that the U.S. Healthcare delivery systems need some improving. For a long time ANA has been advocating for reforms in healthcare and several of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provisions are in line with the Health System eform Agenda of the ANA. The ANA gave a chart that gives…… [Read More]

References"

1)

Kemp, C. (2012, October 11). Public Health in the Age of Health Care Reform. Retrieved January 21, 2015, from  http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2012/12_0151.htm 

2)

How National Health Care Reform Will Affect a Variety of States. (2011, April 5). Retrieved January 21, 2015, from  http://www.rand.org/news/press/2011/04/05.html
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Nursing Healthcare Business

Words: 5470 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Chapter Paper #: 30995758

Healthcare

We can compare the healthcare workplace to what is seen by a person when he/she looks through a kaleidoscope: since there are numerous different patterns that appear as the moments pass by. The shortage of nurses which has been publicized widely and the high turnover rates amongst the nurses are some of the unwanted patterns which have occurred. The dependence of healthcare institutions on the nurse-managers for the retention and recruitment of nurses is steadily increasing (Contino, 2004).

There are a number of routes through which the critical care nurses have become the leaders. Most of these routes don't have any educational or managerial training as a part of the process. There is a need for effective strategies for the care leaders who provide critical care in order to inspire the staff and manage the departmental operations in an effective manner to get positive results. One of the strategies…… [Read More]

References

Adams, J., Erickson, J., Jones, D., & Paulo, L. (2009). An evidence-based structure for transformative nurse executive practice, Nursing Administration Quarterly, 33(4), 280-87

Advisory Board Web site. (2004). Available at:  http://www.advisory.com .

Ales, B.J. (1995). Mastering the art of delegation. Nurs Manage. August; 26: 32A, 32E.

American Organization of Nurse Executives (2005). AONE Nurse Executive Competencies. Nurse Leader, 3(1), 15-22.
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Mission Viejo Healthcare

Words: 3473 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 97092115

Healthcare Administration Mission Viejo Executive Summary

Over the last several years, the healthcare delivery environment has been continually evolving. This is because consumers are demanding efficient ways for receiving a variety of services. That is focused on reducing costs and enhancing quality. The result is that the entire system is continually changing to keep up with them. In the case of Golden Age Hospital (GAH), they are reaching a crossroads with rising number of seniors locally and nationally. This is in response to the rising demographic and many local facilities feeling overwhelmed. The new location can be utilized as an integrated business model that will achieve these larger objectives. In the long-term, this will make them more competitive and able to respond to changes in the way industry is operating. Those who are able to do this will see their employee turnover rates decrease and they can enhance the care…… [Read More]

References

Community Profile. (2014). City of Aliso Viejo. Retrieved from:  http://www.cityofalisoviejo.com/wp-content/uploads/ApdxC_Community_Profile.pdf 

Mission Viejo, California. (2015). U.S. Census. Retrieved from: http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0648256.html

Rising Demand for Long-Term Care. (2014). CBO. Retrieved from:  http://www.cbo.gov/publication/44363 

Cuellara, A. (2006). Strategic integration of hospitals and physicians. Journal of Health Economics, 25 (1), 1-28.
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Legal Environment in Healthcare and Administrative Responsibility

Words: 1118 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 2327677

Healthcare -- Administration and Legal

Many vectors -- science, research funding, social acceptance or rejection -- influence how and whether medical technology is eventually adopted into medical praxis (Hogle, et al., 2012). Undergirding the choices and changes is a shared body of ethical standards and law, the establishment of which is often not consensual or efficacious. Any emerging technology can encounter unanticipated social resistance and ethical concerns that can change the course of how medical science research progresses (Hogle, et al., 2012). Medical technology often poses questions about access to expensive innovations and considerations about race, gender, and social justice that are inseparable from the socio-economic levels of patients (Hogle, et al., 2012). In contemporary society, there are the inevitable considerations about patent issues, clinical practice, and the commercialization of medical innovations (Hogle, et al., 2012). The recent court decision finding in favor of Myriad Genetics, Inc. provides a good…… [Read More]

References

Cho, M. (2010, November 1). Patently unpatentable: implications of the Myriad court decision on genetic diagnostics. Trends in Biotechnology, 28(11), 548-551. Retrieved http://www.cell.com/trends/biotechnology//retrieve / pii/S0167779910001411?_returnURL= http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167779910001411?showall=true 

Hogle, L., Tobin, S., Gaba, D. And Yock, P. (2012). Web-Based Research Integrity Training for Biomedical Engineers and Medical Device Researchers (Public Health Service). Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford School of Medicine. Retreived  http://bioethics.stanford.edu/research  / programs/science_and_society.html

Morrison, E. (2011). Ethics in health administration: A practical approach for decision makers. (2nd ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Stempel, J., Steenhuysen, J., Wallace, J., Grebler, D. And Orr, B. (2012, August 16). Myriad wins gene patent ruling from U.S. appeals court. Thomson Reuters. Retrieved  http://www.reuters.com/assets/