Mary Shelley Essays (Examples)

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Shelley's Frankenstein

Words: 1367 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10490193

Frankenstein

"You, who call Frankenstein your friend, seem to have a knowledge of my crimes and his misfortunes. But in the detail which he gave you of them he could not sum up the hours and months of misery which I endured wasting in impotent passions. For while I destroyed his hopes, I did not satisfy my own desires," (Shelley, Frankenstein, Chapter 24)

Frankenstein's monster remains one of the most misunderstood characters in English literature. Part of the problem can be traced to the commercialization of the book and its adaptation for cinema. As Mary Shelley's work has been appropriated by the horror genre, the monster has taken on a new form as an evil and fearsome creature rather than being the tragic and lonely figure that he actually is in the novel. Film versions of Frankenstein have stripped away from the monster some of the core components of his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hammond, Kim. "Monsters of Modernity: Frankenstein and Modern Environmentalism." Cultural Geographies 11(2). April 2004.

Johnson, Barbara. "My Monster/My Self." Diacritics. Vol. 12, No. 2.

Laplace-Sinatra, Michael. "Science, Gender and Otherness in Shelley's Frankenstein and Kenneth Brannagh's Film Adaptation." European Romantic Review. Vol 9, Issue 2. 1998.

Picart, Caroline Joan S. Remaking the Frankenstein Myth on Film. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003.
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Monstrosity in Frankenstein Mary Shelly's Frankenstein Or

Words: 1252 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22864437

Monstrosity in Frankenstein

Mary Shelly's Frankenstein; Or, the Modern Prometheus, which is considered by many to be one of the first science-fiction novels that was ever written, is full of anti-Enlightenment sentiments, many of which are still present in society today. Shelley's novel, published first in 1818 and then edited and republished in 1831, takes a look at the conflicts between science and religion. Through this examination, Shelley provides insight into the dangers of playing God and taking the forces of nature into one's own hands. Seeing as Mary Shelley was the daughter of two well-known Enlightenment intellectual figures, it can be posited that Shelley understood the arguments and beliefs of the movement and could provide a well thought out argument against the movement. Shelley's anti-Enlightenment stance takes a look at the dangers that may arise through unsupervised educational pursuits, which include the unharnessed exploration of science and denunciation or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kant, Immanuel. Was ist Aufklarung? Modern History Sourcebook. Fordham University.

Web. 3 May 2012.

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus. Project Gutenberg. Web. 3 May
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Life Lessons in Shelley's Frankenstein

Words: 1580 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2721287

He notes that at the time of the novel's publication, there was growing concern and distrust for unregulated scientific experimentation. He claims that these beliefs "so successfully dominated the cultural sphere that the word "Frankenstein" was soon used to refer to the creature created by the scientist rather than the scientist himself. Frankenstein, therefore, became the monstrous and supernatural offspring of the practices of science" (illis 236). Mellor suggests that Frankenstein was the first creature that was created by a single man and Shelley created her myth "single-handedly" (Mellor 38). Victor teaches us some valuable lessons and the most important might be to never forget the law of unintended consequences. Victor never considered that his creation would be hideous and that oversight ruined everything for him and the creature. Victor's desire to know more lead to more destruction than he could have ever imagined.

ork Cited

Berry Laura. The Child,…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Berry Laura. The Child, the State, and the Victorian Novel. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. 1999.

Brackett, Virginia. "Frankenstein." Companion to the British Novel: Beginnings through the

19th Century. 2006. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Information Retrieved April 29,

2009. http://www.fofweb.com
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Nature in Shelley's Frankenstein Mary

Words: 1680 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31964037

The monster knows right from wrong and he choice is one of desperation. Victor never realizes the difference between right and wrong because it is not within his nature to do so.

Frankenstein will always be closely examined when it comes to matters of humanity because of its subject matter. Victor has every opportunity to do something good with his life and the most he can muster is achieving his own dreams of glory by attempting to recreate life. Despite his education and loving family, Victor swerves off the normal path and skids onto the freakish one. The monster he creates encompasses more goodness than he does but he cannot see this because he is just like the rest of humanity - unable to see beyond the monster's appearance. The monster tried everything within his power to remove himself from the freakish path that Victor placed him on and gain…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. "An excerpt from a study of Frankenstein: or, the New Prometheus." Partisan Review. 1965. Gale Resource Database. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.comInformation Retrieved December 4, 2008.

Bloom on Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley." Bloom's Classic Critical Views. 2008. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Information Retrieved December 4, 2008. http://www.fofweb.com

Gould, Stephen. "The Monster's Human Nature." Natural History. 1994. EBSCO Resource Database. Information Retrieved December 4, 2008. http://search.epnet.com/

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam Books. 1981.
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Danger of Knowledge in Shelley's

Words: 1187 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28344278

He is over-confident and refuses to look at anything negative that could happen as a result of his endeavors. He fails to believe that any unintended consequences would be negative enough to make him regret his decision. He simply does not see what he does not want to see. e all do this at one point or another when we want something. However, Victor's choices involve other people and he demonstrates he does not care. He realizes he is "solely wrapped up" (36) with his experiment and does not care. Here we see how knowledge is dangerous because it becomes more important than life itself.

The thirst of knowledge is linked to destruction as we watch the events of Victor's life unfold. The most important fact we see as Victor recounts his tale to Robert is how Victor could not the danger he is now expressing to Robert while he…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam Books, 1981.
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Frankenstein an Analysis of Mary

Words: 1625 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32354673

It has "… taken on a life of its own independent of Mary Shelley's text, and indeed even independent of certain parts of her narrative." (Goodall 19) This has resulted in film and stage play versions of the novel.

The reason for this continuing popularity lies largely with the relevance of the themes; particularly with regard to the theme of man 'playing God' through his application of scientific knowledge and his need to manipulate and control nature. This then can be linked to many questions and issued of contemporary importance. One could, for example, take modern scientific attempts at cloning animals and the possibility of human cloning. The question arises whether science will create monsters in the future through scientific knowledge. As one critic notes; "The public debate on cloning continues to be littered with references to Frankenstein." (Goodall 19)

Furthermore, "Mary Shelley's story has been taken variously to illustrate…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Britton, Jeanne M. "Novelistic Sympathy in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein." Studies in Romanticism 48.1 (2009): 3+. Questia. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. ( http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/frankenstein/section1.rhtml )

Frankenstein: Introduction. Web. 16 Feb. 2011.

(http://www.enotes.com/frankenstein)
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How Bronte and Shelley Develop the Theme of Abandonment in Their Novels

Words: 2509 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63849391

Abandonment in Shelley's Frankenstein and Bronte's Jane Eyre: a Comparison

Abandonment is a substantial theme in literature written by women. It appears in the poems of Emily Dickinson, in the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, and in the novels of the Bronte sisters -- uthering Heights and Jane Eyre. It is not a theme that is only addressed by women in literature, to be sure, but it is one that seems to be utilized most evocatively by them. This paper will provide a comparative analysis of two literary sources -- Shelley's Frankenstein and Bronte's Jane Eyre -- to show how abandonment can cause depression, deep emotions and despair, but how it can also open up new doors for an individual; it will show how unprofitable it can be and yet how beneficial to one's life it can also prove in the long run.

Jane Eyre is a romantic-gothic novel by…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. London: J. M. Dent, 1905. Print.

Linker, Damon. "Terrence Malick's profoundly Christian vision." The Week, 2016.

Web. 2 Apr 2016.

Macdonald, D. L.; Scherf, Kathleen, eds. Frankenstein: The 1818 version. NY:
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Ellen Moers

Words: 1087 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3118576

Mary Shelley & Ellen Moers

Creation and Abortion: The Creator's Dilemma in Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" as analyzed by Ellen Moers

In the essay, "Female Gothic: the Monster's Mother," author Ellen Moers provided a new perspective in interpreting Mary Shelley's Gothic cum science fiction novel, "Frankenstein." In the essay, she discussed the parallelisms between the Mary Shelley and the character of Victor Frankenstein, which she both considered as "creators." One parallelism that stands out in the lives of Shelley and Frankenstein is their being both creators and destructors of human life. The 'creator's dilemma' is when Shelley and Frankenstein experienced giving "birth" to life while also being responsible for its death upon its birth.

This argument presented by Moers is given central focus in this paper. Using her argument that the novel "Frankenstein" presented the "creator's dilemma," where creators Shelley and Frankenstein both became creators and destructors of human life. This…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Shelley, M. (1991). Frankenstein. NY: Bantam Books.
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Voltaire's Candide and Shelley's Frankenstein

Words: 1179 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39108725

This section of the novel opens our eyes to the real monster of the story and, as a result, we feel sympathy for the creature. His desire to learn about life and the world around him is amazing and his encounter with the De Lacey family demonstrates just how much he wants to makes friends and be a part of his "community." He teaches himself to read and attempts to make friends with this family because he is aware of the importance of connecting with others. atching them, he is filled with "sensations of a peculiar and overpowering nature" (Shelley 93) and wants to be a part of their world. He is a good creature at first and Shelley does an excellent job of portraying him in this light. He only becomes evil after he suffers rejection and abuse from those that he is trying to connect with on a…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam Books. 1981.

Voltaire. Candide and Other Stories. New York: Signet Classics. 1961.
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Frankenstein Terminator 3

Words: 1828 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 674407

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and James Cameron's Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines have come to occupy similar positions in American popular culture -- largely, for their iconic appeal -- but they are also comparable in more subtle ways. Specifically, each tale depicts the emergence of human nature within entities that superficially seem nonhuman. Frankenstein's monster and the T-101 both come forward as compelling and sympathetic characters because they learn and express themselves in terms that human beings are able to understand. The T-101's apparent progression from a methodical killer into an unwavering companion within the Terminator movies is mirrored by the monster's progression from an infantile murderer into a sensitive literature aficionado. Additionally, it is significant that both are brought into creation through clandestine scientific practices; thus, similar themes surrounding the T-101 and the monster make themselves apparent. Essentially, both characters represent the volatile nature of too much knowledge: they…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

1. Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Modern Library, 1993.

2. Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines. Feature film. WGA, 2003. 109 min.
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Harold Bloom on Shelley's Frankenstein

Words: 819 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64379940

Bloom claims that Victor was a "moral idiot" (Bloom) when he shirked his responsibilities. Victor's actions reveal that he is a completely selfish individual, incapable of being aware of anyone else's existence. The monster undergoes a radical transformation in the novel, from a being with no sense to a being completely aware of himself. He is more aware of himself than Victor could ever be and this allows the reader to identify with him on a more personal level. It is his sense of self that makes him human and Victor's selfishness that makes him seem inhuman. The irony is what brings Bloom back to the Romantic mythology of self.

Bloom successfully proves his points in this essay. He could have used more quotations from the text itself but the essay is strong enough without them. Bloom's examination of the novel in the broader spectrum of the Romantic Movement is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. "An Excerpt From a Study of Frankenstein: or, The New Prometheus." Partisan

Review. XXXII. 4. 1965.

Milton, John. Paradise Lost. The English Poems of John Milton. London: Oxford University

Press. 1926.
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Bright Lights Lit Up the

Words: 1601 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96327975



However, with the same aforementioned idea in mind, in Vitro Fertilization technology also has it's benefits. Being able to remove all disease from human kind would be an unimaginable thing to do. ith in Vitro Fertilization technology the possibilities are endless (Russell 2010). A new generation could be produced where life-debilitating illnesses would be free from them. They would not have to worry about passing certain genetic diseases on because they would be completely erased from their DNA. It makes the possibilities of medicine and health care seem endless.

The ethical issues involved in Vitro Fertilization lay hand in hand with the ethical dilemmas that Shelley was attempting to address in "Frankenstein." The very idea of creating an individual without fully knowing the consequences may not be the best way to go. It carries with it consequences that will affect an entire society, the parties involved, and most importantly, the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Klitzman, Robert. "Who Made Me?' The Ethical Issues That in Vitro Fertilization Families Face." The Huffington Post. 16 Nov 2010. Web. 22 Mar 2012.

Russell, Cristine. "Four Million Test-Tube Babies and Counting." The Atlantic. 7 Oct 2010. Web. 22 Mar 2012.

Sandel, Michael J. "The Case Against Perfection." The Atlantic. Apr 2004. Web. 22 Mar 2012.

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Monstrousness in Frankenstein Almost Everyone

Words: 1889 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29426161

His family worries about him, of course, but they have no idea what is actually the problem. If they did, would they see Victor as a monster? It is difficult to say. Families can overlook a great deal of things when found in a person that family loves. However, some things are simply too great to bear when it comes to what a person has done or what he or she might do in the future. Because of that, Victor avoids telling anyone about the monster until he is on his deathbed. There, he recounts his story to the captain of the ship that has rescued him. In telling the tale, it is possible that the monster is real and also possible that Victor is deluded and he is the monster.

Once Victor dies, the monster appears one last time to grieve for his creator. All he ever wanted was…… [Read More]

References

Shelley, Mary (1922). Frankenstein. New York: The Cornhill Publishing Company.
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Emilia Wife of Iago Do Not Learn

Words: 1306 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38138420

Emilia, Wife of Iago

Do not learn of him, Emilia, though he be thy husband.[footnoteRef:1] [1: Othello, Act II, Scene i.]

More than once, I think to myself how life could have been differed between that of my previous past to that which I have now. A woman whose prospects boiled down to nothing as important as marriage could not have many to begin with. But a husband whose soul blackens the very environment, whose tongue twists morality, whose plots send shivers down my little spine? No, even this I had not asked for, not one bit.

If my good mother was still alive, I would wager that her argument would play out as follows:[footnoteRef:2] [2: Theme: The hardships of mother-daughter relationships (Lucy by Jamaica Kinkaid)]

How now, Emilia, where is your sense? Was it really so bad to leave Mantua[footnoteRef:3], to head face-front to the catastrophe that is your…… [Read More]

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Knowledge and Peril Explored in

Words: 2257 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55926262

He tells alton he was "surprised that among so many men of genius . . . that I alone should be reserved to discover so astonishing a secret" (37). Here Shelley illuminates the weakness of man with Frankenstein's inability to control himself in this situation. Shelley placed Frankenstein in this environment because he represented "modern scientist is search of the spark to animate lifeless matter" (right 14). Like Prometheus, he is penalized for "meddling in the work of the gods" (14). Shelley foreshadows the mood of the novel when she writes, "Frightful it must be; for supremely frightful would be the effect of any human endeavor to mock the stupendous mechanism of the Creator of the world" (Shelley xxv). Here Shelley is making a stand against certain aspects of knowledge. hile knowledge itself is not bad, the desire for knowledge to do great things for the sake of fame or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Garrett, Martin. Mary Shelley. New York. Oxford University Press. 2002.

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam Books. 1981.

Graham, Richard. The Masters of Victorian Literature, 1837-1897. London: Simpkin, Marshal

and Co. 1897.
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Veidemanis a High-School English Teacher

Words: 650 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12014392

Second, it provides an excellent introduction "to a unit on the Romantic Era in English literature" with its spirit in line with Coleridge, Wordsworth, Lord yron and Percy Shelley. Third, the novel is truly "the work of a gifted woman writer who merits study and recognition" (62). One aspect of Shelley's life which is quite extraordinary is that she heard Samuel Taylor Coleridge recite the "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" which clearly influenced Shelley's use of the supernatural in her novel.

Fourth, Veidemanis maintains that the novel's central theme, being "scientific aims pursued in reckless disregard of human consequences," has much significance in today's modern scientific age related to biological and genetic engineering and raises the question "Should limits be placed on scientific endeavor?" A reference to Victor Frankenstein and his "reckless disregard" for the possible consequences of his experiments with the dead and the creation of a human monster.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Veidemanis, Gladys V. "Frankenstein in the Classroom." The English Journal. Vol. 75 no. 7 (November 1986): pp. 61-66. {Available at JSTOR online}.
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Vindication of the Rights of

Words: 12319 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94246949

Ross (1988) notes the development of Romanticism in the late eighteenth century and indicates that it was essentially a masculine phenomenon:

Romantic poetizing is not just what women cannot do because they are not expected to; it is also what some men do in order to reconfirm their capacity to influence the world in ways socio-historically determined as masculine. The categories of gender, both in their lives and in their work, help the Romantics establish rites of passage toward poetic identity and toward masculine empowerment. Even when the women themselves are writers, they become anchors for the male poets' own pursuit for masculine self-possession. (Ross, 1988, 29)

Mary ollstonecraft was as famous as a writer in her day as her daughter. Both mother and daughter were important proponents of the rights of women both in their writings and in the way they lived and served as role models for other…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander, Meena. Women in Romanticism. Savage, Maryland: Barnes & Noble, 1989.

Burke, Edmund. Reflections on the Revolution in France. Indianapolis: Hackett, 1987.

Cone, Carl B. Burke and the Nature of Politics. University of Kentucky, 1964.

Conniff, James. "Edmund Burke and His Critics: The Case of Mary Wollstonecraft" Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 60, No. 2, (Apr., 1999), 299-318.
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Frankenstein War of the Worlds

Words: 899 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87874276

The rash, brash young soldier Claudio is betrothed to Hero, who adores him, but because of the male code of the military he has been raised to believe in, he tends to assume the worst of women rather than the best. On their wedding-day, he shames Hero unjustly, even though nothing in her manner indicates she has changed: "You seem to me as Dian in her orb, / as chaste as is the bud ere it be blown" (4.1). In this male-dominated society, where women are aliens and suspect, even the supposedly wise Don Pedro believes the slander at first: "hy, then are you no maiden" (4.1).

But mistrust and a refusal to sympathize with another are not limited to times of turmoil, or emotionally fraught relationships like marriage. Even the relationship of parent to child becomes perverted in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The scientist and doctor is so determined to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Shakespeare, William. "Much Ado About Nothing." MIT Shakespeare Homepage.

11 Mar 2008.  http://shakespeare.mit.edu/much_ado/ 

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Literature.org. 11 Mar 2008. http://www.literature.org/authors/shelley-mary/frankenstein/

Wells, H.G. The War of the Worlds. 1898. Web edition of the War of the Worlds.
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Crying of Lot 49

Words: 1940 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73138330

Dominance of Humanity over Nature: Conflict and Change in 19th Century Human Society in the Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, author of the novel Frankenstein (1818), had introduced in literature a new genre and theme where human society and nature experiences conflict over time. The novel primarily depicts the state of humanity in the 19th century, where the effects of the Enlightenment period are reinforced through the study of the natural sciences (biology, physics, and chemistry, among others) and predominance of empirical thought, i.e., human knowledge acquired through experience and obtained through the scientific method.

With these state of events and forces dominating 19th century human society, this paper's analysis of the novel Frankenstein is two-fold: one facet discusses the issue of conflict and change happening in human society during the period, and the other facet looking into the dynamics of these changes, through exemplars and cases illustrated…… [Read More]

Bibliography

St. Clair, W. (2000). "The Impact of Frankenstein." In Bennett, B. And S. Curran, Mary Shelley in Her Times. Baltimore: John Hopkins UP.

Shelley, M. (1994). Frankenstein. (Dover Thrift Edition). NY: Dover Publications, Inc.

Turney, J. (1998). Frankenstein's Footsteps: Science, Genetics, and Popular Culture. New Haven: Yale UP.
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Victor Frankenstein - Thematic Explorer

Words: 922 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87769835

With this confession, Victor is telling Walton that he is a broken man because of his inner desires to explore the unknown and by pretending that like God he has control over his own destiny and that of the creature he created. Thematically, Victor is relating that the pursuit of knowledge can often be a very dangerous affair.

At the point when the creature begins to show some movement upon the laboratory table, Victor realizes that he has made an abomination to nature. Later on, he relates a portion of what he calls his "wildest dreams": "I thought I saw Elizabeth, in the bloom of health... I embraced her, but as I imprinted the first kiss on her lips, they became livid with the hue of death... her features appeared to change, and I thought I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms; a shroud enveloped her…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Shelley, Mary W. Frankenstein. New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1993.
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Realism in Literature Realism and

Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37583613

This was Shelley's observation and the reality she experienced during her time.

Dickens and Bronte, meanwhile, experienced reality through social change, in the same way that Shelley had observed the changing times of 19th century society. However, while Shelley contemplated about the dominance of science over nature in "Frankenstein," both Dickens and Bronte reflected the breaking down of class divisions happening in the society, illustrated through the novels "Great Expectations" and "Wuthering Heights," respectively.

Dickens depicted the dissolution of class divisions through the characters of Pip and Estella, individuals who represented the underprivileged and the elite classes, respectively. In the novel, readers witnessed how Pip's ascent to a higher social class became possible through a secret benefactor, while Estella's higher stature eventually led to her poverty when Miss Havisham died. The once poor Pip eventually attained a better life, while Estella, once rich, became imprisoned in an abusive relationship with…… [Read More]

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Monstrous Natures in Frankenstein and

Words: 1330 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59805936

Though the Monster tries to refrain from interfering; "hat chiefly struck me was the gentle manners of these people, and I longed to join them, but dared not…[remembering] too well the treatment I had suffered the night before from the barbarous villagers" (142). The Monster learns how society behaves through the observation of the family, and through the reading of books. Much like Frankenstein, the Monster is greatly influenced by what he reads including Plutarch's Lives, Sorrow of erter, and Paradise Lost. The Monster's innocence and ignorance, at this point, does not allow him to fully understand or relate to any of the characters in the books (166). The Monster eventually relates to Adam in Paradise Lost, not considering himself a monster, because even "Satan had his companions, fellow devils, to admire and encourage him" (169). As Adam was created in God's own image, the Monster is a "filthy type…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus. Project Gutenberg. Web. Retrieved

from http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/84.

Stoker, Bram. The Annotated Dracula. Ed. Leonard Wolf and Satty. Ballantine Books, New

York: 1975. Print.
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Family and Education in Frankenstein

Words: 2250 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42657604

People generally focus on appearance when coming across a particular individual. This is perfectly exemplified by the meeting between the old member of the De Lacey family and the monster. The man initially welcomes the creature, as he is no longer able to see and is unacquainted with the monster's facial features and body.

Victor Frankenstein can be considered to contrast the monster through his behavior, his background, and because of the goals that he has. The scientist virtually had everything that the monster longed for, considering his family, his reputation, and the fact that he was generally seen as one of society's leading members. Instead of valuing what he had, however, Frankenstein gave it all away in favor of gaining reputation, as this was apparently the thing that he appreciated the most in life. hile most readers are likely to blame Frankenstein for most unfortunate events in the book,…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Bloom Bissonete, Melissa, "Teaching the Monster: Frankenstein and Critical Thinking"

Chao, Shun-Liang. "Education as a Pharmakon in Marry Shelley's Frankenstein," the Explicator, Vol. 68, No. 4, 223-226, 2010.

Lunsford, Lars, "The Devaluing of Life in Shelley's Frankenstein," the Explicator, Vol. 68, No. 3, 174-176, 2010

Schmid, Thomas H. "Addiction and Isolation in Frankenstein"
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Sickness in Frankenstein Is One

Words: 1583 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99089224

He had built a wall around him that was preventing his normal interaction with people. This was causing real suffering and sickness. "hat then became of me? I know not; I lost sensation, and chains and darkness were the only objects that pressed upon me." (p.168) He loses interest in life even more when his dear ones are killed: "I had formed in my own heart a resolution to pursue my destroyer to death; and this purpose quieted my agony, and provisionally reconciled me to life." (p.169)

Sickness is thus a multifaceted theme in the novel. It serves many purposes. On the one hand, we see it as a force fighting against the evil ambitions of Victor and on the other, it can also be seen as a compassionate force trying to restrain Victor. It is all a matter of perception. Had Frankenstein understood why he was falling ill so…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anne K. Mellor, " Making a "monster": an Introduction to Frankenstein," the Cambridge Companion to Mary Shelley, ed. Esther Schor (Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2003)

The Mary Shelley Reader, eds. Betty T. Bennett and Charles E. Robinson (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990)
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Enlightenment-Era Neo-Classical Works With Romantic Overtones 'Tartuffe

Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55737002

Enlightenment-era, Neo-Classical works with Romantic overtones 'Tartuffe," Candide, and Frankenstein all use unnatural forms of character representation to question the common conceptions of what is natural and of human and environmental 'nature.' Moliere uses highly artificial ways of representing characters in dramatic forms to show the unnatural nature of an older man becoming attracted to a younger woman. Voltaire uses unnatural and absurd situations to question the unnatural belief of Professor Pangloss that this is the best of all possible worlds. Mary Shelley creates a fantastic or unnatural scenario to show the unnatural nature of a human scientist's attempt to turn himself into a kind of God-like creator through the use of reason and science alone.

"Tartuffe" is the most obviously unnatural of the three works in terms of its style. It is a play, and the characters do not really develop as human beings because of the compressed nature…… [Read More]

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Love and Creation in Frankenstein

Words: 1374 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22820645

Creation ithout Love: The Problem of Frankenstein

In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Dr. Frankenstein assumes the role of God by attempting to create new life. He is not, however, prepared for the consequences, and the outward hideousness of his creation compels him to reject the monster. Inwardly, Frankenstein's monster possesses a soul and longs for love and learning. The fact that he must seek both surreptitiously (and is yet still rejected) compels him to lash out -- both at society and at his creator. Along the way, the monster identifies with Milton's Satan -- another creature who lashed out at his creator after feeling spurned. This paper will show how Frankenstein's monster feels rejected by "god" (both the actual God of creation and also Frankenstein in the role of creator-god for the Creature) and how this leads to tragic consequences -- namely, both Frankenstein's and the monster's eventual isolation and death…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Milton, John. Paradise Lost. Poetry Foundation. Web.

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/45718

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. UK: Oxford University Press, 2008. Print.
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Prometheus Unbound

Words: 1436 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30159759

" (Rossetti, 1886)

Mary Shelley is noted as having stated that it would require "…a mind as subtle as his own to understand the mystic meanings scattered throughout the poem." (Rossetti, 1886) Mary writes that rough the whole poem there "There reigns a sort of calm and holy spirit of love, it soothes the tortured, and is hope to the expectant, till the prophecy is fulfilled, and love, untainted by any evil, becomes the law of the world…" (as cited in: Rossetti, 1886) it is agreed upon by all Shelley critics, according to Ristic that the imagery of the "…lyric built drama is bold and original and that its lyrical splendor is one of the wonders of English poetry. Thirty-six different verse forms have been counted, "all perfectly handled," and the drama has been compared to symphonic music." (Ristic, 2000)

Shelley writes in the Preface to Prometheus Unbound that the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bromwich, David (2002) Love Against Revenge in Shelley's Prometheus. Philosophy and Literature. Vol. 26, No. 2, October 2002. pp. 239-259.

Reading Justice: From Derrida to Shelley and Back. (2007) Studies in Romanticism. 1 Jan 2007 Available online at:  http://www.infoplease.com/t/lit/shelley/1/10/8.html 

Ristic, Ratomir (2000) Shelley's First Major Lyrics and Prometheus Unbound. Facta Universitatis. Linguistics and Literature Vol. 2, No. 7, 2000.

Rossetti, William M. (1886) Shelley's Prometheus Unbound. Lecture Delivered to the Shelley Society December 1886. Online available at: http://www.archive.org/stream/shelleyspromethe00rossrich/shelleyspromethe00rossrich_djvu.txt
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Dangers of Knowledge as Demonstrated

Words: 1986 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39737510

Here the man understands his fate and realizes that he will have a difficult time trying to convince others not to follow in his path.

Not all is lost, however. Victor does influence someone in a positive way before he leaves this earth and that person is Robert alton. hile we only see him at the beginning and end of the novel, he is significant to the story because he, too, harbors a desire to know the unknown. Robert is also important because he is the only one through which Victor and his message can live. He tells Margaret that he cannot begin to describe the "sensations on the near prospect of my undertaking... I have often attributed my attachment to, my passionate enthusiasm for, the dangerous mysteries of the ocean to that production of the most imaginative or modern poets" (7). He admits to loving "a belief in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Garrett, Martin. Mary Shelley. New York. Oxford University Press, 2002.

Hoobler, Dorothy and Thomas. The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2006.

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam Books, 1981.
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Ethical Practice the Foundations of

Words: 2674 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51767911



The foundational ideas of the limits of science and medical ethics goes back a very long way and as it has evolved over the centuries, certain laws, rules, regulations and taboos have been put in place to protect the human race from that sometimes blurred line between scientific discovery and human existence. Medical ethics created a system, bound by the ideals of many that came before them to control this blurring and attempt to stand between sciences desire to discover and the public and individual's desire to remain safe and in control of one's own body. A long time medical ethicist discusses the history of medical ethics as one that was founded on the principles of the ancients, but that has now become one where medical ethicists are demanding concrete answers, even laws to guide and demand decisions regarding medical ethics be enforced. "My new colleagues were polite enough, to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adler, Robert E. Medical Firsts: From Hippocrates to the Human Genome. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2004.

Harvey, William. Lectures on the Whole of Anatomy: An Annotated Translation of Prelectiones Anatomiae Universalis. Trans C.D. O'Malley, F.N.L. Poynter, and K.F. Russell. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1961.

Jecker, Nancy S. "Knowing When to Stop: The Limits of Medicine." The Hastings Center Report 21.3 (1991): 5.

Marble, Annie Russell. The Nobel Prize Winners in Literature. New York: D. Appleton, 1925.
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Character and Nature of Frankenstein's Creation the

Words: 2548 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36585000

character and nature of Frankenstein's creation, the monster. It aims to study the potential nature of the monster's evil deeds and to provide readers with understanding of the monster's "being" as told in the story. eing the creator of the monster, this paper also looks into the nature of Victor Frankenstein having to be able to create a monster that haunted his family, friends, and even his own life.

Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein, shows how humans tend to be influenced by the major factors in their lives, such as people and the environment that they are living in. The novel shows how constant rejection can cause someone to become a monster. It also stresses an idea of human injustice towards outsiders, as the monster experienced from humans.

Throughout this paper, I will attempt to point out some factors in the story that made the two characters, Frankenstein and his creation,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brasier, Keri. Psychoanalytical Panel.

1999. Class Uidaho. 13 Dec. 2002. http://www.class.uidaho.edu/eng321/_disc1/0000001c.htm

Collings, David. The Monster and the Imaginary Mother: A Lacanain Reading of Frankenstein.

Boston. Bedford Books of St. Martins Press. 1992.
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Frankenstein and Dr Jekyll

Words: 2790 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27401305

Kuwait language Arabic, consideration moderate English. I an essay 8 pages including a thesis statement MLA outline ( thesis outline a separated page). My Essay a comparison Frankenstein Mary Shelly (1831 edition) The strange case Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde Robert Stevenson.

Comparison between Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" and Robert Louis Stevenson's "Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde"

The Risks of doing science

The connection between the two scientists

Society's tendency to steer away from the idea of evil

The scientist's understanding of his feat

Ambition

Fast progress as a cause for death

Mary Shelley's book "Frankenstein" (1818) and Robert Louis Stevenson's book "Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" (1886) are two historic novels that are widely known and appreciated as a consequence of the ideas they put across. Both books address the concept of a scientist attempting to manipulate the rules of the universe and eventually…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Dawkins, R. "The Selfish Gene: 30th Anniversary edition." (Oxford University Press, 16 Mar 2006)

Drees, W. "Is Nature Evil? Religion Science and Value: Religion, Science and Value." (Routledge, 2 Sep 2003)

Shelley, M. "Frankenstein, Or the Modern Prometheus: The 1818 Text." (University of Chicago Press, 1974)

Stevenson, R.L. "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." (Alan Rodgers Books, 1 Aug 2005)
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Vindication of the Rights of

Words: 2169 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27224399

Furthermore, this brief introduction details the different types of legislation regarding men and women that Wollstonecraft supported. Next, this chapter moves onto Wollstonecraft's own life and actions, as well as a brief description of the time period in which she lived. These descriptions allow the reader to understand how Wollstonecraft was both revolutionary and conventional, in addition to how society encouraged and discouraged her various roles. Furthermore, I introduce these ideas to personify the struggle in which Wollstonecraft operated every day. It is this struggle that I emphasize during this chapter, giving the reader an idea of the challenging nature of Wollstonecraft's life because of it, in addition to its contribution to her struggle on paper. This chapter also introduces the reactions that others had to her work, as well as a tribute to its lasting contributions. I remark that Wollstonecraft is a strong voice among other female writers and…… [Read More]

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Critical Literacy the Discourse of

Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48385549



Changes in and to children's literature mirror, as well as construct, changes in social norms. For example, the 1908 book by Kenneth Grahame, Wind in the Willows, is a frolicking fantasy tale starring a cast of anthropomorphic animals. Themes of camaraderie, friendship, and adventure do not serve as vehicles for political discourse. When Jan Needle published Wild Wood nearly a century later in 1981, the author imbued the basic structure of Grahame's story with political awareness. Issues like social justice are explored in Wild Wood, issues that were not touched upon in Wind in the Willows. A similar vehicle of storytelling was used for a different literary function. Both 1908 and 1981 were times ripe for the exploration of labor issues and class-consciousness, and it is in many ways ironic that Needle would have been more overtly political than his forebear.

There seems to have been a deliberate awakening of…… [Read More]

References

"Children's Book of the Year Awards." Retrieved online: http://cbca.org.au/awards.htm

DAWCL. Website retrieved:  http://www.dawcl.com/introduction.html 

Leland, C., Harste, J., Ociepka, A., Lewison, M. & Vasquez, V. (1999). Exploring critical literacy: You can hear a pin drop. Language Arts, v77 n1 p70-77 Sep 1999.

Shor, I. (1997). What is critical literacy? Journal for Pedagogy, Pluralism, and Practice. Retrieved online: http://www.lesley.edu/journals/jppp/4/shor.html
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Greek Legend of Prometheus the God That

Words: 1316 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98266952

Greek legend of Prometheus, the god that defied Zeus and brought fire to humans, is one that figures largely in the imagery of the later Romantic poets. There's Byron's Prometheus, Percy Shelley's Prometheus Unbound, and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. For Percy Shelley and Lord Byron, Prometheus embodied the revolutionary, creative, and daringly original spirit, and a "courage and majesty and firm and patient opposition to omnipotent force" (Prometheus Unbound, Norton Anthology 734). Prometheus was the "champion of humanity" persecuted for his selfless desire to bring good to the world. Considering both men's hate for tyranny and zeal for social justice such a reading is not surprising.

However, Paul Cantor points out in Creature and Creator that, "the Romantics made a hero out of Prometheus by glossing over those aspects of the original legends which cast him in a bad light"(77). Mary Shelley's use of the Promethean legend,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brailsford, H.N, Shelley, Godwin, and Their Circle. New York: Henry Holt and Co., n.d.

Cantor, Paul Creature and Creator: Mythmaking and English Romanticism. Cambridge: Cambridge U. Of P, 1984.

____ "Mary Shelley and the Taming of The Byronic Hero: Transformation and The Deformed Transformed." The Other Mary Shelley: Beyond Frankenstein. Ed. Audrey A. Fisch. Oxford: Oxford U. Of P, 1993. 89-106.

Evslin, Bernard and Dorothy, and Ned Hoopes. The Greek Gods. New York: Scholastic Magazines, Inc., 1966.
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Feminism 19th and Early 20th Century America

Words: 1283 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51152133

Feminism 19th and Early 20th Century America

riting and women's roles were unavoidably mixed in the late 1800s and early 1900s. It was a time in which many women protested their restrictions through novels, poetry, pamphlets, and speeches. By analyzing those creations, readings can begin to understand the lives of those forward-looking women. In their own time, people dismissed them as inconsequential complainers. Minority authors, like blacks and lesbians were even more ignored. However, by learning about their work, we can learn about the daily life of the social classes to which they belonged.

Many people feel that our socioeconomic status limits our understanding of others (McClish and Bacon). Because our understanding is limited by our own viewpoint from our socioeconomic status, patriarchal societies tend to limit self-expression to that which is compatible with the patriarchy. As a result, it's important to remember to ask questions based one's own experience,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Markley, A.A. "Laughing That I May Not Weep": Mary Shelley's Short Fiction and Her Novels." Keats-Shelley Journal (1997): 97-124.

McClish, Glen and Jacqueline Bacon. "Telling the Story Her Own Way": the Role of Feminist Standpoint Theory in Rhetorical Studies." Rhetoric Society Quarterly (2002): 27-55.

Ross, Christine. "Logic, Rhetoric, and Discourse in the Literary Texts of Nineteenth-Century Women." Rhetoric Society Quarterly (2002): 85-109.
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Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus

Words: 1418 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25254490

He writes, "Lucy Westenra, but yet how changed. The sweetness was turned to adamantine, heartless cruelty, and the purity to voluptuous wantonness" (Stoker 225). It is clear that wantonness is not a characteristic to be admired in Victorian times, because he compares her wantonness to cruelty, as well. Clearly, both these novels echo the time they were written and society's views on women. Women play insignificant and "wanton" roles in both books, and they are a source of motherly love and distress. One critic, however, feels the novel may be a beacon of change, too. He writes, "Dracula is not only a threat but also imaginative and physical vitality, a catalyst for change. The novel suggests that a new understanding of sexuality and decay is necessary for any attempt to attain social order and growth" (Boone). What is most interesting about these two novels is that they portray relatively like…… [Read More]

References

Boone, Troy. "He Is English and Therefore Adventurous: Politics, Decadence, and 'Dracula." Studies in the Novel 25.1 (1993): 76+.

Nitchie, Elizabeth. Mary Shelley: Author of "Frankenstein." Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1970.

Hoeveler, Diane Long. "3 Frankenstein, Feminism, and Literary Theory." The Cambridge Companion to Mary Shelley. Ed. Esther Schor. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2003. 45-60.

Schor, Esther, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Mary Shelley. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2003.
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Compare and Contrast Frankenstein and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Man's Dual Nature

Words: 2143 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18203766

Frankenstein and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in relation to man's dual nature

Frankenstein written by Mary Shelley when she was only nineteen years of age is considered to be one of the most fascinating novels in our literature. Such a fact is imaginatively approved in a strikingly fresh adaptation by Jonathan Pope for the Glasgow Citizens that takes off the congealed veneer of the horror film industry and makes out a truly attractive background of adventurism relating to scientific and philosophical levels. (Coveney, Frankenstein) Frankenstein relates to the duality of human nature and the manner in which humans are perceived by the society.

Mary Shelley is of the view that the treatment they attain due to societal perceptions will in the end draw out or contain some features of their nature. In brief, Frankenstein depicts the story of a scientific genius named Victor Frankenstein, whose studies made him to…… [Read More]

References

Augustine, James R. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Pearls of Wisdom Lecture. C School of Medicine. April 18, 1996. Retrieved from http://www.med.sc.edu/cma/PearlofWisdom3.htm Accessed on 22 June, 2005

Dean, Katie. Review of Frankenstein. 07 November, 2003. Retrieved from  http://trashotron.com/agony/reviews/2003/shelley-frankenstein.htm  Accessed on 22 June, 2005

Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Retrieved from http://www.newi.ac.uk/rdover/other/dr_jekyl.htm Accessed on 22 June, 2005

Fear and Fun. Retrieved from http://www.beloit.edu/~fyi/fearandfun/greenknights.htm Accessed on 22 June, 2005
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Romantic Monster The Human Within

Words: 4437 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60474246

Yet, we also see that he still does not understand the true origin of the beast -- the human within. The fact that he dies before he is successful, yet the monster obviously goes off to end his own fate, indicates that the evil both originated, and eventually died with him -- the true source from which it sprang.

Victor Hugo's Hunchback: An Illustrative Device

In Victor Hugo's Hunchback of Notre Dame, there exists a strikingly similar theme -- if different in form. Although it is definitely true that Hugo's famous Quasimodo is a bit more innocuous than the Frankenstein monster, he nonetheless evokes a certain horror if only in appearance. Yet, much like in Shelley's work, Hugo brings out the monster that is human nature within the other character's interactions, motivations, and actions in the story.

There is little question that Hugo fully intended Quasimodo to evoke horror in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baldick, Chris.

In Frankenstein's Shadow: Myth, Monstrosity, and Nineteenth-Century Writing.

Ebbs, Robert. "Monsters." Essays. 1998. Retrieved from Web site on July 7, 2005  http://www.feedback.nildram.co.uk/richardebbs/essays/monsters.htm 

Hugo, Victor. The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Online version. Retrieved from Web site on July 7, 2005  http://www.online-literature.com/victor_hugo/hunchback_notre_dame/
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Cautionary Tales Revealed in The

Words: 1301 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73692756

He does not care because he is greedy. Victor is the same way. He wants the knowledge of how nature works. He is curious and this eventually gets the best of him. He says, "I would sacrifice my fortune, my existence, my every hope, to the furtherance of my enterprise. One man's life or death was but a small price to pay for the acquirement of the knowledge which I sought" (Shelley 13). Victor realizes the folly of his ways but it is too late to salvage anything that he has lost. Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler agrees with this assumption, noting that the irony of the story is that, "at the culmination of his research, the moment of his triumph, all Victor's pleasure in life ends" (Hoobler 159). Both men are consumed and actually believe that they possess some of the characteristics of God.

Both men suffer from their selfish…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "The Birthmark." The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction. Cassil, R.V.,

ed. 1981 W.W. Norton and Company. pp. 600-13.

Hoobler, Dorothy and Thomas. The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2006.

Erich S. Rupprecht. "Nathaniel Hawthorne." Supernatural Fiction Writers. 1985. Scribner's
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Was Frankenstein Born With His Identity or Was His Identity Created

Words: 713 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23802696

Frankenstein: An Identity Born or Created?

The title character in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein grew up in eighteenth-century Switzerland. In the character's own words, "No human being could have passed a happier childhood than myself" (33). Young Victor Frankenstein had loving parents, and siblings he adored. These early years proved to be a stark contrast to university life, where Victor was an eager student but very lonely. He threw himself into his work, becoming obsessed with natural philosophy and science. In a bold experiment, he gathered an assortment of human parts and stitched them together, curious as to whether he could create life. Victor was astounded to see that he did, indeed, create a living creature. The initial thrill he experienced at the success of his experiment quickly turned to horror as his creature escaped and began terrorizing the countryside. The creature was not born a monster, however. His identity was…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein: Or, The Modern Prometheus. Salem, Oregon: Bookbyte Digital,

n.d. Electronic Book.