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Women and Mental Health in Early 1900's
Words: 1287 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5710235
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Mental Health

The health of women has been a subject of discussion for many years and it has been emphasized because the health of women is directly related to the health of the child and thus the health of the society (Jacobson, 1993). However, the unfortunate part is that when considering the health of the women, only her physical and reproductive health is given importance and there is no consideration of her mental health that is equally as important as her physical health. All around the world, efforts have increased to make the health conditions of the women better especially since the last decade. Women are now regularly screened for HIV and other diseases that have a vertical pattern of transmission so that the children can be saved from such diseases. Awareness has also increased over the years among the women and they realize that their health, both mental and…

Bibliography

Belle, D. Poverty and Women's Mental Health.American Psychologist (1990) 45:385-389.

Jacobson, J. Women's Health: The Price of Poverty. In The Health of Women: A Global Perspective, edited by M. Koblinsky, J. Timyan, and J. Gay, pp. 3-32. Boulder, CO: Westview Press (1993).

Jayarajan, Nishanth; Chandra, Prabha.HIV and Mental Health: An Overview of Research from India. Indian Journal of Psychiatry, September 2010.

WHO.Mental Health Determinants and Populations.Geneva (2000)  http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2000/who_msd_mdp_00.1.pdf .

Mental Retardation in Adolescences Mental
Words: 1756 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64628334
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Vocational training can help place within the adolescent mind the strategies they will need to adapt to life as an adult.

Further research is needed within the field of adolescents with the condition. According to research, "Unfortunately, most psychiatrists are ill-equipped to handle this situation, having received little or no formal training in this area," (Sebastian 2008). Therefore, more research can only open up new information to psychiatrists and physicians who work with families to make the most comfortable life for the adolescent dealing with mental retardation.

eferences

Biasini, Fred J.; Grupe, Lisa; Huffman, Lisa; & Bray, Norman W. (2010). Mental retardation: A symptom and a syndrome. Comprehensive Textbook of Child and Adolescent Disorders. New York: Oxford University Press. etrieved March 10, 2010 from http://www.uab.edu/cogdev/mentreta.htm

Collins, H. (2004). Children who are mentally retarded. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. etrieved March 10, 2010 from http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/facts_for_families/children_who_are_mentally_retarded

Daigneault, obert. (2007). Mental…

References

Biasini, Fred J.; Grupe, Lisa; Huffman, Lisa; & Bray, Norman W. (2010). Mental retardation: A symptom and a syndrome. Comprehensive Textbook of Child and Adolescent Disorders. New York: Oxford University Press. Retrieved March 10, 2010 from  http://www.uab.edu/cogdev/mentreta.htm 

Collins, H. (2004). Children who are mentally retarded. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Retrieved March 10, 2010 from  http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/facts_for_families/children_who_are_mentally_retarded 

Daigneault, Robert. (2007). Mental retardation / adolescent issues for mental retardation. Your Total Health. Retrieved March 10, 2010 from http://yourtotalhealth.ivillage.com/mental-retardation.html?pageNum=4#4

Mental Retardation -- Developmental delay. (2010). Mass General Hospital for Children. Retrieved March 10, 2010 from  http://www.massgeneral.org/children/adolescenthealth/articles/aa_mental_retardation.aspx

Mental Retardation Is Generally Understood
Words: 2000 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76150564
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They very seldom become fully integrated into society or become independent. (Mental etardation: Free Health Encyclopedia)

6. Conclusion

The is little doubt that mental retardation has an effect on society in general and in terms of care and treatment of the affected person. However, it is also true that with the knowledge and expertise that has been accumulated about mental retardation it is also become more feasible to accommodate the mentally retarded person as a productive member of society.

My perception of the mentally retarded in society is that are less fortunate and that the mentally healthy members of society should help and assist these individuals wherever possible. The research for this paper has made me aware that we often categorize the mentally retarded in a general way without realizing that there are different categories and degrees of retardation. Cognizance should be taken of the fact that many people who…

References. Retrieved June 24, 2008, at  http://www.cloudnet.com/~edrbsass/mrdefinitions2.htm 

Goldstein, G. And Shapiro B. (2007) Mental Retardation. Retrieved June 24, 2008 at  http://www.dana.org/news/brainhealth/detail.aspx?id=9836 

Lustig D.C. (1996)

Family adaptation to a young adult with mental retardation.  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0825 " Journal of Rehabilitation,

Mental Retardation in Adults Mental
Words: 1735 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 11878955
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The severity of mental retardation covers a wide spectrum, as discussed before, and variation in ability of individuals within this spectrum is wide (Tammi, 2006). In order to understand and to assist such persons, it is important to know the category in which they fall and the possible causes of the condition. In most cases, a little psychological instability leads to a mental retardation and therefore psychological interventions can be very effective in solving such cases. The notion of viewing mental retardation as a case of pure medical condition should be changed in order to find means of reducing such situations.

eferences

Christopher D. Prater, MD. (2006, June 15). Medical Care of Adults with Mental etardation.

etrieved March 11, 2010, from American Family Physician: http://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0615/p2175.html

Donna K. Daily, MD. (2000, February 15). Identification and Evaluation of Mental etardation.

etrieved March 11, 2010, from American Family Physician: http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000215/1059.html

Gotiesrnati, .L. (s.f.).…

References

Christopher D. Prater, MD. (2006, June 15). Medical Care of Adults with Mental Retardation.

Retrieved March 11, 2010, from American Family Physician:  http://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0615/p2175.html 

Donna K. Daily, MD. (2000, February 15). Identification and Evaluation of Mental Retardation.

Retrieved March 11, 2010, from American Family Physician:  http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000215/1059.html

Mental Retardation This Work Examines
Words: 6188 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58210378
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Jones relates that statement of Corrigan: "Our work suggests that the biggest factor changing stigma is contact between people with mental illness and the rest of the population. The public needs to understand that many people with mental illness are functioning, fully contributing members of society." (Jones, 2006) Jones states that "the social cost of stigma associated with mental illness is high because it translates into huge numbers of people with treatable mental illness not getting help." Jones relates the fact that the National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) is a group of advocates that works toward fighting the "inaccurate, hurtful representations of mental illness" that are found in the media. Jang (2002) states that the National Health Law Program has a priority to access of healthcare. In fact, the Executive Order (EO 13166) was focused toward the implementation of guidelines in overcoming the language barriers. Jang states that LEP…

Bibliography

Anderson, S.K. & Middleton, V.A.

Explorations in privilege, oppression and DiversityBrooks Cole 2005. ISBN0-534-51742-0

Barber, J.G. (1995). Politically progressive casework. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 76(1), 30-37.

Children Who Can't Pay Attention/ADHD (2004) Facts for Families. Academy of child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Online available at  http://www.aacap.org/page.ww?section=Facts+for+Families&name=Children+Who+Can%27t+Pay+Attention%2FADHD

Mental Health Nearly 40 of
Words: 2015 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 30551883
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New findings show that the spouses of veterans also experience mental health disorders, and the prevalence increases with the length of deployment (Mansfield, Kaufman, Marshall, Gaynes, Morrissey & Engel, 2010). When spouses are considered to be clients of health services, the need for improved and more robust resources becomes apparent. Moreover, spouses with mental health disorders present unique issues and questions for treatment. eturning soldiers may find that they have supportive partners who can lead to a mutually beneficial treatment relationship, via couples or family therapy. On the other hand, the mental health problems of the spouse can exacerbate those of the soldier, and vice-versa. Thus, a family systems approach can be extremely helpful when addressing the multifaceted mental health concerns among veterans.

Veteran health services are at a critical juncture. The need for targeted mental health interventions, ranging from screenings and assessments to therapies and treatments, has been proven…

References

Britt, T.W., Greene-Shortridge, T.M. & Castro, C.A. (2007). The Stigma of Mental Health Problems in the Military. Military Medicine 172(2), February 2007, pp. 157-161(5)

Bliese, P.D., Wright, K.M., Adler, a.B., Thomas, J.L. & Hoge, C.W. (2007). Timing of postcombat mental health assessments. Psychological Services 4(3), Aug 2007, 141-148.

Hoge, C.W., Auchterlonie, J.L. & Milliken, C.S. (2006). Mental Health Problems, Use of Mental Health Services, and Attrition From Military Service After Returning From Deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. JAMA. 2006;295(9):1023-1032. doi:10.1001/jama.295.9.1023.

Hoge, C.W., Castro, C.A., Messer, S.C., McGurk, D., Cotting, D.I. & Koffman, R.L. (2004). Combat Duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, Mental Health Problems, and Barriers to Care. N Engl J. Med 2004; 351:13-22July 1, 2004 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa040603

Mental Health Counseling and Research
Words: 3990 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 65935118
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However, more empirical studies have been published in recent years which have both reported outcomes but also have acknowledged the complexity of the interaction of the number of variables involved in predicting outcome effects on children whose parents are substance abusers (Dworkin & Hirsch, 2004). This literature is particularly important because of the large number of children affected by substance abuse of various kinds and the social policy directed toward substance abuse offenders including parents.

Although the empirical research base is growing on the relationship of parental disability to child outcome effects (Emerick & Zirpoli, 2000) there continues to be a need for research that methodologically addresses specific critical parental disability factors.

Implementing Culturally Sensitive Crisis

In conclusion, when faced with an individual who is recognizably from a culture different from the crisis worker, some modification in approach will be considered. However, there is sufficient cultural diversity present in our…

References

Colangelo, N. (2007). Counseling gifted students: Issues and practices. In N. Colangelo and G.A. Davis (Eds.), Handbook of Gifted Education (2nd ed.), (pp. 353-381). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Colangelo, N., & Assouline, a. (1993). Families of gifted children. A research agenda. Quest, 4, 1-4.

Dworkin, M., & Hirsch, G. (2004). Responding to managed care: A roadmap for the therapist. Psychotherapy in Private Practice, 13, 1-21.

Emerick, L., & Zirpoli, T. (2000). Different concerns, different needs? Perceptions of gifted children and parents of children with disabilities. Paper presented at the conference of the American Association of Gifted and Talented, Little Rock, AR.

Mental Health Ethics
Words: 2831 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 98623571
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Given this priest is able to coax and created situations where boys are with him alone is even worse. In short, the counselor in this situation has no choice but to step in and say/do something.

To make a final decision, it would normally be wise to do some information gathering and to truly find out for sure whether or not this man has offended or not. However, the only real way to do that is to prod the priest even more and/or to ask the children and/or parents what is going on, if anything, and that would probably not be the best idea, at least in the latter case. Any querying of children would have to be done with the full knowledge and consent of the parents, and this is true both ethically and legally, and even if such permission was not garnered it would get back to them…

Works Cited

Brown, Francesca, and Mark R. Kebbell. "Policing Indecent Images of Children. What Are the Critical Issues Surrounding Police Risk Assessment?." Sexual Abuse in

Australia & New Zealand 5.1 (2013): 52-59. SocINDEX with Full Text. Web. 5

Apr. 2014.

DeYoung, Mary. "The World According to NAMBLA: Accounting for Deviance." Journal

Metal Health Mental Issue 2226 Mental Health
Words: 3481 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10485560
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Metal Health

Mental Issue 2226

Mental Health

esearches indicate that poverty and mental illness are correlated with each other in a broader spectrum. This research paper is commissioned on the basis of two exhaustively researched hypotheses: H1 Poverty can cause mental illness and H2 Mental illness is subjected to poverty. Throughout this research paper, these two hypotheses have been investigated from scholarly academic resources. At the end of the proposed research it has been concluded that those, who are financially deprived, as exposed to severe mental illness due to their inability of fulfilling their basic needs, including house, education, food and employment. Likewise, evidences have also been explored on the fact that metal illness can cause extreme levels of poverty to the suffering beings. This signifies that both the research hypotheses are accepted by the research in the projected domain.

Introduction

For affirming the undertaken pinching social reality, a statement…

References

Alegria, M., Canino, G., Rios, R., Vera, M., Calderon, J., Rusch, D. & Ortega, A. (2002).

Inequalities in Use of Specialty Mental Health Services among Latinos, African-Americans, and Non-Latino Whites. Psychiatric Services 53(12): 1547-1555.

Battle, K., Mendelson, M. & Torjman, S. (2009). Towards a new architecture for Canada's adult benefits. Caledon Institute of Social Policy, June.

Burstein, M. (2005). Combating the social exclusion of at-risk groups. Policy Research

Person for Mental Illness the
Words: 1953 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 10571299
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, 2001). (Corrigan, Watson, Byrne & Davis, 2005, p. 363)

Individuals who then enter the system and attempt treatment are taking a leap of faith that doing so will improve rather than continue to degrade their life and their options in it. Though HIPPA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) attempts to resolve issues of confidentiality, creating strict rules for who when and how communications about one's health can be communicated between individuals attempts to aide all health care clients they are specifically helpful with regard to mental health clients. Possible barriers they create with regard to the sharing of information between clinicians can also be specifically troubling in the mental health arena as the individual must be shown to be giving consent in some way to these communications and they also bar clinicians from sharing information with the individual's support network, such as family, unless permission has been granted…

References

Suicide. (2007). In the Columbia Encyclopedia (6th ed.). New York: Columbia University Press.

Corrigan, P.W., Watson, a.C., Byrne, P., & Davis, K.E. (2005). Mental Illness Stigma: Problem of Public Health or Social Justice?. Social Work, 50(4), 363.

Heeringen, K. (Ed.). (2001). Understanding Suicidal Behaviour: The Suicidal Process Approach to Research, Treatment, and Prevention. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Seaburn, D.B., Lorenz, a.D., Gunn, W.B., Gawinski, B.A., & Mauksch, L.B. (1996). Models of Collaboration: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals Working with Health Care Practitioners. New York: Basic Books.

Evidence-Based Approach to Patients' Conditions
Words: 1245 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 43766005
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However, the screening of patients for these conditions necessitates the inclusion of brief screening questions into a health systems review at the medical visit because patients may be embarrassed or unwilling to show concerns or talk about their mental distress or health. The inclusion of the questions into the health systems review can help to facilitate early discovery and intervention and communicating to patients about concerns on their overall health. Many people with these mental conditions tend be unwilling to consult their care providers because of the stigma linked to the conditions and the lack of effective treatments available (Haddad, Buszewicz & Murphy, n.d.).

The other approach that can be taken to screen for these conditions is to administer validated screening measures in the waiting room. In this case, the screening measures even as brief scales have been identified to be effective in discovering the problems. The validated screen measures…

References:

Bartels et. al. (2003). Evidence-based Practices in Geriatric Mental Health Care: An Overview of Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses. Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 26, 971-990. Retrieved from  http://amhd.org/About/ClinicalOperations/MISA/EBP%20geri%20meta-analysis.pdf 

Haddad, M., Buszewicz, M. & Murphy, B. (n.d.). Supporting People with Depression and Anxiety. Retrieved November 23, 2012, from  http://www.mind.org.uk/assets/0001/4765/MIND_ProCEED_Training_Pack.pdf 

Katz, S. (2010, March 8). it's Not Just about the Gut: Managing Depression and Anxiety in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Retrieved November 23, 2012, from  http://www.practicalgastro.com/pdf/July10/GraffArticleRev.pdf 

"Specific Mental Disorders." (n.d.). Mental Illness and Suicide. Retrieved November 23, 2012,

Philosophy of Mind and Mental Illness
Words: 2455 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32851897
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Joan of Arc

Thanks to the many media representations of her, Joan of Arc has become somewhat of a household name. Also known as Jeanne or Jehanne D'Arc, this extraordinary young woman fearlessly led the French Army to victory at a time when it became obvious to all but her that they would lose. In addition to devising military strategies that would ultimately lead them to victory, Joan of Arc also boosted the morale of her soldiers to such an extent that they rapidly came from a deep depression about their possibilities as an army towards a unified front that few could defeat. In the end, however, and perhaps this is the most well-known part of her story, Joan of Arc came to her tragic end by being burned at the stake as a heretic at best or a witch at worst. Today, this story has culminated in many speculations.…

References

Graham, G. (2010). The disordered mind: An introduction to philosophy of mind and mental illness. New York: Routledge.

Keko, D. (2011, May 29). Joan of Arc: The Visions. Examiner.com. Retrieved from:  http://www.examiner.com/article/joan-of-arc-the-visions 

National Post (2014). Joan of Arc's Secret. Retrieved from: http://www.nationalpost.com/news/story.html?id=18ce2b05-67d7-402a-833e-f0618da5c4e6

Benefits and Costs of Gamification in Mental Health
Words: 2862 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12695880
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Gamification in Mental Healthcare

There is no doubt that we have had decades of research geared at developing new and more effective treatments for mental conditions ranging from autism to anxiety, from schizophrenia to depression and so on. What is rather worrying, however, is that we have very little to show for it. Mental disorders such as these continue to impact on the quality of life of a significant proportion of the population, costing the taxpayer millions of dollars every year. Currently, approximately 90 million Americans, which translates to approximately one-third of the population, suffers from some form of anxiety disorder, yet a majority of these fail to seek out treatment for the same owing to the stigma, burden and cost associated with such evidence-based treatments. Mental health professionals are, thus, focusing their attention towards the development of low-burden, effective interventions for mental illness. Gamification, the introduction of game-like elements…

References

Arthur, G., 2015. Cellphone Therapy: New Apps Help Track and Treat Mental Illness. Aljazeera.com [online] Available at  http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/5/15/cell-phone-therapy-new-apps-help-track-and-treat-mental-illness.html  [accessed 22 May 2015]

Bolluyt, V., 2013. How Apps are Tackling Important Mental Health Issues. Cheatsheet. [online] Available at  http://www.cheatsheet.com/technology/how-apps-are-tackling-important-mental-health-issues.html/?a=viewall  [accessed 21 May 2015].

Chan, S.R., Torous, J., Hinton, L., and Yellowlees, P., 2014. Mobile Tele-Mental Health: Increasing Applications and a Move to Hybrid Models of Care. Healthcare, 2(1), pp. 220-233

Cugelman, B., 2013. Gamification: What it is and why it Matters to Digital Health Behavior Change Developers. JMIR Serious Games, 1(1), pp. 1-6.

Counseling for Mental Health Professionals Working With
Words: 1085 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14279514
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Counseling

For mental health professionals, working with patients can be challenging. This is because they will have issues that could be directly associated with their condition. In the movie One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, it is discussing these problems. To fully understand how this relates to crisis theory and intervention requires comparing different scenes from the film that are relevant. This will be accomplished by focusing on: the precipitating event, identifying the type of crisis, examining the material / personal / social resources available, studying the different perspectives, looking at how it was handled by the protagonist, suggesting coping skills, discussing referral sources that are available and biblical perspectives. Together, these elements will provide specific insights as to the way it is illustrating crisis theory and intervention challenges.

Identify precipitating events

The main event is when andal Patrick McMurphy is sent to a mental hospital from the state prison.…

References

Holly Bible New International Version. (1985). Oak Ridge, TN: Gideon's International.

How Do I Find a Local Support Group. (2012). NMHA. Retrieved from:  http://www.nmha.org/go/find_support_group 

Douglas, M. (Producer), & Forman, M. (Director). (1975). One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. USA: United Artists.

Wright, N. (2011). The Complete Guide to Crisis and Trauma Counseling. Ventura, CA: Regal.

Mental Health Counseling Discuss the Role in
Words: 1923 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96482523
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Mental Health Counseling

Discuss the role in relationship to the prescription and monitoring of pharmacological treatments for mental health issues.

Unique advances have been achieved in the treatment offered to clients suffering from mental illness. Mental health care providers must understand the original causes of mental health disorders in order to provide treatment to clients with these disorders. Therefore, mental healthcare providers are able to treat disorders associated with mental health. This is being done with much success as physical disorders (Madden, 2008).

The profession of mental health provision has categorized strategies of treating mental health problems as either psychotherapeutic or somatic. Somatic methods of treating mental disorders include therapies such as electroconvulsive therapy, which have the potential of stimulating the brain. Psychotherapeutic method includes behavioral therapy strategies, hypnotherapy, and psychotherapy. esearchers have established that most mental health disorders require treatment strategies that involve both psychotherapy and drugs. This is…

References

Madden, R.G. (2008). Legal issues in social work, counseling, and mental health: Guidelines for clinical practice in psychotherapy. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications

Palmo, A.J., Weikel, W.J., & Borsos, D.P. (2011). Foundations of mental health counseling.

Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.

World Health Organization (2009). Mental health aspects of women's reproductive health: A

Mental Health Prisoners Usa I've Included Outline
Words: 1860 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83733055
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mental health prisoners usa. I've included outline main idea, I apply ideas questions. contact clarifications. I. Introduce define global health issue connection nursing. For, .

Mental Health in the American Prison System

There has always been much controversy regarding prisoners and their mental health, but as civilization has experienced much progress throughout this century people have become more and more concerned about making sure that prisons are able to differentiate between individuals who are mentally ill and persons who are not. Even with the fact that prisons were never design to accommodate the mentally ill, conditions are critical today as a great deal of men and women who are unable to get mental health treatment in the communities they live in are incarcerated consequent to committing an illegality. There are a great deal of people suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or depression in U.S., thus meaning that society needs to…

Works cited:

Austin, W. And Boyd, M.A. (2010). Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing for Canadian Practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Cornwell, D.J. (2009). The Penal Crisis and the Clapham Omnibus: Questions and Answers in Restorative Justice. Waterside Press.

Finkel, M.L. (2010). Public Health in the 21st Century: [Three Volumes]. ABC-CLIO.

Videbeck, S.L. (2010). Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Mental Health Court Study the
Words: 2549 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 1040849
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Nonetheless, people who received some level of ACRP intervention had a lower rate of criminal recidivism than people who received no intervention at all.

System Flow

The study found that the case flow through the ACRP was a little slow. The amount of time between the Initial Opt-In Hearing and the Formal Opt-In Hearing averaged 74 days. While there are no hard and fast rules governing how long this process should take, the study found that that "the ACRP is performing rather well on the front-end of the admissions process (up to the initial opt-in stage) but that more could be done to work on the back end (time between the Initial Opt-In Hearing and the Formal Opt-In Hearing)."

Status Hearings

The study found that the incentives and sanctions used by ACRP judges to promote compliance at status hearings, though standardized, were not tailored to correspond to participant progress.

Also,…

Bibliography

Outcomes from the Last Frontier: An Evaluation of the Anchorage Mental Health Court (Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority, Ferguson-Hornby-Zeller, 2008).

Improving Responses to People with Mental Illnesses: The Essential Elements of a Mental Health Court (Thompson, Osher, Tomasini-Joshi, 2008).

Mental Health Courts: Decriminalizing the Mentally Ill. (Irwin Law, Schneider-Hyman-Bloom, 2007).

Mental Health Courts. (Wiley Encyclopedia of Forensic Science, Schneider, 2009).

Mental Health and Poor Mental Health Explain
Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32821915
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mental health and poor mental health. Explain two ways your own culture influences your definitions of mental health. Then explain how your definition of mental health might differ from that of your selected culture. Finally, describe a behavior that is considered normal in your culture but would be considered abnormal in the culture you selected.

Defining mental health: Japan vs. The United States

Even within a culture, the definition of what constitutes 'sanity' or 'insanity' can be extremely controversial. Where to draw the line between eccentricity and quirkiness vs. full-blown mental illness? In Western culture, definitions of mental illness have changed over time. For example, during the 19th century, a woman who did not want to get married and have sex outside of marriage might be considered deranged. Today, being gay is not considered a mental illness, but less than 50 years ago homosexuality was officially classified as an abnormality.…

Given the subjective nature of mental illness, it is not surprising that every culture has a different definition of what constitutes deviancy. In Japan, for example, a new mental disorder has been identified called "hikikomori," meaning "pulling in" or "withdrawal" (Grisafe 2012) Hikikomori usually affects young men who "withdraw entirely from society and stay in their own homes for more than six months, with onset by the latter half of their twenties, and for whom other psychiatric disorders do not better explain the primary causes of this condition" (Grisafe 2012). Most of these young men are middle-class and come from households able to support them financially. The young men spend their days watching television, playing video games, and pursing other activities that do not require social interaction. While some have reported self-destructive behavior like 'cutting' or obsessive-compulsive cleaning, their most distinguishing feature is their complete social isolation.

One of the causes of hikikomori is thought to be the famously rigid Japanese social system. If a young person does not get into a good school and find a good job immediately upon graduation, few opportunities are available for him or for her. While women have the possibility of marriage, men have little else to look forward to, given that society regards them as a 'failure.' The condition was first identified during Japan's great recession in the 1990s, when the formerly stable, booming economy began to unravel.

Of course, the phenomenon of young people struggling to find work after graduation is not confined to Japan. In the wake of the recession of 2008, many young American graduates were forced to return home. "The number of young adults ages 20 to 34 who lived with their parents jumped from 17% in 1980 to 24% in 2007-09" (Nasser 2012). Young male returnees are also reported to have fewer domestic demands placed upon them by their parents, such as cooking and cleaning (Nasser 2012). However, the sense of complete emotional stasis and failure that afflicted the Japanese men is not characteristic of American graduates enough to be regarded as a mental illness. Although some graduates undeniably experience depression and frustration, the fact that society in America takes a more permissive view of taking time to 'find one's feet' after graduation likely has a more positive emotional impact upon graduates unable to be financially independent. Also, in contrast to Japan, American colleges tend to be prohibitively expensive, and the need to alleviate their debt burden forces many young graduates to take some kind of a job (and therefore, to leave the house), in contrast

Mental Retardation in Relationship to Developing Learning
Words: 469 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63618298
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mental retardation in relationship to developing learning programs.

Review relevant literature.

Developmental learning programs are based on the child's cognitive abilities and IQ range.

To begin, an individual is considered to have mental retardation based on the following three criteria: intellectual functioning level (IQ) is below 70-75; significant limitations exist in two or more adaptive skill areas; and the condition is present from childhood (defined as age 18 or less) (AAMR, 1992).

When considering the development of learning programs for the disabled, the following terms refer to the link between the child's IQ and their ability to learn basic skills.

The least severe form of retardation is mild with an IQ range of 52-68. Moderate refers to an IQ range of 35-40 and 50-55; severe is 20-25 and 35-40 and profound is below 20-25.

Individuals in these categories tend to learn at a slower rate, have a hard time combining…

Sources

Hallahan, Daniel, Kauffman, James M. Exceptional Learners: Introduction to Special Education, 9th Edition.

Kenny TJ, Clemmens RL: Mental retardation, in Primary Pediatric Care, edited by RA Hoekelman. St. Louis, C.V. Mosby Company, 1997.

A www.thearc.com www.disabledperson.com

Conditions on Happiness a Growing
Words: 982 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35604895
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The items are coded form 1= not at all to 7= a great deal. Two of the questions are:

In general, I consider myself not a very happy person (running the gamut to) a very happy person.

Compared to most of my peers, I consider myself: less happy (running the gamut to) more happy.

In order to most accurately and scientifically evaluate the effect of the differing variables, I will also closely scrutinize effects of other conditions in my life so as to ascertain that no stressors are occurring at the moment that may contaminate the study and raise or lower my happiness mood.

Being that this is a qualitative study, and that it will be difficult to bracket surrounding variables, I will use the phenomenological method to conduct this study. The phenomenological approach is best for understanding description of lived experience in regards to methods that include observation, interviews,…

References.

Baron, R.A., Byrne, D., & Branscombe, N.R. (2006). Social Psychology (11th Ed.). Pearson Education, Inc.

Campbell, B. (n.d.) Phenomenology as research method. Victoria Univ.

 http://www.staff.vu.edu.au/syed/alrnnv/papers/bev.html 

Leighton, J.P. (2006). Teaching and assessing deductive reasoning skills. The Journal of Experimental Education, 74(2), 109-136.

Mental Retardation With Autism
Words: 4103 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76295287
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Incidence, Diagnoses, Characteristics and Safety Considerations Involved in the Provision of Physical Education Activities to Students with Mental Retardation with Autism

An Examination of the Incidence, Diagnoses, Characteristics and Safety Considerations Involved in the Provision of Physical Education Activities to Students with Mental Retardation ith and ithout Autism

To excuse students from physical education is the safe way out, but it does not meet their needs since it becomes costly to them in the long run. The inference here is not to say that physical educators advocate placing children in a program of physical education which will aggravate an injury, cause frustration, or to make him do things which are beyond their ability. -- Nancy Allison Close, Donald K. Matthews, 1973

This paper provides an overview of what physical education (PE) teachers should consider when developing activities and lesson plans for students with the cognitive and physical constraints associated with…

Works Cited

Ammerman, Robert T. And Michel Hersen. Advanced Abnormal Child Psychology. Mahwah,

NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2000.

Bauman, Joanne. (2004). Benefits and Barriers to Fitness for Children with Disabilities. The National Center on Physical Activity and Disability. Available: http://www.ncpad.

org/yourwrites/fact_sheet.php.

Mental Health for Military Personnel
Words: 714 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 15504681
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National Council for Behavioral Health (n.d.) points out, at least thirty percent of active duty military personnel suffer from a serious mental health disorder that requires treatment, but less than half of these individuals receive treatment. However, there are a variety of state and national mental health services specifically for individuals and families affiliated with the military. The state of Washington maintains a list of mental health resources including family resources for military and veteran families (Washington Mental Health Care esources, n.d.). The state of California's Department of Health Care Services (n.d.) offers a similar set of resources including suicide prevention hotlines for homeless veterans. The California Department of Veterans Affairs (n.d.) draws attention to the range of state and federal resources available, including those that are funded under the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), Proposition 63. The primary resource for service members and their families is the Department of…

Mental Health and the Criminal Justice System
Words: 1100 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19376522
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The deinstitutionalization trend that began during the 1960s was based on the notion that people suffering from mental illness would be able to receive better treatment for their disorder in community-based facilities while also saving the state and federal governmental tens of millions of dollars in the process (Lamb & Weinberger, 2019). This movement, however, ultimately backfired and the incidence of individuals with mental illness that become involved with the criminal justice system remains a serious problem for American policymakers and citizens alike today. The purpose of this paper is to review the relevant literature to determine the types of problems that are typically experienced by the criminal justice system in the provision of timely and effective treatment for incarcerated mentally ill offenders and what moral dilemmas arise as a result. In addition, an analysis concerning the costs that are associated with treating mentally ill prisoners is followed by a…

References
Addressing mental illness in the criminal justice system. (2009). U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved from  https://www.justice.gov/archives/opa/blog/addressing-mental-illness-criminal-justice-system .
Gilbert, M. (2015, May 5). Treatment, not jail: It’s time to step up. National Alliance on Mental Illness. Retrieved from  https://www.nami.org/ .
Interventions for adults with serious mental illness who are involved with the criminal justice system. (2012, September 13). U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Retrieved from  https://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/products/mental-illness-adults-prisons/research-protocol .
Ireland, J. L. & Ireland, C. A. (2011). Personality structure among prisoners: How valid is the five-factor model, and can it offer support for Eysenck’s theory of criminality? Criminal Behavior and Mental Health, 21, 35–50.
Lamb, R. & Weinberger, L. E. (2019, October 10). Deinstitutionalization and other factors in the criminalization of persons with serious mental illness and how it is being addressed. CNS Spectrums, 25(2), 173-180.

Mental Health and Addiction
Words: 2699 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64549580
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ecovery can be a difficult journey for many. The reality of having to change old habits for new ones can take a lifetime. The recovery approach/model realizes the struggle of change and transformation and makes it so that way emphasis is not placed on the destination, but rather the journey. Although other approaches like the disease/medical model aim to treat one aspect of recovery from addiction, the recovery model encompasses all aspects making it one of the most advantageous models to adopt to fight addiction.

The recovery approach/model to addiction and/or mental disorder places a strong emphasis on a support for an individual's potential for recovery. ecovery means a person undergoing a personal journey instead of determining and setting an outcome. This personal journey involves the development of hope, a sense of self, a secure base, social inclusion, meaning, empowerment, and coping skills that will take that person past the…

References

Barker, P. & Buchanan-Barker, P. (2012). Tidal Model of Mental Health Nursing. Currentnursing.com. Retrieved 24 July 2016, from  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Tidal_Model.html 

Best, D. & Lubman, D. (2012). The recovery paradigm - a model of hope and change for alcohol and drug addiction. Aust Fam Physician., 41(8), 593.

Hall, W., Carter, A., & Forlini, C. (2015). The brain disease model of addiction: is it supported by the evidence and has it delivered on its promises?. The Lancet Psychiatry, 2(1), 105-110.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s2215-0366 (14)00126-6

Hammer, R., Dingel, M., Ostergren, J., Partridge, B., McCormick, J., & Koenig, B. (2013). Addiction: Current Criticism of the Brain Disease Paradigm. AJOB Neuroscience, 4(3), 27-32.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21507740.2013.796328

Mental Health Case Study Depression
Words: 2894 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 50384493
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Demographics

Patient is a Hispanic male, aged 31. He is the father of one son, aged 10. The patient is Puerto ican, and was born and spent his childhood in Puerto ico. He came to live in the U.S. at age 11. He now lives in Brooklyn, New York. The patient is separated from the mother of his son. His son lives with his mother. The patient currently lives alone and is unemployed.

Chief Complaint

The chief complaint of the patient is that he is "feeling down and alone recently," and that he also feels separated from his family: "I also haven't seen my son for a while." Clearly he is depressed about his living situation, his prospects, and his health.

History of Present Illness

The patient's present illness is related to drug abuse, of which the patient has a considerable history. Essentially, the patient reports that over the past…

References

Beck, J. (2011). Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond. NY: Guilford Press.

Hewitt, J. P. (2009). Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology. Oxford University

Press.

McKay, D. et al. (2015). Efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for obsessive-

Importance of Treatment of Mental Illnesses
Words: 1465 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37845922
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Mental Illness

In recent years, mental illnesses have been the focus of considerable attention from medical professionals. These are conditions that can cause disruptions in individual's moods, feelings, thinking, daily functioning, and the ability to relate with other people and things. Mental illness is a condition of the brain which results in different symptoms, as well as affecting the day-to-day life of that person and the people around him or her in different ways. The mental illnesses include borderline personality disorder, post-traumatic stress, obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety to name a few. More than sixty million people in America, i.e. one out of four adults, are going through mental illnesses in a given year. One out of seventeen people experiences disorders such as bipolar disorder, depression, and schizophrenia while one out of ten million children are going through emotional disorders and mental illnesses. Every person who…

Bibliography

Miles, J., Espiritu, R., Horen, N., Sebian, J., & Waetzig, E. (2007). A public health approach to children's mental health. Georgetown: Center for Child and Human Development.

(n.d.). Models of Human Service Delivery.

NAMI. (2013). Mental Illness: What you need to know. Virginia: National Alliance on Mental Illness.

NIMH. (n.d.). NIMH Plan of Research. Retrieved from www.nimh.nih.org:  https://www.nimh.nih.gov/about/strategic-planning-reports/introduction.shtml

Frontline's Prisons and Mental Health Video
Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Chapter Paper #: 78831261
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Mental Health, Prisons and Hospitals

The two videos -- the news piece on Connecticut's "purple pods" used in Hartford hospital and the Frontline special on prisons and mental health -- both indicate a problem in how society copes with and treats individuals with mental health. They also portray the two extremes of society's response to mental health issues. The Hartford hospital is on the one extreme -- in which the patient's comfort and security are top priorities (to the extent that mental health patients are given their own specially constructed rooms where safety mechanisms and soothing features have been built into the room). The prison system in Ohio described in Frontline is on the other extreme -- where prisons essentially act as mental health hospitals because the mental health facilities in Columbus are no longer able to tend to the needs of mental health patients: the patients end up being…

References

Gonzalez, M., Connell, N. (2014). Mental health of prisoners: identifying barriers to mental health treatment and medication continuity. American Journal of Public Health, 104(12): 2328-2333.

Harner, H., Riley, S. (2013). The impact of incarceration on women's mental health.

Qualitative Health Research, 23(1); 26-42.

Analyzing Mental Health Disorder
Words: 2533 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 66967288
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Mental Health Disorder

The following is a close examination of the psychosocial status of mental health disorder. There is going to be an examination of the symptoms along with a comprehensive diagnosis of the case.

Mental Health Disorder- Background

Childhood mental health disorder refers to all mental health conditions that affect a person in childhood. The disorder in children is described as critical changes that affect the way a child behaves, learns or even handles emotional situations. Some of the known childhood mental health disorders include (CDC - Child Development, Children's Mental Health -- NCBDDD, n.d):

Hyperactivity disorder/attention deficit disorder (ADHD) (http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/index.html)

Disorders related to behavior

Anxiety and mood disorders

Tourette syndrome

Substance use disorders

Mental health is essential in life. Mental health disorders can persist throughout a person's life (CDC - Child Development, Children's Mental Health -- NCBDDD, n.d). The problem needs to be diagnosed early. Otherwise, children continue…

References

(n.d.). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC - Child Development, Children's Mental Health - NCBDDD. Retrieved February 6, 2016, from  http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/childdevelopment/mentalhealth.html 

Klauck, S. (2006). Genetics of autism spectrum disorder. European Journal of Human Genetics, 14, 714-720. Retrieved February 6, 2016 from  http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v14/n6/full/5201610a.html 

(n.d.). Medicine Net. Mental Health: Get the Facts on Common Disorders. Retrieved February 6, 2016, from  http://www.medicinenet.com/mental_health_psychology/article.htm 

(n.d.). MU School of Health Professions. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Case Study. Retrieved February 6, 2016, from  http://shp.missouri.edu/vhct/case4108/case_study.htm

Critical Analysis Mental Illness
Words: 3769 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82859192
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Mental illness appears in various forms. It is characterized by some serious disruptions in someone's thoughts or even demonstrated in their actions. The person presenting these symptoms is often unable to deal with the day-to-day activities and patterns of a normal life. Mental illness can take over 200 forms each having an effect on the patient's disposition, character, traits, and even the way they interact with others. Some of the common forms of mental illness are 'schizophrenia', 'depression,' 'bipolar disorders' and 'dementia'. Taylor and Brown (1988) state that mental illness can be presented in a psychological, emotional way and even in physical symptoms. A person under severe stress due to dealing with an incident or series of stressors' build-up over time is prone to mental illness. A person may also present symptoms of mental illness through a biochemical imbalance, a negative reaction to his environment, and the pressures accrued thereby,…

References

Bartlett, A., & McGauley, G. (2010). Forensic mental health: Concepts, systems, and practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Clinic, M. (2015, October 13). Mental illness. Retrieved December 7, 2015, from  http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mental-illness/basics/definition/CON-20033813 

Corrigan, P. W., Morris, S., Larson, J., Rafacz, J., Wassel, A., Michaels, P., ... Rusch, N. (2010). SELF-STIGMA AND COMING OUT ABOUT ONE'S MENTAL ILLNESS. Journal of Community Psychology, 38(3), 259-275.  http://doi.org/10.1002/jcop.20363 

Dowrick. C., Dunn. G., Ayuso-Mateos.J et al. (2000). Problem-solving treatment and group psycho-education for depression: multicenter randomized controlled trial. British Medical Journal, 321, 1450-4

Psycho Path Reflections of Mental
Words: 1368 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42526056
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The individuals with the condition often face a series of exclusions and rejections (Widiger 2011). There are many scenarios that have been denied basic needs such as housing on the basis of their mental status. People are denied loans, job opportunities and health insurances on the basis of mental health. The stigmatization cases are so prevalent that many people affected or who suspect they have the condition fear to seek professional assistance.

Stigmatization causes the person to have low self-esteem the strong social, religious and cultural beliefs have greatly distorted views of people on mental illness. Media portrays most of the characters with aggressive behavior and other negative traits as suffering from mental illness. This has created the impression that mental sickness is a sign of inferior character.

The basics of mental health include examination of theories of psychology, sociology, health psychology and transitions of life in relation to mental…

References

Jensen-doss, a., & Hawley, K.M. (2011). Understanding clinicians' diagnostic practices:

Attitudes toward the utility of diagnosis and standardized diagnostic tools. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 38(6), 476-85. doi:

 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10488-011-0334-3 

Widiger, T.A. (2011). Integrating normal and abnormal personality structure: A proposal for DSM-V. Journal of Personality Disorders, 25(3), 338-63. doi:

Physical and Mental Disorders for
Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61490952
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Usually, diagnosis is symptom driven, then combined with testing, forms an opinion, sometimes verified by lab tests, of a specific diagnosis. For instance, someone may have symptoms of nausea, pain, depression, anxiety, and their skin has a yellowish hue. The physician runs blood tests and finds that the liver is malfunctioning and there is likely a diagnosis of hepatitis. In this case, there are both physical and mental symptoms, but it is the physical nature that is diagnosed first. For mental diagnosis, symptoms are also important, but are based more on the functioning of the individual in social systems, or by observing the patient's behavior (How are Mental Illnesses Diagnosed? 2012). Thus, both use symptoms as a guide, but mental diagnosis is more empirical and uses observation, while physical diagnosis uses quantitative measurements.

Etiology- Etiology is the study of basic causation. We now know that there are a number of…

REFERENCES

American Psychiatric Association Practice Guidelines. (2006). PsychiatryOnline. Retrieved from:  http://psychiatryonline.org/guidelines.aspx 

How are Mental Illnesses Diagnosed? (2012). WebMD. Retrieved from:  http://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/mental-health-making-diagnosis 

Curtis, a.J. et.al. (2000), Introduction to Health Psychology, New York: Routledge.

Dombeck, M. (2003). Blurring the Boundary Between Mental and Physical. Seven Counties Services, Inc. Retrieved from:  http://www.sevencounties.org  / poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=1855&cn=74

Obstruct Access to Mental Health
Words: 1638 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 35795316
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17). Likewise, left untreated, mental health problems such as anxiety disorders can result in increased healthcare utilization over the lifespan, but access to effective and proven mental health treatments remains a problem across the country (Gauthier, 2004) .

Conclusion

The research showed that a wide range of efficacious treatments exist for mental health disorders that can help people regain control over their lives and avoid the long-term adverse consequences of untreated mental disorders. Unfortunately, the research also showed that just a tithe of those with mental health disorders receive treatment for them because a broad array of obstacles remain in place that inhibits or prevents access to timely and effective interventions. These obstacles were shown to include the fact that mental health care is costly, services are often fragmented, and insurance is frequently nonexistent or inadequate for the mental health services that are needed. In addition, other obstacles were shown…

References

Allen-Kelly, K. & Charikar, K. (2010, Autumn). Social workers and occupational therapists shut out of Medicare. Impact, 17-19.

Brindis, C.D., Morreale, M.C. & English, a. (2003). The unique health care needs of adolescents. The Future of Children, 13(1), 116-117

Conyne, R.K. (2004). Preventive counseling: Helping people to become empowered in systems and settings. New York: Brunner-Routledge.

Gauthier, J. (2004). The costs of anxiety disorders and their treatment: a commentary. Canadian Psychology, 45(3), 219-221.

Welfare Mental Health Problems and
Words: 2491 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61805198
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Consistent with this, other findings propose that women are more likely than men to take part in violence in the home whereas men are more likely than women to take part in violence in public places.

Even though there is some evidence that mental illness is associated with violence, it appears that the bigger contributing factor is that of outside influences. Substance abuse appears to be the greatest contributing factor, but it can be something as insignificant as one's living arrangements or even just their gender. Overall people with mental health problems do not appear to be at an increased risk of violence.

References

Appelbaum, P.S., Robbins, P.C., Monahan, J. (2000). Violence and delusions: data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study. American Journal of Psychiatry, 157,

p. 566-572.

Cottle, C. (2004). The role of social context in the prediction and management of violence among persons with mental illness. Dissertation…

Emerging Standards of Care Mental Health Cultural Competence
Words: 2289 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2653470
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Standards of Care/Mental Health/Cultural Competence

EMEGING STANDADS OF CAE/MENTAL HEALTH/CULTUAL

Sometime in 1999, the Surgeon General released Mental Health: A eport of the Surgeon General. Inside this report, it acknowledged that not every Americans, particularly minorities, are getting the equal mental health treatment, a discovery that provoked the Surgeon General to give out a supplemental report on differences in mental health care for individuals of color (Donini-Lenhoff, 2006). The addition, which was available in 2001, sends out one obvious message: culture does actually count. Cultural competency is considered to be one the vital ingredients in closing the differences hole in health care. It is looked as the way patients and doctors are able to come together and then talk about health issues without cultural differences stopping the conversation, nonetheless improving it. Fairly simply, health care services that are deferential of and receptive to the health beliefs, practices and cultural and…

References

Choi, H.M. (2006). ETHNIC DIFFERENCES IN ADOLESCENTS' MENTAL DISTRESS, SOCIAL STRESS, AND RESOURCES. Adolescence, 41(126), 263-83.

Donini-Lenhoff, F. (2006). HEALTH: Cultural competence in the health professions; insuring a juniform standard of care. The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, 65(45), 45.

Furler, J. & . (2012). Mental health: Cultural competence. Australian Family Physician, 39(5), 206-8.

Sawrikar, P. & . (2013). The relationship between mental health, cultural identity and cultural values in non-english speaking background (NESB) australian adolescents. Behaviour Change, 21(3), 97-113.

Effects of Mental Illness
Words: 675 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 92256514
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mental illness on the individual, family, and community, and identify mental health resources for individuals experiencing mental illness. Mental illness does not just affect the patient, it affects the entire patient's family and friends, and it can affect them throughout their life. Unfortunately, mental illness still invokes a stigma in this country, which has a negative affect on patients suffering from mental illness.

Even when people attempt to be open minded, there is still a stigma that revolves around people who suffer from mental health issues. Two authors note, "People suffering from mental illness and other mental health problems are among the most stigmatized, discriminated against, marginalized, disadvantaged and vulnerable members of our society" (Overton & Medina, 2008). This is just one of the negative affects of suffering from mental illness, and it can be as debilitating as the disease itself. In the past, (such as the middle ages, people…

References

Corrigan, P.W., Watson, A.C., Byrne, P., & Davis, K.E. (2005). Mental illness stigma: Problem of public health or social justice?. Social Work, 50(4), 363+.

Neugeboren, J. (2006, October 6). Side effects. Commonweal, 133, 38.

Overton, S.L., & Medina, S.L. (2008). The stigma of mental illness. Journal of Counseling and Development, 86(2), 143+.

Society Mental Health and Welfare
Words: 668 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 67240615
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Mental Health, and Welfare

Society, mental health and welfare:

A problem related to counseling (under-insurance) and a social problem (the lack of adequate healthcare coverage)

The course text Social action: A mandate for counselors discusses the ethical implications of such issues as race and social injustice in the counseling profession. However, perhaps even more important than these factors is the issue of class, specifically the affordability of counseling on an individual basis. Wealthier individuals with better insurance or who can afford to pay 'pout of pocket' often have the luxury of 'talk' therapy that poorer people, or people without adequate health insurance, lack. This creates a 'haves' versus 'have not' situation in terms of the availability and the quality of counseling. Poorer individuals with minimal insurance coverage for mental health care are often offered fewer counseling sessions, or have their psychological complaints treated as medical disorders, rather than fully addressed…

References

Considering some practical matters. (2011). AMHA (American Mental Health Alliance).

Retrieved June 8, 2011 at  http://www.americanmentalhealth.com/index.tpl?page=10737827503031878 

Harris, G. (2011, March 6). Talk doesn't pay. The New York Times. Retrieved June 8, 2011 at  http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/06/health/policy/06doctors.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=psychiatrist%20talk%20therapy&st=cse

Assessing Mental Illness
Words: 1890 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41184962
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Mental Illness

The ability for patients to access mental health services these days are more wide ranging than ever before. This is in part due to the fact that the realm of mental health, once simply governed by physicians, is now peopled by staff of all different types and disciplines. In addition, many mental health professionals are now multiply credentialed, so it is not impossible to see a mental health professional who is all at once a family and marital therapist, a chemical dependency practitioner and a social worker. All these elements only serve to improve the ability of patients/clients to receive quality mental health services, whether it be in a large institutional setting, a community mental health center or in a private clinical office.

But what are the different types of mental health professionals who are trained in the identification and treatment of patients with mental health issues? There…

Reference:

Bridget, J. 1994, Treatment of Lesbians with Alcohol Problems in Alcohol services in North-West England, Lesbian Information Service.

Faulkner, A. 1997, Briefing No.1 - Suicide and Deliberate Self-Harm. Mental Health Foundation

National Patient Safety Agency 2001, Safety First, National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness, five-year report of the National Confidential Inquiry

Shaffi, M., Carigan, S., Whittinghall, J.R. et al. 1985, 'Psychological Autopsy of Completed Suicide in Children and Adolescents', American Journal of Psychiatry, 142, 1061-1064.

Fear Sadness Fear and Access to Mental
Words: 1665 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37227858
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Fear Sadness

Fear and Access to Mental Health Support

Mental health treatment is, in a certain regard, a widely accepted sector of the healthcare community. However, in spite of continued advances in this field, there remain many demographics which present a heightened and unmet need for mental health support. The review here, which assess two recent newspaper articles on the subject to mental health, reports on the need for an expansion and refinement of the responsibilities assumed by the mental health community.

Craft, C.H. (2012). U.S. mental health programs little help to Latinos, UC Davis study says. The Sacramento Bee.

A 2012 article by Cynthia H. Craft, published in The Sacramento Bee and entitled "U.S. mental health programs little help to Latinos, UC Davis study says," evaluates the relative experience of disenfranchisement from mental health treatment and counseling among Latinos living in the United States. The article evaluates the various…

Works Cited:

Craft, C.H. (2012). U.S. mental health programs little help to Latinos, UC Davis study says. The Sacramento Bee.

Ortega, J.R. (2012). Behavioral health expert talks future of mental, primary health care. Victoria Advocate.

Forensics and Mental Health
Words: 2723 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89090754
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Forensic Mental Health Legislation and Policies

The current position on forensic mental health issues when it comes to legislation and policies is a strong one, but there are some difficulties that do not translate well into the probation and parole policies that are currently offered. In other words, there are issues that are not being addressed, and that are allowing individuals with mental health problems who on are probation and parole to slip through the cracks and struggle with their issues on their own (Wang, et al., 2005). Not only are they not getting the help they need in order to live productive lives, they are also more likely to reoffend, violate their probation or parole, become homeless, drink to excess, do drugs, and get involved in other unsavory behavior (Patel & Prince, 2002). The high proportion of indigenous offenders is one of the biggest issues that indicates mental health…

References

Australian Government (2012). Mental health services in Australia. Retrieved from https://mhsa.aihw.gov.au/home/

Demyttenaere, K., Bruffaerts, R., Posada-Villa, J., Gasquet, I., Kovess, V., Lepine, JP., Angermeyer, MC., Bernert, S., et al. (2004). WHO World Mental Health Survey Consortium. Prevalence, severity, and unmet need for treatment of mental disorders in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey. Journal of the American Medical Association, 291(21): 2581 -- 2590.

Keyes, C. (2002). The mental health continuum: From languishing to flourishing in life. Journal of Health and Social Behaviour, 43(2): 207 -- 222.

Munce, S.E., Stansfeld, S.A., Blackmore, E.R., & Stewart, D.E. (2007). The role of depression and chronic pain conditions in absenteeism: Results from a national epidemiologic survey. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 49(11): 1206 -- 1211.

History of Mental Health in the United
Words: 2192 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79918035
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history of mental health in the United States has not always been a pleasant one. Prior to the mid-20th century those unfortunate numbers of Americans who were considered mentally ill were either ignored or placed in asylums (Philo, 1997). The asylum approach was considered to be a logical one. It protected the community for potentially dangerous or unwanted individuals; it provided families relief from the burden of having to care for a mentally ill family member; and, at least theoretically, they offered humane custodial care. The asylum system operated without question for many years in the United States. Society, as a whole, paid little attention to the concerns of the mentally ill and there was a general attitude that the mentally ill were largely undesirable.

Subsequent to the Second World War societal attitudes began to transform as the warehousing of the mentally ill in asylum was beginning to be considered…

References

Iglehart, J.K. (1996). Managed Care and Mental Health. New England Journal of Medicine, 131-136.

Institute of Medicine. (2005, November 1). Improviing the Quality of Health Care for Mental and Substance -Use Conditions: Quality Chasm Series. Retrieved October 30, 2011, from Institute of Medicine of the National Academies: http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2005/Improving-the-Quality-of-Health-Care-for-Mental-and-Substance-Use-Conditions-Quality-Chasm-Series.aspx

National Mental Health Act. Public Law 79-487, 79th Congress (1946).

New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. (2003). Achieving the Promise: Transforming Mental Health Care in America. Washington, D.C.: Government Publishing Office.

Adult Mental Illness in 2010
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Another reason for not seeking treatment is that people are sacred of the mental illness help. People get scared and are afraid of what will happen if they agree to go ahead and get help. They often have visions of electrocutions, over-medicated zombies as well as being forced to stay in asylums. They also do not seek treatment since they are overwhelmed by the mental health problems. People with mental health problems are worst placed mentally and they are not at the best state to make any decisions. They are often scared, lonely and they are doing anything so as to get on to the next day. Therefore adding the idea of getting help to what they are going through is terrifying to them hence they do not seek help (Conley, 2012).

Improving mental health treatment in the community

The treatment of mental health problem is very crucial .As a…

References

Conley, M. (2012).1 in 5 Americans Suffers From Mental Illness. Retrieved May 26, 2013 from  http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2012/01/19/1-in-5-americans-suffer-from-mental-illness/ 

SoRelle, R, (2000). Circulation Electronic Pages. Nearly Half of Americans with Severe Mental Illness Do Not Seek Treatment. Retrieved May 26, 2013 from  http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/101/5/e66.full

Nurses Role in Mental Health
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Making available recovery program treatment besides collaborating with partnership to leverage resources and knowledge is a role that I perform in efforts of helping clients access care. I am also involved in continual community-based quality improvement programs that are designed to support care access and quality.

B. Veteran Centered Care

With respect to centered care, I normally assist with provision of alternatives to inpatient care for mental health linked problems. Additionally, I make CVT available for weekend and evening hours. As a MHICM practitioner, I perform various administrative and clinical functions for clients and my team. Clinical tasks entail stress and crisis management, group therapy, advocacy and treatment planning. I also ensure that patient preferences with respect to appointments and mental health care providers are maintained.

C. Performance Measures

I offer administrative and clinical supervision for my team besides facilitating cohesiveness communication, education programs and systems concerning community-based services. Given…

References

Committee on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation initiative on the future of nursing.(2011). The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. New York: National Academies Press

Daniels, R., & Nicoll, L.(2011). Contemporary medical-surgical nursing, Volume 1. New York: Cengage Learning.

Sullivan-Marx, E.(2010). Nurse practitioners: The evolution and future of advanced practice. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

Thonicroft, G. (2011). Oxford textbook of community mental health. London: Oxford University Press.

Psychological Basis of Mental Illness Is Certainly
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psychological basis of mental illness is certainly only half of the story. Though mental illness is genetic, the actual symptoms and condition being presented is based on a careful marriage between biological and environmental factors. In particular, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), is a mental illness in which "people have unwanted and repeated thoughts, feelings, ideas, sensations or obsession, or behaviors that make them feel driven to do something (compulsions)" (National Institute of Mental Health, 2011). This mental illness, like many others is multi-faceted, in that there is a physiological process associated with it, a set of symptoms that manifest, certain diagnostic criterion and then a set of treatment options.

Foremost, the physiological process of mental illness is mainly concerned with the brain and certain regions of it. The physiological process is a process that evaluates the neural mechanisms of perception and behavior. esearch examining the brain has found that "a selective…

Riccardi, Christina J, Timpano, Kiara R, & Schmidt, Norman B (2010). A Case Study Perspective on the Importance of motivation in the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Clinical Case Studies, Volume 9, (Issue 4), pages 273-284.

Rosenberg, David R. & Keshavan, Matcheri S. (1998). Toward a Neurodevelopment Model of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Biological Psychiatry: Official Journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, Volume 43 (Issue 9), Pages 623-640.

Swinson, Richard P (2001). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Theory, Research, and Treatment. New York: The Guilford Press.

Working for a Community Mental Health Agency
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working for a community mental health agency that serves male adolescents aged 14-16 who have received a diagnosis of conduct disorder. You have been asked by your director of clinical training to answer the following questions (choose only one): a) What family treatment modes have been found to be effective (best practices, evidence-based) for treating this population?

Submit an annotated bibliography with an entry for each of your resources. Include the references in proper APA format. Write a brief summary highlighting the theory, treatment, intervention, and research methodology discussed in each resource.

Authors conducted thorough review of existent studies on psychosocial conduct disorder and interventions in regards to children and adolescents. They also investigated oppositional defiant disorder. 82 experimental studies were evaluated using certain criteria created by the Clinical Psychology Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures. Authors concluded that the two most effective programs that met all…

Brestan, EV. & Eyberg, EM (1998) Effective psychosocial treatments of conduct-disordered children and adolescents: 29 years, 82 studies, and 5,272 kids Journ. Clin. Child Psyc. 27, 180-189

Burke, JD, Loeber, B., & Birmaher, R. (2002) Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder: A Review of the Past 10 Years, Part II, J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry, 41, 1275-1293.

Kumpfer, K & Alvarado, R (2003). Family-Strengthening Approaches for the Prevention of Youth Problem Behaviors American Psychologist, 58, 457-465

Supervisory Procedures for Mental Health
Words: 1850 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 59097137
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This is when there will be a focused approach that is seeking out the best tools for addressing a host of issues.

Conclusion

Clearly, the field of mental health is continually changing. Part of the reason for this, is because there is emphasis on identifying new techniques for effectively treating patients. This has created a transformation in what kind of tools that are being used to address these issues. At the same time, there has been a focus on implementing supervisory procedures that will have an impact on kinds of treatment options that are being provided. This is important, because these kinds of transformations mean that they are providing effective support to mental health professionals in dealing with these issues. Once this occurs, is when there will be an emphasis on how psychologists are interacting with: patients, colleagues and supervisors. As this approach, is based upon respect, understanding, compassion and…

Bibliography

Clinical Supervision. (2009). Health. Retrieved from:  http://www.health.qld.gov.au/qcmhl/src/superguide_2009.pdf 

Bernard, J.M., & Goodyear, R.K. (2009). Fundamentals of clinical supervision. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Brown, L. (2008). The New Handbook of Counseling Supervision. Mahwah, NJ: Taylor and Francis.

Campbell, J. (2006). Essentials of clinical supervision. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Racism Mental Health in the Juvenile Justice System
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acism and Mental Health Issues in Juvenile Justice Systems

It seems that, not only are juvenile justice systems deficient in mental health services, and not only is there a disparity between services for whites and African-American youths - but some juvenile facilities may even be contributing to the deterioration of kids' emotional and mental well-being. This paper looks at racial prejudice in the administration of juvenile justice from the point-of-view of who gets locked up, what happens once they're in, and the built-in system cruelty.

ace: Chances of incarceration are far greater if you're a Black kid

Between the years 1985 and 1994, delinquency cases brought through the Juvenile Justice System (JJS) increased by 41%; but more disturbing is the fact that in that time period, delinquency cases involving blacks jumped 78% and cases involving other non-white youths skyrocketed by 94% (Lardiero, 1997). Another key fact illustrating the institutional bias…

References

Bishop, Donna M., & Frazier, Charles E. (1996). Race effects in juvenile justice

Decision-making: finding of a statewide analysis. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology. 86, 392-414.

Glasser, Jeff (2000, May 8). And Justice for Some. U.S. News & World Report.

Lardiero, Carl J. (1997). Of disproportionate minority confinement. Corrections Today. 59, 14-16.

School-Based Mental Health Program on
Words: 8166 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 67429057
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This is discussed at length by Fusick and ordeau (2004) "...school-based counselors need to be aware of the disturbing inequities that exist in predominantly Afro-American urban school districts, where nearly 40% of Afro-American students attend school in the United States" (Fusick and ordeau, 2004) This again places emphasis on the need for mental health programs in these areas of concern. This is also related to findings from a study by McDavis et al. (1995) Counseling African-Americans, which refers to research that stresses the "...widening achievement gap between Afro-American and Euro-American students." (McDavis, et al. 1995)

An important study Laura a. Nabors, Evaluation of Outcomes for Adolescents Receiving School-ased Mental Health Services (2002) refers to the particular issue and problems experience at inner-city schools. The author states that, "School mental health (SMH) programs are an important setting for providing mental health services to adolescents, especially urban youth who typically face in-…

Bibliography.aspx www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308

Smith, P.B., Buzi, R.S., & Weinman, M.L. (2001). Mental Health Problems and Symptoms among Male Adolescents Attending a Teen Health Clinic. Adolescence, 36(142), 323. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database:  

Limitations of Treating Mental Illness
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This is a fact that is virtually undisputed among the sociological and medical school of thought and practice. Many researchers of late have suggested alternative approaches to treating abnormal behaviors evident in persons diagnosed with mental illness.

By far the most common of these is a cooperative approach to care that involves treatment utilizing pharmacological and cognitive or counseling therapies. It is believed that the combination of both of these will work in tandem to best serve the needs of the patient afflicted with a mental illness. A cooperative approach to treating mental illness will also guarantee that both the sociological aspects and physiological aspects of the disease are treated adequately.

eferences

Buelow, G., & Hebert, S. (1995). Counselor's resource on psychiatric medications, issues of treatment and referral. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Christensen, O.J., England, J.T. & Scovel, K.A. (2002). "Mental health counselors'

Perceptions regarding Psychopharmacological prescriptive privileges." Journal of…

References

Buelow, G., & Hebert, S. (1995). Counselor's resource on psychiatric medications, issues of treatment and referral. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Christensen, O.J., England, J.T. & Scovel, K.A. (2002). "Mental health counselors'

Perceptions regarding Psychopharmacological prescriptive privileges." Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 24(1), 36

Hagan, J. (1991). "The disreputable pleasures: Crime and deviance in Canada, 3rd ed."

The link between Mental Health and Trauma Informed Care
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Trauma-informed care is an approach in mental health care and nursing practice that recognises the existence of trauma in the life of patients receiving mental health care, irrespective of whether or not the trauma is known to exist (Isobel & Edwards 2017). Clinicians who employ this approach acknowledge the complexity of trauma, and integrate the principles of safety, trustworthiness, choice, collaboration, and empowerment in care delivery (Qadara, 2013). Using this approach can result in better patient outcomes as well as more effective and fulfilling clinical practice. This essay discusses how trauma-informed care informs the provision of mental health care in Australia at a policy level and for consumers. Also, the essay highlights how this approach will influence the author’s mental health nursing practice.

Before progressive further, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding of what trauma-informed care entails. Trauma-informed care involves recognising the existence of traumatic experiences in mental…

Modeling and Mental Practice
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Modeling and Mental Practice

There has been much research regarding modeling (also called observational learning) and mental practice, also -- and perhaps more commonly -- known as imagery. Mental practice is also known as mental rehearsal and visuo-motor rehearsal, although these terms are much less commonly used in the literature assessed here. The current research question is:

Does modeling, when combined with mental practice and physical practice, have a grater effect than the combination of mental practice and physical practice on the learning of a novel motor skill?

The literature accessed tends not to make much distinction between modeling and mental practice, and it tends also not to assess the addition of these factor as an intensifier per se of the physical learning of a motor skill, or at least, does not quantify the impact precisely. However, previous research into motor skills vis-a-vis modeling and mental practice does point the…

References

Glisky, M.L., Williams, J.M., & Kihlstrom, J.F. (1996). Internal and external mental imagery perspectives and performance on two tasks. Journal of Sport Behavior, 19(1), 3+. Retrieved November 14, 2005, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o& ; d=5002278837

Jax, S.A., Rosenbaum, D.A., Vaughan, J., & Meulenbroek, R.G. (2003). Computational motor control and human factors: Modeling movements in real and possible environments. Human Factors, 45(1), 5+. Retrieved November 14, 2005, from Questia database:

Maternal Mental Health in Pregnancy and Child
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Maternal Mental Health in Pregnancy and Child Behavior. This is designed to provide better insights about how parental postpartum depression (PPD) is impacting the mother and the child. The findings are determined based upon looking at different cultures and the frequency of them. It is at this point, when there is a focus on previous research and any kind of gaps in existing theories. (Lukose, 2011)

In the future, these conclusions can improve everyone's understanding of how this is impacting both the patent and child during the pregnancy process. Then, after they are born is when these factors are taken into consideration to see how this is influencing their development. Over the course of time, this will enable healthcare professionals to understand the impact PPD on the parents and their children. (Lukose, 2011)

Provide a summation of the research conducted and the research findings

The research looked at the effects…

References

Lukose, A. (2011). Maternal Mental Health. Indian Journal of Psychiatry, 53 (4), 351 -- 361.

Sigmund Freud & the Human condition
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Sigmund Feud is popularly referred to as "the father of psychoanalysis." He lived between 1856 and 1939. His work and ideas have greatly influenced psychological imaginations and popularized notions such as Freudian sleep and dream symbolism, defense mechanism, unconsciousness, and many more. These notions have greatly contributed to films, literature, and theories such as feminism, psychology, philosophy and criticism.

Freud is also known for theories such as unconscious mind, specifically those revolving around repression mechanism. He redefined sexual desire as mobile and believed that it is directed towards a wide variety of objects. His therapeutic techniques improved the understanding of transference in therapeutic relationship. The technique presumed that human beings are able to gain insight into the unconscious desires through dreams.

Freud's psychoanalysis had an objective of bringing the repressed feelings and thoughts to consciousness. Freud's successors including his daughter Anna Freud postulated that the goal of the therapy was…

HHS Initiative on Multiple Chronic Conditions
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HHS Initiative on Multiple Chronic Conditions

Multiple chronic conditions (MCC) are significant challenges and obstacles to the health practitioners and citizens of the United States. The aim of the programs by the HHS includes prevention and management of multiple chronic conditions in the context of the United States. In the execution of its duties in accordance to the programs, HHS also offers an essential component in relation to leadership for the improvement of the health of the citizens of the United States with multiple chronic conditions.

Brief overview of the mission of the program

Multiple chronic conditions (MCC) are significant challenges and obstacles to the health practitioners and citizens of the United States. This relates to the role of the multiple chronic conditions on the health and development of the economy. In order to reduce the burden and suffering in relation to the aspect of multiple chronic conditions, the government…

References

Anand K. Parekh et al. (2011). Managing Multiple Chronic Conditions: A Strategic

Framework for Improving Health Outcomes and Quality of Life. Public Health Rep.

2011 Jul-Aug; 126(4): 460 -- 471.

How is HHS addressing Multiple Chronic Conditions?

Homeopathy for Acute vs Chronic Conditions
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Homeopathy for acute conditions is mainly focused on the symptoms being presented at that particular time. For chronic conditions homeopathy focuses on a larger set of symptoms and the characteristics of the person experiencing the symptoms. An acute condition is defined as a condition that comes on quickly and lasts for a short duration not more than several weeks. Acute conditions can be traced back to a situation. Chronic conditions are conditions that have persisted for long periods mostly throughout a person's life. The symptoms might be less severe than those of an acute condition, but they seriously affect an individual's quality of life. Acute conditions can be easily treated with homeopathy without the intervention of a professional homeopathic. This is because the condition is well known and it is easily established when it begun and what caused the condition (Haidvogl et al., 2007). The symptoms of an acute condition…

Psychological Condition That Is Increasingly
Words: 1055 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 62200534
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(Hornbl, 1999)

How this related to other ideas on the subject?

When you look at other ideas on the subject, it is clear that those people who are suffering from gender dysphoria, have other conditions that are affecting them as well. Where, psychologist Richard Carroll has identified a number of issues that need to be examined when someone suffers from these conditions. To include: helping patients understand themselves, letting them know what options they have available, looking for other conditions they could suffer from and establishing life goals. This is significant, because this information can be used to show how the school handled the situation wrong. Where, if Rivers was sent to counseling once he expressed these intentions, the odds would have declined dramatically that he would violate the wishes of the school board. As the counseling, would address the underlying psychological decisions that were pushing him to make this…

Bibliography

Hornbl, M. (1999). He? She? Whatever!. Retrieved July 19, 2010 from Time website:  http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,992203,00.html 

Lieblum, L. (2007). Gender Dysphoria Principals and Practice of Sex Therapy. (pp. 477 -- 479). New York, NY: Guliford Press.

Harness The Male Condition Herb Goldberg Argues
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Harness: The male Condition

Herb Goldberg argues men lost touch, running, feelings awareness

There are a number of societal pressures based upon gender. These pressures, and the roles they inevitably lead men and women, boys and girls, to fulfill are widely discussed in a pair of essays: Herb Goldberg's "In Harness: The Male Condition" and Nancy Mairs' "A Letter to Matthew." Although they pursue so via different means, both of these essays allude to a brimming awareness required to see people for how they truly are devoid of societal boundaries. Both essays encourages men to free themselves from the conventions of society that threaten to harness them -- Goldberg's essay suggests doing so through a liberation movement based on fear, whereas Mairs' work implies doing so through an awareness that allows men to avoid stereotypical behavior.

The titular harness in Goldberg's piece of literature refers to the restrictions that society…

Cormobidity of Mental Illness and Substance Abuse
Words: 4477 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71299370
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Mental Illness and Substance Abuse

Does mental illness cause substance abuse addiction or does substance abuse addiction cause a mental illness diagnosis? Does it go both ways?

A complex relationship exists between substance abuse and mental illness. Those suffering from depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses may use alcohol and drugs as self-medication. Unfortunately, though such options may appear to work temporarily, substance abuse is no treatment for any condition; in fact, it often aggravates the problem during severe intoxication as well as in the course of substance withdrawal (NAMI, 2010).

Furthermore, alcohol and drugs can initiate mental illness in persons who are otherwise mentally healthy, while worsening problems in those who are already mentally ill. Active substance users will tend to not follow-through properly with therapy, and are more vulnerable to serious health complications and even premature death. Those having dual diagnosis will also be more prone to violent…

References

Anderson P, & Baumberg B. (2006). Alcohol in Europe: a public health perspective. London: Institute of Alcohol Studies.

Anderson, M. L., Ziedonis, D. M., & Najavits, L. M. (2014). Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and substance Use Disorder Comorbidity among Individuals with Physical Disabilities: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27(2), 182-191. doi:10.1002/jts.21894

Book SW, & Randall CL. (2002). Social anxiety disorder and alcohol use. Alcohol Res Health; 26:130-5.

Cerda M, Sagdeo A, Galea S. (2008). Comorbid forms of psychopathology: key patterns and future research directions. Epidemiol Rev; 30:155_177.

Low Ses Connected With Mental Health
Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 51555838
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Low socio-economic status (SES) is linked with a number of mental health outcomes in both adults and children. For young people, low SES has been associated with higher rates of attempted suicide, higher levels of behavioral and emotional issues, higher levels of aggression, higher rates of specific behavioral and mental health concerns including anxiety, depression, and conduct disorders (APA, 2015a). egardless of the specific environmental conditions, "type of hardship," or type of mental illness evaluated, a study of 34,000 patient records revealed "the poorer one's socioeconomic conditions are, the higher one's risk is for mental disability and psychiatric hospitalization," (Hudson, 2005). While correlation does not signal causation, there are certainly reasons to consider low SES a major risk factor for mental illnesses of all types.

One of the proximate causes of some mental illnesses are environmental stressors like unemployment, housing uncertainty, and general material insecurity (Hudson, 2005). For adolescents and…

References

American Psychological Association (APA, 2015a). Children, youth, families, and socioeconomic status. Retrieved online: http://www.apa.org/pi/ses/resources/publications/factsheet-cyf.aspx

American Psychological Association (APA, 2015b). Disability and socioeconomic status. Retrieved online: http://www.apa.org/pi/ses/resources/publications/factsheet-disability.aspx

Hudson, C.G. (2005). Socioeconomic Status and Mental Illness: Tests of the Social Causation and Selection Hypotheses. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 75(1).

McLaughlin, K.A. et al. (2012). Socioeconomic status and adolescent mental disorders. American Journal of Public Health 102(9): 1742-1750.

Policy Alternatives for Mental Health
Words: 2583 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67549093
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US Mental Health Assistance
Mental health problems or mental illnesses are among the major public health issues in the United States given their prevalence. Mental health illnesses affected nearly all populations in the United States including children and adults. However, the prevalence of mental illnesses among adults is high in comparison to other populations. Mental health problems among adults in the U.S. incorporate many different conditions whose degree of severity varies from mild to moderate to severe (National Institute of Mental Health, 2019). One of the major contributing factors to the prevalence of mental illnesses among adults in America is the rapid growth of the aging population. Adults suffering from mental illness don't always understand they are sick and are difficult to help. Our system puts them out on the street or locks them up. There is need for policy changes to address the prevalence of mental health illnesses among…

Diagnosis in Mental Health Diagnosis
Words: 2203 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57813905
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With medical terms, even though they explain little, we then have a reason to implement strong institutional controls such as the use of drugs and hospitalization.

The Medicalization of Deviant ehavior

Our discussion of DSM shows us clearly that the categories of deviant behavior voted on from time to time reflect social and political conventions. Depending on the disorder, the sociopolitical role played by diagnoses is either great or small, but the application of a diagnosis is always, to a greater or lesser degree, embracing political and social values. Diagnostic labels define what limits of difference society can tolerate.

Whenever a culture decides that it will define a set of behaviors as "sick" rather than "immoral" or unwitting, it is enacting a social value that favors illness over the view that such destructive or unusual behavior is volitional. Armed with this view of behavior as illness, we can justify forced…

Bibliography

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text rev.). (Washington, DC: Author. 2008).

Robinson K, ed. Advances in School-Based Mental Health Interventions. (Kingston, NJ: Civic Research Institute; 2004).

Seligman, L. Selecting effective treatments: A comprehensive guide to treating mental disorders (Rev. ed.). (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass; 2009).

US Census Bureau. Current population survey, (October 2009).