Health Assessment Essays (Examples)

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Health Education Plan Red Hook

Words: 1073 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11834798

Most of the people in that area are still trying to rebuild from that, and they have put their health on the back burner for the time being. They are not as interested in tending to potential problems and going to doctors appointments when their homes and community are damaged or destroyed. In the coming months and years things will normalize and people will return to pre-hurricane activities, but for now the post-hurricane cleanup is something with which health care providers and health educators will simply have to deal. The other factor that is a barrier to learning is the geographic isolation of ed Hook, because it is tucked away from the hustle and bustle of the main part of the city. That can leave the people somewhat forgotten when it comes to their needs.

One of the most important issues has to do with the health education outcomes (McKenzie,…… [Read More]

References

Brockwell, S., Kilminster, F. & Starr, A. (2009). Red Hook Community Health Assessment.

Hunter College Department of Urban Affairs and Planning, Issued 22 May, 2009.

Retrieved from http://www.brooklyncb6.org/_attachments/2009-05-

22%20RHI%20Red%20Hook%20Houses%20Health%20Assessment.pdf
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Health Tsunami Public Health and

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26735915

A 2006 study that examined the rates of depression and other mental health disorders following the December 2004 tsunami found that large numbers of people still faced significant health impairment from the event, and that treatment had been negligible when compared to relief and rebuilding efforts in other areas (CDC 2006). These efforts would likely be made far more effective and efficient, however, if mental health issues were dealt with. Addressing the depression and other mental health maladies that the people suffered from following the tsunami would have led to a better adjusted and more productive (as well as healthier) population.

There was an effective degree of trauma care provided immediately after the tsunami struck, but preventative care measures could have been stepped up during this time to forestall and mitigate the spread of infectious diseases that often comes after a major disaster event (WHO 2005). Obviously, trauma care was…… [Read More]

References

CDC (2006). "204 South Asia tsunamis." Center for disease control. Accessed 14 November 2009. http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/tsunamis/

WHO (2005). "South Asia earthquake and tsunamis: Inter-agency rapid health assessment." World health organization. Accessed 14 November 2009. http://www.who.int/hac/crises/international/asia_tsunami/final_report/en/index.html
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Healthcare Team

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52965732

Healthcare Team Members

HEALTH CARE TEAM

The healthcare team is assembled and trained to meet the special needs of patients and their families (Ezziane, et al., 2012). A skilled health care team can consist of doctors, nurses and many other health care professionals. A patient may encounter many different team members, each playing a special role in delivering quality care (Allen, 2009).

Attending Physicians (M.D., Doctor of Medicine) are experts in very specialized areas such as obstetrics or pediatrics. Most physicians treat injuries and illnesses in patients by giving exams, taking medical histories, prescribing medications, and ordering, performing, and interpreting diagnostic tests. They oversee and lead the healthcare team.

Education - Physicians complete at least 4 years of undergraduate school, 4 years of medical school, and 3 to 8 years of internship and residency, depending on their specialty.

Anesthesiologists (M.D., Doctor of Medicine or D.O., Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) administer…… [Read More]

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SBAR Assessment of Older Adults

Words: 725 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88122504

Health Assessment -- Older Adult

SBAR TEMPLATE

The SBAR (Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation) technique provides a framework for communication between members of the health care team. Although this technique was original developed to target a patient-centered condition, the NNLC will implement this technique to communicate and address critical issues to support immediate attention and action by the committee. This SBAR tool was developed by Kaiser Permanente.

Situation:

The patient is a 75-year-old Navaho woman who lives with her family on the reservation. She has not ever been hospitalized, has not had any major or minor surgery, and does get annual check-ups and immunizations. She presents today with complaints of joint pains in her hands that are keeping her from working on the handicrafts that she makes to supplement her income.

B

Physical Exam

Nutritional / Metabolic: The patient does not take any supplements and reports that she does not consume much meat, other…… [Read More]

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Case Study Health Promotion

Words: 1068 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56119023

Health Promotion Case Study

In this scenario the individual has been asked by a local law firm to come into the organization and establish a wellness program to promote the health of its employees. The firm includes a team of 20 lawyers, 3 managers, 45 paralegals, 5 administrative assistants, 2 information technologists and 4 part-time housekeeping and maintenance staff. The partners agreed last year to install a fully equipped gym in their building because otherwise they would receive a discount on the health insurance if 85% of the employees were participating in the gym at least an average of 90 minutes a week. At the time of renewal of the health care benefits package, the organization was disqualified from the discount because only approximately 10% of the employees were participating in the gym. This case involves a solution for engaging more of the law firm employees in health promotion activities…… [Read More]

References

Wieczner, J (2013) Your Company Wants to Make You Healthy. The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved from: SB10001424127887323393304578360252284151378

Gaines, M. (2012) How to Motivate Employees to Exercise. Chron. Retrieved from: http://work.chron.com/motivate-employees-exercise-1860.html

Garity, C. (nd) Corporate Fitness and Active Aging. Retrieved from: http://wellness.nifs.org/blog/bid/39826/Corporate-Fitness-Programs-Can-Motivate-Employees-to-Exercise-at-Work
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Effects on Public Health of Health Care Reform

Words: 5200 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40260343

Health Care eform Effecting Public Health United States

Healthcare reform is an integral part of the United States healthcare system. Below is an evaluation of the effects healthcare reform has had on healthcare in the U.S. Internet sources as well as peer-reviewed journals will be looked at so as to see the effects.

The cost of healthcare has been on the rise. Issues of healthcare quality ought to be paid attention to and healthcare access equity improved upon (Health Care Transformation). Given these causes, while some differences exist on what reforms to carry out, a majority of Americans hold the belief that the U.S. Healthcare delivery systems need some improving. For a long time ANA has been advocating for reforms in healthcare and several of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provisions are in line with the Health System eform Agenda of the ANA. The ANA gave a chart that gives…… [Read More]

References"

1)

Kemp, C. (2012, October 11). Public Health in the Age of Health Care Reform. Retrieved January 21, 2015, from  http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2012/12_0151.htm 

2)

How National Health Care Reform Will Affect a Variety of States. (2011, April 5). Retrieved January 21, 2015, from  http://www.rand.org/news/press/2011/04/05.html
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Assessing Patient Health and Lifestyle

Words: 1292 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52498486

Health Promotion and Preventative Care Plan

The purpose of this paper is provide information about the process of conducting a health assessment and a care plan based on the findings of the several assessments that were conducted for the benefit of the patient. The paper will describe the health history consisting of a review of systems, and will provide information about the assessment and its relevance to the plan of care developed for the patient.

The patient (CM) is a 24-year-old single black female who was born in the Democratic epublic of Congo (DC) and arrived in the United States three years ago to pursue an education. CM lives at home with her siblings, nieces and nephews, and her parents who just moved to the U.S. five months ago from the DC. CM works in retail and has been working extra shifts in order to help with the expenses of…… [Read More]

References

Gulanick, M. (2012). Knowledge deficit: Patient teaching, health education. Elsevier Publishing.

Jarvis, C. (2012). Physical examination and health assessment (6th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.
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Health Unit Coordinator Description a Health Unit

Words: 469 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18885791

Health Unit Coordinator Description

A health unit coordinator may also be known as a unit clerk, ward clerk, or unit secretary (Health Unit Coordinator). They help maintain the facility's service and performance. One of the main responsibilities is acting as a liaison between patients and staff, which includes communicating with doctors, nurses, patients, other departments, patients, and visitors that visit the patients.

Prospects of health unit coordinator positions are in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, health maintenance organizations, and home health agencies all across the nation. Employment opportunities for this position are expected to grow in demand as agencies require more help to coordinate services and performance. The start salary can range from $21,600 to over $24,000. The health unit coordinator may specialize in several different areas, such as reception, scheduling, safety protocols, or patient interaction.

High school courses of algebra, biology, chemistry, computer skills, data processing, psychology, English, composition, social…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Health Unit Coordinator Certification, Exam, and Licensing Information. (2012, Dec 8). Retrieved from Edcation Portal: http://education-portal.com/articles/Health_Unit_Coordinator_Certification_Exam_and_Licensing_Information.html

Health Unit Coordinator. (n.d.). Retrieved from Health Careers Center:  http://www.mshealthcareers.com/careers/healthunitcoord.htm
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Health Psychosocial Model of Health Use Questions

Words: 1354 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59055296

Health

Psychosocial Model of Health

Use questions 2, 3, 5, 11, and 12

Many times a health professional will look at a health issue and see only the problem at hand. The difficulty with this approach is that most health problems affect the entire person whether or not the issue is localized or not. The psychosocial model of health looks at more than an individual's physical state to determine how they will respond to treatments in the short- and long-term. A patient's psychological well-being and their support system are as important as a willingness to see a treatment through to the end. The following paper looks at two patients and whether they were well-served from a psychosocial perspective, and, if not, what improvements could be made to serve the patient better.

In the documentaries, two of the patient interviews stood out as especially relevant to this discussion. One of these…… [Read More]

References

Back, A.L., Arnold, R.M., Baile, W.F., Fryer-Edwards, K.A., Alexander, S.C., Barley, G.E., Gooley, T.A., & Tulsky, J.A. (2007). Efficacy of communication skills training for giving bad news and discussing transitions too palliative care. Arch International Medicine, 167, 453-459.

Douglass, J.L., Sowell, R.L., & Phillips, K.D. (2003). Using Peplau's Theory to examine the psychosocial factors associated with HIV-infected women's difficulty in taking their medications. Journal of Theory Construction & Testing, 7(1).

Ellingson, L.L. (2002). Introduction to the field of healthcare communication. Communication Research Trends, 21(3).

Holland, D.J., Bradley, D.W., & Khoury, J.M. (2005). Sending men the message about preventive care: An evaluation of communication strategies. International Journal of Men's Health, 4(2).
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Health Care Drivers for Increased

Words: 3735 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23797263

097

United States

0.109

0.093808

0.036112

0.068

Utah

0.1071

0.1401

0.035696

0.073

Vermont

0.1326

0.0988

0.040851

0.114

Virgin Islands

NA

NA

NA

Virginia

0.1048

0.0829

0.080009

0.092

Washington

0.1229

0.0669

0.027831

0.068

West Virginia

0.1293

0.0774

0.036499

0.055

Wisconsin

0.0954

0.0357

0.032367

0.097

Wyoming

0.1251

0.1453

0.053867

0.075

Notes

All spending includes state and federal expenditures. Growth figures reflect increases in benefit payments and disproportionate share hospital payments; growth figures do not include administrative costs, accounting adjustments, or costs for the U.S. Territories.

Definitions

Federal Fiscal Year: Unless otherwise noted, years preceded by "FY" on statehealthfacts.org refer to the Federal Fiscal Year, which runs from October 1 through September 30.  for example, FY 2009 refers to the period from October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009.

Sources

Urban Institute estimates based on data from CMS (Form 64) (as of 12/21/11).

From this entire chart, the entire increase in expenditure of…… [Read More]

References

Clark, Cheryl et al. "State Medicaid Eligibility and Care Delayed Because of Cost." New England Journal of Medicine, 368 (2013): 1263-1265. Print.

Ellwood, Marilyn Rymer et al. An Exploratory Analysis of the Medicaid Expenditures of Substance Exposed Children Under 2 Years of Age in California. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1993. Print.

Goodnough, Abby. "October 25th." The New York Times. 25th October. 2012. Web. 29th March 2013. [http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/26/us/spending-on-medicaid-has-slowed-survey-finds.html?_r=0].

Grannemann, Thomas W. And Mark V Pauly. Controlling Medicaid Costs: Federalism, Competition, and Choice. Washington DC: American Enterprise Institute, 1983. Print.
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Healthcare Administration and Leadership Health Care in

Words: 853 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97330642

Healthcare Administration and Leadership

Health care in the United States has progressed and improved to the point at which providers in all health care settings have defined and developed at least 4 major areas of importance for effective health care. Knowledgeable health care leaders have identified Quality and Safety; Community Health; Health Care Access and Coverage; and Leadership and Governance as key areas that must be constantly addressed and improved to provide optimal health care. The Human Research and Educational Trust has provided significant leadership in those 4 areas since its establishment approximately 60 years ago. By developing studies and assessments, as well as uniting health care leadership across the nation, HRET has exerted a great impact on health care in America.

Analysis

Two of the HRET's Major Areas and Why Each Area is Important to Health Care Administrators

The four major areas addressed by the Health Research and Educational…… [Read More]

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Health Care Leadership Problems Over

Words: 1005 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56997426

The idea with this part of the strategy is to be able to form some kind of a partnership with these individuals. This will help to push for a transformation inside the organization. As, these people will help to provide everyone with: a reason for adapting and pushing others to do so (indirectly). (Turner, 1999, pp. 162 -- 163)

Once this occurs, you could then have these individuals become a part of a committee. They will have the responsibility for making specific recommendations about how this can be implemented. This is important, because this will help everyone to realize that some kind of change is occurring inside the facility. Over the course of time, this will lead to shifts in the operating environment by giving people reason for embracing these changes. (Turner, 1999, pp. 162 -- 163)

The Effectiveness of the Plan

To determine the effectiveness of the plan the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Nationwide Medical Errors Cost $19.5 Billion. (2010). The Society of Actuaries. Retrieved from:  http://www.qualitydigest.com/inside/health-care-news/study-nationwide-medical-errors-cost-195-billion-annually.html 

Kovnar, A. (2008). Jonas and Kovnar's Health Care Delivery in the United States. New York, NY: Springer Publishing.

Turner, S. (1999). Essential Readings in Managed Nursing Care. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publishing.
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Health Care Strategic Planning Over

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8831945

The reason why, is because this is a sign that the quality of care that is being provided in declining. What normally happens is staff members, will often become frustrated with: health care environments that are inefficient and where management has an attitude of indifference. This is problematic, because it can spread through the organization like cancer by: eating away at the fundamentals that made the facility great.

Once this occurs, it will have an impact on: the costs, efficiency and profitability of the hospital. This is the point that this could undermine the reputation of facility and it could have an impact on the brand. When this takes place, it is a sign that many hospitals are falling into a downward spiral of: declining quality of care and increasing costs. At which point, it only becomes a matter of time until: some kind of major restructuring must occur or…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ableson, R. (2010). Employers Push Costs for Health Care on Workers. New York Times. Retrieved from: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/03/business/03insure.html

Palfry, C. (2004). Effective Health Care Management. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Shortell, S. (2006). Health Care Management. New York, NY: Thomason.
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Health Literacy the Nurse Plays

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35885390

Therefore, I would tell the patient that their symptoms should not be considered in isolation of their whole person. Websites that address symptoms only are not taking into account the wealth of factors that can influence the diagnosis of a specific disease.

At the same time, patients have the right to know about alternative solutions other than those provided or suggested by the physician or health care organization. Sometimes insurance constraints prevent nurses and doctors from mentioning interventions, diagnoses, and cures. The insurance provisions should not come in the way of the patient seeking second opinions or investigating such things as alternative and complementary medicine.

The strategies for assisting patients in becoming informed consumers of online health information include creating brochures and pamphlets, as well as websites. These materials can offer patients helpful links to the CDC (2013) and similar credible resources related to health literacy. The nurse can also…… [Read More]

References

CDC (2013). Health literacy. Retrieved online:  http://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/ 

Speros, C.I. (2011). Promoting health literacy: A nursing imperative. Nurs Clin North Am. 2011 Sep;46(3):321-33, vi-vii. doi: 10.1016/j.cnur.2011.05.007
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Health Care a Major Challenge

Words: 2346 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9551101



The expectations for these kinds of changes will be to see gradual shifts at first. Where, it may not seem like anything is changing at the facility. However, over the course of time, these kinds of changes will be obvious in the quality of treatment that is being provided will improve. As a result, the strategy will take approximately one year to fully implement a change in the atmosphere of the operating environment.

To ensure that these improvements can continue to be built upon a new system will be introduced of monitoring for shifts that are occurring. In this case, the committee that was established to implement these changes will become way of: monitoring the kinds of treatment that is being provided and the challenges that are facing the facility. This will be accomplished by having outside consultants conduct anonymous surveys of patients, staff members and within the community. They…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Online Customer Surveys. (2011). Key Survey. Retrieved from: http://www.keysurvey.com/solutions/healthcare-surveys.jsp

SWOT Analysis. (2010). Quick MBA. Retrieved from: http://www.quickmba.com/strategy/SWOT/

Badrick, T. (2002). Role of External Management. Clinical Leadership, 16 (5), 281 -- 286.

Bennis, W. (1969). Organizational Development. New York, NY: Addison Wesley.
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Healthcare Policies

Words: 1952 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86833684

Health Policies Medicare

hen everyone in our country finally starts to reach the age of 65 years of age or older, then every person will become eligible for Medicare. It is clear that there are some elderly that are having minimum health concerns while others recurrently are dealing with medical issues for which they will have to seek out treatment by the doctor. However, research is starting to display that there are at least five top conditions that are enhancing on medical and drug spending. It is obvious that Heart disease circumstances are the number one medical issue that the those that are considered elderly are facing and that is becoming very costly to them. Most are unaware that the second one is the disease cancer and it could be internal or external for various elderly patients. Other issues such as joint ailments a lot of the times can cost…… [Read More]

Work Cited:

Wenzlow, Audra T., et al. "Effects of a Discharge Planning Program on Medicaid Coverage of State Prisoners with Serious Mental Illness." Psychiatric Services 62.1 (2011): 73-8.

Sommers, Benjamin D. "Loss of Health Insurance among Non-Elderly Adults in Medicaid." Journal of General Internal Medicine 24.1 (2009): 1-7.

Verdier, James, and Allison Barrett. "How Medicaid Agencies Administer Mental Health Services: Results from a 50-State Survey." Psychiatric Services 59.10 (2008): 1203-6.

Harman, Jeffrey S., Allyson G. Hall, and Jianyi Zhang. "Changes in Health Care use and Costs After a Break in Medicaid Coverage among Persons with Depression." Psychiatric Services 58.1 (2007): 49-54.
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Health Reform Act

Words: 4387 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71002250

Health eform Act

The work of Flanagan, Miller, Pagano, and Wood (2010) entitled "Employee Benefit Plan eview -- Meyerowitz, Health care eform Is Here -- Now What?" states that health care reform laws are expected to have an impact that is significant in nature and this is on the health insurance industry as well as on employee benefit issues as well. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), which was then supplemented and modified, less than one week later, by the Health Care and Education Tax Credit econciliation Act (HCEA)." (Flanagan, Miller, Pagano, and Wood, 2010) Those two laws are referred to as "Health Care eform" or "Health eform Laws." (Flanagan, Miller, Pagano, and Wood, 2010) The Health eform Laws are reported, while being extremely lengthy and in depth and very detailed to "leave open a host of issues that will have to be resolved either through agency regulations…… [Read More]

References

Current Internal Revenue Code (Standard Federal version), SEC. 45R. EMPLOYEE HEALTH INSURANCE EXPENSES OF SMALL EMPLOYERS (2010) WK_ Current Internal Revenue Code SEC 45R EMPLOYEE HEALTH INSURANCE EXPENSES OF SMALL EMPLOYERS.pdf

Part III - Administrative, Procedural, and Miscellaneous Section 45R -- Tax Credit for Employee Health Insurance Expenses of Small Employers Notice 2010-44

National Tax Advisory (2010) What you need to know now about the tax aspects of health reform litigation. 6 Apr 2010.

IRS Rulings & Other Documents (2002-Current), Rev. Rul. 2010-13, Internal Revenue Service, (May 3, 2010) WK_ IRS Rulings Other Documents 2002-Current Rev Rul 2010-13 May 3, 2010.pdf ©2010 Wolters Kluwer.
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Health Prevention Programs

Words: 2666 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64756401

Health Promotion Lesson Plan

The concept of health promotion is thought of as "the science and art of helping people change their lifestyle to move toward a state of optimal health" (Dunphy et al., 2011, p 25). Serious heart conditions can be prevented, which is why it is so important to utilize community education techniques in order to help try to warn community members of the complications before they occur. This current lesson plan works to create three separate community lesson plans, based on specific age ranges. The age 18-29 focuses primarily on the use of social media and health advocacy efforts in association with the American Heart Association. For ages 30-49, there is also a focus on these two, combined with more community oriented issues, and for 50-60, there is much more of a focus on financial training along with community organized workshops.

Prevention has become a major issue…… [Read More]

References McLeod, Saul. (2010). Erik Erikson. Developmental Psychology. Simply Psychology. Web.  http://www.simplypsychology.org/Erik-Erikson.html
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Healthcare Issues With the Provision

Words: 1180 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96629310

In their move from a completely government-paid and -- operated healthcare system to a fees-based approach, the Chinese have greatly improved the efficiency, availability, and efficacy of their healthcare system (Wan & Wan 2010). This suggests that a combination of perspectives, rather than the market or single-payer perspectives that form so many healthcare systems, is most effective.

There are also, of course, healthcare systems that have developed in the same period as those mentioned above, but with far more negative results. The South African healthcare system, though effective in combating certain specific conditions, has many of the same failings as the United States' system, only on to a far more apparent degree. A lack of organization and responsiveness, exacerbated by an attempt to exert highly politicized and highly centralized control over healthcare provision, has plagued South African efforts to combat AIDS and many other problems the country -- and the…… [Read More]

References

Offredy, M. (2008). "The health of a nation: perspectives from Cuba's national health system." Quality in primary care 16(4), pp. 269-77

Sewankambo, N. & Katamba, A. (2009). "Health systems in Africa: learning from South Africa." The lancet 374(9694), pp. 957-9.

Squires, A. (2009). "U.S. Healthcare reform: A comparative book review." Nursing ethics 16(5), pp. 673-5.

Wan, Y. & Wan, Y. (2010). "Achievement of equity and universal access in China's health service: A commentary on the historical reform perspective from the UK National Health Service." Global public health 5(1), pp. 15-27.
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Health Promotion Theory Description and

Words: 1506 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58731126

Pender's is a theory of preventive medicine, for the healthy rather than the chronically ill. However, in an age where lifestyle-related disease are on the rise, it can provide an important function, particularly for nurses facing an epidemic of pre-diabetic and diabetic adolescents reared on poor diets and little physical activity. Some might protest that the genetic component to even Type II Diabetes, or obesity in general, might be unacknowledged in the model, but Pender would no doubt respond to her critics that although it is true that certain individuals have a greater predisposition to certain lifestyle diseases, everyone can act within those parameters to improve their life with preventative medicine, as counseled by her model.

orks Cited

McEwen & illis. (2007). "Chinn & Kramer Model." From Chapter 5 of Theoretical bases for nursing.

Pender, Nola J. (2003). "Most frequently asked questions about the Health Promotion

Model and my professional…… [Read More]

Works Cited

McEwen & Willis. (2007). "Chinn & Kramer Model." From Chapter 5 of Theoretical bases for nursing.

Pender, Nola J. (2003). "Most frequently asked questions about the Health Promotion

Model and my professional work and career." Last modified 4 Aug 2006. Retrieved 14 Sept 2007 at http://www.nursing.umich.edu/faculty/pender/pender_questions.html

Pender, Nola J., Murdaugh, C.L., & Parsons, M.A. (2002). "Assumptions and theoretical principles of the Health Promotion Model." Retrieved 14 Sept 2007 at http://www.nursing.umich.edu/faculty/pender/HPM.pdf
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Health Economics A How Does

Words: 2057 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91179011

As a result, the Govt. has been eager to encourage self-medication, where probable, in an endeavor to save money and time as optimizing convenience for the consumer. (the UK OTC Pharmaceuticals Market: UK pharmaceutical market report)

E) Is there any one burning issue related to health care in this country that is undergoing extensive debate? What do you know about it?

Although Britain NHS has been a model for the rest of the world to emulate, however over the years, a persistent concern with cost constraints and market-defined efficiencies since the bygone twenty years has radically battered the core principles of universal healthcare in UK. The discouragement of proceeds of central taxation as the funding base has been coupled with Govt. passing the costs and dangers to patients and their families. The internal market launched by the Thatcher Govt. In 1980s showed the most prominent features of these modifications, however,…… [Read More]

References

Bad Medicine. New Internationalist. Vol: 355. April 2003.

Retrieved at http://www.newint.org/issue355/bad.htm. Accessed on 21 March, 2005

Bio-Pharmaceutical Study Finds Significant Link between Innovation and Market-based Drug Pricing. May 9, 2002. Retrieved at http://www.tiax.biz/aboutus/pdfs/press_releases/pharma_may.htm. Accessed on 21 March, 2005

Donelan, Karen; Blendon, Robert J; Schoen, Cathy; Davis, Karen; Binns, Katherine.
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Health Benchmarking Discuss Barriers to Health and

Words: 596 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60307599

Health Benchmarking

Discuss barriers to health and safety benchmarking

Barriers to carrying out a safety health bench marking exercise

"Health and safety benchmarking is a planned process by which an organization compares its health and safety processes and performance with others to learn how to: reduce accidents and ill-health; improve compliance with health and safety law; and/or cut compliance costs" (Health and safety benchmarking: Improving together, 1999, HSE: 1). Just like assessing one's competitors is an important component of improving productivity and quality standards, it is also important that the company gain a sense of 'where it is' in relation to the industry as a whole in terms of safety compliance.

However, there is often organizational resistance to carrying out such exercises. First and foremost, it must be understood that "benchmarking is not just about comparing data or copying your competitors. Benchmarking is more about continuously learning from others, learning…… [Read More]

References

Health and safety benchmarking: Improving together. (1999). HSE. Retrieved:

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg301.pdf
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Health Care Reform Federal Deficit the American

Words: 4331 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22551835

Health Care Reform Federal Deficit

The American Health Care Crisis and the Federal Deficit

The United States spends more than any other country on medical care. In 2006, U.S. health care spending was $2.1 trillion, or 16% of our gross domestic product. At the same time, more than 45 million Americans lack health insurance and our health outcomes (life expectancy, infant mortality, and mortality amenable to health care) are mediocre compared with other rich democracies. We spend too much for what we get.

Nothing is new about these sobering realities. The Nixon administration first declared a health care cost crisis in 1969. Four decades later, the United States still has not adopted systemwide cost controls because the politics of health care make it extraordinarily difficult to control costs. I explain below why this is so (Marmor, et al., 2009).

The starting point for understanding the politics of cost control is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Eakin, Douglas and Michael Ramlet. (2010) "Health Care Reform is Likely to Widen Budget Deficits -- Not Reduce Them." Health Affairs, 29, no.6:1136-1141. Eakin and Ramlet examine the underpinnings of the Congressional Budget Office's projection that enacting the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will decrease deficits, and conclude that it is built on a shaky foundation of omitted costs, premiums shifted from other entitlements, and politically dubious spending cuts and revenue increases. A more comprehensive and realistic projection suggests that the new reform law will raise the deficit by more than $500 billion during the first ten years and by nearly $1.5 trillion in the following decade. This is an excellent article with regards to my article, written by two policy commentators at the forefront of their field. This article shows expertise in medical economics and offers compelling, clear arguments for the increase in the federal deficit due to the massive spending on entitlements as a result of passing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. They project deficits, opposing the Congressional Budget Office, through their insightful analysis.

2. Marmor, Theodore, Jonathan Oberlander, and Joseph White. (2009) "The Obama Administration's Options for Health Care Cost Control: Hope vs. Reality." Ann Intern Med. 150:485-489. Controlling the costs of medical care has long been an elusive goal in U.S. health policy. This article examines the options for health care cost control under the Obama administration. The authors argue that the administration's approach to health reform offers some potential for cost control but also embraces many strategies that are not likely to be successful. Lessons the United States can learn from other countries' experiences in constraining medical care spending are then explored. This article offers evidence for the lack of cost containment in the Obama administrations' plans for health reform. It gives a good analysis of the international scene in health care as well.

3. Collins, Sara, Michelle M. Doty, Karen Davis, Cathy Schoen, Alyssa L. Holmgren, and Alice Ho. (2004) "The Affordability Crisis in Health Care." Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey. Published in 2004, The Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, conducted from September 2003 -- January 2004, presents new and timely information on where the American public stands on solutions to reform the health care system. The survey finds widespread support for federal efforts to extend health insurance to more people, as well as a widely held belief that the financing of health care should continue to be a shared responsibility among individuals, employers, and the government. The survey also uncovered potential reasons for such strong support for health care reform. Among the insured and the uninsured alike, there is concern that health care security in the United States is eroding. People are experiencing reductions in insurance coverage that are threatening their financial security.

4. Etheridge, Lynn (1984) "An Aging Society and the Federal Deficit." The Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly. Health and Society, 521-543. This article serves as early warning sign of the deficit battles to come. It argues that the conflict between the growing needs of an aging society and a federal budget which cannot afford its current commitments has become one of the nation's most difficult government policy dilemmas. Assistance for the elderly through Social Security, Medicare, and other programs-is already the federal government's largest fiscal responsibility. In 1985 these programs will require nearly half of all domestic program spending an estimated $256 billion. The future costs of these commitments will rise rapidly well into the next century, accounting-with national defense and interest costs-for virtually all of the spending increases in the projected $200 to $300 billion deficits. Etheridge asserts that the decisions about the nation's assistance to the elderly -- and about reaffirmation, reform, and/or retrenchment of these commitments-will thus be central to the coming budget debates.
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Healthcare Budgetary Decision Making With Resources Becoming

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94531660

Healthcare Budgetary Decision Making

With resources becoming increasingly limited in the healthcare industry, managers are continually challenged with devising effective strategies for dealing with budgetary concerns. The most prominent challenge comes in the form of decision making that results in striking a balance between cost reduction and the maintenance of high quality care and safety for patients. The following discussion outlines approaches that can be utilized by managers to effectively deal with budgetary concerns in healthcare settings, with an emphasis on the advantages of group decision making strategies.

It is evident that there is often a struggle in the healthcare industry for managers to continually and effectively manage depleting resources, address the ever-changing needs of patients, and all the while provide a high level of patient care (Sibbald et al., 2010). This struggle has at its core a need for improvement in regards to the processes in which priorities are…… [Read More]

References

Burleson, G. (1984). Management, budgeting and the use of resources -- a private sector review. Hospital and Health Services Review, 80(3), 124-5.

Sibbald, S.L., Gibson, J.L., Singer, P.A., Upshur, R., Martin, D.K. (2010). Evaluating priority setting success in healthcare: a pilot study. BMC Health Services Research, 10, 131.

Xie, H., Chaussalet, T., Toffa, S., Crowther, P. (2005). A software tool to aid budget planning for long-term care at local authority level. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 114, 284-90.
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Health Management Discussion Questions a Health Plan

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81383582

Health Management (Discussion questions)

A health plan is gradually devised in four main stages. The first step is to assess the current situation, and what needs to be changed in terms of a given health setting. Secondly, a set of solutions is designed to bridge the cap between what is, and what is desirable. Thirdly, the measures that were agreed upon are implemented in the targeted environment. Lastly, a process of evaluation determines how effectively the health measures made the transition from what was to what was demanded to be changed.

During the initial phase, it is the general identification of health in a population sector that morphs. The redefining of health justifies enacting a new health plan; in other words, the new plan has to accommodate the effects of this redefinition of society's health goals. After the goals are set, the devised measures ought to take into consideration existing…… [Read More]

References

National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (2011). Public health planning toolkit. Hamilton, ON: McMaster University. Retrieved from http://www.nccmt.ca/registry/view/eng/105.html

The Health Planner's Toolkit (2006). Ontario, Canada: Queen's Printer for Ontario. Retrieved from  http://www.health.gov.on.ca/transformation/providers/information/resources/health_planner/module_1.pdf
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Healthcare in the United States Where We

Words: 2445 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5665201

Healthcare in the United States: Where We Have Been, Where We Are Going

The current healthcare crisis in America is not one that happened over night. It is one that has been building for more than a quarter century. There was a time in America when healthcare was a stellar institution: research, cures, technological advances, and treatments. The focus of healthcare was maintaining and improving the quality of life. Then, during the early 1980s, managed care became an entity between the physician, the patient, and the healthcare provider of hospital services. It began subtly, but has, today, become one of the most aggressive and successful business ventures of our time; and it has been the unmaking of a once stellar and progressive American institution.

Managed care is a "distinctly American" product (Birenbaum, 1997). It was legislation introduced by the Nixon Administration with the intent to regulate healthcare and to maintain…… [Read More]

Reference List

Bernstein, A.B., Hing, E., Moss, A.J., Allen, K., Siller, A., and Tiggle, R. (2003). Health Care in America: Trends in Utilization. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.

Birenbaum, A. (2002). Wounded Profession: American Medicine Enters the Age of Managed Care. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Birenbaum, A. (1997). Managed Care: Made in America. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Committee on Health Care Access and Economics Task Force on Mental Health (2009). Improving Mental Health Services in Primary Care: Reducing Administrative and Financial Barriers to Access and Collaboration. The Official Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, March, 30, 2009, pp. 1248-1251.
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Healthcare Assessing the Effect of

Words: 781 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82305509

Through the use of statistical modeling the researcher was able to arrive at the validation of their hypothesis.

Assessment of esearch Findings

Based on the results of the statistical modeling used in conjunction with the Household Component of Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) data set, it was found that tax subsidies do not have a differentially large or targeted effect on the prevalence of high burdens (Selden, 2008). Selden (2008) defines burdens as cash and wage equivalents of employer premium contributions. The results show that tax subsidies assist those above the poverty line more than those below it. The study is concluded prior to explaining why this is so, yet the author contends there are many other factors in addition to tax-based subsidies that have an impact on those below the poverty line being able to afford medical care even with tax-based subsidies.

Analysis

This research study shows that at…… [Read More]

References

Selden, T. (2008). The effect of tax subsidies on high health care expenditure burdens in the United States. International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, 8(3), 209-23.
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Health and Nursing Reduction of Bedsores Through

Words: 1591 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8156838

Health and Nursing

eduction of bedsores through implementation of Hospital wide turntable

Does the implementation of a hospital-wide turntable team have a positive impact on the reduction of bedsores?

eduction of Bedsores

A pressure ulcer (PU) or bedsore can be defined as an injury to underlying tissue of the skin that occurs due to pressure or friction. In most cases, the injured tissue sores due to the pressure exerted over a prominent bone. PU has also been defined as areas of necrosis due to tissue compression amid the bony prominence and the extracorporeal surface for a prolonged time period (Gray & Krapfl, 2008). It is therefore apparent from these definitions that exposure to pressure for a lengthy time is the primary cause of bedsores.

To prevent or minimize bedsores therefore, it is imperative upon medical practitioners to put intervention measures in place that will reduce exposure to pressure. The human…… [Read More]

References

Gorecki, C., Brown, J.M. & Andrea, N.E. (2009) Impact of Pressure Ulcers on Quality of Life in Older Patients: A Systematic Review. Journal of American Geriatrics Society. DOI: 10.1111/j, 1532-5415.

Gray, M & Krapfl, L.A. (2005) Does regular repositioning prevent pressure ulcers? Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing. Vol.35, No.6, 571-577.

Ikechokwu, E.C., Idowu, O.A. & Anekwe, D.E. (2012) Prevalence and Factors Associated With Healing Outcomes of Hospitals-acquired Pressure Ulcers among Patients With Spinal Cord Injury. Journal of Public Health and Epidemiology.Vol. 4(2), p. 44-47.

Kaitani, T., Tokunaga, K., Matsui, N., Sananda, H. (2010) Risk factors related to the development of pressure ulcers in the critical care setting. Journal of Clinical Nursing. Vol.19, 414-421.
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Healthcare the Impacts of Case

Words: 4123 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44424148

"Studies of the relationship between managed care penetration in the health care market and expenditures for Medicare fee-for-service enrollees have demonstrated the existence of these types of spill over effects" (Bundorf et al., 2004).

Managed care organizations generate these types of spillover effects by increasing competition in the health care market, altering the arrangement of the health care delivery system, and altering physician practice patterns. Studies have found that higher levels of managed care infiltration are linked with lower rates of hospital cost inflation and lower physician fees are consistent with competitive effects. "Other studies demonstrate the impact of managed care on delivery system structure including hospital capacity, hospital admission patterns, the size and composition of the physician workforce and the adoption and use of medical equipment and technologies. More recent evidence has linked market-level managed care activity to the process, but not the outcomes of care" (Bundorf et al.,…… [Read More]

References

Altman, D.E. And L. Levin. (2005). The Sad History of Health Care Cost Containment as

Told by One Client. Health Affairs, 24(1).

Bodenheimer, T. (2005). High and rising health care costs. part 1: Seeking an explanation.

Annals of Internal Medicine, 142(10), 847-54.
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Healthcare Promotion Prevention and the

Words: 3190 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80129421

Nurses, who have first hand knowledge and understanding of how to live healthy and how to take proper care of themselves, are far better equipped to teach others about these concepts. Certain populations can benefit greatly from prevention, especially those who are prone to specific types of diseases or conditions.

One of the most common behaviors that leads to many chronic and often very damaging health conditions is smoking. Smoking can cause a multitude of diseases and conditions from emphysema to heart disease to lung cancer (Chapman, 2007). The list goes on and on. But smoking is 100% preventable and nurses need to understand not only how to treat these smoking-related diseases but how to more importantly discourage and prevent people from smoking in the first place. Many nurses agree that this behavior leads to many of the worst case scenarios for people with pre-existing chronic conditions. It is therefore…… [Read More]

References

Chapman, Simon. (2007). Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control: Making Smoking

History. Blackwell Publishing, New York, NY. Pp. 55-56.

Chung, Daniel C. (2008). "Stool DNA Testing and Colon Cancer Prevention: Another Step

Forward." Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 149, No. 7. pp. 509-510.
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Healthcare Dan Hall a Self-Described

Words: 2809 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77363048

A recent article touted the 6.1% growth of spending on medical care in 2007.

The same article cautioned however that, "most experts know that no matter what the numbers say, there is still a great deal of work ahead to reform a healthcare system that is still fundamentally broken -- and is facing one of the worst economic recessions in decades" (Lubell, 2009, pg. 6).

Government and industry officials have been working to reform the industry for more than a decade yet the problem seems to be getting worse rather than better. More and more individuals are finding that insurance takes too much of their income and are forced therefore to forego that expense. Government is leery of committing to the cost of such expense, and industry is reluctant to offer expanded coverage without the backing of the federal government. As the interested parties do the two-step the problem becomes…… [Read More]

References

Bentley, C.S.; (2005) the new healthcare system, New American, Vol. 21, No. 18, pg. 44

Blizzard, R.; (2002) the haves and have nots of healthcare, Gallup Poll Tuesday Briefing, pp. 8-9

Brown, J.; (2009) Obama healthcare plan would shut down private sector, OneNewsNow, http://www.onenewsnow.com/Politics/Default.aspx?id=414372, Accessed February 10, 2009

Conn, J,; DerGurahian, J.; (2008) HIT budgets taking a hit: study, Modern Healthcare, Vol. 38, No. 50, pp. 10-11
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Health Maintenance Organization Impact on

Words: 13949 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80930377

" (AAF, nd)

The Health Maintenance Organization further should "…negotiate with both public and private payers for adequate reimbursement or direct payment to cover the expenses of interpreter services so that they can establish services without burdening physicians…" and the private industry should be "…engaged by medical organizations, including the AAF, and patient advocacy groups to consider innovative ways to provide interpreter services to both employees and the medically underserved." (AAF, nd)

One example of the community healthcare organization is the CCO model is reported as a community cancer screening center model and is stated to be an effective mechanism for facilitating the linkage of investigators and their institutions with the clinical trials network. It is reported that the minority-based CCO was approved initially by the NCI, Division of Cancer revention Board of Scientific Counselors in January 1989. The implementation began in the fall of 1990 and the program was…… [Read More]

Principles for Improving Cultural Proficiency and Care to Minority and Medically-Underserved Communities (Position Paper) (2008) AAFP -- American Academy of Family Physicians http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/policy/policies/p/princcultuproficcare.html

Volpp, Kevin G.M. (2004) The Effect of Increases in HMO Penetration and Changes in Payer Mix on In-Hospital Mortality and Treatment Patterns for Acute Myocardial Infarction" The American Journal of Managed Care. 30 June 2004. Issue 10 Number 7 Part 2. Onlineavaialble at: http://www.ajmc.com/issue/managed-care/2004/2004-07-vol10-n7Pt2/Jul04-1816p505-512

Darby, Roland B. (2008) Managed Care: Sacruificing Your Health Care for Insurance Industry Profits: Questions You must ask before joning an HMO. Online available at: http://www.rolanddarby.com/br_managedhealth.html
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Health Care Disparity in Maryland

Words: 18449 Length: 67 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96057578



Chapter II: Review of the Literature in Chapter II, the researcher explores information accessed from researched Web sites; articles; books; newspaper excerpts; etc., relevant to considerations of the disparity in access to health care services between rural and urban residence in Maryland and the impact of the lack of financial resources. The researcher initially accessed and reviewed more than 35 credible sources to narrow down the ones noted in the reference section in this study. The literature review chapter presents a sampling of literature to support the research questions this study addresses.

Chapter III: Methods and Results Throughout Chapter III, the researcher proffers information the utilized to address contemporary concerns/challenges/consequences relating to determining the information used in this investigation. This chapter also presents the overall methods and techniques the researcher implemented to conduct this study. Considerations for the methodology chapter include data/information the researcher uses; identifying it as primary and/or…… [Read More]

Potter, S. (2002) Doing Postgraduate Research. London: Sage.

Qualitative research: Approaches, methods, and rigour, (2008, Nov. 7). Microsoft PowerPoint Qualitative Research AdvC08 RS.PPT. Retrieved March 10, 2009 from www.unimaas.nl/bestand.asp?id=11629

Wolvovsky, Jay. (2008). Health disparities: Impact on Business and Economics Summit. Maryland's healthcare at a glance. The Heart of Community Health Baltimore Medical Syste. Retrieved March 10, 2009 at http://dhmh.maryland.gov/hd/pdf/2008/oct08/Jay_Wolvovsky.pdf
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Health Care -- Regulatory Scheme and Licensure

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54878500

Health Care -- Regulatory Scheme and Licensure Requirements -- Operating a Health Care Organization

California's licensing process for health care organizations is governed by the State's Health and Safety Code, with responsibility for licensing, licensing, inspecting, regulating and/or certifying shouldered by State and Federal agencies. In a straightforward yet rigorous process aided by online application packets and checklists, these agencies are intent on ensuring compliance with State and Federal laws and regulations.

The process for becoming licensed to operate as a health care organization in California is governed by §1200 -- 1209 of the California Health and Safety Code (California State Legislature, 2003). These code sections broadly deem the term "clinic" or "primary care clinic" to mean an "organized outpatient health facility," whether a community clinic, free clinic, specialty clinic or clinic corporation required to be licensed (California State Legislature, 2003). The requirements and processes outlined in these code sections…… [Read More]

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Health Care Insurance

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4274184

Health Care Finance

Greenwald engages in a discussion comparing the U.S. health care system to, well, other health care systems. An interesting methodological fault is that Greenwald cherry-picks his examples. In one paragraph, he compares the U.S. with Canada, in other the UK, and in another Spain. he problem, methodologically, is that he can cherry-pick data from whatever country best suits his argument. What this means, in terms of interpretation, is that Greenwald's findings need to be taken with a grain of salt. As an example, Greenwald notes higher wait times in three countries for urgent coronary artery bypass. Nobody likes high wait times, but Greenwald's U.S. figure doesn't factor in the uninsured, whose wait time is infinity. hey just die. he issue many have with the U.S. system is not that performance is poor; it is that performance is only good when you can afford it.

his cuts to…… [Read More]

This cuts to the heart of the difference between the U.S. And other industrialized countries. The trade-off between quality of care and universal care exists in any nation. The trade-off that other countries have made is that they have chosen universal care, even when there are times when service standards are lower. In the U.S., there has never been a strong collective motivation to make that trade-off. There are reasons for this, and they are more social that medical. While some have argued that lobbyists are the issue, I disagree with that assessment, because most other nations adopted universal health care long before lobbyists took over the U.S. government. The lack of universal health care in the U.S., therefore, is more related to social factors. The erosion of the manufacturing base has in turn eroded the sort of jobs where working class Americans can get health insurance; replace such jobs with part-time retail and the number of insured will decrease. Further, at-risk groups such as the poor, African-Americans, Native Americans and the disabled are disproportionally uninsured (Link & Phelan, 1996). There is a certain lack of concern with the well-being of these groups that has resulted in a lack of desire to provide insurance for them. It's kind of the elephant in the room -- while Canada and Europe were developing universal health care, a lot of parts of the United States were having trouble wrapping their head around desegregation in schools. We should not be so naive as to think this mentality does not play a role in public opposition to universal health care. As well, health care costs were manageable and for most, the system has worked reasonably well. This means there was no impetus for change -- only recently with the explosion of health care costs has there been concern about paying for health insurance even from the middle class.

Costs

There are a number of reasons why health care costs are lower in other nations. Greenwald notes that American health care facilities are more likely to invest in the most modern equipment. I wish he did not cherry-pick his supporting evidence ("seniors in Miami in the last six months of their lives receive the best care anywhere in the world") because this is a fairly demonstrable reality. At the top end, the U.S. health care system is usually better than in other countries. The fault Greenwald has is not following through and asking why this is. He is correct in pointing out that the best care can and should cost more. But facilities invest so heavily for two key
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Healthcare Addressing the Issue of

Words: 8204 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34819035

Stated to be barriers in the current environment and responsible for the reporting that is inadequate in relation to medical errors are:

Lack of a common understanding about errors among health care professionals

Physicians generally think of errors as individual that resulted from patient morbidity or mortality.

Physicians report errors in medical records that have in turn been ignored by researchers.

Interestingly errors in medication occur in almost 1 of every 5 doses provided to patients in hospitals. It was stated by Kaushal, et al., (2001) that "the rate of medication errors per 100 admission was 55 in pediatric inpatients. Using their figure, we estimated that the sensitivity of using a keyword search on explicit error reports to detect medication errors in inpatients is about 0.7%. They also reported the 37.4% of medication errors were caused by wrong dose or frequency, which is not far away from our result of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Discussion Paper on Adverse Event and Error Reporting In Healthcare: Institute for Safe Medication Practices Jan 24, 2000

Patient Safety/Medical Errors Online at the Premiere Inc. page located at: http://www.premierinc.com/all/safety/resources/patient_safety/downloads/patient_safety_policy_position_2001.doc

Medstat / Shortell, S. Assessing the Impact of Continuous Quality Improvement on Clinical Practice: What It Will Take to Accelerate Progress.

Health Policy Monitor (2001) A Publication of the Council of State Governments Vol. 6, No. 1 Winter/Spring 2001 PO18-0101
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Health Promotion

Words: 3496 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28197192

Health Promotion

The absence of illness does not thoroughly explain "Health", it can as well be described as wellness of the body and mind. More technically, health can be defined from two perspectives -- bodily and psychological health. A state of well-being due to regular exercises, adequate nutrition, sufficient rest, sensitivity to signs of sickness and when to seek help is referred to as Physical health. A person's fitness is showcased by his/her body make-up, cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular stability, and adaptability. Mental wellness refers to psychological and emotional welfare.

As defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO), mental health is "a state of wellness in which an individual discovers and harnesses his abilities, make headways regardless of stress encountered in life, can complete tasks adequately and profitably with substantial end product, and also contributes immensely to the uplift of his or her locality." (Nordqvist, 2015). A means of enabling people…… [Read More]

References

Boundless, 2016. Research Methods for Evaluating Treatment Efficacy - Boundless Open Textbook. Boundless. Available at: https://www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/treating-psychological-disorders-19/introduction-to-the-treatment-of-psychological-disorders-99/research-methods-for-evaluating-treatment-efficacy-382-12917/ [Accessed June 27, 2017].

Brassai, L, Piko, B, & Steger, M 2011, 'Meaning in Life: Is It a Protective Factor for Adolescents' Psychological Health?', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 18, 1, p. 44, Advanced Placement Source, EBSCOhost, viewed 27 June 2017.

Cuijpers, P. et al., 2014. EU-Compass for Action on Mental Health and Well-being. PREVENTION OF DEPRESSION AND PROMOTION OF RESILIENCE. Available at: https://ec.europa.eu/health/sites/health/files/mental_health/docs/ev_20161006_co03_en.pdf [Accessed June 27, 2017].

Gillham, J.E. et al., 2012. Preventing Depression in Early Adolescent Girls: The Penn Resiliency and Girls in Transition Programs. Handbook of Prevention and Intervention Programs for Adolescent Girls, pp.124 -- 161.
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Healthcare Propsal Are Immigrants Left

Words: 2880 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45935050

Unless the physicians can succinctly argue their case for care and services, the managed care entity will, for reasons of medical necessity, deny access to care and services.

What Cost-Added atio Based on Illegal Immigrant Population?

The argument by opponents that loopholes exist that would allow illegal immigrants to access Obama's proposed legislation on healthcare services is rendered moot in lieu of the fact that those illegal immigrants are currently receiving healthcare services Medicaid and through Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS). The Federal eimbursement of Emergency Health Services Furnished to Undocumented Aliens states:

"Section 1011 of the (Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) (P.L. 108-173)) MMA appropriated $250 million dollars in FY 2005 through 2008 for payments to eligible providers for emergency health services provided to undocumented aliens and other non-specified citizens who are not eligible for Medicaid (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 2009, found online, p.…… [Read More]

Reference List

Birenbaum, A. (1997). Managed Care: Made in America, Praeger Publishers, Westport,

CT.

Birenbaum, A. (2002). Wounded Profession: American Medicine Enters the Age of Managed Care, Praeger Publishers, Westport, CT.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2009). Uninsured Americans: Newly
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Healthcare Is One of the

Words: 701 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39432906

Starbucks has committed to provide healthcare coverage to employees who work at least 20 hours a week. This year, the cost will add up to over 200 million dollars for coverage of its over 80,000 employees. Schultz's perspective, differing from G is that the company's healthcare accounts for its very low employee turnover and high productivity. However, their generosity is even now bringing down their bottom line, Starbucks is attracting older workers who no doubt join the company for its healthcare benefits. As a result, Shultz notes that Starbuck's future healthcare costs will dramatically increase. Starbucks has seen that their insurance costs have had double digit increases in each of the past four years, and that this growth is completely "non-sustainable." Part of the reason that Starbucks is able to maintain its current healthcare policy is the relative newness of the company and its current lack of retirement healthcare costs.…… [Read More]

Moroni, R. (2005, August 29). Foreign Competition May Push U.S. Health Reform.

Grand Rapids Business Journal. 23 (36), p4-4, 1/3p. Retrieved September 21, 2006, from the EBSCO HOST Regional Business News database. (an 18097323).

Yip, P. (2005, October 18). General Motors health-care deal an example of changes over time. Dallas Morning News, the (TX). Retrieved September 21, 2006, from the EBSCO HOST Newspaper Source database. (an 2W62009610037).
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Health and Safety Legislation in Relation to

Words: 2023 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61217965

Health and Safety Legislation in elation to Employee Protection for Accidents at Work

Every individual within a workplace environment has the legal rights to protection against any work related risk, which may arise on the course of duty performance. Generally, the employees' health and safety legislation impose a range of duties to both employers and employees. The employees' health and safety guides apply to the self-employed as well as the diverse categories of employees such as manufacturers, designers, and suppliers. In different states, the legislation expresses a wide-based duty guideline within the Health and Safety at Work Acts. These regulations or acts are further spelt out in details within the subsidiary regulations, including those dealing with health and safety management, accident and/or risk management (Johnson & Geraldine, 2013, p. 57), as well as other emerging issues specific to health and safety of employees at work. This paper aims at providing…… [Read More]

References

Chamberlin, K.W., Cottle, M. & Neville, R. (2007).Responsibilities in notifying accidents to the health and safety authorities.Health and Safety Management, 4(3), 67-78.

Hansson, P. (2008). Employment laws and employee accident claims. Employment, Safety and Health, 14(5), 27-42.

Johnson, W.B. & Geraldine, C.K. (2013).The management of health, safety and welfare of employees at work.Employment Rights and Conditions, 3(1), 56-68.

Occupational Health and Safety Act (2000).Workplace injuries management and workers compensation.Journal of Employees' Safety and Health, 73(4), 78-97.
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Health Educational Tool Health Education Tool Family

Words: 1588 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91690431

Health Educational Tool

Health Education Tool

Family Background

Miss S. is an African-American who is 67 years old. She came to the United States at the age of 20 and currently performing the roles of housekeeping. Miss S. is married to Mr. S who is 69 years old, suffering from disability resulting from stroke. The two have five children: two girls and three boys. The older daughter is ailing thus the constant battles with colon cancer with metastasis. Members of the family are disturbed and require quality assistance and encouragement. According to the information from Miss S, the daughter is on acute rehab following the development of anaphylactic reaction resulting from the IV contrast dye during the CT scan of the abdomen. Miss S. is now extensive responsible for the two boys belong to her daughter. She is willing to corporate and offer valuable information in relation to her family.…… [Read More]

References

Anne Fothergill et al., (2004). Stress, Burnout, Coping, and Stress Management in Psychiatrists:

Findings from a Systematic Review. doi: 10.1177/0020764004040953 Int J. Soc

Psychiatry March 2004 vol. 50 no. 1 54-65

Watson J. Theory of human caring [acesso em 2006 Nov 11]. Disponivel em:
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Health Maintenance Issues Concerns

Words: 1305 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42746766

Health Maintenance Issues

Mrs. Gray is an 86-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with Type Two Diabetes. She has lived with the disease for three years. Mrs. Gray is single and lives in the area in a naturally occurring retirement community. Mrs. Gray, though 86, appears much younger than her stated age, which can be largely attributed to her active physical nature. Mrs. Gray boasts an exceedingly active social life, meeting her friends for lunch several times a week, and she strives to keep herself in good physical condition by going to the gym an average of four times a week. Mrs. Gray is further involved in the community through significant work in her church and as a member of the Senior Friends Program, which allows volunteers to interact with shut-ins by visiting with them and bringing them dinner once a week. Mrs. Gray's last A1C was 6.1%.

Health Maintenance…… [Read More]

References

Esfahani, A., Josse, A., and Panahi, S. (2008). Nutritional considerations for older adults with type 2 diabetes. Journal of Nutrition for the Elderly, 27.3-4. pp. 363-80. Retrieved from: EBSCOhost Database.

Fravel, M., McDanel, D., and Ross, M. (2011). Special considerations for treatment of type 2 diabetes in the elderly. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, 68.6. pp. 500-9. Retrieved from: EBSCOhost Database.

Haffner, S., Lehto, S, and Ronnemaa, T. (2008). Mortality from coronary heart disease in subjects with type w diabetes and in nondiabetic subjects with and without prior myocardial infarction. New England Journal of Medicine, 349:1. pp. 229-234. Retrieved from: EBSCOhost Database.

Halter, J. (2009). Geriatric patients. In: Therapy for Diabetes Millitus and related disorders, 3 ed. Alexandria, VA: American Diabetes Association. pp. 234-240. Retrieved from: EBSCOhost Database.