Filter By:

Sort By:

Reset Filters

Mark Twain Essays (Examples)

Having trouble coming up with an Essay Title?

Use our essay title generator to get ideas and recommendations instantly

Twain's Good Little Boy Twain's
Words: 1787 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 49671857
Read Full Paper  ❯

" In it, he showed a poor boy and a rich boy (the Prince), who exchanged places and found that they each preferred to live in the life to which they had been born. Still, each learned from the other's life and the outcome was not what the Sunday School books had all written. The rich Prince "lived only a few years," but he lived them worthily.

In conclusion, Mark Twain was saying in his Story of the Good Little Boy, it is in a situation where one might expect to find reward that one finds punishment, and it is not how one's religion wants one to live that one finds reward and satisfaction. Also, the authorities in his Story did not exercise justice, so this was another disappointment for the reader, again coming to the conclusion that religion was not the answer to life's problems. It did no good…

Works Cited

Library of Congrress. "America's Story from America's Library." Website at: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/cgi-bin/page.cgi/jb/gilded.

PBS, "Andrew Carnegie: The Gilded Age." Website at  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/carnegie/gildedage.html .

Twain, Mark. "Poor Little Stephen Girard," in Carleton's Popular Readings, Anna Randall-Diehl, ed., New York, 1879, 183-84.

Twain, Mark. The Gilded Age. New York: Classic Literature Library. 1873.

Twain's To the Person Sitting
Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26837199
Read Full Paper  ❯

They are so shrouded in mental and spiritual darkness, say the oppressors that they require outside assistance in the form of religious missionaries and military personnel. Christianity and the armies that propagate it are here to help the "Persons Sitting in Darkness," to save them from themselves. Thus, Twain uses the printed word to demonstrate how American foreign policy is founded on principles of social Darwinism and thinly concealed racism.

Throughout "To the Person Sitting in Darkness," Twain concentrates on lambasting the notion that America stands for freedom, liberty, and Civilization. According to Twain, these concepts are "only for Export." Moreover, they are costly. Twain makes sure to bring up the financial motives for American political maneuvers: "The Actual Thing that the Customer Sitting in Darkness buys with his blood and tears and land and liberty." The word "Customer" drives home the point that money, not concern for the well…

Twain and the Slavery Controversy
Words: 935 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39434877
Read Full Paper  ❯

His decision that Jim is worthy of the same consideration as any other man is not only a sign of Huck's growth, but a direct statement that Twain was making to the people reading his book in a very racially divisive time.

Twain also makes many broader statements about humanity in the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The book is full of many characters who take advantage of others, like the Duke and the King, people who hate and fight senselessly, like the Grangerfords and the Shepherdsons, and even honorable seeming men like Colonel Sherburn, who despite an eloquent speech about honor and the common man's cowardice shot and killed a defenseless drunk. Huck has a major epiphany when he sees the Duke and King, who have betrayed Huck and everyone else they met, tarred and feathered. Despite their actions against him and their obvious lack of regard for others, Huck…

Twain's Use of Irony in The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County
Words: 794 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86534246
Read Full Paper  ❯

Notorious Jumping Frog

Mark Twain's iconic story "The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" is one of the most entertaining and interesting examples of a tall tale. Twain uses the tools of literature expertly, weaving human and irony into the narrative with his usual style and flair.

The narrator is obviously from the east, an educated person, and Simon heeler, the man being interviewed by the narrator, is from the wild west. Right away there are two cultures interacting, and in effect the two cultures are in conflict, which is traditional between eastern and western values at this point in the settling of the United States. The frontier is an unknown concept to genteel, civilized persons from the east so there is a juxtaposition and a conflict of cultures set up at the beginning, making irony and humor a likely outcome with Twain.

The potential for irony is there. Irony…

Works Cited

Twain, Mark. "The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County." Retrieved September 9,

2011, from http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/lavender/jumpingfrog.html.

Twain Involve Slavery in Huck
Words: 1155 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86417438
Read Full Paper  ❯

He had the whitest shirt on you ever see, too, and the shiniest hat" (Twain, 37); "They said he was a p'fessor in a college, and could talk all kinds of languages, and knowed everything. nd that ain't the wust. They said he could vote when he was at home" (idem). The white man who considered his white ancestry all it took to make him better than any black person, regardless of whatever qualities he or she may have had, is the very expression of a society that was gravely affected by the gangrene of slavery and would bear the scars of segregation for almost another century after the bolition ct had been passed.

Twain's choice for the time setting of his novel proved to be well thought and pointed at those who were still blinded by the slightest shade of dark on the skin of their fellow countrymen. Mentalities…

Another striking scene is revealed by the discussion between Huck and the runaway Jim, the slaved owned by the widow Douglas. Jim is telling his story about the fourteen dollars he once had and lost, first by making the wrong decision of investing ten of them in a cow who died. After he tells Huck the whole story of how he came to loose all of his money, he concludes: "Yes; en I's rich now, come to look at it. I owns mysef, en I's wuth eight hund'd dollars. I wisht I had de money, I wouldn' want no mo'" (Twain, 65).

The comparison between owning a cow and owning oneself and Jim's consideration of being rich based on his former value as a slave and not on his value as a human being are words that should be engraved on the stone wall of every school. Twain was right to choose a period in history that left the American people with numerous things to be proud of, but also with one of the worst and most unfortunate aspects of its inheritance: slavery and after that, segregation.

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Collier & Son. 1918

Scoundrels in Twain's Adventures of
Words: 781 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37775098
Read Full Paper  ❯

However, this label can only be loosely applied to Tom, as society accepts that the scoundrel will grow out of him, given his proper upbringing.

Second, dangerous scoundrels often seem humorous, but the danger they pose cannot be underestimated. The most blaring examples of dangerous scoundrels in the novel are Pap, Huck's father, and the Duke and the Dauphin. Pap is a drunk who has a reputation for causing trouble. If he were simply a drunk, however, he would be classified as a societal scoundrel. Instead, he is a dangerous man who beats his son and takes advantage of him for his money. Twain clearly disapproves of Pap, as his actions toward Huck, despite Huck's desire to have a family are abysmal. Twain's judgment against Pap is avenged as dies early on in the novel, although the reader and Huck do not know about it until the end. In addition…

Chopin Twain Etc Change in
Words: 1496 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17064575
Read Full Paper  ❯

Herein is composed a character who captures the internal conflict that would identify America on its path to Civil ar.

In Twain's work, Huck emerges as a figure whose behavior and ideology are stimulated by a discomfort with the circumstances constraining him. Though painted as a portrait of one young man, the adventures which give the novel its title are actually a series of events wherein Huck brazenly flouts the standards which had given the pre-Civil ar delta its cultural outlook. His flight to freedom is guided by the juxtaposed but equally inapt incarcerations which he endured both at the pious hands of the idow Douglas and the abusive hands of his drunken father. Certainly, his staged death and his river-raft escape here would be explicit forms of active protest to the church-going morality of the former and the violent authority of the latter. In both, we see the religious…

Works Cited

Chopin, Kate. (1898). The Storm. About Literature. Online at  http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/kchopin/bl-kchop-thestorm.htm 

Eliot, T.S. (1917). The Love Song of Alfred J. Prufrock. The Egoist.

Robinson, E.A. (1921). Mr. Flood's Party. Web Books. Online at  http://www.web-books.com/Classics/Poetry/Anthology/Robinson_E/MrFlood.htm 

Twain, Mark. (1884). The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Charles L. Webster and Co.

Narrative Use in Twain's Huck Finn
Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28407876
Read Full Paper  ❯

Narrative Style of Twain's The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

The entire structure of the novel is one of frustrated attempt to escape from restrictions only to find the refuge susceptible to invasion and destruction.

Huckleberry Finn himself is the most American of heroes: he is the boy-man in a male world... And solitary -- alone even among others. (Solomon, 175).

While the vast majority of critical analysis conducted on Mark Twain's The

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn focuses on the symbolic significance of the river within the overall narrative; few scholars have suggested that Huck himself may have been constructed in such a way as to evoke the emergence of America and the realization of its national identity. A youth filled with the spirit of rebellion, yearning to live free from the dominion of an arbitrary authority, self-sufficient and reliant on his own intelligence to guide him, Huckleberry Finn embodies the…

U S History From 1865-1945 Mark
Words: 1059 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64912054
Read Full Paper  ❯

(oyer, 2001)

Sixty-hour weeks, no insurance, no compensation for injuries or overtime, and no pensions symbolized the workers' plight. And when the workers went on strike over the inequities, the government sided with the owners.

The mass society of the late nineteenth century had no diversity. It was a society in which the rich and powerful manipulated the existence of the politically and economically powerless mass through overwhelming mass production, mass communication, and mass distribution.

Examples (oyer 2, 2001) Mass production transformed the way Americans lived and worked at the beginning of the twentieth century. Thanks to its role in creating mass consumer culture (mass society), it constitutes a vital part of contemporary life. It was responsible for the dehumanizing assembly-line work of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century as well as the physical comfort enjoyed by most people in industrialized countries. The 1926 edition of the Encyclopedia ritannica…

Bibliography

Boyer, P.S. (2001). Early republic, era of the. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from encyclopedia.com:  http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O119-EarlyRepublicEraofthe.html 

Boyer, P.S. 2 (2001). Gilded age. Retrieved February 23 from encylcopedia. com, 2009, from The Oxford companion to U.S. history: h ttp:/ / www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O119-GildedAge.html

Calhoun, C.W. (2006). The Gilded Age: Perspectives on the origins of modern America. New York: Rowman and Littlefield. ( http://books.google.com/books?id=XrZTTCaCRAUC&printsec=frontcover ) enotes.com. (n.d.). Overview: 1900's. Retrieved February 25, 2009, from Enotes.com:

 http://www.enotes.com/1900-american-decades-about/introduction

Twain Incorporates Humor by Using
Words: 565 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 32730455
Read Full Paper  ❯

They are the same age but Buck's family is wealthy and, for all intents and purposes, he should be refined but he is not.

Twain uses satire with the Grangerfords by making fun of Emmeline, who keeps a notebook full of notations like car wrecks, other kinds of bad luck, and suffering because she would later use those records to compose poetry.

The Grangeford's are also used for Twain to point out the hypocrisy of people. They are "church goers" and one of Mr. Grangerford's sermons is about brotherly love yet his family is feuding with another family for a reason no one can remember.

Examples of imagery in Chapter 19 include the days and nights swimming by, sliding along slowly. e read about the bullfrogs "a-cluttering" (323) and the cool breeze "fanning" (323) their faces. The intent on this scene is to bring the woods alive for the reader.…

Work Cited

Clemens, Samuel. "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." The Heath Anthology of American

Literature. Lauter, Paul, ed. Lexington D.C. Heath and Company. 1990. Print.

Prince and the Pauper
Words: 1432 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79016495
Read Full Paper  ❯

Mark Twain, The Prince and the Pauper

Calais, France

Anno Domini 1544,

October the First

My dear Hugh,

It is with a heavy heart that I take up quill and inkpot to pen this sad missive, informing thee of the death of Miles thy brother during that recent battle between his majesty our most puissant sovereign King Henry the Eighth and his sworn enemy, that perifidious frog the Dauphin of France, which did of late take place in pitched battle at Boulogne-sur-Mer in the month of August, in the year of our lord 1544.

As doubtless thou hast heard at Hendon Hall, in the heat of summer His Majesty did command His Grace the Duke of Norfolk to raise the engines of siege so as to break the will of the French garrison in that wretched town, so close to the Channel which doth separate our blessed England from the…

Fennimore Cooper's Literary Offenses
Words: 958 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29905395
Read Full Paper  ❯

Twain and Cooper

Cover Letter

The following essay looks at Mark Twain's reaction to James Fennimore Cooper's writing, and more specifically at the praise given to Cooper by these people. The reader should take away that Twain was correct in what he wrote because he was structurally accurate. However, Twain slights Cooper in that he looks at his works from an only a structural standpoint. Cooper's works meant much more to American literature than the face value of the books. Cooper was an innovator as far as American literature went, and gave American writers a distinct voice.

At first the essay strikes of jealousy, but Twain seemed more irritated by what the critics overlooked than he was of Cooper's writing. The assignment was enjoyable because it speaks to the clear differences between a visionary writer and a more structural one. Twain is more of an engineer than a creator. He…

Huckleberry Finn and What Makes an American
Words: 1401 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76425793
Read Full Paper  ❯

Huckleberry Finn and What Makes an American

What Makes Twain's Huckleberry Finn American?

"Those canonic ideals -- self-government, equal opportunity, freedom of speech and association, a belief in progress, were first proclaimed during the era of the evolution and the early republic and have developed more expansive meanings since then," these are the basic core ideals which make something truly American (Kazin & McCartin 1). The freedom to live as we want, say what we want, and govern ourselves -- these are what make us Americans in culture and ideology. In literature, these core elements are also often what define a book or character as truly American. Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn adheres to the very ideals of what it is to be an American, which is what makes the work and its author truly Americanized in style and content.

One of the most important ideals in the concept of Americanism…

References

Jehlen, Myra. "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Classic American Literature." Banned in Concord. 1995. Web. http://www.dlackey.org/weblog/docs/Banned_in_Concord.pdf

Kazin, Michael & McCartin, Joseph Anthony. Americanism: New Perspectives on the History of an Ideal. University of North Carolina Press. 2006.

Twain, Mark. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Harper Bros. 1910.

Styles of Henry James and
Words: 740 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61655454
Read Full Paper  ❯

This style is in stark contrast to the writing style of Mark Twain, despite the fact that both authors are examining the broader aspects of life through their individual characters.

Twain and James also differ in the level of emotionality that is attached to their work. Twain writes with a vibrant passion, seeing the world through the lenses of his wide-eyed protagonists. There is a clear emotional connection between Twain and his characters, and the stories that he is telling. James, on the other hand, seems rather detached from his stories and his characters, almost as if he is viewing them from a distance. His description of Daisy's death is completely detached, as is the dialogue between the characters themselves. For example, even when Mrs. Costello is gossiping about the relationship between the Millers and Eugenio, she seems very reserved and staid -- not at all as if she were…

Works Cited

James, Henry, "Daisy Miller" In Nina Baym, ed. The Norton Anthology: American Literature. (Shorter Seventh Edition; Volume 1) pp. 319-356

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Forgotten Books, 1925

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Words: 1383 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 2918036
Read Full Paper  ❯

Huck Finn

In Mark Twain's Huckeberry Finn, the title character and escaped slave Jim bond together in their mutual quest for freedom. Neither knows where they are headed, but they do know where they have been and what they are running from. Both have endured a different type of slavery. Jim escapes from the actual legally sanctioned and racialized form of slavery; whereas Huck Finn is running from an abusive father who literally locks him up. Therefore, Huck Finn and his friend Jim are mirrors for each other as well as partners. It matters not that their backgrounds are different, and in spite of the overarching theme of race, the two friends bond psychologically in a mutually respectful and mutually protective relationship.

Huckleberry Finn and Jim go out of their ways to help one another while they are on the island, and after. There is no formal bond of loyalty…

References

Arac, J. (1992). Nationalism, hypercanonization, and Huckleberry Finn. Boundary 2, 19(1).

Chadwick-Joshua, J. (1998). The Jim Dilemma: Reading Race in Huckleberry Finn. University Press of Mississippi.

Jehlen, M. (1995). From Banned in Concord: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and classic American literature. In The Cambridge Companion to Mark Twain, Forrest G. Robinson ed. (Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 1995)

Robinson, F.G. (1988). The characterization of Jim in Huckleberry Finn. Nineteenth Century Literature 43(3): Dec 1988.

Satan Has Many Names in Literature
Words: 1917 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80695130
Read Full Paper  ❯

Satan has many names in literature, beginning with the Bible, and they are not limited to the image that people have come to associate with his person. For example, Lucifer means "Angel of Light" (apparently the station from which he fell), but he has also been called "The Prince of the Power of the Air," "The Devil," "The Prince of Demons," and, more in line with the needs of this story, "Mephistopheles." He, or a character very like him, is seen as the central opposite of good in many legends, stories, religious writings and artistic depictions throughout history. It seems every culture has to believe in the dichotomous good and evil, so there has to be a primarily "good" character, and a primarily "bad" character. The two stories selected for this comparison contrast paper, Mark Twain's "The Mysterious Stranger" and Goethe's "Faust," use Satan as a central theme, but they…

Works Cited

Goethe, Johann Wolfgang. Faust: A Tragedy. Trans. Frank Claudy. Washington, D.C.: Wm. H. Morrison, Law Bookseller and Publisher, 1886. Print.

Twain, Mark. The Mysterious Stranger: A Romance. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1916. Print.

Children's Literature
Words: 2790 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44250974
Read Full Paper  ❯

Children's Literature

"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy." This adage takes on various meanings according to context -- in the early twenty-first century, it will most likely be used to imply too much seriousness about schoolwork. But in the consideration of children's literature in the nineteenth century, we face the prospect of a society where child labor was actually a fact of life. e are familiar with the stereotypes that still linger on in the collective imagination, of young boys forced to work as chimney-sweeps or girls forced to labor in textile factories. But the simple fact is that between the present day and the emergence of children's literature as a category of its own, largely during the nineteenth century, there has been a widespread reform in labor practices and social mores which has altered the meaning of what "work" might mean for young Jack, or…

Works Cited

Alcott, Louisa May. Little Women. Edited with an introduction by Elaine Showalter. New York: Penguin Books, 1989. Print.

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Edited with an introduction by John Seelye. New York: Penguin Books, 1986. Print.

Bad Experience With a Priest Comparison of
Words: 8554 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8779256
Read Full Paper  ❯

Bad Experience ith a Priest:

comparison of the Catholicism aspects in Scott's Ivanhoe and Twain's a Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

In reading Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, one cannot deny that the blame for the collapse of Hank's new civilization falls on the Church. Throughout the novel, Twain paints a negative image of the Church and its priests. This negative image can also be found in Sir alter Scott's Ivanhoe. Scott gives us characters such as the confused Templar and the misaligned Prior. Both writers have poor views of religion and this is evident in their unflattering portraits of the corrupt medieval church.

Scott's portrait of the Prior is not a very pleasant one. Nothing about him seems to be spiritual. hen we first meet him, his costume is basically appropriate for a priest, but it is said to be "composed of materials much…

Works Cited

Boston Literary World. 15 February 1890. University of Virginia. 10 March 2003.  http://etext.virginia.edu/railton/yankee/cyboslw.html .

Chandler, Alice. "A Dream of Order." Lincoln: University of Nebraska press.

Church. 2003. Twainquotes. 10 March 2003.  http://www.twainquotes.com/Church.html .

Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court." New York W.W. Norton & Company. (1982).

Classism and Racism Literature Is
Words: 3754 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 70800341
Read Full Paper  ❯

"It was a curious childhood, full of weird, fantastic impressions and contradictory influences, stimulating alike to the imagination and that embryo philosophy of life which begins almost with infancy."

Paine 14) His consummate biography written in 1912, just after his death claims that Clemens spent the majority of his childhood in the company of his siblings, and the family slaves as his parents where often otherwise engaged, his father and inventor and his mother challenged by the running of such a large family with very little support.

Mark Twain did not remember ever having seen or heard his father laugh. The problem of supplying food was a somber one to John Clemens; also, he was working on a perpetualmotion machine at this period, which absorbed his spare time, and, to the inventor at least, was not a mirthful occupation. Jane Clemens was busy, too. Her sense of humor did not…

Works Cited

Barnard, Robert. "Imagery and Theme in Hard Times." Charles Dickens's Hard Times. Ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House, 1987. 39-null8

Connor, Steven. "Deconstructing Hard Times." Charles Dickens's Hard Times. Ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House, 1987. 113-120.

Dickens, Charles. Hard Times. Ed. Paul Schlicke. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Leonard, James S., Thomas A. Tenney, and Thadious M. Davis, eds. Satire or Evasion?: Black Perspectives on Huckleberry Finn. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1992.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by
Words: 3626 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 80042730
Read Full Paper  ❯

Examining the difficult process that Huck has when he finally determines not to turn Jim in can be especially helpful in this. In addition, readers of this opinion can discuss the effects of Twain's own divergence from society when contemplating the ways in which his articulation of his nonstandard views into text affected society.

Thus, while two sides clearly exist in this debate -- one stating that Twain's novel advocates racism through the relationship between Huck and Jim and the other arguing that Twain actually condemns the ideology by using this relationship -- a compromise can be reached. Each side can still find Twain's novel valuable in a discussion of the effects of racism on society and the role literature plays in those effects. Thus, the need to ban this novel from the classroom is null and void when this type of compromise can be reached.

Regardless of the fact…

Works Cited

Alonso, Alex. "Won't You Please Be My Nigga: Double Standards with a Taboo Word."

Streetgangs Magazine. 30 May 2003. 17 April 2009. < http://www.streetgangs.com/magazine/053003niggas.php>

Depalma, Anthony. "A Scholar Finds Huck Finn's Voice in Twain's Writing About a Black Youth." The New York Times. 7 July 1992. 17 April 2009.

Fox, Laurie. "Huckleberry Finn N-word lesson draws controversy." The Dallas News. 1

Huck Finn
Words: 1454 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71874772
Read Full Paper  ❯

Conscience vs. Societal Pressure in Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn

The novel Huckleberry Finn (1876), by Samuel Clemens (published under Clemens's pen name, Mark Twain) contains myriad personal and social conflicts, mainly on the part of its narrator, Huck, between what his conscience tells him and what society of the time (the pre-Abolition American South) believed. In this essay, I will explore various incidents in which Huck decides between what he instinctively feels (his conscience) and what he knows society considers right.

The story of Huckleberry Finn is "essentially a process by which the hero gains self-knowledge and finds his own identity. In the process, he also learns about the world in which he lives and the nature of evil" ("Major Theme"). Huck often finds himself having to disobey social conventions and rules in order to follow his conscience. Usually, however, he feels guilty and sinful afterward, but also knows he…

Works Cited

Baym, Nina, et al. "Mark Twain (Samuel L. Clemens)." In The Norton Anthology

of American Literature, 1865-1914, Vol. C. (Nina Baym et al., Eds.). New

York, Norton, 2003. 212-215.

'Major Theme." Huckleberry Finn: Themes. Retrieved April 20, 2005, from:

Calaveras County as Many an
Words: 1074 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 6315591
Read Full Paper  ❯

"

However, as Baender demonstrates, it has to be too much of a fluke to have such "sophisticated" (192) humor. That is, telling the story tongue-in-cheek as such as serious anecdote. Twain, himself, reflected on using this device in "How to tell a story," when he said that the "humorous story is told gravely." And that the teller should "conceal the fact that he even dimly suspects...there is something funny." Even before he wrote the story he said about Coon's delivery: "He was a dull person, and ignorant; he had no gift as a story-teller, and no invention...he was entirely serious, for he was dealing with what to him were austere facts...he saw no humor in his tale..." (Baender 194)

Twain gives hints about his feelings of this seriousness by stating in his first draft of the story: "...the spectacle of a man drifting serenely along through such a queer…

References

Baender, Paul. The "Jumping Frog" as a Comedian's First Virtue. Modern Philology

1963) 60.3: 192-200

Bruggers, James. Biologist hopes to save celebrated frog. Contra Costa Times.

Cuff, Roger Penn. Mark Twain's Use of California Folklore in His Jumping Frog

Tom Sawyer
Words: 897 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34471605
Read Full Paper  ❯

Tom Sawyer. There are four references used for this paper.

Mark Twain is one of America's most well-known and respected writers. It is interesting to define satire and how Twain uses it in the Sunday school scene in the book 'Tom Sawyer'.

Defining Satire

In order to understand how Mark Twain uses satire in his stories, it is important to understand exactly what satire is. Satire is a "literary manner which blends a critical attitude with humor and wit to the end that human institutions or humanity may be improved. Satire is the literary art of diminishing or derogating a subject by making it ridiculous and evoking towards it attitudes of amusement, contempt, scorn, and indignation. The true satirist is conscious of the frailty of institutions of man's devising and attempts through laughter, not so much to tear them down, but to ridicule their folly and shortcomings to inspire a…

Works Cited

(Mark Twain. (Accessed 03 December, 2004).

American Dream in Arthur Miller's Death of
Words: 1635 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87974772
Read Full Paper  ❯

American Dream" in Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman" with References to Mark Twain and Henry Thoreau

Arthur Miller's play entitled "Death of a Salesman" is a story about a man who has created a conflict with his family because of his great belief in the American Dream. Willy Loman, the main character in the story, makes a living by being a salesman, and the story revolves around his frustrations in life, particularly the strain in his relationship with his eldest son, iff Loman. Willy's frustrations stems from the fact that iff was not able to have a permanent and stable job, and is often fired from work because of some petty offense or misconduct on his son's part. Willy always insist that his son iff must develop relations with other people, and he must also have charisma and the ability to interact with them in order to achieve prosperity…

Bibliography

Miller, Arthur. "Death of a Salesman." New York: Penguin Books USA Inc. 1949: 137-8.

Thoreau, Henry. E- text of "Walden: Part I, Economy." American Transcendentalism Web site. 15 November 2002  http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/webtexts/walden/chapter01a.html .

Twain, Mark. "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court." New York: Penguin Books USA Inc. 61, 303.

Pudd'nhead Wilson About the Author the Well-Known
Words: 1452 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 2021539
Read Full Paper  ❯

Pudd'nhead ilson

About the author

The well-known author Marl Twain was born in Florida, Missouri, and when he was four years old he moved with his family to a port on the Mississippi River called Hannibal, Missouri. He began setting type for in 1851 and at the same time contributed sketches to his brother Orion's Hannibal Journal. Later, Twain was a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi River until the American Civil ar.

Further on, in 1863 on the Territorial Enterprise in Virginia City, Nevada he became a reporter in 1862, and began signing his articles with the pseudonym Mark Twain which was a Mississippi River expression that meant "two fathoms deep." And thus, in 1865 Mark Twain published The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and the author as well as the story became national sensations within few months (Under the Sun).

However, in the 1870s and 1880s are counted…

Works Cited

About Mark Twain. Under the Sun. www.underthesun.cc/

Pudd'nhead Wilson Homepage. Electronic Text Center. www.etext.lib.virginia.edu

The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson - Mark Twain. Boondocks Net.com.

www.boondocksnet.com

Southern Literature
Words: 1364 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 30692851
Read Full Paper  ❯

roots of Southern literature and how the authors view moral freedom in their works. It has 5 sources.

When the Puritans of Europe left their homeland for the vast and wild continent of America they envisioned social and religious freedom. For them American had been a deserted place and the only enemy they have had been the Natives. However, they did not envision the fact that they would undergo severe battle of the inner self as well as the harsh external environment. As they spend more of their time on the continent they realized that the promise of a free new land has been a dream and that in order to survive they have abandon their old ways to become more focused and adapt to the environment. The pervasive and massiveness of the diversified American culture at the time posed a mixture of excitement as well as danger for them.…

References

Blair, John. "Mexico and the Borderlands in Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses." Critique 42.3, Spring 2001: 301-07.

Arnold, Edwin T. "Horseman, Ride On." World & I Oct. 1998: 259-67.

Paine, Albert Bigelow. Mark Twain: A Biography, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1912; BoondocksNet Edition, 2001.  http://www.boondocksnet.com/twaintexts/biography/ (Aug. 1, 2003).

Lewis, R.W.B. "The Hero in the New World: William Faulkner's 'The Bear'." Bear, Man and God, 306-322.

Naturalist and Realist Literary Movements
Words: 2280 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71336904
Read Full Paper  ❯



The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is perhaps the best example of Realism in literature because of how Twain presents it to us. Morality becomes something that Huck must be consider and think out as opposed to something forced down his throat. He knows the moral thing to do would be to report Jim, noting, " "People would call me a low down abolitionist and despise me for keeping mum -- but that don't make no difference. I ain't agoing to tell" (Twain 269). Furthermore, he cannot send Miss atson his letter he because his friendship with Jim trumps the morality he knows. Similarly, Jim wrestles with issues of good vs. bad. This is evident because of they way he decides to escape. He even begins to understand what Huck is going through when Huck does not turn him in. His revelation forces him to realize that Huck is "de bes'…

Works Cited

Crane, Stephen. Maggie, a Girl of the Streets. New York: Random House. 2001.

The Red Badge of Courage. New York: Aerie Books Ltd. 1986.

Steinbeck, John. Of Mice and Men and Cannery Row. New York: Penguin Books. 1986.

Clemens, Samuel. "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." The Heath Anthology of American Literature. Lauter, Paul, ed. Lexington D.C. Heath and Company. 1990.

Successful Narrative Applying These Techniques
Words: 2244 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19075561
Read Full Paper  ❯

This illustrates the importance of tension and conflict in the narrative, no matter where it comes from or how the author uses it.

Often, the tension or conflict in resolved in the last paragraph. Another writer notes, "In the final paragraph of the essay, the author reflects on the larger meaning or importance of the experience described" ("Writing skills," 2007). Thus, the conflict has served some kind of purpose in the writer's life, and the writer has learned something or grown better because of it. The conflict should not be too contrived or unbelievable, so the narrative's subject is an important aspect of the conflict. If the event that occurred really did not contain tension, drama, or conflict, it is probably not worthy of using as the subject of a narrative, because it is not sufficiently interesting to hold an average reader's attention. The reader must care about the outcome…

References

DeSoto, M. (2005). Writing a narrative essay. Retrieved 19 Jan. 2008 from the Glendale Community College Web site: http://glory.gc.maricopa.edu/~mdesoto/101online_new/assignment3writing.htm

Editors. (2008). Writing activities: Narrative. Retrieved 19 Jan. 2008 from the Holt, Rinehart and Winston Web site:  http://my.hrw.com/support/hos/hostwritingactivities4/hostswritingact4_narr4.html 

How to write a narrative. (2008). Retrieved 19 Jan. 2008 from the Northern Illinois University Web site:  http://www.engl.niu.edu/wac/narr_how.html 

Montgomery, J.K., & Kahn, N.L. (2003). You are going to be an author: Adolescent narratives as intervention. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 24(3), 143+.

Huck Finn Jim and Huck A Relationship
Words: 666 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87813064
Read Full Paper  ❯

Huck Finn

Jim and Huck: A Relationship in Spite of Race

As Leslie Gregory points out in "Finding Jim," Twain used the "minstrel mask" as a stereotypical platform upon which to base one of the central characters of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. And yet behind the "mask" is a very human and humane man, who, in spite of a tendency towards superstition, acts as a kind of father figure to Huck, revealing to the boy the proper path to manhood -- just as Huck promises to take Jim on the path to freedom. This paper will show how their relationship is symbiotic though charged with racial tension at times.

Huck begins the novel with a "misconception" of Jim's personhood (Gregory). Although this misconception is not as cruel as Tom's (Tom has no scruples about playing tricks on Jim), Huck's conscience is informed by his society (and certainly by his…

Works Cited

Gregory, Leslie. "Finding Jim Behind the Mask: The Revelation of African-American

Humanity in Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." Ampersand. 30 Mar 2013. Web.

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. NY: Harper, 1912.

Characters and the Way They
Words: 2484 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 5305878
Read Full Paper  ❯

y the final chapter, although Huck has come to like Silas and Sally, he knows that they are still a part of the society he has come to distrust and fear so, before the dust from his adventures is fully settled he is already planning to detach himself again:" but I reckon I got to light out for the territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can't stand it. I been there before" (chapter 43, Electronic text center, University of Virginia Library).

In Austen's novel the theme is to show the violation of the moral and social codes and its disastrous results in a humored way. While human follies and stupidities lead to the violation of the code and only the self-knowledge can prevent the human error, Jane Austen's main theme becomes to know yourself. Through self-analysis Emma changes…

Bibliography

Twain, Mark (1835-1910)

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library

 http://etext.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Huc.html