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We have over 10 essays for "Octavio Paz"

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Spanish Literature

Words: 3190 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52509561

Treatment of omen in Mexican Culture

The choices for women have, across both time and space, almost always been far more constrained than the choices of men. They have in fact all too often been reduced to a single pair of opposing choices: The pure or the corrupt, the white or the black, the chaste or the sexual - the virgin or the whore.

Mexican culture is certainly not exempt from this tendency to place women on one side of this dichotomy or the other, but in the case of Mexican images of women this division of the female half of the population into the chaste, good woman and the terrible promiscuous one becomes complicated by issues of race (and racial purity), by the historical condition of colonization and post-colonization, by the partial displacement, partial incorporation of native belief systems by Catholicism.

These many complications and elaborations of this essential…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Diaz del Castillo, Bernal. Historia de Conquista de la Nueva Espana. Madrid: Espasa, 1997.  http://www.findarticles.com/m2278/2_25/67532177/p1/article.jhtml   http://gateway.library.uiuc.edu/mdx/malintzin.htm   http://www.utexas.edu/students/cwiforum/issue1/malinche.html   http://www.mexconnect.com/mex_/travel/slenchek/slmalinche.html 

Paz, Octavio. The Labyrinth of Solitude. New York: Grove, 1985.

Rebolledo, Tey D, and Eliana Rivero. "Myths & Archetypes." Infinite Divisions: An anthology of Chicana Literature. Tucson: U. Of Arizona P, 1993.
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American National Character History

Words: 3902 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52485827

American National Character (history)

The Ongoing Search for an "American National Character"

This assignment asks the following pertinent and challenging questions: Is it possible to find trends amongst so much diversity? What characteristics are distinctly American, regardless of class, race, and background? What is problematic about making these generalizations and inheriting the culture? What have we inherited exactly? What problems arise with our ideals - and are we being honest with ourselves? Discuss individualism and the "American Dream." Are these goals realized and are they realistic? This paper seeks solid answers to these often elusive questions.

The search for a national character should be never-ending, and the pivotal part of the search that should be enlightening and enriching for the seeker of that knowledge may just be the inspiration from the books and authors springing into the seeker's mind along the way to discovery.

Who is presently engaged in a…… [Read More]

References

Bellah, Robert. Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life.

New York: Harper & Row, 1985.

Cochran, Thomas Childs. Challenges to American Values: Society, Business, and Religion. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.

Geertz, Clifford. The Interpretation of Cultures. New York: Basic Books, 1973.
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Keats Dickinson Keats and Eliot

Words: 921 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59364683

However, in line with the Paz prompt at the outset of this discussion, Keats merely uses this tradition as a bridge on which to extend toward motivation on behalf of the evolving form. The subject matter is where this work takes a step toward modernity. The manner in which Keats describes the reality of dying is startling for its time primarily because it lacks religiosity. In describing death, the poet tells, "where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies; / here but to think is to be full of sorrow / and leaden-eyed despairs; / here beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes, / or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow."

The notion of discussing death from a decidedly humanistic rather than spiritual perspective is more daring and innovative than perhaps we are won't to give credit for. It is remarkable that the poet would invert a steadfastly traditional form…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Dickinson, E. (1862). #303 (the Soul Selects Her Own Society). Poets.org.

Eliot, T.S. (1917). The Love-Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. University of Virginia. Online at  http://people.virginia.edu/~sfr/enam312/prufrock.html 

Keats, J. (1819). Ode to a Nightingale. Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. 1919. The Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250 -- 1900.
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Noah Eli Gordon's Book the Source Takes

Words: 1515 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96116104

Noah Eli Gordon's book The Source takes on the structure of a new long poem and uses several references from other works in an intrinsic battle between reference and experience. The Source is such a node -- a beaming node -- inside a site-specific complex of other books. ithin the time span of 20 months or so (January 2008-September 2009), intertextuality, the author's experience in creating such a book, was not simply a conversational circumstance but became an intense chance for procedural arrangement: throughout that interim, Gordon fashioned The Source by arrogating things that he located only on page "26" from the numerous (thousands) of books located in the Denver Public Library. hat is so special about the number 26?

In addition comparing with the quantity of letters existing in the English alphabet, the number totaling 26 -- conferring to Gordon's development notes -- it essentially signifies the arithmetical value…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gordon, Noah E. "The Source Snippet." home | zingmagazine. Zing, n.d. Web. 5 Dec. 2014. .
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American National Character

Words: 3200 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 37432127

American National Character

America can almost be thought of as a massive experiment in culture. Here we have a nation inhabited almost entirely by immigrants; all with different languages, customs, beliefs, and appearances who are forced to somehow reach a common understanding and identity. Through the over two hundred years of American history many differences have threatened to unravel our diverse nation, but still, many commonalities have ultimately held it together. Amidst such a range of economic, political, and racial mixtures it is a daunting task to identify what characteristics are uniquely American.

Yet, what can be considered "American" can also be traced to the roots of the nation. The place now called the United States was founded by puritan settlers who valued the notion of all men's equality in the eyes of God. Accordingly, the authors of the U.S. Constitution included equality under the law as one of its…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bellah, Robert N., et al., eds. Habits of the Heart. Los Angeles, California: University of California, 1985.

Cochran, Thomas C. The Puerto Rican Businessman: A Study in Cultural Change. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania, 1959.

Hacker, Andrew. The End of the American Era. New York, New York: Atheneum, 1968.

Klausner, Samuel Z. "A Professor's-Eye View of the Egyptian Academy." The Journal of Higher Education, Vol. 57, No. 4 (Jul.-Aug., 1986): 345-369.
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Art of Colonial Latin America

Words: 1933 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 6585454

Admittedly, these two teams were faced with a daunting challenge in acquiring and interpreting those works of art that were most appropriate for their exhibition goals, and interpretive efforts must use some framework in which to present the resources in a fashion that can be understood and appreciated by the targeted audiences.

Nevertheless, there is little or no discussion concerning the fusion of artistic styles in the two catalogs, with a preference for a neat and orderly, date by date, presentation of representative works that typify the points being made by the exhibition. Despite these shortcomings, both catalogs were shown to be authoritative references that were supported by relevant citations and imagery. Likewise, both catalogs provide useful overviews of the materials that are being presented preparatory to their interpretation, helping place the information in its historical context.

Conclusion

The research showed that interest and appreciation in colonial Latin American art…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bailey, Gauvin Alexander. Introduction in Art of Colonial Latin America. New York: Phaidon

Press, 2005.

Paz, Octavio. Metropolitan Museum of Art: Mexico: Splendors of Thirty Centuries. Los Angeles: The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Pierce, Donna, Gomar, Rogelio R. And Bargellini, Clara. Painting a New World: Mexican Art
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Gender in Mexican Intellectual History Juana Inez

Words: 892 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73291741

Gender in Mexican Intellectual History

Juana Inez Ramirez de Asbaje, also known as Juana Ines de la Cruz, was an amazing woman in both Latin American and world history. Here was a woman writing in the 17th century who was willing to discuss the sexual practices of the males around her and to criticize them. Being a nun, this was even more out of the ordinary and makes Asbaje an even more extraordinary figure. In the 1600s, a woman's place was at the home either as a servant or as a bearer of children to a proper husband. It was not proper for a female to be educated or to think. For many women who were born with an untimely and unfortunate intellect, the only venue for them to learn was by entering the church. In her "Response to Sor Filotea," she states that as a young girl, Asbaje asked…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

De Cruz, Juana, and Alan S. Trueblood. A Sor Juana Anthology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP,

1988. Print.
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Conflict the Theme of Freedom

Words: 2503 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56411818

The choice cannot be repudiated or duplicated, but one makes the choice without foreknowledge, almost as if blindly. After making the selection, the traveler in Frost's poem says, "Yet knowing how way leads on to way/I doubted if I should ever come back" (14-15). And at the end, as one continues to encounter different forks along the way, the endless paths have slim chance of ever giving the traveler a second choice. One can see this as similar to Mrs. Mallard's change. As she looks out into the future, she sees endless possibilities for choice and nothing feels like she would ever return to the determinate state of marriage.

The final two lines of "The Road Not Taken" say, "I took the one less traveled by / and that has made all the difference" (19-20). Unlike in Chopin, the traveler determines to take the path. In Chopin, the path forces…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Carver, Raymond. (1981). Cathedral: stories. New York: Vintage.

Chopin, Kate. (2003). The Awakening and selected short fiction. New York: Barnes & Noble.

Frost, Robert. (1969). The Poetry of Robert Frost: the collected poems E.C. Lathem, Ed. New York: Holt.
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Good Man Is Hard to Find for

Words: 1891 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 57839336

Good Man is Hard to Find

For the purposes of this essay, I chose Flannery O'Connor's short story "A Good Man is Hard to Find." "A Good Man is Had to Find" is an apt topic for research such as this, because the ambiguity of the story's position regarding a grandmother ultimately responsible for the death of her entire family leads to a wide variety of possible readings, each with its own adherents and defenders. Upon reading this story, I immediately questioned the grandmother's role in the story, and especially whether or not the story portrayed her in a positive or negative light, because although at points in the story she appears positive in contrast to the other characters, she is ultimately shown to be reactive, shortsighted, and altogether incapable of protecting either her family or herself. Using Google Scholar, I searched for academic essays and books discussing "A Good…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bandy, Stephen . "One of my babies": the misfit and the grandmother." Studies in Short Fiction.

Winter. (1996): 1-7. Print.

Desmond, John. "Flannery O'Connor's Misfit and the Mystery of Evil." Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature. 56. (2004): 129-37. Print.

Evans, Robert C. "Cliches, Superficial Story-Telling, and the Dark Humor of Flannery