Health Psychology Essays (Examples)

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Health of Indigenous Australian Using Ecological and

Words: 2500 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72970397

Health of Indigenous Australian Using Ecological and Holistic Health Paradigm

Patterns of health and illness

Physical Health

Mental Health

Spiritual Health

Social Health

Impact of Broader Environments

Natural

Built

Social

Economic

Political

Critical eflection

Health is a basic component of human life that comprises of multiple facets. The description of health has witnessed dramatic change during past few years, as it has become a holistic phenomenon. Previously, it was considered that a healthy person is the one who does not suffer from any ailment or illness. However in recent times, the physical, psychological and communal aspects of human life have been amalgamated to give a broader perspective to human health which is identical to the concept of indigenous communities (Hjelm, 2010).

Numerous organizations are working extensively for providing adequate health care to the world population since many decades. However, it is appalling to notice that discrimination on social, economic and…… [Read More]

References

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2012, Australia's health 2012, AIHW, Australia.

Biddle, N & Yap, M 2010, Demographic and Socioeconomic Outcomes Across the Indigenous Australian Lifecourse: Evidence from the 2006 Census, ANU E. Press, Australia.

Caltabiano, ML & Ricciardelli, L 2012, Applied Topics in Health Psychology, John Wiley & Sons, Great Britain.

Carson, B, Dunbar, T & Chenhall, RD 2007, Social Determinants of Indigenous Health, Allen & Unwin, Singapore.
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Health and Psychology in the Past Research

Words: 622 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2634400

Health and Psychology

In the past, research findings have pointed out that illnesses are brought about by a constellation of factors. This effectively means that contrary to popular belief, no single factor can be said to cause illness and hence social, psychological and biological factors all have a role to play in relation to illness. It is on this realization that health psychology is founded. In this text, I concern myself on health and psychology.

The elationship between Health and Psychology

In basic terms, psychology concerns itself with mental processes and behavior. According to Pitts and Phillips (1998), health psychology addresses a number of questions regarding the link between health and psychology through identifying how health and illness relates to an individual's emotional psychological bases. In a large way, an individual's physical health remains intertwined (sometimes inexorably) with his or her mental state. Thus effectively, our vulnerability to ailments can…… [Read More]

References

Pitts, M. & Phillips, K. (1998). The Psychology of Health: An Introduction. Routledge
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Health Care and That Too a Quality

Words: 1923 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28802097

Health care, and that too, a quality health care is one of the most basic needs of any human being. In current times, where the fast paced lives are getting faster each day, work stresses are increasing, streets are being storm with junk foods and fast foods, and pollution and congestion is increasing, human lives are getting more and more prone to physical and mental diseases. As a result, the importance of health care systems and health care facilities increases. While, surgeons and doctors are generally seen as the captain of the ship as far as health sector is concerned, very important personnel of the health sector are the nurses. Once quite ignored, the importance of the nursing profession was highlighted by Florence Nightingale, one of the nursing pioneers. Florence Nightingale broke the conventional perceptions associated with the profession of nursing and took it to a new level, explored various…… [Read More]

References

Lee, H. & Winters, C. (2006). Rural nursing: concepts, theories and practice. New York:

Springer Publishing.

Joel, A. & Kelly, L. (2002). The nursing experience: trends, challenges and transitions. New York: Mc Graw Hill.

Lumby, J. & Picone, D. (2000). Clinical Challenges: focus on nursing. St. Leonards, N.S.W: Allen and Unwin.
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Psychology of Consumer Behavior

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72385198

Psychology of Consumer Behavior

The research into how young women perceive their own bodies -- in response to constant exposure to media images of un-naturally thin and extraordinarily beautiful females -- has been a popular topic for many years. But when it comes to male models that are nearly perfect, handsome and muscular in exactly the right places, there has not been as much attention or research. This paper reviews the potential of -- and reality of -- dissatisfaction in males based on the media's model images of males.

Body Image for Males -- Background

Annette La Greca is Professor of Psychology at the University of Miami and Gerald Koocher is the Dean of the School for Health Studies at Simmons College. As co-authors of The Parents' Guide to Psychological First Aid: Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Predictable Life Crises they assert that the research for body dissatisfaction among…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cassell, Dana K, and Gleaves, David H. (2009). The Encyclopedia of Obesity and Eating

Disorders, Third Edition. New York: Infobase Publishing.

Grogan, Sarah. (2007). Body Image: Understanding Body Dissatisfaction in Men, Women, and Children. Florence, KY: Taylor & Francis.

Koocher, Gerald P., and La Greca, Annette. (2010). The Parents' Guide to Psychological First
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Healthcare Has Been Moving From a Total

Words: 980 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65357474

healthcare has been moving from a total "organic" model to a more holistic viewpoint of the patient and their individual needs. Healthcare professionals have come to realize that within any organization, nothing is ever in isolation. Research has shown us many things that can be improved using the holistic and multi-cultural models, as well as the direction(s) we are suggesting with our new program. Clearly, the empirical research shows us that there are many modifiers that can create illness, modify illness patterns, contribute to healing, and act in a preventative manner (Adler, 1994). This is particularly true when dealing with chronic diseases like AIDS. Specialized AIDS units within a modern healthcare facility offer a team of experts who are familiar with the various permutations of the disease and who have greater responsibility and autonomy within the nursing staff. This should, in theory, increase both objective and subjective outcomes for the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adler, N., et.al. (1994), "Health Psychology: Why do Some People Get Sick and Some

Stay Well?," Annual Review of Psychology, 45. http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/oi/abs/10.1146/annurev.ps.45.020194.001305

Aiken, L., Sloan, D. (1997). Effects of Specialization and Client Differentiation on the Status of Nurses: The Case of AIDS. Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 38 (3): 203-22.

Chow, M.k, et al. (2010). The benefits of using a mixed methods approach -- quantitative with qualitative -- to identify client satisfaction and unmet needs in an HIV healthcare centre. AIDS Care. 22-94): 491-98.
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Healthcare and Fitness Research

Words: 1293 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48205230

Statistics and Research Method for Business Decisions
Potential of Fitness Industry

Fitness industries today are increasingly receiving clients from all sorts of demographics and ages. Human fitness is turning out to be an asset that people are taking every effort to ensure it is preserved and protected at all times. The fitness standards are essential because they are multifaceted but appear to converge towards the need for a long healthy life characterized by productivity and reduced vulnerabilities. Fitness is a concern for almost every individual in the world today and the reasons are diverse and varied depending on one's goals and aspirations. Every individual in the world, across all ages, aspires to be healthy for some reasons. For instance, every individual seeks to be healthy so that they can engage freely in almost everything that requires a healthy body system (Jacobsen, 2011). Human health is a concern for attacks from…… [Read More]

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Health and Social Sciences Grade Course Health

Words: 2334 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84059300

Health and Social Sciences

Grade Course

Health, Well Being and Social Care in UK

Sociological Perspective of Health and Well Being in UK

Psychological Perspective of Health and Well Being in UK

Psycho-Social Needs of Service Users in UK

Health and Social Sciences

This report casts light upon the various aspects of physical and mental health of people living in United Kingdom. The selected sample chosen for this study belongs to the settings of people who do not belong to UK from their old generations and they are spending the lives of homelessness there. In other words, the paper is about physical and mental health of people who belong to other areas of the world but are settled in UK for education of job purpose. Since they are outsiders, they do not have permanent place to live in, they make temporal arrangements depending upon their requirements. Their priorities are different…… [Read More]

References

BBC News, 2011. Archbishop calls for NHS bill to cover spiritual health. [Online] Available at: <  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-15570290  > [Accessed 07 Oct 2012]

Department of Health, 2012. Public Health, adult social care and the NHS. [online] Available at: < http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/index.htm > [Accessed 07 Oct 2012]

International Health Insurance, 2012. 3 Easy Steps to Health Insurance. [Online] Available at: < http://www.international-health-insurance.com / > [Accessed 07 Oct 2012]

Men's Health News, 2012. The Hardest Workout You're not Doing. [online] Available at: < http://news.menshealth.com/the-hardest-workout-youre-not-doing/2012/02/10 / > [Accessed 07 Oct 2012]
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Psychology Theories in Psychology Personality Can Be

Words: 1438 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67545435

Psychology Theories

In psychology, personality can be described as the "the patterns of behavior, thought, and emotion unique to an individual, and the ways they interact to help or hinder the adjustment of a person to other people and situations" ("personality," 2013). Psychologists may make use of idiographic or nomothetic techniques in order to study personality of an individual. Many characteristics of human behavior can be examined while studying one's personality. To put in simple words, personality theories are utilized for organizing what is known, stimulating new research, and specifying a view of personality in a formal way (Kasschau, 1985). Psychoanalytic theory, person-centered theory and existential theory are three such theories which have been developed in the precedent century and cover a lot of information regarding the pathology, health/wellness, treatment and the weight or significance of early life.

Freud's Psychoanalytic Theory

The Psychoanalytic Theory was put forwarded by Sigmund Freud…… [Read More]

References

Diem-Wille, G. (2011). The Early Years of Life: Psychoanalytical Development Theory According to Freud, Klein and Bion. London: Karnac.

Gurman, A.S., & Messer, S.B. (2003).Essential Psychotherapies: Theory and Practice. New York: Guilford Press.

Kasschau, R.A. (1985). Psychology: Exploring Behavior. New Jersey: Englewood Cliffs. Print.

Kitano, M.K., & LeVine, E.S. (1987). Existential theory: Guidelines for practice in child therapy. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 24(3), 404-413. doi:10.1037/h0085732
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Psychology Mental Health Recovery Program

Words: 1748 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89916178

One of the best things about the WAP program is the flexibility that it has. Every patient has their own individual needs that need to be met by a recovery program. Most recovery programs are very rigid and to not have much give to them. The WAP program is just the opposite. It allows each patient to recover at their own rate and using the best resources available to them.

The flexibility that the WAP program allows each patient to have helps to reinforce the idea of self-management recovery. This is so important is giving each patient the responsibility for their own recovery. Empowering each patient to design and implement their own recovery helps to ensure that they will follow through and be successful in recovering.

eferences

Davidson, Laurie. (2005). ecovery, self-management and the expert patient - Changing the culture of mental health from a UK perspective. Journal of Mental…… [Read More]

References

Davidson, Laurie. (2005). Recovery, self-management and the expert patient - Changing the culture of mental health from a UK perspective. Journal of Mental Health, 14(1), 25-35.

Dewa, Carolyn S., Hoch, Jeffrey S., Carmen, Glenn, Guscott, Richard, and Anderson, Chris.

(2009). Cost, Effectiveness, and Cost-Effectiveness of a Collaborative Mental Health

Care Program for People Receiving Short-Term Disability Benefits for Psychiatric
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Psychology Briefly Describe the Differences

Words: 551 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14840903



The nature vs. nurture debate is over whether an individual learns behaviors from their environment (nurture) or whether an individual is born with certain genetic traits and predispositions toward certain behaviors. Today, most developmental psychologists believe that nurture enhances nature: that while biology is important, environment probably trumps biology in most cases. One developmental process that can be explained by both genetics and environment is gender identity. Biology does affect certain aspects of gender and sexuality but environment and conditioning are very important factors in the development of an individual's gender identity.

4. How do maternal nutrition and alcohol use potentially affect the health of a fetus?

The heath of a fetus is directly related to maternal nutrition and fetal development is hindered by malnutrition or use of alcohol. Excess drinking by the mother can cause fetal alcohol syndrome, which may cause birth defects, mental health problems and hyperactivity in…… [Read More]

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Healthcare for Mentally Impaired Patients Probing What

Words: 3532 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69380077

Healthcare for Mentally Impaired Patients

Probing what information is available about the current status of placement or accommodation and level of personal healthcare available to mentally impaired and emotionally disturbed individuals, it is clear that the analysis is as diverse as there are different mental illnesses. While statistics on managed care treatment for people with severe and disabling mental illnesses are sparse, it is evident that the financial responsibility to care for and house these patients is enormous.

According to Dr. David Satcher, the Surgeon General (1999), approximately 20% of the U.S. adult population has a mental illness. He says, "These illnesses include anxiety disorders, mood disorders, anorexia nervosa, and severe cognitive impairment. More serious mental illnesses include ipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mental illness accounts for 15% of overall burden of disease -- more than malignant cancer and respiratory diseases -- and as far back as 1996 the direct cost…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Boulard, G. (2000, April). Forgotten Patients the Mentally Ill. State Legislatures, 26, 12. Retrieved February 13, 2004, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Callahan, D. (1993, October) Minds and hearts: priorities in mental health services.

The Hastings Center Report.

Fox, M. & Kim, K. (2004, January) Evaluating a Medicaid Home and Community-based Physical Disability Waiver. Family and Community Health. Vol 27: 37.
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Health Prevention Programs

Words: 2666 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64756401

Health Promotion Lesson Plan

The concept of health promotion is thought of as "the science and art of helping people change their lifestyle to move toward a state of optimal health" (Dunphy et al., 2011, p 25). Serious heart conditions can be prevented, which is why it is so important to utilize community education techniques in order to help try to warn community members of the complications before they occur. This current lesson plan works to create three separate community lesson plans, based on specific age ranges. The age 18-29 focuses primarily on the use of social media and health advocacy efforts in association with the American Heart Association. For ages 30-49, there is also a focus on these two, combined with more community oriented issues, and for 50-60, there is much more of a focus on financial training along with community organized workshops.

Prevention has become a major issue…… [Read More]

References McLeod, Saul. (2010). Erik Erikson. Developmental Psychology. Simply Psychology. Web.  http://www.simplypsychology.org/Erik-Erikson.html
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Psychology Movie Relation

Words: 1364 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11166389

Psychology Movie elation

A ose for Emily

Diagnosing a psychological complication are a daunting task and one that requires immense responsibility of the concerned health professionals who examine the patient and decide the appropriate diagnosis (APA, 2001). Among the many variables that a psychological professional observes, are the patient's past life history. For Emily, an examination of the setting and characters in the plot, and an assessment of some of the themes in Faulkner's short story, A ose for Emily and the occurrences involving Emily's father aids the reader to comprehend the pressures with which Emily tried coping and how she might have suffered from schizophrenia. Emily came from a family of high stature and affluence in their southern community and always had a burden of enormous expectations that people had for her. Her community anticipated her to have a hereditary obligation to uphold traditions, norms that her ancestors had…… [Read More]

References

APA. (2001). Quick Reference to the Diagnostic Criteria from DSM-IV. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association.

Kinney, A.F. (2000). Faulkner's Narrative Poetics: Style as Vision. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press.

Staton, S.F. (2005). Literary Theories in Praxis. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

William, F. (2003). "A Rose for Emily." In The Norton Anthology of American Literature. Ed. Nina Baym. 2160-2166. New York, NY: W.W. Norton.
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Psychology Chapter 5 Of the Abnormal Child

Words: 562 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85306710

Psychology

Chapter 5 of the Abnormal Child Psychology textbook is about Attention Deficit Hyperactivity (ADHD). The chapter provides a brief description and history of the disorder. Then, core characteristics of ADHD are listed, such as inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity. This information is helpful for understanding how ADHD is diagnosed. The authors also give information on the DSM criteria, which are critical for an actual diagnosis of the disorder. A section on associated characteristics refers to cognitive deficits, speech and language impairments, tic disorders, and medical concerns associated with ADHD.

The authors also talk about accompanying or related psychological disorders such as conduct disorder, anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. Prevalence, course, and outcomes of ADHD are discussed along with social variables including gender. There is a section outlining various theories as to why ADHD exists, such as genetics, diet, and family influences. Finally, treatment options are listed including medications, parent management training,…… [Read More]

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Psychology Definitions Psychosis Loss

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85134043



Know the predominant features of each personality disorder = Such knowledge will help the therapist to identify assistance strategies ahead of time, which can be modified as necessary.

Know about the link between borderline personality disorder and suicide attempts = an awareness of this link will help the therapist to identify warning signs and provide assistance in a timely way.

Know that group therapy is useful for treatment of avoidant personality disorder = Knowing this avoids the intuitive tendency to reinforce the patient's avoidance.

Patients with which disorder are most likely to seek treatment on their own? Depression sufferers are most likely to seek treatment for their condition.

Problems in using the DSM-IV-TR to diagnose personality disorders = the main concern is that some guidelines are very specific. Some personality disorders may overlap or display atypical symptoms.

Chapter 14

Are boys or girls more likely to have a diagnosable psychological…… [Read More]

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Health Care Law Relating to

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44996916

Informed consent signifies one of the protections in studies on mental illness. Consent is a procedure that permits for the free choice by a knowledgeable and competent person to or not to partake in investigative procedures. Capacity for consent is not a stationary experience. It can transform with the circumstance of the person. The theory of informed consent was established on two distinctive legal philosophies. Every patient has the right to figure out what will or will not be completed on them and in regards to a fiduciary character of the patient physician affiliation it has to be articulated with the main purpose of endorsing individual self-rule while endorsing balanced decision formulation.

Evaluation

This article was very easy to read and attempted to break the subject matter down into everyday language in order to maintain clarity. It gave a very good overview of psychiatric drug testing on children and how…… [Read More]

References

Malhotra, Savita and B.N., Subodh. (2009). Informed consent & ethical issues in paediatric psychopharmacology. Indian Journal of Medical Research, 129(1), p.19-32.
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Health Behavior Currently at the

Words: 380 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26719721

I have, as the transtheoretical model suggests, gone through the decisional balance that encourages me to weigh pros and cons of quitting smoking. I noted that quitting might be time-consuming (con); might make me irritable and for a while, horrible to be around (con); and would most certainly be the most difficult thing I have ever done (con). The pros, however, seem so much more invigorating and include younger looking skin, better breath, better smelling clothes and home, and most importantly, improved health and well-being. Moreover, I included improved familial relationships as a significant pro-in my decision to quit. I anticipate my intervention will work because it is a well-thought out plan that involves systematic stages; assistance from qualified medical staff; and support from friends and family. Knowing that I can rely on myself as well as external supports will ensure that I reach the maintenance stage and remain smoke-free…… [Read More]

Reference

Cancer Prevention Research Center. "Transtheoretical Model." Retrieved Feb 26, 2008 at http://www.uri.edu/research/cprc/transtheoretical.htm
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Health Unit Coordinator Description a Health Unit

Words: 469 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18885791

Health Unit Coordinator Description

A health unit coordinator may also be known as a unit clerk, ward clerk, or unit secretary (Health Unit Coordinator). They help maintain the facility's service and performance. One of the main responsibilities is acting as a liaison between patients and staff, which includes communicating with doctors, nurses, patients, other departments, patients, and visitors that visit the patients.

Prospects of health unit coordinator positions are in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, health maintenance organizations, and home health agencies all across the nation. Employment opportunities for this position are expected to grow in demand as agencies require more help to coordinate services and performance. The start salary can range from $21,600 to over $24,000. The health unit coordinator may specialize in several different areas, such as reception, scheduling, safety protocols, or patient interaction.

High school courses of algebra, biology, chemistry, computer skills, data processing, psychology, English, composition, social…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Health Unit Coordinator Certification, Exam, and Licensing Information. (2012, Dec 8). Retrieved from Edcation Portal: http://education-portal.com/articles/Health_Unit_Coordinator_Certification_Exam_and_Licensing_Information.html

Health Unit Coordinator. (n.d.). Retrieved from Health Careers Center:  http://www.mshealthcareers.com/careers/healthunitcoord.htm
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Psychology How Stress Affects the

Words: 933 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3101532

This occurs when people experience feelings of terror and helplessness during a trauma and then has recurrent flashbacks, nightmares, impaired concentration and emotional numbing afterwards. Some victims of this disorder turn to alcohol or other drugs which do nothing accept compound the problem. It is thought that approximately 10% of Americans have had or will have this disorder at some point in their lifetime (Carpenter and Huffman, 2008).

Since it seems evident that we can't escape stress, we need to learn how to effectively cope with it. There is not one single thing that must be done but a process that allows us to deal with various stressors. A person's level of stress depends on both their interpretation of and their reaction to stressors. Elimination of drug use and no more than moderate alcohol use are important in the successful management of stress. It is known that people, when stressed,…… [Read More]

References

Carpenter, Siri and Huffman, Karen. (2008).Visualizing Psychology. New Jersey: Wiley.

Stress. (2009). Retrieved July 31, 2009, from MedicineNet Web site:

 http://www.medicinenet.com/stress/article.htm
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Psychology and Education Psychological Counseling

Words: 1302 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14134490

Shame and Doubt, according to Erickson, children develop a sense of self-control as they control their bodily functions. This makes them feel confident and able to handle problems independently. But Tom's mother would not relinquish her control over his bodily functions at this time. Her forcing him to void on her schedule and not his, gave him a sense of shame and the feeling that he was not in control of his world. He therefore felt inadequate and doubtful of his ability to cope with anything. As she continued to control him by denying him food, love and choices of clothing, he became increasingly angry at the world, frustrated at the impression that his body and whole life was under the control of someone other than himself. This created anger and depression.

It is a wonder that Tom was as normal as he was during his teen years. He was…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Association for Humanistic Psychology. Website: http://ahpweb.org/aboutahp/aboutahp.html.

Berger, Kathleen S. The Developing Person Through Childhood and Adolescence, Sixth Edition. New York: Worth Publishers. 2002.

Thompson, Ross a. "Child development." Microsoft® Encarta® Online Encyclopedia 2007. http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761557692_2/Development_Child.html.

Thorpe, G.L., Olson, S.L. (1997) Behavior Therapy: Concepts, Procedures, and Applications, Second Edition (Paperback). New York: Allyn & Bacon.
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Health Science

Words: 1690 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44181244

Health Sciences

hen I think about the challenges of the health profession in the 21st century, a very direct quote from former Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala and Linda Bolton, Head of Nursing at Cedars Mt. Sinai Medical Center comes to mind:

The image that people often have of nurses as acute care handmaidens…. Is so out of date and inaccurate that it may impede the nation's ability to harness the expertise and vision of these professionals in ways that can produce the needed improvements in the quality of health care…. The evidence is clear that we must shift our focus to the care that individuals and populations need to improve and protect their health, whether it means changing the way nurses are educated or addressing the interprofessional competition that results in resistance to the full utilization of nurses (Mason, et.al., 2011, 401).

This may seem a bit…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED & CONSULTED

Adams, L. (2007). Nursing academic administration: who will take on the challenge?

Journal of Professional Nursing. 23 (5): 309-15.

American Organization of Nurse Executives. (2005). AONE Nurse Executive Competencies. The Nurse Leader. 3 (2): 15-21

Ashcraft, A., et.al. (2007). Time requirements for implementation of the course facilitator role. Journal of Nursing Education. 46 (7): 334-8.
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Health Care to Answer This

Words: 657 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95487251

It is my belief therefore, as a very wealthy family it is the obligation of the group to help those less fortunate. In this instance, health care (Kim, 1976).

There is an opportunity cost associated against the population for not implemented this policy on a nationwide basis. For one, the money allocated towards health care will help prevent illness. Illness associated with absenteeism, tardiness, and lack of productivity can cost society billions of dollars. Various studies have been conducted to measure productivity loss in the workplace due to worker illness. esults show that not only does the business suffer when a worker is absent from the job, but productivity loss can also occur when a worker is suffering from illness and attempting to work. The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine also cites idle assets and benefits paid to absent workers as additional costs an employer must deal with…… [Read More]

References:

1) Earley, P.C. "Trust, Perceived Importance of Praise and Criticism, and Work Performance: An Examination of Feedback in the United States and England." Journal of Management 12.4 (1986): 457 -- 73

2) Kim, J. & Hamner, C. (1976 February). Effect of Performance Feedback and Goal Setting on Productivity and Satisfaction in an Organized Setting. Journal of Applied Psychology
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Psychology Testing Psychometric Emotional Intelligence

Words: 12427 Length: 45 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79715879



As emotionally intelligent employees are reportedly more content, conscientious and committed in the workplace, businesses and organizations are repeatedly advised to recruit and retain these individuals. Abraham (2006), nevertheless, reports that the strongest findings emerging from her study was.".. The effect of job control on emotional intelligence." She contends that emotionally intelligent employees will not just naturally thrive in their workplace; that the work environment needs to provide independence in decision making for employees to succeed.

Aims and Objectives

Aim

To explore concepts encapsulated in and related to EQ testing, through intensive research and appropriate assessment of collected data.

esearch for this project proposes to increase understanding of EQ testing, as well as, complementary components.

Each objective presented in this proposal reflects an area of interest which will be expounded upon. As Objective 5, however, mirrors a primary consideration, plans are to include numerous samplings of related studies.

1.2 Objective…… [Read More]

References

Abraham, Rebecca. "The Role of Job Control as a Moderator of Emotional Dissonance and Emotional Intelligence -- Outcome Relationships.(Statistical Data Included)," the Journal of Psychology, March 1, 2000.

Bar-on, Reuven Ph.D (2005). "The World's First Scientific Measure of Emotional Intelligence."(2006). PEN Psychodiagnostics [26 September 2006]. http://www.eqiq.nl/eqivol.htm.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5008598359

Before You Start Your Fruit and Fibre Diet You Should Speak to This Man. (2005, February 9). Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), p. 12.
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Health Maintenance Organization Impact on

Words: 13949 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80930377

" (AAF, nd)

The Health Maintenance Organization further should "…negotiate with both public and private payers for adequate reimbursement or direct payment to cover the expenses of interpreter services so that they can establish services without burdening physicians…" and the private industry should be "…engaged by medical organizations, including the AAF, and patient advocacy groups to consider innovative ways to provide interpreter services to both employees and the medically underserved." (AAF, nd)

One example of the community healthcare organization is the CCO model is reported as a community cancer screening center model and is stated to be an effective mechanism for facilitating the linkage of investigators and their institutions with the clinical trials network. It is reported that the minority-based CCO was approved initially by the NCI, Division of Cancer revention Board of Scientific Counselors in January 1989. The implementation began in the fall of 1990 and the program was…… [Read More]

Principles for Improving Cultural Proficiency and Care to Minority and Medically-Underserved Communities (Position Paper) (2008) AAFP -- American Academy of Family Physicians http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/policy/policies/p/princcultuproficcare.html

Volpp, Kevin G.M. (2004) The Effect of Increases in HMO Penetration and Changes in Payer Mix on In-Hospital Mortality and Treatment Patterns for Acute Myocardial Infarction" The American Journal of Managed Care. 30 June 2004. Issue 10 Number 7 Part 2. Onlineavaialble at: http://www.ajmc.com/issue/managed-care/2004/2004-07-vol10-n7Pt2/Jul04-1816p505-512

Darby, Roland B. (2008) Managed Care: Sacruificing Your Health Care for Insurance Industry Profits: Questions You must ask before joning an HMO. Online available at: http://www.rolanddarby.com/br_managedhealth.html
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Psychology - Intro to Forensics

Words: 652 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87791223



Despite the fact that the field of forensic psychology was formally recognized by the American Psychological Association (APA) as a "subset" in 2001 (Salfati, 2009), aspects of this science have influenced law enforcement long before that. One of the most salient ways it does so is in terms of interviewing people for certain positions -- whether they be formal positions such as an appointment to a law enforcement position or informal ones such as witness and eyewitness testimony.

Various branches of the law have been made cognizant of the fact that individuals who work within law enforcement have a very tenuous, difficult job. There is a significantly greater amount of work -- and psychology -- involved in working as a police officer. Therefore, within the past several years law enforcement officials have included personality tests as part of the testing for police officers (Salfati, 2009). Although these tests are far…… [Read More]

References

Huss, M.T. (2001). "What is forensic psychology? it's not silence of the lambs." Eye on Psi Chi. Retrieved from http://www.psichi.org/pubs/articles/article_58.aspx

Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2009). "Introduction to forensic psychology." Baltimore: Author. "Foundations of Forensic Psychology" with Dr. C. Gabrielle Salfati.
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Psychology Law and Ethics

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3665587

Psychology Law and Ethics

In presenting my analysis of the legal and ethical issues involved with Beverly's and Ron's situation, I've tried to push aside many of my own personal feelings that would bias me in my considerations. For starters, I've tried to consider that a woman can just as easily abuse a man despite my beliefs about traditional gender roles and that males are usually the aggressors in domestic abuse. I also believe there may be a class and educational bias on my part because of the way that Beverly has communicated her response to Ron's allegations. Here, she appears to be mentally unstable, but I've tried to consider that she may either lack the education and social skills to relay her feelings in a more meaningful way, may herself be the victim of abuse who is too traumatized to relay a calmer response, or that she may have…… [Read More]

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Psychology Is a Multifaceted Field

Words: 1705 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85096253



eferences

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101936297

Blocher, DH (2000). The Evolution of Counseling Psychology. New York: Springer. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102034235

Darlington, Y., & Scott, D. (2002). Qualitative esearch in Practice: Stories from the Field / . Crows Nest, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=10079016

Hoagwood, K., Jensen, P.S., & Fisher, C.B. (Eds.). (1996). Ethical Issues in Mental Health esearch with Children and Adolescents. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99086817

Lewis, D. (1960). Quantitative Methods in Psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=9395983

Newman, I., & Benz, C.. (1998). Qualitative-Quantitative esearch Methodology: Exploring the Interactive Continuum. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5006987353

Poyrazli, S. (2003). Validity of ogerian Therapy in Turkish Culture: A Cross-Cultural Perspective. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development, 42(1), 107+. etrieved February 28, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101936297

Blocher, DH (2000). The Evolution of Counseling Psychology. New York: Springer. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102034235

Darlington, Y., & Scott, D. (2002). Qualitative Research in Practice: Stories from the Field / . Crows Nest, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=10079016

Hoagwood, K., Jensen, P.S., & Fisher, C.B. (Eds.). (1996). Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Children and Adolescents. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99086817
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Psychology -- Contribution of Psychological Experiments Philip

Words: 2079 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73324050

Psychology -- Contribution of Psychological Experiments

Philip anyard explains how Stanley Milgram came to be involved with research regarding the Nazi slaughter of millions of people in Europe during World War II. Milgram's obedience study of course had emotional and cultural meaning for him because he is Jewish. In fact he feels blessed that even though his family roots were in Europe in proximity to where the Holocaust took place, he was born in the U.S. And hence avoided the Nazi madness. What is the value of Milgram's research experiments? That is the crux of this section -- the value of Milgram's research into why people are obedient at pivotal moments -- including moments when human lives are at stake.

What does this particular method allow psychologists to study? In the first place, having someone in a room by himself giving shocks to a person he cannot see, a person…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Banyard, Philip. Just Following Orders? Chapter 2.

Edgar, Helen, and Edgar, Graham. Paying Attention. Chapter 8.

Toates, Frederick. Changing Behaviour. Chapter 4
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Health Care -- Introduction of Evaluation Plan

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3562634

Health Care -- Introduction of Evaluation Plan:

Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Services

he Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Services (LADMH) is the largest mental health department in the United States. reating more than 250,000 patients of all ages every year, LADMH stresses the importance of community for adequately addressing mental health issues. Furthermore, in order to serve its stated mission of enriching lives through partnership with the community, the Department has developed six long-term goals supported by multiple short-term goals.

he Mission of the Organization Responsible for Implementing the Program

he stated mission of the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Services (LADMH) is "Enriching lives through partnership designed to strengthen the community's capacity to support recovery and resiliency" (Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, n.d.)

he Program's Short and/or Long-erm Goals

LADMH is a comprehensive program that stresses the importance of community for effectively addressing…… [Read More]

The stated mission of the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Services (LADMH) is "Enriching lives through partnership designed to strengthen the community's capacity to support recovery and resiliency" (Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, n.d.)

The Program's Short and/or Long-Term Goals

LADMH is a comprehensive program that stresses the importance of community for effectively addressing mental health issues (Edmund G. "Pat" Brown Institute of Public Affairs, 2010). The organization has six long-term goals supported by multiple short-term goals. The first long-term goal, to "Enhance the quality and capacity, within available resources, of mental health services and supports in partnership with clients, family members, and communities to achieve hope, wellness, recovery and resiliency," is supported by the short-term goals of: developing a system providing a balanced and "transformed continuum" of services to as many County clients as possible, according to the program's resources; providing integrated mental/physical health and substance abuse treatment to improve service quality and the clients' well-being; assisting clients' establishment of their own goals and the best process for achieving those goals; inclusion and support of clients' families as a vital aspect of the clients' recovery (Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, n.d.). The second long-term goal to "Eliminate disparities in mental health services, especially those due to race, ethnicity and culture" is supported by the short-term goals of: developing programs for early intervention for underserved populations; working with underserved communities to provide services in ways that reduce and overcome traditional barriers to treatment such as socioeconomics, culture, race, language, religion, age, disability and sexual orientation; develop programs that reach out to and educate the population in order to reduce the stigma of mental health treatment, promote tolerance of and increase compassion for persons suffering from mental illness, and reduce the incidence/severity of mental illness (Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, n.d.). The third long-term goal to "Enhance the community's social and emotional well-being through collaborative Partnerships" is supported by the short-term goals of: creating effective partnerships/models for integrating mental/physical health and substance abuse treatment; establishing, supporting and enhancing the organization's partnerships with community organizations in natural environments to enhance the community's well-being; increasing collaboration with organizations, individuals and families that serve children and youth in order to address the mental health of children and youth; strengthening partnerships among mental health organizations, courts, probation and law enforcement to best address the mental health needs of the community's children and youth; partnering with educational institutions ranging from pre-school through higher education to enhance the provision of mental health services; and partnering with religious organizations to use spirituality in supporting mental health recovery goals (Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, n.d.; (Edmund G. "Pat" Brown Institute of Public Affairs, 2010). The fourth long-term goal to "Create and enhance a culturally diverse, client- and family-driven, mental health workforce capable of meeting the needs of our diverse communities" is supported by the short-term goals of:
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Health Experiment -- Measuring Reaction

Words: 850 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34135484

The results will be analyzed and compared with reference to the two hypotheses.

Experimental Results

The results of the experiment were statistically significant with respect to all three experimental hypotheses and all three experimental hypotheses were confirmed. Specifically, (1) reaction times were shorter in the second sequence of each sequence set, averaging a .040/second difference as between the first and second random sequences and averaging .080/sec difference as between the first and second fixed-interval sequences; (2) reaction times were shorter in connection with regular or fixed-interval sequences than in connection with random-interval sequences by an average of .064 as between the first random sequences and the first fixed-interval sequences, and by an average of 0.80 as between the second random sequence and the second fixed-interval sequences; and (3) the differential increased by an average time of .024 as between the first trials and the second trials of random/fixed-sequence measurements.

Discussion…… [Read More]

Literature Cited

Gerrig, R. And Zimbardo, P. (2009). Psychology and Life. New York: Allyn & Bacon.

Tables and Figures
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Psychology States of Consciousness Sleep

Words: 721 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11630376

I find that I could fall asleep almost anywhere, but especially after eating or when trying to relax. I am usually asleep within minutes of going to bed, but struggle mightily to get up in the morning. On a daily basis I find myself stressed to get through the day without felling tired, irritable and drowsy.

According to the Mayo Clinic's Sleep tips: 7 steps to better sleep (2012) there are 7 steps that one can use to achieve better sleep. These include:

Sticking to a regular sleep timetable -- going to bed and getting up at the same time every day, even on weekends, holidays and days off strengthens ones sleep-wake sequence and helps encourage better sleep at night.

Paying attention to what one eats and drinks -- one should never go to bed either hungry or stuffed as the discomfort might keep them up.

Creating a bedtime ritual…… [Read More]

References

Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep. (2007). Retrieved from  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/brain_basics/understanding_sleep.htm 

Carpenter, S. & Huffman, K. (2009). Visualizing Psychology (2nd ed.), John Wiley & Sons.

Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders. (2008). Retrieved from http://www.aasment.org/resources/factsheets/crsd.pdf

Sleep tips: 7 steps to better sleep. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sleep/HQ01387
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Psychology and Behavior Discuss Antipsychotic

Words: 1555 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39699085



Therapeutic communities are important and valuable tools, but certainly not for all patients. Often, the community is made up of a certain ward or unit of the hospital, rather than the entire facility. Clearly, some patients, such as those suffering from serious debilitating diseases such as dementia or severe schizophrenia might not be physically or mentally able to exist in such a facility. However, for others, who have specific issues or health problems, and are in the facility hoping for a cure, the community concept can help them become more sure of themselves, more able to function outside the facility, and give them confidence in their decision-making abilities.

Often this term describes those in a substance abuse facility, but it can relate to other disorders and treatment facilities as well. Some of these communities are all group based, while others combine individual counseling and therapy with group activities. The main…… [Read More]

References

Butler, Gillian, and Freda McManus. Psychology: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Smith, David L. Approaching Psychoanalysis: An Introductory Course. London: Karnac Books, 1999.
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Psychology After Reviewing the Vignette Miles Case

Words: 876 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99058516

Psychology

After reviewing the "Vignette Miles "case study, using the five axis of the DSM-IV-T, it is clear as Axis I provides anxiety because he has been distressed after the holidays due to financial set backs. His financial situation has been gradually deteriorating during the past six months, and he has been feeling a great deal of anxiety. Miles demonstrated tolerance, loss of control, and denial. This also included trying often to cut down going out but to no avail. Axis II and Axis III shows no symptoms. However, Axis IV provides marital problems and legal involvement. His work as a tree cutter is seasonal, and his income varies from month to month. The child support payments for his two children have recently been increased, and his new wife of two years has no job. She is unwilling to work outside the home. Miles reports that his marriage is otherwise…… [Read More]

References

Corsini, R. & Wedding, D. ( Eds.). (2008). Current Psychotherapies (8th ed.). California: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning.

Hirsch, I. (2010). Discussion: On some contributions of the interpersonal tradition to contemporary psychoanalytic praxis. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 70(1), 86-93. doi: 10.1057/ajp.2009.47

Magnavita, J.J. (2012). Theories of Personality. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.
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Healthcare Master Case Study Baum C M Et

Words: 1301 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21878519

Healthcare Master Case Study

Baum, C.M., et al. (2008). eliability, Validity, and Clinical Utility of the Executive Function Performance Test: A Measure of Executive Function in a Sample of People With Stroke The American Journal of Occupational Therapy 62 (4); pg 446.

Study rationale. The research study is designed to assess the validity and reliability of a test for executive function in post-stroke occupational therapy patients. Clinical tests of executive function may not be good predictors of a patient's ability to function in day-to-day life. The Executive Function Performance Test (EFPT) employs ordinary daily living skills in which the post-stroke patients are likely to have engaged in the past, and are reasonable target behaviors for adaptation to independent or supported living arrangements. The test is particularly valuable in that it offers a convenient test for executive function using real-world tasks.

esearch design. An experimental design is employed in this study.…… [Read More]

References

Baum, C.M., Connor, L.T., Morrison, T., Hahn, M., Dromerick, A.W., Edwards, D.F. (2008). Reliability, validity, and clinical utility of the executive function performance test: A measure of executive function in a sample of people with stroke, The American Journal of Occupational Therapy 62 (4), 446. Retrieved http://www.practicechangefellows.org / documents/Baum_et_al.pdf

Chaytor, N., & Schmitter-Edgecombe, M. (2003). The ecological validity of neuropsychological tests: A review of the literature on everyday cognitive skills. Neuropsychology Review, 13, 181 -- 197. Retrieved http://www.dissertations.wsu.edu/Dissertations/

Summer2004/n_chaytor_070604.pdf
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Healthcare Research What Was the

Words: 1101 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12895915

Overall, 8% from the control group completed testing and counseling versus 23% from the intervention group, which is a "modest increase" according to the researchers. None of those who completed testing was positive for HIV.

With the results controlled for race/ethnicity, i.e., meaning, within the same race/ethnic group, the turnout from the incentive-driven group was significantly higher than the control group. It was also found that whether or not they came from the incentive group, African-Americans and to a lesser degree, Hispanics were significantly less likely to complete testing and counseling compared to the other racial groups.

The researchers concluded that financial incentive resulted in a moderate increase in the number of ED-referred patients completing HIV testing and counseling. They could not say if this method was going to increase the percentage of detection of undiagnosed HIV+ individuals or if it's going to be cost-effective. They recommended point-of-care testing, or…… [Read More]

References

Haukoos, J., Witt, M., Coil, C., & Lewis, R. (2005). The Effect of Financial Incentives on Adherence with Outpatient Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing Referrals from the Emergency Department. Academic Emergency Medicine 12 (7); p 617. Retrieved May 27, 2008 from Proquest.

Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Research Design. (n.d.). Retrieved February 23, 2009, at http://www.apsu.edu/oconnort/3760/3760lect04a.htm.
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Health Care Disparity in Maryland

Words: 18449 Length: 67 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96057578



Chapter II: Review of the Literature in Chapter II, the researcher explores information accessed from researched Web sites; articles; books; newspaper excerpts; etc., relevant to considerations of the disparity in access to health care services between rural and urban residence in Maryland and the impact of the lack of financial resources. The researcher initially accessed and reviewed more than 35 credible sources to narrow down the ones noted in the reference section in this study. The literature review chapter presents a sampling of literature to support the research questions this study addresses.

Chapter III: Methods and Results Throughout Chapter III, the researcher proffers information the utilized to address contemporary concerns/challenges/consequences relating to determining the information used in this investigation. This chapter also presents the overall methods and techniques the researcher implemented to conduct this study. Considerations for the methodology chapter include data/information the researcher uses; identifying it as primary and/or…… [Read More]

Potter, S. (2002) Doing Postgraduate Research. London: Sage.

Qualitative research: Approaches, methods, and rigour, (2008, Nov. 7). Microsoft PowerPoint Qualitative Research AdvC08 RS.PPT. Retrieved March 10, 2009 from www.unimaas.nl/bestand.asp?id=11629

Wolvovsky, Jay. (2008). Health disparities: Impact on Business and Economics Summit. Maryland's healthcare at a glance. The Heart of Community Health Baltimore Medical Syste. Retrieved March 10, 2009 at http://dhmh.maryland.gov/hd/pdf/2008/oct08/Jay_Wolvovsky.pdf
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Healthcare -- Hospital Organization General

Words: 351 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58215209

It would be impractical, for example, to expect Cardiac Medicine, Billing Services, Supply, and Maintenance functions to be supervised by the same individuals. In essence, the many services and functions provided by modern hospitals are so different from one another that they are actually completely distinct operations, each with its own organizational substructure and supervisory hierarchy.

The Hierarchical Nature of Hospital Administration

Generally, the various different areas of hospital services and functions all use a hierarchical supervisory structure. Within medical departments, senior attending physicians supervise residents based on professional seniority and experience. The same is true within nursing services. Other non-medical service areas such as administration and billing function much more similarly to general business offices. Usually, they are headed by a director or supervisor who performs the same role as supervisors responsible for administrating general business offices. Finally, departments such as supply and maintenance operate within a hierarchical structure…… [Read More]

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Health Promotion

Words: 3496 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28197192

Health Promotion

The absence of illness does not thoroughly explain "Health", it can as well be described as wellness of the body and mind. More technically, health can be defined from two perspectives -- bodily and psychological health. A state of well-being due to regular exercises, adequate nutrition, sufficient rest, sensitivity to signs of sickness and when to seek help is referred to as Physical health. A person's fitness is showcased by his/her body make-up, cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular stability, and adaptability. Mental wellness refers to psychological and emotional welfare.

As defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO), mental health is "a state of wellness in which an individual discovers and harnesses his abilities, make headways regardless of stress encountered in life, can complete tasks adequately and profitably with substantial end product, and also contributes immensely to the uplift of his or her locality." (Nordqvist, 2015). A means of enabling people…… [Read More]

References

Boundless, 2016. Research Methods for Evaluating Treatment Efficacy - Boundless Open Textbook. Boundless. Available at: https://www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/treating-psychological-disorders-19/introduction-to-the-treatment-of-psychological-disorders-99/research-methods-for-evaluating-treatment-efficacy-382-12917/ [Accessed June 27, 2017].

Brassai, L, Piko, B, & Steger, M 2011, 'Meaning in Life: Is It a Protective Factor for Adolescents' Psychological Health?', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 18, 1, p. 44, Advanced Placement Source, EBSCOhost, viewed 27 June 2017.

Cuijpers, P. et al., 2014. EU-Compass for Action on Mental Health and Well-being. PREVENTION OF DEPRESSION AND PROMOTION OF RESILIENCE. Available at: https://ec.europa.eu/health/sites/health/files/mental_health/docs/ev_20161006_co03_en.pdf [Accessed June 27, 2017].

Gillham, J.E. et al., 2012. Preventing Depression in Early Adolescent Girls: The Penn Resiliency and Girls in Transition Programs. Handbook of Prevention and Intervention Programs for Adolescent Girls, pp.124 -- 161.
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Psychology Terrorism the Stuff IT'S Made of

Words: 1015 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70640262

Psychology Terrorism

THE STUFF IT'S MADE OF

Psychology Terrorism

Psychological Profile of a Terrorist

More than four decades of investigation on the profiling of terrorists yielded two major findings (Hudson, 1999; Nance, 2008). First, there does not seem to a single terrorist personality by which they can be profiled. Terrorism psychologists, political scientists and sociologists shared this consensus. Terrorist personalities are as varied as practitioners in the legal profession or any group. Terrorists do not possess neatly identifiable personality traits by which they can be visibly detected. Second, terrorists are not typically diagnosably psychopathic or mentally sick. Although they act and proceed with their task out of a delusional view of the world, they are actually and ironically sane and quite deliberate (Hudson, Nance).

Terrorist groups are carefully and highly selected during recruitment, although their top leaders may possess psychopathic traits (Hudson, 1999; Nance, 2008). ut members cannot depose a…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alexander, D.A. And Klein, S. (2005). The psychological aspects of terrorism: from denial to hyperbole. Vol. 98 # 12, Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine: The

Royal Society of Medicine Press. Retrieved on December 7, 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1299349

Hudson, R.A. (1999). The sociology and psychology of terrorism: who becomes a terrorist and why? Federal Research Division: Library of Congress. Retrieved on December 7, 2013 from  http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/pdf-files/Soc_Psych_of_Terrorism.pdf 

Kershaw, S. 2010). The terrorist mind: an update. The New York Times: The New York
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Healthcare Leadership and Management in Healthcare Effective

Words: 1197 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10516037

Healthcare Leadership

Leadership and Management in Healthcare

Effective Leadership and Management

Leadership is much like communications in regards to the complexity inherent in these concepts. There are many different perspectives that are used to examine these issues and researchers study leadership and management from such disciplines includes Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Social Psychology, Business, and Sociology. There have been somewhere in the neighborhood of six to eight major approaches, depending on the vantage point, to leadership theory produced in the scientific literature over the last sixty years and even more have emerged from outside academia (Kilburg & Donohue, 2011). Competing theories include such perspectives as trait theory, situational theory, behavioral theory, competencies theory, network theory of leadership and many more.

Much of the work that a nurse-leader engages in on a daily basis rests in their ability to communicate with others; including clients, colleagues, superiors, and subordinates. Therefore, since this…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Judge, J., & Bono, J. (2000). Five factor model of personality and transformational leadership. Journal of Applied Psychology, 751-765.

Kilburg, R., & Donohue, M. (2011). Toward a "Grand Unifying Theory" of Leadership. Consulting Psychology Journal, 6-25.

Marquis, B., & Huston, C. (2011). Leadership Roles and Management Functions in Nursing: Theory and Application. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Straker, D. (2011). Transformational Leadership. Retrieved February 6, 2011, from Changing Minds:  http://changingminds.org/disciplines/leadership/styles/transformational_leadership.htm
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Health and Socio-Cultual Factors Health and Socio-Cultural

Words: 1535 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43787095

Health and Socio-Cultual Factors

Health and Socio-Cultural Factors

Health and Socio cultural Factors

Health and Socio-Cultural Factors

Health and Socio-Cultural Factors

The value of health being wealth is as old as the history of mankind. People of all times have their philosophies related to healthcare and they developed the precautions and treatment according to their specified theories. As the changes take place in every aspect of life, the theories of healthcare and causes of diseases were also developed and the new concepts were promoted to replace the old concepts and practices.

This paper casts light upon causes of disease and illness with regard to classical and modern concepts. The paper explains the differences between the two concepts and elaborates how the new concepts are better than the classical ones.

Classical Concepts about Health

The classical statement about health was 'Illness is simply a matter of bad luck, bad judgment, or…… [Read More]

References

International Vegetarian Union. (2011). Retrieved from  http://www.ivu.org/history/northam20a/einstein.html 

Natural News. (2008). Retrieved from  http://www.naturalnews.com/023237_minerals_health_soil.html 

World Health Organisation. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.who.int/suggestions/faq/en/index.html
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Healthcare Disparity in Georgia

Words: 1488 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82886029

Healthcare Disparity in Georgia

HIV infection continues to be a substantial trouble in Bibb County, Georgia. This illness substantially impacts lots of areas and Bibb County shares among the greatest HIV rates in America. One reason Bibb County deals with greater rates of infection is due to the high minority populace. Likewise, high levels of poverty and joblessness can make it tough for an individual to keep his/her health plan and access their primary-care service provider and acquire the required therapy for HIV. Social preconception likewise extends unfavorable mindsets of the community and can force the individual from looking for therapy or even testing for HIV.

The very best protection against HIV is enlightening the general public about the illness. outine testing for HIV is vital too. The first intervention would be to associate with a regional testing center and have the ability to check people as well as inform…… [Read More]

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2008). HIV / AIDS among youth. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved July 24, 2011, from  http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/resources/factsheets/PDF/youth.pdf 

Hamilton, D. (2011). What constitutes best practice in healthcare design? The Health Environments Research and Design Journal 4(2), 121-126. Retrieved from http://www.herdjournal.com/ME2/Default.asp

Maurer, F.A., & Smith, C.M. (2009). Community/public health nursing practice: Health for families and populations (4th ed.). St. Louis: Elsevier Saunders.

Bachanas, P., Morris, M., Lewis-Gess, J., Sarett-Cuasay, E., Flores, A., Sirl, K., et al. (2002). Psychological adjustment, substance use, HIV knowledge, and risky sexual behavior in at-risk minority females: developmental differences during adolescence. Journal Of Pediatric Psychology, 27(4), 373-384. Retrieved from MEDLINE with Full Text Database.
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Health System Management

Words: 2067 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38807038

Health System Management

State why this issue selected by the student.

In modern lifestyles, work stress is getting very common. Social life and work both have undergone drastic change in this new century. All the professions have been hit directly and even the physical health of the professionals has been affected badly because of it. With the health of the workers the health of the organization is also affected adversely (AACN, 2008).

On one side, where there is a heavy demand of life improving actions on the other side we see a demand of better customer services. It is an employee's duty to fulfill the demand of the customers, even if he is stressed, while doing so he must have a firm believe on the fact that customers are always correct (AACN, 2008).

There lies an indirect link between the hospital's high employer turnover rate during the residency program and…… [Read More]

References

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2008, September). Fact Sheet: Nursing Shortage. Retrieved March 23, 2009, from AACN Web site:http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Media/FactSheets/NursingShortage.htm

Chulay, M. & Burns, S. (2010) AACN Essentials of Progressive Care Nursing. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill

Hodges, H.F., Keeley, A.C., & Troyan, P.J. (2008). Professional Resilience in Baccalaureate-Prepared Acute Care Nurses: First Steps. Nursing Education Perspectives, 80-89.

Kim, H.J., Shin, K.H. And Swanger, N. (2009). Burnout and engagement: A comparative analysis using the Big Five personality dimensions. International Journal of Hospitality Management 28, 96 -- 104
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Healthcare Psychology Stress Illness Workplace Matrix Use

Words: 807 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10884382

Healthcare Psychology Stress Illness orkplace Matrix Use table describe relationship stress health workplace identify ways reduce stress workplace. If additional sources, include citations consistent APA guidelines.

Associate Level Material

Stress and Illness in the orkplace Matrix

Use the following table to describe the relationship between stress and health in the workplace and to identify ways to reduce stress in the workplace. If you use additional sources, include citations consistent with APA guidelines.

Include reference page.

hat is the relationship between stress and health in the workplace?

There is a strong relationship between stress and health in the workplace, as there is a significant number of individuals from around the world who believe that their jobs have a negative effect on their health. A study involving civil service employees in London generated conclusive results showing that many individuals experience low control in the workplace and that this lead to serious health…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Cardwell, M. And Flanagan, C. (2005). Psychology AS. Nelson Thornes.

Nguyen, S. Creating an Ethical Organizational Culture. Retrieved August 6, 2013, from  http://workplacepsychology.net/2011/02/14/creating-an-ethical-organizational-culture/
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Psychology Models Since Sigmund Freud

Words: 2736 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77173873

Therefore, it is necessary to account for the acquisition of habits.

Due to certain limitations of the behaviorism approach, there have been revisions to the theory over the century. For example, although behaviorism helped people to forecast, alter, and change behavior over time, it did not attempt nor intend to understand how or why the theory worked. The present-day social cognitive approach asserts that behavior is results from an ongoing reciprocal three-way relationship among the individual (cognition), the environment (physical context, which consists of the organizational structure and design, social context or other people), and the person's past behavior. This broader view, called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) incorporates the cognitive in addition to the behavioral approaches to therapy and view people "as active seekers and interpreters of information, not just responders to environmental influences" (Nevid, 2007, p. 484). Many psychologists now believe that behavior is understood best by studying the…… [Read More]

References Cited:

Fall, K.A., Holden, J.M. & Marquis, A. (2004) Theoretical models of counseling and psychotherapy New York: Taylor and Francis.

Freud, Sigmund. (1926). Inhibitions, symptoms, and anxiety, SE, 20(14): 111-205.

Kohlenberg, R.J., Bolling, M.Y., Kanter, J.W. & Parker, C.R. (2002) Clinical behavior analysis: where it went wrong, how it was made good again, and why its future is so bright. Behavior Analyst Today. 3(3): 248-253

Martz, E (2002) Principles of Eastern philosophies viewed from the framework of Yalom's four existential concerns. International Journal for the Advancement of Counseling. 24(1): 31-42
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Psychology Psychotherapy vs Behavior Therapy

Words: 346 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95502778

Behavior therapy uses rewards or reinforcements to create positive behaviors in order to replace destructive behaviors. Desensitizing is an important part of this type of therapy, where the patient confronts something they have been unable to deal with, such as a fear or anxiety, and gradually learns to become desensitized to the problem, which eliminates the negative behavior (Editors, 2006).

Basically, both therapies give the patient ways to deal with problems in their lives. The basic different between the two therapies is how they address and handle these problems. Psychotherapy attempts to give the patient ideas and tools to help them master their problems and reactions to problems, while behavioral therapy attempts to fully eliminate unwanted behaviors by desensitizing and behavior modification.

eferences

Editors. (2006). Psychotherapy: An overview of the types of therapy. etrieved from the Mayo Clinic Web site: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/psychotherapy/MH0000912 March 2007.

Little, N. (2006). Techniques in psychotherapy. etrieved…… [Read More]

References

Editors. (2006). Psychotherapy: An overview of the types of therapy. Retrieved from the Mayo Clinic Web site: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/psychotherapy/MH0000912 March 2007.

Little, N. (2006). Techniques in psychotherapy. Retrieved from the Anxiety-and-depression-solutions.com Web site: http://www.anxiety-and-depression-solutions.com/articles/conventional/psychotherapy/psychotherapy_techniques.php12 March 2007.
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Psychology Motivational Interviewing and Addiction Substance

Words: 1252 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42659880

The book adds substance, extent, lucidity, and substantiation to the clinical and training processes, and will add energy to mainstreaming motivational advances to behavior change in health care. Primary care physicians and practitioners can augment their expert work and improve patient outcomes by learning about motivational interviewing.

Motivational Interviewing can be defined as a client-centered, directive method for making better inherent motivation to change by investigating and resolving ambivalence. It comprises a mixture of philosophical and clinical aspects that together make up the whole of MI. Motivational interviewing distinguishes and recognizes the fact that clients who need to make changes in their lives move toward counseling at dissimilar levels of eagerness to change their behavior. If the counseling is mandated, they may never have thought of altering the behavior in question. A few may have thought about it but not taken action to do it. Others, particularly those freely seeking…… [Read More]

References

Miller, William R. & Rollnick, Stephen. (2002). Motivational interviewing: preparing people for change. New York: The Guilford Press.

Smith, David E. & Seymour, Richard. (2001). Clinician's Guide to Substance Abuse. New York: McGraw-Hill.
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Health Education Plan Issues of

Words: 665 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28920627



It has been said that all types of therapy, regardless of the type, must be characterized by "constancy of therapist's interest no matter how disturbing the subject; suspension of moral judgment; therapist's empathy, insight, understanding, and acceptance; patient's opportunity to speak the unspeakable now; reliability of therapist in keeping appointments, the duration of the session; the attempt to put patient's welfare first; the safe environment that the therapist's structure provides in which the patient can regress;" and "the therapist allowing him/herself to be used as a transference object without the interference of counter-transference" (Niolon 1999).

Clients should not have to feel as if they must censor class-related issues regarding their concerns about money when debating whether to make a life change, or their feelings about a spouse or relative. However, along with empathy and acceptance, the therapist's duty in many forms of therapy (such as in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy) is also…… [Read More]

Reference

Niolon, Richard. (1999). The therapeutic relationship. Psych Page. Retrieved October 30, 2011 at  http://www.psychpage.com/learning/library/counseling/thxrel.html