Health Belief Model Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Health Promotion Health Belief

Words: 1164 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28260448

Osteoporosis and the Health Belief Model

Discuss the Health Belief Model

The Health Belief Model was initially a systematic mode of predicating and thus preventing health behavior. By focusing on the relationship between the practices and the behaviors of health services it aimed to create a theoretical presentation of the same. Later it was revised to motivate the general health for the 'purpose of distinguishing illness and sick-role behavior from health behavior'. [Brown, 1999] The HBM is essentially a concept that integrates psychological motivators with physical and social settings. Its said to have been initiated in 1952 by three socio-psychologists, Godfrey Hochbaum, Stephen Kegels and Irwin osenstock. During the 1950's the society realized a need to prevent disease rather than cure it. The U.S. Public Health Service was more concerned with preventing outbreaks which would have a nationwide impact than with trying to solve and cure the symptoms that individuals…… [Read More]

References

Brown, Kelli M. [January 11, 1999] HEALTH BELIEF MODEL Community and Family Health University of South Florida

Bandura, A. (1977). Self-efficacy: toward a unifying theory of behavior change. Psychological Review, 84, 191-215.

National Osteoporosis Foundation [NOF]. (1999a). NOF Physician's Guide: impact and overview [Online]. Available: http://www.nof.org/physguide/impact_and_overview.

National Osteoporosis Foundation [NOF]. (1999b). Osteoporosis Fast Facts [Online]. Available: http://www.nof.org/osteoporosis/stats.htm.
View Full Essay

Obesity Prevention Using Health Belief

Words: 2200 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14731318

S Gubbels. Talks about how obesity is a major problem of our society and how it is affecting the children and adults. The article talks about the causes and the consequences of obesity and provides certain prevention for this problem. The article relates the problem of obesity with the Health Belief Model and talks about how the Model contributes in motiving the people to bring Health behavior change in their lives. It point out the reasons for people in bringing behavior changes associated with the Health Belief Model. (J.S Gubbels, 2013)

In the article "Health Belief Model in the Town of Obese Elderly Women use Health Education" by Zeng Gui Ying, the writer talks about how the Health Belief Model is a major source of information and education for the obese women living in towns and villages .It tells that how the model motivates and encourages the obese women to…… [Read More]

References

Baranowski, T. (2012, September 6). Obesity. Are Curent Health Behavior Change Models Helpful in Guiding Prevention of Weight Gain Efforts.

Boskey, E. (2010, 24 March). Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Health Belief Model.

Galletta, G.M. (2012). Medicine Health. Obesity.

J.S Gubbels, M.J. (2013). ISRN Obesity. Health Beliefs regarding Dietary Behavior and Physical Activity.
View Full Essay

Health Behavior the Theories at a Glance

Words: 7053 Length: 24 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74310569

Health Behavior

The "Theories At A Glance" manual discussed a variety of healthy behaviors. Select two theories that can be used to explain why people behave the way they do. Discuss the basic premise and constructs of the theories you choose. Cite two examples of how each theory could be used to explain a health behavior.

Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB)

The relationship that exists between behavior and attitudes, beliefs and intention is studied under TPB (Theory of Planned Behavior). TA (Theory of easoned Action) is also associated with TPB. According to TA and TPB, behavior is mainly determined by behavioral intention. These models show that the attitude of an individual affects behavioral intention. Hence, the behavior of a person towards the performance of some particular behavior is also influenced. In addition to this, beliefs concerning individuals who have close association (these people have the decision making power of approving…… [Read More]

References

Bandura A. Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A Social Cognitive Theory. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1986.

Bronfenbrenner, U 1994 'Ecological Models of Human Development', International Encyclopaedia of Education, Vol 3, Oxford, Elsevier.

Eddy Module 2. Dr. James Eddy. Social Learning Theory (SLT/SCT): Reciprocal Determinism, Expectations, Value Expectancies. Accessed March 18th, 2012 from: mms://mediasrv1.ccs.ua.edu/CCS-AO2/HHE520/tape2b/2b_clip1.wmv

Eddy Module 2a. Dr. James Eddy. SLT/SCT (cont'd): Observational Learning, Reinforcement, Self-Efficacy, Emotional Coping. Accessed March 18th, 2012 from: mms://mediasrv1.ccs.ua.edu/CCS-AO2/HHE520/tape2b/2b_clip2.wmv
View Full Essay

Primary Health Care Initiative

Words: 1909 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57975841

Health Care -- PHI

A Primary Health Care Initiative (PHI) is a fundamental, affordable health care mode clearly illustrated the Declaration of Alma-Ata. Michelle Obama's "Let's Move!" adheres to the PHI format and uses the Health Belief Model as its guide. Unfortunately, several problems with both the Model and the initiative hamper its success. Several measures can be taken to significantly enhance the initiative's impact.

Identify PHI (20%)

A PHI is a fundamental and affordable mode of health care that is grounded in realistic, well-established and culturally agreeable science and practices, and is made accessible to all members of a community (HO, 1978, pp. 2-3). It relies on continuous financial and ideological support from the immediate and larger communities, as well as the wholehearted participation of community members, who are deemed partners in their own health care (HO, 1978, pp. 2-3). Though the initiative works with individuals in their local…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clarke, V.A., Lovegrove, H., Williams, A., & Machperson, M. (2000). Unrealistic optimism and the health belief model. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 23(4), 367-376.

Keating Simons, K. (2010, December 13). Let's Move: Looking at the flaws of a childhood obesity intervention. Retrieved November 8, 2013 from  http://challengingdogma-fall2010.blogspot.com  Web site:
View Full Essay

Healing Model and Health Model

Words: 1881 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71877367

Health Model and Healing Model

The healing model and health model have influenced the human belief for several decades, and the health model defines health as robust physical human fitness that is free of disease. On the other hand, healing is a functional restoration of repairing or conquering alien destroyer. In other word, health is the balance of spirit, mind and body. Since disease serves as an agent that disrupts the balance, healing serves as restoration of human balance. (Carpenter, 2010).

In essence, healing and spirituality are intimately connected. Healing is the spiritual process that influences the wholesome of an individual. In other word, healing is an intangible, experiential and spiritual that integrates human body, mind, soul and spirit. More importantly, healing is concerned with the wholesome of human being. For several thousand years, many people with different cultures have used the healing model for the well being of their…… [Read More]

Liu, C. Li, D. Fu, B. et al. (2014). Modeling of self-healing against cascading overload failures in complex networks. EPL (Europhysics Letters). 107(6).

Meilin, S. (2013). Characterization of a porcine model of post-operative pain European Journal of Pain.

Tiaki, K.C. (2013). Helping transform health service models. Nursing New Zealand. 19 (7): 27.
View Full Essay

Health of Indigenous Australian Using Ecological and

Words: 2500 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72970397

Health of Indigenous Australian Using Ecological and Holistic Health Paradigm

Patterns of health and illness

Physical Health

Mental Health

Spiritual Health

Social Health

Impact of Broader Environments

Natural

Built

Social

Economic

Political

Critical eflection

Health is a basic component of human life that comprises of multiple facets. The description of health has witnessed dramatic change during past few years, as it has become a holistic phenomenon. Previously, it was considered that a healthy person is the one who does not suffer from any ailment or illness. However in recent times, the physical, psychological and communal aspects of human life have been amalgamated to give a broader perspective to human health which is identical to the concept of indigenous communities (Hjelm, 2010).

Numerous organizations are working extensively for providing adequate health care to the world population since many decades. However, it is appalling to notice that discrimination on social, economic and…… [Read More]

References

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2012, Australia's health 2012, AIHW, Australia.

Biddle, N & Yap, M 2010, Demographic and Socioeconomic Outcomes Across the Indigenous Australian Lifecourse: Evidence from the 2006 Census, ANU E. Press, Australia.

Caltabiano, ML & Ricciardelli, L 2012, Applied Topics in Health Psychology, John Wiley & Sons, Great Britain.

Carson, B, Dunbar, T & Chenhall, RD 2007, Social Determinants of Indigenous Health, Allen & Unwin, Singapore.
View Full Essay

Health Promotion Theory Description and

Words: 1506 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58731126

Pender's is a theory of preventive medicine, for the healthy rather than the chronically ill. However, in an age where lifestyle-related disease are on the rise, it can provide an important function, particularly for nurses facing an epidemic of pre-diabetic and diabetic adolescents reared on poor diets and little physical activity. Some might protest that the genetic component to even Type II Diabetes, or obesity in general, might be unacknowledged in the model, but Pender would no doubt respond to her critics that although it is true that certain individuals have a greater predisposition to certain lifestyle diseases, everyone can act within those parameters to improve their life with preventative medicine, as counseled by her model.

orks Cited

McEwen & illis. (2007). "Chinn & Kramer Model." From Chapter 5 of Theoretical bases for nursing.

Pender, Nola J. (2003). "Most frequently asked questions about the Health Promotion

Model and my professional…… [Read More]

Works Cited

McEwen & Willis. (2007). "Chinn & Kramer Model." From Chapter 5 of Theoretical bases for nursing.

Pender, Nola J. (2003). "Most frequently asked questions about the Health Promotion

Model and my professional work and career." Last modified 4 Aug 2006. Retrieved 14 Sept 2007 at http://www.nursing.umich.edu/faculty/pender/pender_questions.html

Pender, Nola J., Murdaugh, C.L., & Parsons, M.A. (2002). "Assumptions and theoretical principles of the Health Promotion Model." Retrieved 14 Sept 2007 at http://www.nursing.umich.edu/faculty/pender/HPM.pdf
View Full Essay

Health Maintenance Organization Impact on

Words: 13949 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80930377

" (AAF, nd)

The Health Maintenance Organization further should "…negotiate with both public and private payers for adequate reimbursement or direct payment to cover the expenses of interpreter services so that they can establish services without burdening physicians…" and the private industry should be "…engaged by medical organizations, including the AAF, and patient advocacy groups to consider innovative ways to provide interpreter services to both employees and the medically underserved." (AAF, nd)

One example of the community healthcare organization is the CCO model is reported as a community cancer screening center model and is stated to be an effective mechanism for facilitating the linkage of investigators and their institutions with the clinical trials network. It is reported that the minority-based CCO was approved initially by the NCI, Division of Cancer revention Board of Scientific Counselors in January 1989. The implementation began in the fall of 1990 and the program was…… [Read More]

Principles for Improving Cultural Proficiency and Care to Minority and Medically-Underserved Communities (Position Paper) (2008) AAFP -- American Academy of Family Physicians http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/policy/policies/p/princcultuproficcare.html

Volpp, Kevin G.M. (2004) The Effect of Increases in HMO Penetration and Changes in Payer Mix on In-Hospital Mortality and Treatment Patterns for Acute Myocardial Infarction" The American Journal of Managed Care. 30 June 2004. Issue 10 Number 7 Part 2. Onlineavaialble at: http://www.ajmc.com/issue/managed-care/2004/2004-07-vol10-n7Pt2/Jul04-1816p505-512

Darby, Roland B. (2008) Managed Care: Sacruificing Your Health Care for Insurance Industry Profits: Questions You must ask before joning an HMO. Online available at: http://www.rolanddarby.com/br_managedhealth.html
View Full Essay

Personal Health Action Plan the

Words: 1933 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75819784

The six major concepts and definitions of HBM are as follows, with the corresponding self-assessment information following a (/).

Perceived Susceptibility: refers to a person's perception that a health problem is personally relevant or that a diagnosis of illness is accurate."/relevance of family history of disease

Perceived severity: even when one recognizes personal susceptibility, action will not occur unless the individual perceives the severity to be high enough to have serious organic or social complications."/all the diseases or illnesses associated with family history and listed above are potentially deadly or life altering

Perceived benefits: refers to the patient's belief that a given treatment will cure the illness or help to prevent it."/my personal belief in the fact that reduction of weight and BMI and the health related behaviors needed for these changes are preventative measures as well as beneficial to my life

Perceived Costs: refers to the complexity, duration, and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Health Belief Model (HBM): Nursing Theories" CurrentNursing.com  http://currentnursing.com /nursing_theory/health_belief_model.htm

Healthy People 2010 objective 19-1, Accessed February, 22, 2008

http://www.healthypeople.gov/document/html/objectives/19-01.htm

Healthy People 2010 objective 19-2, Accessed February, 22, 2008
View Full Essay

Community Health Advocacy

Words: 849 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58416396

Community Health Advocacy

The prevention of disease has three distinct levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Primary prevention methods are the first prevention strategies that are employed to prevent a person from a disease or illness. Primary prevention's main goal is to stop the disease or illness from occurring at all. Secondary prevention is employed after the disease or illness has happened, but before the individual has any adverse effects from the disease or illness and before they realize that anything is wrong with them. Tertiary prevention comes into play when an individual has symptoms of a disease or an illness and thus the goal becomes to prevent both harm and physical hurt from that disease or illness. Tertiary prevention is also used in order to prevent the disease or illness from escalating, ease the pain of the disease or illness, and help people get back to their former quality of…… [Read More]

References

Butz, A.M., Breysse, P., Rand, C., Curtin-Brosnan, J., Eggleston, P., Diette, G.B., Williams, D.,

Bernert, J.T., & Matsui, E.C. (2011) "Household smoking behavior: effects on indoor air quality and health of urban children with asthma." Matern child health (15): 460-468.

Chan, K.G., Upi, H.., Gani, R., & Chang, K.H. (2007). "Paediatric ward nurses' action intentions

and attitudes towards quit smoking interventions and their knowledge on second-hand smoke." International journal of nursing practice (17): 181-186.
View Full Essay

Cultural Perspectives on Health Changing

Words: 2175 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76259472



In the health care practice, there are those aspects of culture that are sensitive and that the health care practitioners need to consider when making decisions related to the practice. Some of these cultural aspects are those that contradict with the principles of modern medicine. Therefore, by the practitioner having a good understanding of these sensitive aspects of culture, he/she will be able to make the appropriate decision for the situation at hand.

Communication skills are also important for all culturally competent health care professionals. For example, in situations which concern culture and the norms associated with culture based on the amount of information that can be disclosed and the type of information. This can form a serious barrier in the provision of health care and therefore the practitioner needs to understand the culture and the norms in order to be able to enable communication and self-disclosure of the patient.…… [Read More]

References

AUSTRALIAN NURSING and MIDWIFERY COUNCIL National Competency Standards for the Registered Nurse. Australia: Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council.

BURNS, N. & GROVE, S.K. 2009. The practice of nursing research: Appraisal, synthesis, and generation of evidence., St. Louis, MO Elsevier.

CROSS, T., BAZRON, B., DENNIS, K. & ISAACS, M. 1989. Towards a Culturally Competent System of Care, Volume I, Washington, DC, Georgetown University Child Development Center, CASSP Technical Assistance Center.

LEE, H.C., DUDLEY, R.A. & GONZALES, R. 2011. Translating Evidence into Practice, Policy, and Public Health in Perinatal Medicine. NeoReviews, 12, e431-e438.
View Full Essay

Hhe 595 Workshop in Comprehensive School Health Education

Words: 3359 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62884560

School Health Education

HEALTH THROUGH EDUCATION

Comprehensive School Health Education

Kolbe's Expectations

Dr. Lloyd Kolbe lines up the expectations of a school health education. These are: increased understanding about the science of individual and societal health; increased competency to make decisions about personal behaviors that influence health; increased skills required to form behaviors conducive to health; contribute to the development and maintenance of such behaviors; and enhancement of these skills to maintain and improve health of families and communities.

The existing school health education has not come to par with its function. It confronts problems, such as the failure of the home to encourage practice of health habits learned in school, ineffectiveness of instructional methods, and resistance to certain health topics by parents and the community. A more effective or responsive school health education requires a valid curriculum, qualified teachers, and consistent application of what is learned.

Increased understanding about…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Comprehensive School Health Programs. Healthy Children are Prepared to Learn

Managing Emotional Arousal

Research Findings on Growing Health

National Health Education Standards. Achieving Health Literacy
View Full Essay

Health Promotion Strategies and Methods DQ

Words: 2450 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15047224

Nursing Case Study and Theoretical Knowledge of Healthcare System

Significant evidence shows that the responsibilities of the primary and acute care nurses vary significantly. The variation creates differences in the scope of work for the nurses, as they are engaged in different job perspectives. Primary and acute care nurses provide an array of services that aim at promoting health, preventing the occurrence of diseases, treating the sick, and providing the e clients with services, meeting their needs alongside creating public awareness to issues that affect their health and well-being. The difference of the services provided by the two becomes evident by the fact that the acute care nurses provide their services to patients who are critically sick, creating continuum variation in the services provided. In addition, nurses involved in the provision of nursing care services in the acute setups require specialized knowledge, skills, and expertise that allows them to provide…… [Read More]

References

Brown, L., Burton, R., Hixon, B., Kakade, M., Bhagalia, P., Vick, C., et al. (2011). Factors Influencing Emergency Department Preference for Access to Healthcare. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 13(5), 410-415.

Brown, S., & Stenner, P. (2009). Psychology without foundations history, philosophy and psychosocial theory. London: Sage Publications.

Crowe, M., & Carlyle, D. (2003). Deconstructing risk assessment and management in mental health nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 43(1), 19-27.

DiClemente, R.J., Crosby, R.A., & Kegler, M.C. (2002). Emerging theories in health promotion practice and research strategies for improving public health. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
View Full Essay

Models of Transcultural Care

Words: 2266 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51475473

Nursing Theories

Transcultural Care

For the past several decades, nursing theory has evolved with considerable considerations towards transcultural care. The concept of culture was derived from anthropology and the concept of care was derived from nursing. When one understands the derivative of nursing knowledge and the basis for cultural sensitivity, one may tailor and provide the best nursing care for diverse groups. Each group may have specific needs that may help or hinder healthcare delivery. Hence, if one fully understands the meanings, patterns, and processes, one can explain and predict health and well-being. Although many nursing theories exist, a closer evaluation will be given to Cultural Care Diversity & Universality and Purnell Model for Cultural Competence.

Cultural Competence & Influence

Cultural competence is deemed as essential component in providing healthcare today. Healthcare professionals in healthcare organizations are addressing multicultural diversity and ethnic disparities in health (Wilson, 2004). To better serve…… [Read More]

References

Kim-Godwin, Y.S., Clarke, P.N. And Barton, L. (2001), A model for the delivery of culturally competent community care. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 35: 918 -- 925. doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2648.2001.01929.x

Maier-Lorentz, M. (2008). Transcultural nursing: its importance in nursing practice. Journal of Cultural Diversity, 15(1), 37-43.

Nelson, J. (2006). Madeleine Leininger's Culture Care Theory: The Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality. International Journal For Human Caring, 10(4), 50.

SNJourney. (2007). Purnell's model of cultural competence. Retrieved from  http://www.snjourney.com/ClinicalInfo/Select%20Topics/Transcultural/PurnellModel2.pdf
View Full Essay

Health Literacy the Nurse Plays

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35885390

Therefore, I would tell the patient that their symptoms should not be considered in isolation of their whole person. Websites that address symptoms only are not taking into account the wealth of factors that can influence the diagnosis of a specific disease.

At the same time, patients have the right to know about alternative solutions other than those provided or suggested by the physician or health care organization. Sometimes insurance constraints prevent nurses and doctors from mentioning interventions, diagnoses, and cures. The insurance provisions should not come in the way of the patient seeking second opinions or investigating such things as alternative and complementary medicine.

The strategies for assisting patients in becoming informed consumers of online health information include creating brochures and pamphlets, as well as websites. These materials can offer patients helpful links to the CDC (2013) and similar credible resources related to health literacy. The nurse can also…… [Read More]

References

CDC (2013). Health literacy. Retrieved online:   http://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/  

Speros, C.I. (2011). Promoting health literacy: A nursing imperative. Nurs Clin North Am. 2011 Sep;46(3):321-33, vi-vii. doi: 10.1016/j.cnur.2011.05.007
View Full Essay

Health Qs Massachusetts Cost Limiting Proposal One

Words: 809 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34567608

Health Qs

Massachusetts Cost Limiting Proposal

One of the major problems of the current healthcare system implemented by the State of Massachusetts is the cost of maintaining the program and providing the necessary healthcare to Massachusetts' citizens dependent on the state insurance program. Ideally, of course, the program would be paid for via the revenues generated form business contributions, premium payments into the state system, and general tax funding. Revenue can only make up half of the solution for paying for the system, however; costs must also be effectively managed and strictly limited if the program is to be successful in the long-term. One proposal for limiting these costs is switching from a reimbursement-for-services model of physician payment to the creation of performance-based salaries or regular payments.

There are several features of moving to a pay-for-performance rather than a pay-for-service model that have the potential to yield significant savings. As…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Health Care Legislative Bill

Words: 1387 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5151645

Healthcare Legislative Bill

The expanded and improved Medicare for all Acts

The Expanded and mproved Medicare for All Act was introduced to the House of Representatives in 2009 and seeks to lobby for the implementation of a common single-payer health care system throughout the United States o0f America. The bill if enacted would require that all medical care costs be paid for automatically by the government instead of private insurances for the same. The move will significantly alter the role of private insurance companies as merely offering supplemental coverage especially when the kind of medical care sought is not all that essential (McCormick, 2009).

With the Expanded and mproved Medicare for All Bill, the country's national system will be paid for through taxes and the monies that will replace the regular insurance premiums. Proponents of the bill argue that by eliminating the need for private insurance companies in the national…… [Read More]

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science, (2010), Insuring America's Health: Principles and Recommendations

The American Journal of Medical Practices, (2011), The Impact of single-payer Medicare

Program, New York
View Full Essay

Health Care Provider and Faith Diversity Spirituality

Words: 1146 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49118057

Health Care Provider and Faith Diversity

Spirituality In Health Care

HLT-310V-0104

EMORY DAVIS

Mr. Saracouli, your paper addresses the 3 diverse faiths and identifies some of their components of care and healing. These could be developed more. This will give greater opportunity to discuss more specific comparisons and contrasts of these components with those of Christianity, which is a significantly key element of this assignment (as highlighted in the Mod 2 Assignment Assist and Assignment Clarification). The paper (final draft) can be benefitted by weaving in specific comparisons and contrasts within each faith section... As you go along. Consider organizing 3 faiths in separate paragraphs (see Buddhism below). [Review the Faith Diversity Recommended Content Format attached to Mod 2 Announcement.]

Module 2 Faith Diversity Assignment requirements, per syllabus and assignment assist:

* Research three diverse faiths. Yes.

* Compare the philosophy of providing care from the perspective of each of…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Healthcare Case Study

Words: 1972 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85745335

Healthcare Study

Defined as the philosophical study of right and wrong action, Ethics is a predominant subject of concern in nursing (Michael Dahnke, 2006). Being presented with various situations, the ethical and cultural problems are a serious concern faced by the nursing and healthcare staff which needs to be catered to day in and out. There is no time tested methodology that can be applied here, since the every patient is different, with a different background history, therefore the ethical and cultural implications of each decision would also vary.

Importance of Ethical Theory to Nursing

Defining what is right and wrong is a very subjective approach and even that can change from scenario to scenario. Therefore it is important to have some form of umbrella under which the functioning of nurses takes place. It is under this rationale that the importance of ethical theory emerges in front of us.

In…… [Read More]

Works Cited

DuAnne Foster Edwards, R.M. (1999, Feburary). The Synergy Model: Linking Patient Needs to Nurse Competencies. Retrieved September 30th, 2011, from American Association of Critical Care Nurses: http://www.aacn.org:88/wd/certifications/content/synpract2.pcms?pid=1&menu=

Green, D.B. (2001, July). Medical Ethics. Retrieved September 30th, 2011, from Priory.com:  http://priory.com/ethics.htm 

Michael Dahnke, H.D. (2006). Defining Ethics and Applying the Theories. In P.M. Vicki D. Lachman, Applied Ethics in Nursing (p. 3). New York: Springer.

Samar Noureddine RN, M. (2001). Development of the ethical dimension in nursing theory. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 2-7.
View Full Essay

Health Canadian Health Care the

Words: 1345 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14236067



In 2004, a Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care was announced, primarily intended to improve access to medical services, decrease wait times, and update medical equipment and ensure accurate reporting and enhance public health promotion and prevention programs. Shortly thereafter, the Canadian Supreme Court affirmed the nation's health care philosophy and the immediate need to implement further improvements envisioned by the ambitious 2004 plan in striking down a Quebec law that had prohibited private medical insurance for covered services:

The evidence in this case shows that delays in the public health care system are widespread and that in some serious cases, patients die as a result of waiting lists for public health care...In sum, the prohibition on obtaining private health insurance is not constitutional where the public system fails to deliver reasonable services."

According to legal experts, the decision could "open the door to a wave of lawsuits challenging the…… [Read More]

References

Canadian Medical Association Journal.

1939 September; 41(3):

Chaoulli v. Quebec: Judgments of the Supreme Court of Canada Accessed, September 2, 2007, at http://scc.lexum.umontreal.ca/en/index.html

Kraus, C. (2005) Canada's Supreme Court Chips Away at National Health Care.
View Full Essay

Healthcare and Medicine in the

Words: 2981 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8445117

The issue of grey and black markets often arose as a result of the shortages of experienced health care personnel. The system could not adapt to a flexible environment as it was led by rigid official procedures and the mentality of the people who controlled it was commanding, their vision short-sighted and hardly beneficial in such a situation (Barr and Mark, 1996).

The breaking up of Soviet Union which brought crippling economic and political problems to the countries also aggravated the health care situation making it reach an all-time low. The collapse of the health care system ran by the government led to the belief that turning towards a market economy or more capitalistic notions and perceptions would have been a better idea. The competition in the private sector would have had improved efficiency and averted an inevitable collapse of the health care system in the Soviet Union. This transformation,…… [Read More]

References

Balabanova, D., Haerpfer, C., McKee, M., Pomerleau, J., Rose, R. (2004). Health service utilization in the former Soviet Union: evidence from eight countries. Health Services Research

Barr, D.A. And Mark G. (1996). The Current State of Health Care in the Former Soviet Union: Implications for Health Care Policy and Reform. American Journal of Public Health. 86, 3.

Lewis, M. (2002). Informal Health Payments in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union: Issues, Trends and Policy Implications. In Funding Health Care, European Observatory on Health Care Systems Series, edited by E. Mossialos, a. Dixon, J. Figueras, and J. Kutzin, pp. 184-205. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Mikesell, J.L. And Mullins, D.R. (2001), Reforming Budget Systems in Countries of the Former Soviet Union. Public Administration Review. 61. 5.
View Full Essay

Health Promotion

Words: 3496 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28197192

Health Promotion

The absence of illness does not thoroughly explain "Health", it can as well be described as wellness of the body and mind. More technically, health can be defined from two perspectives -- bodily and psychological health. A state of well-being due to regular exercises, adequate nutrition, sufficient rest, sensitivity to signs of sickness and when to seek help is referred to as Physical health. A person's fitness is showcased by his/her body make-up, cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular stability, and adaptability. Mental wellness refers to psychological and emotional welfare.

As defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO), mental health is "a state of wellness in which an individual discovers and harnesses his abilities, make headways regardless of stress encountered in life, can complete tasks adequately and profitably with substantial end product, and also contributes immensely to the uplift of his or her locality." (Nordqvist, 2015). A means of enabling people…… [Read More]

References

Boundless, 2016. Research Methods for Evaluating Treatment Efficacy - Boundless Open Textbook. Boundless. Available at: https://www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/treating-psychological-disorders-19/introduction-to-the-treatment-of-psychological-disorders-99/research-methods-for-evaluating-treatment-efficacy-382-12917/ [Accessed June 27, 2017].

Brassai, L, Piko, B, & Steger, M 2011, 'Meaning in Life: Is It a Protective Factor for Adolescents' Psychological Health?', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 18, 1, p. 44, Advanced Placement Source, EBSCOhost, viewed 27 June 2017.

Cuijpers, P. et al., 2014. EU-Compass for Action on Mental Health and Well-being. PREVENTION OF DEPRESSION AND PROMOTION OF RESILIENCE. Available at: https://ec.europa.eu/health/sites/health/files/mental_health/docs/ev_20161006_co03_en.pdf [Accessed June 27, 2017].

Gillham, J.E. et al., 2012. Preventing Depression in Early Adolescent Girls: The Penn Resiliency and Girls in Transition Programs. Handbook of Prevention and Intervention Programs for Adolescent Girls, pp.124 -- 161.
View Full Essay

Health Administration

Words: 16307 Length: 59 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95887639

Health Administration

The purpose of this study is to show that there are many reasons why nurses leave their profession, but that financial reasons often rank very high on their list of concerns. Managed care issues and job dissatisfaction also play large roles in the minds of nurses when they decide to seek employment elsewhere. A review of current and pertinent literature indicates that most nurses are leaving because they are unhappy with pay and working conditions. These same reasons are cited by many of those who have considered being nurses and then changed their minds.

An analysis of the relevant data indicates that this trend is continuing and that nurses are much more put upon and underpaid than they used to be. This is not because they are being paid less, but because their salaries have not risen through the years like the salaries of other professions, and because…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aiken, L., et al. (2002, October). Hospital Nurse Staffing and Patient Mortality, Nurse Burnout, and Job Dissatisfaction. JAMA. 288(16): 1987-1993.

Aiken L., et al. (2001, May/June). Nurses' Reports on Hospital Care in Five Countries. Health Affairs. 20(3):43-53.

Beu, Burke. (2002). Nursing Issues. The Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses. Retrieved October 14, 2003, at http://www.aorn.org/journal/2002/novhpi.htm

Hofmann, M.A. (2001). Patient rights bill gains momentum; Senate set to begin debate this week. Business Insurance, 35, 1.
View Full Essay

Health Care Systems Management as

Words: 9550 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98461776

The infant mortality rate is of 8.97 deaths per 1,000 live births. This rate places Kuwait on the 160th position on the chart of the CIA. The adult prevalence rate of HIV / AIDS is of 0.1 per cent.

In terms of economy, Kuwait is a relatively open, small and wealthy economy. It relies extensively on oil exports -- petroleum exports for instance account for 95 per cent of the total export revenues as well as for 95 per cent of the federal income. The Kuwaiti representatives have recently set the goal of increasing the oil production per day. Currently, Kuwait is facing the pressures of the internationalized economic crisis -- which however, due to recent economic surpluses in Kuwait, affects the economy to a lower extent.

Simultaneously with the increase in oil production, the Kuwaiti authorities are also focusing on diversifying the economic activities in the sense of supporting…… [Read More]

References:

Agency, Kuwait News. "Blair's "Kuwait Vision." 15 March 2010. Zawya.com. .

Al-Ansari, H. And S. AL-Enezi. "Health Sciences Libraries in Kuwait." Bulletin of the Medical Library Association 89.3 (2001): 287-93.

Al-Awadhi, Olusi, Al-Saeid, Moussa, et.al. "Incidence of Musculoskeletal Pain in Adult Kuwaitis." Annals of Saudi Medicine 25.6 (2005): 459=62.

Al-Baho, A. "Resident's Guide to the Curriculum for Training in Family Medicine." December 2008. Kuwait Institute for Medical Specialization. .
View Full Essay

Health Weight and Society the

Words: 2114 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24641455

It is imperative to persuade children to go outside and play and to educate them about exercise. They have to learn that there is such a thing as too much or too little. The best thing one can do for their kids is to take walks because it's beneficial to their health (the Media, 2007). Although a good argument can be made that it is not the media that leads women to get eating disorders and that it is instead society that perpetuates this, I think it could be said that one goes hand in hand with the other.

The manner that the main stream media portrays women in the images that they depict has a definite influence on the way that women feel and how they believe that they need to look like. There is a constant barrage of overly think women seen in advertisements that lead women to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coakley, Tedra. 2007, "Eating disorders no longer discriminate," viewed November 24, 2010,

< http://www.iccjournal.biz/eating_disorders_no_longer_discr.htm>

"Cultural Roles." 2007, viewed 24 November 2010, < http://www.something-

fishy.org/cultural/roles.php>
View Full Essay

Health of Native Americans the

Words: 695 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94179257



As to the availability of safe and clean water supplies, and safe waste disposal facilities, Native Peoples are again on the short end of the stick. About twelve percent of Native People do not have adequate supplies of fresh drinking water and dependable waste facilities while only one percent of the general American population do not have those needed facilities (Indian Health Services).

The U.S. Commission on Civil rights reports that the rates Native Americans are dying resulting from diabetes, alcoholism, suicide, unintentional injuries and other health conditions is "shocking" (www.USCCR.gov). Going back to the arrival of the Europeans on the North American Continent, many diseases were brought to the Native Peoples which were "far more lethal than any weapon in the European arsenal" so anyone even preliminarily examining the health care history of Native Peoples can clearly see that this dilemma has been a plague for Indians (www.USCCR.gov). The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population. Retrieved April 14, 2009, from  http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/faststats/indfacts.htm .

Indian Health Services. (2006). Facts on Indian Health Disparities. Retrieved April 14,

2009, from http://www.americanindianhealth.nim.nih.gov.

United States Commission on Civil Rights. (2004). Broken Promises: Evaluating the Native American Health Care System. Retrieved April 15, 2009, from  http://www.usccr.gov/pubs/nahealth/nabroken.pdf .
View Full Essay

Healthcare the Population That Was

Words: 2597 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 211164

He is made at himself for not coming to terms with himself earlier in life and he is mad at himself for spending so much time "giving his love" to people - men -- who didn't deserve it. He says that if he could go back, he would go to school, he would embrace who he is, he would be honest with family about his sexuality, and he would have found a spiritual life sooner. Bruce is quite spiritual now. He is no longer Baptist, but rather he has taken up belief in the tenets of Buddhism, which he claims has brought him much peace inside as well as has made him more tolerant of others -- including whites.

One interesting fact about Bruce is that he says that he has never had a very strong identity to gay men either -- whether they are white or black. He seems…… [Read More]

Gay Men of African Descent (GMAD). (2010). Gay men of African Descent. Accessed on October 28, 2010: http://www.gmad.org/index.html

Sue, D.W., & Sue, D. (1999). Counseling the culturally different: Theory and practice

(3rd ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
View Full Essay

Health Care -- Information Networks

Words: 1899 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15650243

Careful planning is vital due to the first 9 lessons listed here, that BI solutions: must probably be purchased by multiple providers; requires company it specialists who are well-versed in up-to-date BI solutions; are expensive; are time-consuming; take meaningful intra-company education; require the work of a consequential number of company personnel; should involve only necessary outsourcing with an eye toward educating personnel; require anticipation of change and willingness to adjust; can substantially increase productivity while reducing costs.

3. Conclusion

The Marchfield Clinic and Exclusive Resorts cases offer a number of Business Intelligence lessons, ten of which are discussed in this paper. Even without considerable it education and experience, the researcher learns that: businesses must often use Business Intelligence products from more than one company; a company's internal Information Technology specialists must know the state of the art; implementation of the Business Intelligence solutions is expensive; implementation can be quite time-consuming…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Electrosmart Ltd. (2013). Barriers to Business Intelligence. Retrieved May 6, 2013 from thebusinessintelligenceguide.com Web site:   http://thebusinessintelligenceguide.com/bi_strategy/Barriers_To_BI.php  

Imhoff, C. (2005, September 13). Business Intelligence project pitfalls. Retrieved May 6, 2013 from www.b-eye-network.com Web site:   http://www.b-eye-network.com/view/1519  

Konitzer, K., & Cummens, M. (2011, July 11). Case study - using analytics to improve patient outcomes and billing accuracy at Marshfield Clinic. Retrieved May 6, 2013 from tdwi.org Web site: http://tdwi.org/articles/2011/07/11/case-study-using-analytics-to-improve-patient-outcomes-and-billing-accuracy-at-marshfield-clinic.aspx

Mantfeld, F. (2010, March 22). Top 10 reasons by Business Intelligence projects fail. Retrieved May 6, 2013 from www.seemoredata.com Web site:   http://www.seemoredata.com/en/entry.php?12-Top-10-reasons-why-Business-Intelligence-Projects-fail
View Full Essay

U S Health Care System Is a Series

Words: 1314 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97821353

U.S. Health Care System is a series of geographically-determined networks. Established according to American beliefs and values, the system provides essentially two models of health care: the Market Justice Model, based on free enterprise and individual responsibility and ability/willingness to pay; the Social Justice Model, based on the public and equitable provision of basic health care services to all members. The two models are often in conflict with each other, with the Market Justice Model currently being the primary model.

Definition of a Health Care System

A "Health Care System" is commonly defined as "the complete network of agencies, facilities, and all providers of health care in a specified geographic area" (Mosby, 2008). Given that very broad definition, the United States has health care systems spanning such geographical areas as the entire nation, states, counties, cities, towns, villages and neighborhoods.

Implications of Beliefs and Values on a Health Care System…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Daniels, N. (2001). Justice, health and health care. Retrieved on June 9, 2012 from www.hsph.harvard.edu Web site: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/benchmark/ndaniels/pdf/justice_health.pdf

Mosby. (2008). Mosby's Medical Dictionary, 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Shi, L., & Singh, D.A. (2010). Essentials of the U.S. Health Care System, 2nd ed. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Surowiecki, J. (2009, August 31). Status-quo anxiety. Retrieved on June 9, 2012 from www.newyorker.com Web site: http://www.newyorker.com/talk/financial/2009/08/31/090831ta_talk_surowiecki
View Full Essay

Emerging Standards of Care Mental Health Cultural Competence

Words: 2289 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2653470

Standards of Care/Mental Health/Cultural Competence

EMEGING STANDADS OF CAE/MENTAL HEALTH/CULTUAL

Sometime in 1999, the Surgeon General released Mental Health: A eport of the Surgeon General. Inside this report, it acknowledged that not every Americans, particularly minorities, are getting the equal mental health treatment, a discovery that provoked the Surgeon General to give out a supplemental report on differences in mental health care for individuals of color (Donini-Lenhoff, 2006). The addition, which was available in 2001, sends out one obvious message: culture does actually count. Cultural competency is considered to be one the vital ingredients in closing the differences hole in health care. It is looked as the way patients and doctors are able to come together and then talk about health issues without cultural differences stopping the conversation, nonetheless improving it. Fairly simply, health care services that are deferential of and receptive to the health beliefs, practices and cultural and…… [Read More]

References

Choi, H.M. (2006). ETHNIC DIFFERENCES IN ADOLESCENTS' MENTAL DISTRESS, SOCIAL STRESS, AND RESOURCES. Adolescence, 41(126), 263-83.

Donini-Lenhoff, F. (2006). HEALTH: Cultural competence in the health professions; insuring a juniform standard of care. The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, 65(45), 45.

Furler, J. & . (2012). Mental health: Cultural competence. Australian Family Physician, 39(5), 206-8.

Sawrikar, P. & . (2013). The relationship between mental health, cultural identity and cultural values in non-english speaking background (NESB) australian adolescents. Behaviour Change, 21(3), 97-113.
View Full Essay

Reflection Public Preferences and Health Care

Words: 1004 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76564057

Pesonal Values Spiitual Beliefs and Health Cae Policy

I have taken up the majoity of values beliefs fom my paents. I value peace as a citical facto in people's lives. People should show goodwill to othes while tying to limit the conflict unless with absolute necessity. Individuals should have some fom of love within thei life. I believe that loving oneself allows people to adoe to fellow humans. Futhe, showing cae to natue involves engaging in sustainable activities that potect all ceatues. The love fo someone o something and eceiving love in etun indicates a level of espect. Ease aises when people feel that thee is a need to be modeate and balance life's offeings (Sooka & Wlezien, 2010). I believe that the equality between female and male aspects and evil and good ae integal phenomena. I value espect fo life and embace divesity that the wold offes. Inceased divesity…… [Read More]

references and Health Care Spending in the U.S. And UK. British Journal of Politics and International Relations 5 (4): 576-93.
View Full Essay

Milo's Framework Modern Healthcare Is'so Complex

Words: 673 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55552813

Milo's Framework

Modern healthcare is so complex, so rife with new technologies, new procedures, and new expectations from stakeholders, that the contemporary nurse and physician need all the tools possible to pull for varied situations. Milo's framework is a set of propositions that help frame strategies to improve health inducing behaviors by enhancing personal choice-making while still in the context of societal and cultural expectations. Milo posits that the health status of populations at any given time is essentially the result of individual choice. However, the choices that individuals have tend to be limited by what the individual perceives to be options, depending on their personal and cultural/societal background, not necessarily the choices that are really available. In fact, Milo says, "Most people, most of the time will make the easiest choices, i.e., will do the things, develop the patterns or life-styles, which seem to cost them less and/or from…… [Read More]

Cody, M., ed. (2012). Philosophical and Theoretical Perspectives for Advanced Nursing Practice. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett.

Milo, N. (1976). A framework for prevention: changing health-damaging to health-generating life patterns. American Journal of Public Health. 66 (5): 439-9. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1653306/ 

Citation, not plagiarized.
View Full Essay

Selecting a Planning Model for Childhood Obesity

Words: 599 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62541086

Obesity

A brief explanation of the public health need you identified.

Childhood obesity is an increasingly prevalent problem in our homes, schools and in the United States as a whole. ith obesity comes a host of health risks including heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and a significantly shorter lifespan. This is why early intervention in critical.

Describe the population whom you plan to target for your public health program and explain why.

Early intervention should take the form of addressing obesity in your elementary school aged children. It is at this age that health behaviors become habit-forming and more difficult to break. Additionally, because it appears that younger people are ever more susceptible to obesity, it is critical to take corrective action now.

Describe potential sources of funding.

Funding will largely be elicited through the combined support of government grant programs aimed at reducing childhood obesity and private companies such as…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2011). Health People 2020. CDC.gov.

Primary Text. (?). Planning a Health Promotion Program. .
View Full Essay

Social Ecology Model Social Ecology Requires That

Words: 955 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16841716

Social Ecology Model

Social ecology requires that people see that nature and society are intertwined by progress into one environment that is made up of two differences. The first difference being biotic nature and the second being human nature. Human nature and biotic nature split an evolutionary prospective for better prejudice and elasticity. Nature is the manner in which people are flexible, extremely intellectual primates that occupy the natural world. In other words, individuals generate an atmosphere that is most appropriate for their manner of survival. In this case, human nature is no different from the atmosphere that each animal, contingent upon its aptitudes, generates as well as acclimates to, the biophysical conditions or eco community in which it lives. On this extremely basic level, people are, in fact, doing nothing that varies from the endurance actions of nonhumans (Bookchin, 2001).

The SEM is made up of several levels wrapped…… [Read More]

References

Bookchin, Murray. (2001). What Is Social Ecology? Retrieved December 11, 2010, from Web site:  http://dwardmac.pitzer.edu/Anarchist_Archives/bookchin/socecol.html 

Innovative Pediatric Nursing Role: Public Health Nurses in Child Welfare: Theoretical Framework for Health Case Management Role. (2006). Retrieved December 11, 2010, from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/543725_4

Social Ecological Model. (n.d.). Retrieved December 11, 2010, from Web site:  http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/cpns/Documents/Network-Appendix6SocialEcologicalModel.pdf
View Full Essay

Dorothea Orem's Self-Care Model of Nursing Care Theory

Words: 1739 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99679628

Dorothea Orem and her Self-Care Model of Nursing Theory

Born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1914, Dorothea Orem went on to become a much-revered nursing leader in the United States, innovating, developing and teaching her self-care model up until her death in 2007. Her self-care model is in great use today and is the subject of this paper. Orem received her nursing diploma in 1939 (from Providence Hospital) and in 1945 she received her M.S. In nursing education from Catholic University of America (Sitzman, et al., 2010, p. 93). During her career, Orem worked as a staff nurse, a private duty nurse, a faculty member in a nursing college, a consultant and an administrator, Sitzman explains on page 93.

Orem's Self-Care Model

"Communication is the key to positive health results, particularly for patients with low literacy skills, yet few studies have examined patients' ability to converse about healthy information taught to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Callaghan, Donna. (2006). Basic Conditioning Factors' Influences on Adolescents' Healthy

Behaviors, Self-Efficacy, and Self-Care. Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing,

29(4), 191-204.

Current Nursing. (2011). Dorothea Orem's Self-Care Theory. Retrieved June 25, 2011, from  http://currentnursing.com /nursing_theory/self_care_deficit_theory.html.
View Full Essay

Health Care Free Should Health Care Be

Words: 2025 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86146718

Health Care Free

SHOULD HEALTH CAE BE FEE?

The following debate takes place between four individuals as follows: Dr. Barker, a public health sector physician with an experience of fifteen years; Ms. Gomez, a social activist working for improving opportunities and living conditions for immigrants to the United States; Mr. Walters, a journalist who writes on social and political issues in several newspapers and self-professed atheist; and Mr. Bucelli, a modern poet and novelist with strong humanist inclinations. All four are residents of the Green Springs Community and are recognized members of the community. The debate takes place at the community hall where the debaters are taking part in the annual debate challenge where they have been given the topic Should health care be free? Ms. Gomez and Mr. Bucelli support the proposition that health care should be free for all residents whereas Dr. Barker and Mr. Walters are against…… [Read More]

References

Abelson, Reed. "Health Insurance Costs Rising Sharply This Year, Study Shows." The New York Times. 27 September 2011: Web. 24 Sep. 2012. < http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/28/business/health-insurance-costs-rise-sharply-this-year-study-shows.html?pagewanted=all&_moc.semityn.www>.

Ball, James, and Denis Campbell. "More Patients Waiting Too Long for NHS Treatment." The Guardian. 14 July 2011: Web. 24 Sep. 2012. .

Bialik, Carl. "The unhealthy accounting of uninsured Americans." Wall Street Journal. 24 June 2009: Web. 24 Sep. 2012. .

CBS News. "The debate Over Health Care." CBS News. 20 June 2009: Web. 24 Sep. 2012. .
View Full Essay

Health Care Debate

Words: 1666 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97328207

health care debate that has been going in the United States. It discusses the Obama Care Act and how it impacts the society. Functionalist perspectives and theories are utilized in analyzing the situation and what outcomes are expected. The major themes and concepts of the functionalist theory are discussed in detail.

The Health Care reform proposed by the Obama Administration has long been the area of debate in America and in countries all over the world. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act go on to cut down the number of people who are not insured. It requires small businesses to provide medical insurance to all the people working in the business. The employers are obliged to provide a good quality medical insurance. Failure of the small business to provide a good health care system will result in a penalty for any employee that goes uninsured. This act applies to…… [Read More]

References

Berkman, L. et al. (2000) from social integration to health: Durkheim in the new millennium. Social Science & Medicine 51 (2000), 51 p.843-857.

Gerhardt, U. (1979) The Parsonian paradigm and the identity of medical sociology. The Sociological Review, 27 (2), p.229-251.

Napsha, J. (2011) Small Business Owners Fret over Health Care Law's Fallout . Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, 24th March.

Unknown. (2012) Supreme Court Ruling Dooms Small Business; Obamacare Increases Taxes and Red Tape Burden . The Washington Times, 29th June.
View Full Essay

Healthcare Has Been Moving From a Total

Words: 980 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65357474

healthcare has been moving from a total "organic" model to a more holistic viewpoint of the patient and their individual needs. Healthcare professionals have come to realize that within any organization, nothing is ever in isolation. Research has shown us many things that can be improved using the holistic and multi-cultural models, as well as the direction(s) we are suggesting with our new program. Clearly, the empirical research shows us that there are many modifiers that can create illness, modify illness patterns, contribute to healing, and act in a preventative manner (Adler, 1994). This is particularly true when dealing with chronic diseases like AIDS. Specialized AIDS units within a modern healthcare facility offer a team of experts who are familiar with the various permutations of the disease and who have greater responsibility and autonomy within the nursing staff. This should, in theory, increase both objective and subjective outcomes for the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adler, N., et.al. (1994), "Health Psychology: Why do Some People Get Sick and Some

Stay Well?," Annual Review of Psychology, 45. http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/oi/abs/10.1146/annurev.ps.45.020194.001305

Aiken, L., Sloan, D. (1997). Effects of Specialization and Client Differentiation on the Status of Nurses: The Case of AIDS. Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 38 (3): 203-22.

Chow, M.k, et al. (2010). The benefits of using a mixed methods approach -- quantitative with qualitative -- to identify client satisfaction and unmet needs in an HIV healthcare centre. AIDS Care. 22-94): 491-98.
View Full Essay

Healthcare System in the United

Words: 5160 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81713320

However, despite the development of these exemplary healthcare capacities, the UAE's system continued to suffer during this timeframe from a perception among the population that it lacked quality (Kronfel, 1999).

It cannot be discounted that the public may perceive the UAE's healthcare system as lacking in quality because the system does in fact have many developmental issues left to resolve. For example, a study by Margolis (2002) found that as healthcare rapidly expanded in the 1990s, statistically significant numbers of incidents of inappropriate medicine prescription also increased. This finding gave some validity to the concern about quality. However, the majority of the studies reviewed indicated that the UAE's healthcare system was comparable to the healthcare systems in most other developed and developing nations. For example, Margolis et al. (2003) conducted a survey analysis of elderly in the U.S. And the UAE and found that the system of elderly care in…… [Read More]

World Health Organization, (2000). The World Health Organization's ranking of the world's health systems. [24 August, 2009]. Retrieved from  http://www.photius.com/rankings/healthranks.html  (15 January 2010).

Wuyi, W., Ribang, L., Yongfeng, L., Linsheng, Y., and Jianan, T. (2004). "Regional comprehensive assessment on environmental health of China," Journal of Geographical Sciences 14(2): 187-192.

Ypinazar V., and Margolis, S., (2006). "Delivering culturally sensitive care: the perceptions of older Arabian Gulf Arabs concerning religion, health, and disease." Qualitaitive Health Research, 16(6): 773-787.
View Full Essay

Healthcare Law

Words: 1774 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68014946

Third Party Patient

The Doctrine of Apparent Agency

Scenario:

June, a 34-year-old divorced woman diagnosed with severe anorexia, is hospitalized. Her doctors feel she may need to be placed on a feeding tube soon to save her life. Initially June agreed to the feeding tube. However, in the evening (before the tube has been placed), she became combative, disoriented, and refused to have the feeding tube placed. Her mother and father insisted that the feeding tube be inserted despite her refusal to allow it. Her ex-husband wishes to uphold June's decision. The hospital administrators seek risk management for legal counsel.

Explain how the Patient Bill of ights applies to this situation.

The Patient Bill of ights articulates U.S. federal law on the doctor-patient relationship, and is consistent with laws on informed consent where licensed professional practice respective to patient well being is in order. Confidentiality of patient record is perhaps…… [Read More]

References

Bullough, B. ed. The Law and the expanding nursing role. New York, NY: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1980.

Callahan, Joan, ed. Ethical Issues in Profesional Life. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Patient Bill of Rights (2010). NIH. Retrieved from: http://www.cc.nih.gov/participate/patientinfo/legal/bill_of_rights.shtml

How is shared decision-making different from informed consent? (2010) American Cancer Society. Retrieved from: http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/FindingandPayingforTreatment/UnderstandingFinancialandLegalMatters/InformedConsent/informed-consent-shared-decision-making
View Full Essay

Healthcare and Information Technologies Nursing Colleges' Vital Course Offerings

Words: 1866 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36854286

Nursing Health Care Informatics

"…At the beginning of the 21st century, nursing informatics has become a part of our professional activities…[and has] advanced the field of nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as a science…" (Saba, 2001, 177).

Nursing Health Care informatics relate to and address technology and other cutting edge issues of great interest in the healthcare field. According to the AMIA, Nursing Informatics is the "…science and practice (that) integrates nursing, its information and knowledge, with management of information and communication technologies to promote the health of people, families, and communities worldwide." New and relevant knowledge presented in the genre of informatics helps to empower nurses and other healthcare practitioners to deliver the most effective patient-center care possible. This paper presents several informatics in the belief that applying healthcare technologies and practices that are genuinely progressive and helpful to today's nurse is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AMIA (2009) Working Group Nursing Informatics. Retrieved March 9, 2014, from http://www.amia.org.

An, J.Y., Hayman, L.L., Panniers, T., and Carty, B. (2007). Theory Development in Nursing

And Healthcare Informatics. A Model explaining and Predicting Information and Communication Technology Acceptance by Healthcare Consumers. Advances in Nursing Science, 30(3), E37-E49.

Cipriano, P.F. (2011). The Future of Nursing and Health IT. Nursing Economics, 29(5).
View Full Essay

Health Research Study Also in

Words: 2256 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50907217

Individuals who use this coping style tend to be less depressed and more satisfied with their lives. (Kulich, et al. 1998)

Slide 12

High El students were able to use their social skills to access their social network in coping with their stress. They were able to use interpersonal skills to address stressful conflicts with colleagues and patients.

Low El students tended to procrastinate and withdraw from their social support network.

Interpersonal skills are recommended as ideal skills in a good dentist and discussing problems with other per-sons involved has been cited as a coping strategy for stress in practising dentist. (Lundh, et al. 2001)

Slide 13

High El students were able to judge that such behaviours were not helpful. Health-damaging behaviours such as tobacco and alcohol consumption

Adopting health-damaging lifestyles or behaviours was reported by low El students in response to their experiences of stress.

The use of drugs…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Forrest WR. 1978. 'Stresses and Self-Destructive Behaviours of Dentists'. Dental Clinics of North America. 22: 361-371.

Firth-Cozens, Jenny and Roy L. Payne, eds. 1999. Stress in Health Professionals: Psychological and Organisational Causes and Interventions. Chichester, England: John Wiley & Sons.

Goleman D. 1995. Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. New York: Bantam.

Goleman, D., R. Boyatzis, and A. McKee. 2002. Primal Leadership. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
View Full Essay

Healthcare Service Programs Have Been Continually Evolving

Words: 2092 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12998037

healthcare service programs have been continually evolving to meet the needs stakeholders. The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS), is focusing on helping those individuals who are suffering from these conditions. They are conducting an evaluation study to determine the best way to provide various kinds of solutions to the public. This is designed to offer everyone with services that are meeting their social, health and human resource needs. (Chen, n.d.)

To achieve these objectives there is a focus on conducting a study on its Information esource Center (IC). This was achieved by completing a number of steps in the process. The most notable include: understanding the political / organizational environment, defining the relationship between evaluator / sponsor, determining the levels of evaluation, gathering reconnaissance, engaging stakeholders, describing the program and concentrating on what lessons were learned. These different areas are providing executives with an understanding of how to achieve the…… [Read More]

References

Chen. (n.d.). Program Evaluation to Help Stakeholders.
View Full Essay

Healthcare Providers and Religion

Words: 2053 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92056329

Spiritual care in the past was not considered to be a part of medicine. However, over time both holistic nursing and the health movement have become increasingly involved with the assessment of the patient's religious needs and care. In every day lives, a lot of patients who enter the hospital have strong spiritual beliefs and want to be treated in the same way. There are also cases that a doctor might not belong to the same religious belief as of the patient so it becomes more difficult for him/her to fulfill the spiritual needs of the patient. Questions arise regarding the role of the nurses in these cases and whether they can fulfill these needs of the ill person (Spiritual Care: The Nurse's Role, n.d.). Identifying this role of the nurses does not mean that the hospital is devaluing the pastor's or the minister's role in the community. It simply…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bullen, L. (1994). Buddhism: A Method of Mind Training. Retrieved from www.accesstonight.org: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/bullen/bl042.html

Christian Worldview. (n.d.). Retrieved from All About Worldview: http://www.allaboutworldview.org/christian-worldview.htm

Christianity and History. (n.d.). Retrieved from www.allaboutworldview.com: http://www.allaboutworldview.org/christianity-and-history.htm

Davis, F. (2009). THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO STEVEN SEAGAL: BUDDHISM. Retrieved from www.marketfaith.org: http://www.marketfaith.org/non-christian-worldviews/the-gospel-according-to-steven-seagal-buddhism/
View Full Essay

Model Parental Training

Words: 3433 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82589844

Parental Training

Statistics show that incidences of juvenile criminal behavior are on the rise in the United States. In the year 2000, for example, over 2.3 million juveniles were arrested for various criminal offenses ranging from petty theft and drug abuse to crimes of violence. This figure alone represents a 64% increase from juvenile delinquency statistics from 1980. More disturbing is the fact that the greatest increases are in the areas of violent crime such as rapes, assaults and even homicide (Everett, Chadwell and Chesney 2002).

This trend did not happen overnight. Experts agree that the seeds of youth delinquency are planted at an early age, and that juvenile crime has complex socio-economic and psychological roots. Furthermore, many crime experts argue that delinquency is also the result of a combined failure of families, schools and the greater community.

This paper argues that many social difficulties, from delinquency in school to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cassel, Russell, Peter Chow, Donald F. DeMoulin and Robert C. Reiger. 2002. "Comparing the cognitive dissonance of 116 juvenile delinquent boys with that of 215 typical high school students." Education 121(3). ProQuest Database.

Everett, Charlie; Chadwell, Jason and McChesney, Jon. 2002. "Successful programs for at-risk youth." Journal of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. 73(9). Proquest Database.

Fontes, Lisa Aronson. 2002. "Child discipline and physical abuse in immigrant Latino families: Reducing violence and misunderstandings." Journal of Counseling and Development, 80(1): Winter. ProQuest Database.

Neeley, Steven. "The Psychological and Emotional Abuse of Children." Northern Kentucky Law Review. 2000. 27(4). EBSCO host database.
View Full Essay

Medication Compliance

Words: 1451 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99747909

Population and Global Health: Medication Adherence in Seniors

Assess the preventive and protective healthcare needs of a community of individuals, including emergency preparedness. Develop a plan for using behavioral change techniques to promote optimum health of a community, include culturally and spiritually sensitive care.

Describe the population/community you have chosen

The elderly are an incredibly high needs population when it comes to the field of professional medicine: they are consistently under-served and struggle very often to get even their most basic health needs met. One of the particular issues that prevents this population from staying healthy is the issue of medication adherence. A lack of proper medication adherence can cause a range of complicated issues and all of these issues are highly preventable: the individual just needs to stay on their medication. Medication adherence in seniors greater than 60 years of age is a primary factor for preventing serious complications…… [Read More]

References

Coughlin, T.A. (2006). The health care experiences of rural Medicaid beneficiaries. Journal of Health

Care for the Poor and Underserved, 17(3), 575-91.

Griffiths, R., Johnson, M., Piper, M., & Langdon, R. (2004). A nursing intervention for the quality use of medicines by the elderly clients. International Journal of Nursing Practice,

Griffiths, R., Johnson, M., Piper, M., & Langdon, R. (2004). A nursing intervention for the quality use of medicines by the elderly clients. International Journal of Nursing Practice,
View Full Essay

High-Risk Families How Can They Be Helpful

Words: 573 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95050708

high-isk families? How can they be helpful?

The different techniques that can identify high risk families include: intake, investigation, case planning and continuing services. Intake is when there is a focus on gathering information and understanding the problems. Investigation occurs after there are possible signs that someone could be in a high risk environment (i.e. physical marks and the person becomes withdrawn in social situations). Case planning is when different resources are gathered, to intervene and limit the impact of these conditions on the individual / family members. Continuing services is the point that health care workers are consistently monitoring the situation (to determine if there are any kinds of changes with the patient). ("Family Assessment in Child Welfare Services," 2005)

These tools are helpful in determining if a high risk situation exists. At the same time, they are focusing on identifying possible abuses and quickly rectifying them (utilizing a…… [Read More]

References

Family Assessment in Child Welfare Services. (2005). University of California at Berkeley. Retrieved from:  http://cssr.berkeley.edu/bassc/public/BASSC_FamilyAssessment_FULL_REPORT091406.pdf 

Health Promotion Model. (2012). Nursing Planet. Retrieved from:  http://nursingplanet.com/health_promotion_model.html 

Friedman, M. (2003). Family nursing: Research, Theory and Practice. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall

Pender, N. (2011). The Health Promotion Model. University of Michigan. Retrieved from: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/85350/1/HEALTH_PROMOTION_MANUAL_Rev_5-2011.pdf
View Full Essay

Interview of a Health Care Leader

Words: 2539 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74030797

Healthcare

The term health care refers to the inter-related system of care provided to persons during illness. In most of the cases, healthcare begins with the family doctor who refers patient to specialists if needed or directly order further diagnostic testing. Community health clinics perform the same procedure as a family doctor, but alongside with that, clinics also provide insight into patterns of health or illness seen within the community. Hospital just form one part of the healthcare community, as are mostly visited when a patient's condition is more acute and requires intervention by the hospitals high-end staff, since more can be done for him in a hospital rather than in a clinic where he is just an out-patient.

Clinics of various types provide very specific services, such as "pain management clinics" these clinics are targeted for towards people suffering from pain conditions. ehabilitation services also form a needed part…… [Read More]

References

DDI (2006) Health Care Global Comparison: Leadership Forecast 2005|2006. DDI, Pennsylvania.

DDI (2007) Leading the Past: Preparing the Future. DDI, Pennsylvania.

Fischer (2007) Culture and cultural analysis as experimental systems. Cultural Anthropology. 21(1) 1-65.

Greenfield D (2007) The enactment of dynamic leadership. Leadership in Health Sciences. 20(3) 159-168.
View Full Essay

Survey Data of Healthcare System

Words: 2050 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82318099

Healthcare System Survey Data

Healthcare System's Survey Data

This report uses the HCAHPS "(Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems)" scores (Medicare Gov, 2014 p1) to develop the strategic plan for the University of Alabama Hospital. The objective of analyzing the HCAHPS scores of the organization is to enhance an improvement for the hospital. The essence of the NCAHPS is to use the scores of the organization and compare them with hospitals that enroll for the Medicare. The results allow consumer to make objective and fair comparison about the hospital, and evaluate importance care received compared to the national or state standard.

Objective of this document is to use the HCAHPS scores of the University of Alabama Hospital to make the strategy plan and improve the entire organization. The outcomes of the document is to assist the hospital board to make a detailed strategic plan for the organization in…… [Read More]

Reference

Medicare Gov. (2014). Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting Program. Retrieved 19 October From http://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare/psych-measures.html#stateQQ

Appendices

Appendix 1: NCAHPS Scores for the University of Alabama Hospital

NCAHPS Scores for the University of Alabama Hospital
View Full Essay

Enemy of the People

Words: 2934 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17741930

Ibsen / Public Health

Write about the Public Health ethical issues involved in the play

An Enemy of the People is a play in five acts, which depicts a public health crisis in a small Norwegian town. The protagonist is Dr. Stockmann -- he is a physician in this town, and his brother Peter Stockmann is the mayor. As the first act begins, we hear the mayor talking with the newspaper editor Hovstad about the new "baths" which are nearly complete and which promise to attract a large tourist trade to the town. Meanwhile we learn that Dr. Stockmann has suspected these baths of being polluted -- he receives a letter with the results of laboratory analysis, confirming his suspicion. We also learn that Stockmann's own motivation here may come from a lingering resentment -- he reminds the mayor and the others that he himself had proposed a different drainage…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Becker, M.H.,Radius, S.M., & Rosenstock, I.M. (1978). Compliance with a medical regimen for asthma: a test of the health belief model, Public Health Reports, 93, 268-77.

Conner, M. & Norman, P. (1996). Predicting Health Behavior. Search and Practice with Social Cognition Models. Open University Press: Ballmore: Buckingham.

Glanz, K., Rimer, B.K. & Lewis, F.M. (2002). Health Behavior and Health Education. Theory, Research and Practice. San Fransisco: Wiley & Sons.

Glanz, K., Marcus Lewis, F. & Rimer, B.K. (1997). Theory at a Glance: A Guide for Health Promotion Practice. National Institute of Health.
View Full Essay

Emotional Management and Personality as

Words: 3825 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32536421

The first point addressed by Clark's review determines that a fundamental change in medical perspective had begun to transpire with the assumption of varying clinical research investigations on the subject.

This would contribute to what Clark identifies as a major shift in the way that physicians had begun to perceive and treat terminal illness. As opposed to a cut and dry preparation of the patient for the certainty of death, Clark points to a juncture in the mid to late 20th century at which medical professionals had begun to adopt "an active rather than a passive approach to the care of dying people was promoted in which the fatalistic resignation of the doctor ('there is nothing more we can do') was supplanted by a determination to find new and imaginative ways to continue caring up to the end of life." (Clark, 2002) In addition to serving as a fundamental motivation…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Clark, D. (2002). Between hope and acceptance: the medicalisation of dying. The British Medical Journal, 324, p. 905-907.

Eckholm, E. (1991). The price of hope: Medicine's Disputed Frontier. The New York

Times. Retrieved April 8th, 2008 from http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE6D6173AF93AA2575AC

0A967958260>.
View Full Essay

African-American Female Obesity

Words: 1847 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26794483

Obesity is a serious social problem in America. The effects of obesity in childhood are well documented in both the social science literature and medical journals. During the last 30 years, the percentage of obese children between the ages of 6 and 11 has risen 200% while the percentage of obese children between 12 and 19 has tripled (CDC, Preventing Childhood Obesity, 2010). Obesity in the nited States has increased among all cohorts and ethnicities, spans across generations, and is not limited to income or educational levels. However, the incidence of obesity among African-American women is of particular concern given the prevalence and severity of the issue in America.

Public health issue

More than two-thirds of Americans are now obese or overweight (Ogden et al., 2010).

Rates of adult obesity now exceed 20% in 49 states and D.C and 25% in 40 states. By way of comparison, in 1991, rates…… [Read More]

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2011). Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Vital Signs: Prevalence, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension -- United States, 1999 -- 2002 and 2005 -- 2008

Ward, S., Gray, A., Paranjape, A. (2008). African-Americans' perceptions of physician attempts to address obesity in the primary care setting. The Journal of General Internal Medicine, 24(5), 579-584.

Coenen, K.R., Hasty, A.H. (2007). Obesity potentiates development of fatty liver and insulin resistance, but not atherosclerosis, in high-fat diet-fed agouti LDLR-deficient mice. Retrieved from:  http://ajpendo.physiology.org/content/293/2/E492.short
View Full Essay

Effects on Public Health of Health Care Reform

Words: 5200 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40260343

Health Care eform Effecting Public Health United States

Healthcare reform is an integral part of the United States healthcare system. Below is an evaluation of the effects healthcare reform has had on healthcare in the U.S. Internet sources as well as peer-reviewed journals will be looked at so as to see the effects.

The cost of healthcare has been on the rise. Issues of healthcare quality ought to be paid attention to and healthcare access equity improved upon (Health Care Transformation). Given these causes, while some differences exist on what reforms to carry out, a majority of Americans hold the belief that the U.S. Healthcare delivery systems need some improving. For a long time ANA has been advocating for reforms in healthcare and several of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provisions are in line with the Health System eform Agenda of the ANA. The ANA gave a chart that gives…… [Read More]

References"

1)

Kemp, C. (2012, October 11). Public Health in the Age of Health Care Reform. Retrieved January 21, 2015, from  http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2012/12_0151.htm 

2)

How National Health Care Reform Will Affect a Variety of States. (2011, April 5). Retrieved January 21, 2015, from  http://www.rand.org/news/press/2011/04/05.html
View Full Essay

Case Study Health Promotion

Words: 1068 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56119023

Health Promotion Case Study

In this scenario the individual has been asked by a local law firm to come into the organization and establish a wellness program to promote the health of its employees. The firm includes a team of 20 lawyers, 3 managers, 45 paralegals, 5 administrative assistants, 2 information technologists and 4 part-time housekeeping and maintenance staff. The partners agreed last year to install a fully equipped gym in their building because otherwise they would receive a discount on the health insurance if 85% of the employees were participating in the gym at least an average of 90 minutes a week. At the time of renewal of the health care benefits package, the organization was disqualified from the discount because only approximately 10% of the employees were participating in the gym. This case involves a solution for engaging more of the law firm employees in health promotion activities…… [Read More]

References

Wieczner, J (2013) Your Company Wants to Make You Healthy. The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved from: SB10001424127887323393304578360252284151378

Gaines, M. (2012) How to Motivate Employees to Exercise. Chron. Retrieved from: http://work.chron.com/motivate-employees-exercise-1860.html

Garity, C. (nd) Corporate Fitness and Active Aging. Retrieved from: http://wellness.nifs.org/blog/bid/39826/Corporate-Fitness-Programs-Can-Motivate-Employees-to-Exercise-at-Work
View Full Essay

Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Allows Nursing Students Into

Words: 1709 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 945156

Evidence-based nursing practice allows nursing students into developing an understanding of evaluation methods for healthcare research and integrating their findings into practice for he improvement of their practice, education and management of nursing practice. It is a learning method, which introduces nursing students into the process of using evidence in their practice. The nursing practice and handling of patients demand the best practices from nurses (Williams, & Wilkins, 2008). These are achievable through research and the research findings must be availed to nurses for use in their daily practices. However, the challenge of such results is that nurses and nursing students do not easily understand the terminologies used in researches, on most occasions (American Psychological Association, 2009). Therefore, it is important making sure that nurses and students gain adequate knowledge for understanding and critically appraising research for the identification of the best practices found within researches.

For the success of…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Ed.). Washington, D.C

Cronin, P., Coughlan, M., & Ryan, F. (2007). Step-by step guide to critiquing research. Part 1: quantitative research. Mark Allen Publishing Ltd. British Journal of Nursing, Vol. 16, No 11

Griffin, R.A., Polit, D. R, & Byrne, M.W. (2007). Nurse characteristics and inferences about children's pain. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Williams, L. & Wilkins. (2008). Wolters Kluwer Health.
View Full Essay

Message Strategies for Getting the

Words: 1305 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26472784

Number 5 is a cue to action, incenting the mother by reminding her that either she or her baby could be a victim with out proper medical care.

Informed Decision-Making Messaging Strategy

Informed decision-making interventions should be used when persuasion would be inappropriate (Communication for health. Examples include when the evidence is not sufficiently clear to support one behavior over another (e.g., surgical removal vs. watchful waiting for men with a diagnosis of prostate cancer), when an individual's values must be taken into consideration to determine the optimal behavior (prevention of sexual assault), or when society has been unable to reach consensus about the optimal recommended behavior (e.g., prevention of teen pregnancy) (Communication for health). Instead of providing evidence that prenatal care can save lives, it relies on the mother wanting to do the right thing and uses a woman who has lost her child to convince her.

You need…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Communication for health. Encyclopedia of public health. http://www.enotes.com/public-health-encyclopedia/communication-health

Evans W.D. And McCormack, L. (2006, September 13). Marketing "evidence" to healthcare consumers: Applying social marketing to evidence about the harms and benefits of pharmaceuticals. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Conference. http://209.85.173.132/search?q=cache:mTQf4SGTS2gJ:effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/documents/Marketing_Evidence_Evans.ppt+social+marketing+%22Informed+decision+making%22&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=6&gl=us

Health Belief Model. University of Twente. http://www.cw.utwente.nl/theorieenoverzicht/Theory%20clusters/Health%20Communication/Health_Belief_Model.doc/

Gosik. A. (2007, October 12). U.S. ranks 41st in maternal mortality. Seattle Post-Intelligencer
View Full Essay

Message Strategy Maternal and Infant

Words: 660 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91130136

Indeed, the Model is an appropriate way to gain a better understanding of what causes people to make certain health behavior decisions, such as those which are likely to have caused pregnant women to bypass regular medical attention or to have failed to take the necessary lifestyle precautions during pregnancy to protect her health and that of her unborn child. ithout question, issues of poverty and a shortfall of necessary resources will be relevant causes. However, the premise of the message campaign will be to disseminate information about self-care that can help those lacking access. Additionally, we act from the presumption that the scarcity of resources also means that where such are available, there may be a dearth of distributed information to make women aware of these options.

Therefore, it seems reasonable to deduce that a perspective through this model might help to reveal such possible causes for maternal and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ell, K.; Vourlekis, B.; Muderspach, L.; Nissly, J.; Padget, D.; Pineda, D.; Sarabia, O. & Lee, P. (2002). Abnormal Cervical Screen Follow-Up Among Low-Income Latina: Project SAFe. Journal of Women's Health & Gender Medicine, 11(7), 639-651.

Kotch, J. (2005). Maternal and Child Health: Programs, Problems, and Policy in Public Health. Jones & Bartlett Publishers.
View Full Essay

Combat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Words: 1389 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31962980

Computer games were also effective in the treatment of people who underwent automobile accidents. Apparently, something as simple as computer games can serve as a therapy method for people suffering from PTSD. hile some might believe that such therapy techniques are not effective, patients were reported to display intense physical responses to them. Still, because therapists were quick to react to such demonstrations, matters were rapidly resolved and patients were exhibiting fewer symptoms as a result. By adapting the Health Belief Model to the needs of PTSD sufferers therapists succeeded in treating them. The patients did not show reluctance in being subjected to such methods of treatment, as they trusted that it would assist their psychological condition (Burke, Degeneffe & Olney).

Both the Social Cognitive Theory and the Health Belief Model are effective in treating people suffering from PTST. They differ through the fact that the former is applied indirectly…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Bhagar, H.A. & Schmetzer A.D. (2007). Pharmacotherapy of Combat-Related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association 10.4.

2. Burke, H.S. & Degeneffe, C.E. & Olney, M.F. (2009). A New Disability for Rehabilitation Counselors: Iraq War Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. The Journal of Rehabilitation 75.3.

3. Stein, D.J. & Hollander E. (2002). Anxiety Disorders Comorbid with Depression: Social Anxiety Disorder, Post-Traumatiac Stress Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. London: Martin Dunitz.
View Full Essay

Special Colorectal Cancer Screening -

Words: 1088 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93960404

This research applies to elderly patients primarily that hold strong beliefs about certain healthcare practices. The researchers concluded that information about colorectal procedures needs to be presented to patients in a culturally sensitive manner. This information could be applied equally well to other culturally diverse populations even though the population sample is relatively small. This research also helps the nursing practice by suggesting new avenues for education and patient care delivery in the future. This research article would benefit from additional or lengthier analysis of the literature to support the conclusions drawn from the researcher, based mostly on the small sample size used in the survey.

Colon cancer screening among older caregivers - Article 3

This article discusses colorectal cancers among older women. The purpose of the study is to describe participation in cancer screening among older women whose mean age is 65 years who are primary caregivers for a…… [Read More]

References

Bush, S. (2003). "Elderly African-American women's knowledge and belief about colorectal cancer." Tucker Publications, Inc.

Frank, D., Swedmark, J. & Grubbs, L. (2004, July - Aug). "Colon cancer screening in African-American women." ABNF Journal, 15(4): 67.

Sarna, L., Chang, B.L. (1999-Aug). "Colon cancer screening among older women

Caregivers."
View Full Essay

Promoting Community Awareness of the Need for

Words: 1537 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21314408

Promoting community awareness of the need for colorectal cancer prevention and screening," which was written by Causey and Greenwauld, is appropriate. It clarifies the purpose of the research study on which this article is based and provides an effective summary of the particular area of nursing and science that the authors are writing about. Nonetheless, it does not allude to the key variables that influence the study, its results, nor the particular model it utilizes, which is reflective of the principle area in which a sufficient title could be improved.

he abstract for the aforementioned paper is extremely effective. In a paragraph of just a few sentences, the authors are able to identify the key factors related to this study: the problem, the methods and the model used to gather data, the results and the conclusion gathered from those results. he writing is relatively terse and straightforward, and is bolstered…… [Read More]

There really was no intervention in this study, other than the educational session that all of the participants received. Nonetheless, the data collection method was not biased and the authors seemed appropriately trained to collect this data.

GLOBAL ISSUES

Other than the unusual way in which the paper was structured in which the literature review combined various aspects of a general overview of CRC (some of which was not germane to the research question) this document was well written presented in an accessible manner to nurses. Since one of the researchers had done a previous study on a topic closely related to this subject, the credibility of the authors was not dubitable and was enhanced by their professional and academic credentials. The validity of the study findings is also considerably compromised by the fact that the researchers "knew" (Causey and Greenwauld. 2011, p. 39) a percentage of the participants. Still, the study does function as a launching point for future research in this area as it specifically applies to nurses and educating the population regarding CRC.
View Full Essay

Sexual Violence Health Program

Words: 3023 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25269097

Health Promotion Program Proposal

Sexual violence has been a longstanding issue around the world. Women and children face rape, molestation, sexual assault each year. In the United States alone, the annual national average for rape and sexual assault victims is 288,820 (age 12 or older). While the figures for child molestation may be higher than anticipated, the reported sexual assault cases reveal the majority of victims range from ages 18-34 at 54%. The age group at the highest risk for sexual violence is 12-34. Women are at highest risk of experiencing attempted or completed rape with statistics revealing 1 out of every 6 women in America have been or have almost been raped. Of the rape victims reported, 90% are adult female and 82% of juvenile victims are female (AINN, 2016).

The age range of 16-19 is the more dangerous for a female as they are 400% more likely to…… [Read More]

References

Bass, J., Annan, J., McIvor Murray, S., Kaysen, D., Griffiths, S., & Cetinoglu, T. et al. (2013). Controlled Trial of Psychotherapy for Congolese Survivors of Sexual Violence. New England Journal Of Medicine, 368(23), 2182-2191. http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/nejmoa1211853

Brunger, M. (2015). Introduction to Policing Research. Taylor and Francis.

Henry, N. & Powell, A. (2014). Preventing sexual violence. Palgrave Macmillan.

Khosrow-Pour, M. (2013). Cases on emerging information technology research and applications. Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.
View Full Essay

Statistics Healthcare and Human Resources Leadership

Words: 1034 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58212522

Healthcare/Statistics/Human esources Leadership

Unit 3-Assignment Details: Statistic

Empirical probability of an occurrence is essentially an estimate that this occurrence will take place on the basis of how frequent the occurrence takes place subsequent to the collection of data or conducting an experiment. Empirical probability is grounded distinctively on direct observations or experiences. On the other hand, theoretical probability of an occurrence is the number of ways that the occurrence can take place divided by the total number of outcomes. In other words, it is trying to find the probability of occurrences that emanate from a sample space of known equally probable outcomes (Anastas, 1999). The law of large numbers is considered to be one of the main theories of probability and asserts that the sample mean converges to the distribution mean as the sample size rises. The law of large numbers offers a clarification on the manner in which empirical…… [Read More]

References

Anastas, J. W. (1999). Research Design for Social Work and the Human Services. New York: Columbia University Press.

Asch, D. (1996). The role of clinical care nurses in euthanasia and assisted suicide. New England Journal of Medicine, 334 (21); 1374 -1379.

Boudreau, J. D., Somerville, M. A. (2014). Euthanasia and assisted suicide: a physician's and ethicist's perspectives. Medicolegal and Bioethics 2014, 4:13-14

Hatch, M. J. (1993). The dynamics of organizational culture. Academy of Management Review, 18(4), 657-693.
View Full Essay

Infection Related to Catheter Usage in Hospitals

Words: 9212 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56883508

Quality Improvement Program

Needs Assessment and Quality Improvement Plan

Paula Stechschulte, PhD, N

Quarter

This paper discusses the process of drafting a quality improvement plan at a community level medical facility, a plan that is aimed at reducing days under urinary catheter and also reducing the rates of infections associated with the said catheters. As a high rate of incidence of infection related to catheter usage is costly for the hospital, this implementation strategy is aimed both at reducing hospital costs and boosting patient health, safety and satisfaction. The requirement for this strategy is a level of nursing education, dedication and commitment that will necessitate training and a "go-live" session of implementation which can be stressful for workers and for patients as both adjust to change. The management directors will need to not only monitor progress using the Six Sigma method but also will need to effectively maintain levels of…… [Read More]

References

APIC (2008). -- Home. Guide to the Elimination of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs). Retrieved January 16, 2016, from http://www.apic.org/Resource_/EliminationGuideForm/c0790db8-2aca-4179-a7ae-676c27592de2/File/APIC-CAUTI-Guide.pdf

Brusch, J. (2015, August 18). Diseases & Conditions - Medscape Reference. Catheter-Related Urinary Tract Infection: Transmission and Pathogens, Guidelines for Catheter Use, Diagnosis. Retrieved January 15, 2016, from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/2040035-overview#a2

Cetina, K. K., Bruegger, U. (2001). Transparency regimes and management by content in global organizations: The case of institutional currency trading. Journal of Knowledge Management, 5(2): 180-194.

Cooper, A. (2002). Six Sigma deployment in a large integrated health system. Quality Congress. ASQ's Annual Quality Congress Proceedings, ABI/INFORM Global: 71-76.
View Full Essay

Common Health Care Practices in Honduras

Words: 677 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71723525

Health Care Practices in Honduras

In order to understand healthcare in Honduras, it is important to understand that Honduras is one of the poorest countries in the Western hemisphere (ennert & Koop, 2009).

"The economic situation is accompanied by a shortage of health professionals throughout the country. There are 57 physicians and 129 nurses per 100,000 people. In the United States, the corresponding ratios are 256 and 937 per 100,000 respectively" (ennert & Koop, 2009). This scenario means that many people in Honduras lack access to formal healthcare and must rely upon home or folk remedies for diagnosis and treatment of disease. The dire economic conditions in Honduras help create an atmosphere of chronic disease and health conditions that promote disease. Some of these problems include: diarrheal diseases, respiratory infections, lack of access to clean drinking water, waste disposal issues, muscle pain, and tuberculosis (ennert & Koop, 2009). In fact,…… [Read More]

References

Marson, M., Prohaska, A., Burris, S., Richardson, C. Crigger, N. (2006). Rural Hodurans perceptions about health and healthcare practices. Retrieved September 30, 2012 from Journal of Undergraduate Nursing Scholarship website:  http://www.juns.nursing.arizona.edu/articles/Fall%202006/marson.htm 

Massachusetts General Hospital. (2012). Honduras: Bits of culture. Retrieved September 30,

2012 from  http://www2.massgeneral.org/interpreters/b_hon.asp 

Rennert, W., & Koop, E. (2009). Primary health care for remote village communities in Honduras: A model for training and support of community health workers. Family Medicine, 41(9), 646-51.
View Full Essay

Physical Activity Physical Activities and

Words: 2404 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60240417

Anselm's using a number of community outreach methods to involve seniors in a trial 5-day a week exercise program. The health belief model would be central to the campaign used for outreach, with the intent of encouraging involvement of roughly 30 participants over the duration of a full year. This experimental group would be compared to a control group that would remain engaged in St. Anselm's already existing 3-day-a-week tai-chi program.

Researchers will seek out a previously tested and confirmed self-report inventory on physical, mental and emotional well-being. The properly vetted instrument will be used to gauge the personal health evaluation of each respondent with the hypothesis that those in the experimental group will produce more positive index scores. The inventory would be administered four times over the course of the year on a quarterly basis. Hereafter, statistical analysis will rely on the use of a t-test, an appropriate mode…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ)(2002). Physical Activities and Older Americans. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services.

Kovatch, S.; Smith, M. & Segal, J. (2012). Senior Exercise and Fitness Tips. Helpguide.org.

Marques, a.I.; Rosa, M.J.; Soares, P.; Santos, R.; Mota, J. & Carvalho, J. (2011). Evaluation of physical activity programmes for elderly people - a descriptive study using the EFQM' criteria. BMC Public Health, 11, p. 123.

Michigan Governor's Council on Physical Fitness, Health and Sports. (2000). Position Statement: Importance of Physical Activity for the Elderly. MDCH.state.mi.us.
View Full Essay

Nurse Teaching Learning Plan by

Words: 838 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36321133

; And, 3) The individual must believe that the recommended action can be adhered to successfully. (TC, 1)

Prevention: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary (diet, exercise, immunizations, screenings)

The Health Belief Model would contribute to a lesson in prevention of the condition's worsening severity. Here, the primary level of prevention is seen as dietary. The secondary level is seen as exercise and the tertiary level is viewed as immunizations and screenings.

Teaching Strategies

Teaching strategies will included the use of visual aids and literature materials as well as the applied discussion of realistic dietary and exercise goals.

Resources

Resources to be used in supplement to the education of the patient will include pamphlets regarding the implications of diabetes, the distribution of kits with required self-treatment materials, the compilation of useful web resources, nutritional dietary recipe kits and preliminary exercise regimen diagrams.

Methods of Evaluation

The effectiveness of the proposed teaching learning plan…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

TCW. (2006). Health Belief Model. Universitie Twente. Online at http://www.tcw.utwente.nl/theorieenoverzicht/Theory%20clusters/Health%20Communication/Health_Belief_Model.doc/.
View Full Essay

What Drives Adult Consumers to Not Consume Vegetables

Words: 2045 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68106686

Adults and Vegetables

Lack of Incentive Drives Adult Consumers to Not Consume Vegetables

The eating habits of adult consumers are largely determined in the formative years of growth, especially in childhood and adolescence (Fitzgerald et al., 2010, p.1). When coupled with the notion that "liking" and "wanting" are two elements that factor into the decision making process of adults who consume vegetables, the formative years may play an instrumental part in establishing what future adults will "like" and/or "want" (Finlayson, 2006, p. 37). Establishing the conditions under which tastes are developed for specific foods, therefore, may help us understand why some adults fail to consume vegetables.

Attitude Behavioral Model: TPB

As Icek Ajken (2010) states, using the Theory of Planned Behavior shows us how "human behavior is guided by three kinds of considerations: beliefs about the likely consequences of the behavior (behavioral beliefs), beliefs about the normative expectations of others…… [Read More]

Reference List

Ajzen, I. (2010). Constructing a Theory of Planned Behavior Questionnaire. Retrieved from  http://people.umass.edu/aizen/tpb.html 

Chew, F. et al. (1998). Testing the Influence of the Health Belief Model and a Television Program on Nutrition Behavior. Health Communication 10(3): 227-245. DOI: 10.1207/s15327027hc1003_3

Finlayson, G. et al. (2006). Is it possible to dissociate 'liking' and 'wanting' fro foods in humans? A novel experimental procedure. Physiology & Behavior 90: 36-42. doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2006.08.020

Fitzgerald, A. et al. (2010). Factors influencing the food choices of Irish children and adolescents: a qualitative investigation. Health Promotional International. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/heapro/daq021
View Full Essay

Clinical Practice With Individuals Critique

Words: 4351 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63423164

I just tend to go down on myself more. I've been very stressed out lately even though stress is not something I generally have a problem with. I don't know what's wrong.

W: Well, fear can make one uneasy and act differently from what one is used to. Do you think that there was something around you, a situation a symbol a person that made you feel even more fearful?

I wanted to know what kind of situations made her fearful or uneasy

I had an idea that perhaps what made her fearful was the possibility of loneliness for life.

C: I really have no idea & #8230; there just seems to be a lot more for me to do than the people around me and it's just that I can't seem to bring myself up to where there are. I don't know if I ever will, you know.

W:…… [Read More]

References

Catania, J.A., Kegeles, S.M., and Coates T.J. (1990). Towards an understanding of risk behavior: An AIDS risk reduction model (ARRM). Health Education Quarterly, 17(1), 53-72.

Denison, J. (1996). Behavior Change -- A Summary of Four Major Theories. Family health International, 3-13.

Fishbein, M., Middlestadt, S.E., and Hitchcock, P.J. (1994). Using information to change sexually transmitted diseaserelated behaviors. In R.J. DiClemente and J.L. Peterson (Eds.), Preventing AIDS: Theories and methods of behavioral interventions (pp. 61-78). New York: Plenum Press.

Greene G.W., Rossi S.R., Rossi J.S., Velicer W.F., Fava J.L., Prochaska J.O. (1999). Dietary applications of the stages of change model. J Am Diet Assoc;99(6):673-8.
View Full Essay

Establishing an NP-Led Day Treatment Facility in Bessemer Alabama

Words: 12948 Length: 47 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85464574

Establishing an NP Led Wellness and Recovery Center for Deinstitutionalized Individuals

Historically, nursing, and medicine professions have been loath to utilize tools commonly linked with mercenary aspects of business, such as market research and decision analysis. In the contemporary health care setting, however, consumers hold numerous options for care providers. The division of the market or market segmentation into different subgroups allows the determination of target markets and the buildup of marketing policies specific to the needs and interests of the selected subgroups. Market analysis allows the identification of policies for nurse practitioners to enhance their practice in a way that centers on the interests and needs of the selected market. While scores of the nurse practitioner's dream of operating their own businesses, those that have set up their own practice understand that it requires a compelling passion for owning a business, and for the profession.

A nurse practitioner is…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Teen Pregnancy in the United

Words: 3574 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35851463

Abortion trends varied widely by state as well. "Teenage abortion rates were highest in New York (41 per 1,000), New Jersey, Nevada, Delaware and Connecticut. By contrast, teenagers in South Dakota (6 per 1,000), Utah, Kentucky, Nebraska and North

Dakota all had abortion rates of eight or fewer per 1,000 women aged 15 -- 19. More than half of teenage pregnancies ended in abortion in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut" (Guttmacher, 2010). It is important to keep in mind that teenage abortion rates may reflect multiple issues. First, they may reflect that teenager's own personal beliefs and desire to raise a baby. However, they may also reflect prevailing societal norms in that geographic area, which can make it difficult, and even practically impossible, for pregnant teenagers to obtain abortions.

Portrayal in popular culture

Perhaps one of the most alarming things about teen pregnancy is that it is receiving more…… [Read More]

References

Cape Fear Teen Health Council. (2006). Why is teen pregnancy a problem? Retrieved April 2,

2012 from http://www.capefearteen.org/cfthc.php?section=statistics&record_id=1

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012). Prepregnancy contraceptive use among teens with unintended pregnancies resulting in live births- Pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system (PRAMS), 2004-2008. Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 61(2), 25-29.

Drayton, V., Montgomery, S., Modeste, N., Frye-Anderson, B. (2002-2003). The health belief model as a predictor of repeat pregnancies among Jamaican teenage mothers. International Quarterly of Community Health Education, 21(1), 67-81.