Palliative Care Essays (Examples)

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How a Doctor Should Address Molestation Issues

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15249380

Questions
1
Yes, it is appropriate. Sometimes people need care but are embarrassed to seek it out or their situation does not enable them to get to traditional clinics. For the case of women living in shelters or in extreme poverty, it can be difficult to obtain medical care because they may lack the funds to pay for it, they may lack awareness of the fact that they need care, or they may be hampered by social or environmental issues that keep them from reaching out for help. Sometimes people need to see first that there are others outside of their own small world who are willing to enter in and offer assistance. This has been shown to be the case with educators who make home visits and the same is true for physicians (Ventura et al., 2014).
2
Genital warts are spread through skin-to-skin contact and cannot be spread…… [Read More]

References

Genital Warts. (2017). Planned Parenthood. Retrieved from

https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/stds-hiv-safer-sex/genital-warts

National Research Council. (1993). Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect.

Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Ventura, A. et al. (2014). Home-based palliative care: A systematic literature review of

the self-reported unmet needs of patients and carers. Palliative Medicine, 28(5): 391-402.



 

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Care Rural Settings Continuum of

Words: 690 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7683624

As well as expanding patient's abilities to obtain primary care, virtually, telemedicine can enable patients in isolated locations to see specialists. When rural patients are connected to a hospital network such as the Grinnell egional Medical Center, they are able to access high-quality physicians through some of the more advanced healthcare technology available, although this is not always possible in a local healthcare system with fewer physicians and less access to high-level technology. Technology can still enable patients in a variety of settings to keep track of vital signs such as heart rate, blood pressure, and blood sugar, and to alert their physician immediately if their readings are abnormal.

While some surgeons have even performed procedures through virtual consults, certain aspects of medicine remain challenging to provide rural patients, such as physical rehabilitative services, which may require the patient to travel to receive the full benefit of the services. Patients…… [Read More]

References

Campbell, James D. (2001, May). Introducing telemedicine technology to rural physicians and settings. Journal of Family Practice. Retrieved January 27, 2011 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0689/is_5_50/ai_75244766/

Spath, Patrice. (2011). Community Continuum of Care planning.

Brown-Spath & Associates. Retrieved January 27, 2011 at http://www.brownspath.com/original_articles/cccplan.htm
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Caring for Palliative Patients With Chronic Constipation

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26968514

Constipation

The Management of Constipation in Palliative Patients

hich strategy is considered the best when nurses must intervene with a patient suffering from constipation? The PubMed publication put out by the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. National Library of Medicine explains that there is some uncertainty within the healthcare field about the choice between managing constipation with drugs (pharmacologically) or with other various clinical programs in palliative care settings (Clemens, et al., 2013).

A section in the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Nursing dedicated to bowel management -- written by researcher Denice Caraccia Economou -- explains that there is no absolute rule as to what intervention is best (220).

Pharmacological Management: The use of opioids is not always recommended for constipated patients, because they increase electrolyte and water absorption in both intestines which can lead to dehydration and dry, hard stools, according to Economou (221). Also morphine is not…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clemens, K.E., Faust, M., Jaspers, B., and Mikus, G. (2013). Pharmacological treatment of constipation in palliative care. PubMed. Retrieved September 8, 2015, from http://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov.

ConvaTec. Retrieved September 9, 2015, from http://www.convatec.com.

Economou, D. C. (2015). Bowel Management: Constipation, diarrhea, obstruction, and ascites. In the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Nursing, Ferrell, Coyle, and Paice, Eds.

Oxford Textbook of Palliative Nursing. Cary, NC: Oxford University Press.
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Palliative Case Study Example

Words: 555 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18524835

A.J., an 82-year-old female, was admitted three weeks ago with acute on chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) after presenting to the emergency department (ED) with c/o progressive worsening SOB, leg edema, and fatigue. She has a history of severe CHF, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction (MI), renal insufficiency, and hypothyroidism. Since admission, A.J. has needed intubation and ventilation for acute decompensated heart failure due to a massive MI. She is alert when not sedated but has been too unstable for a cardiac catheterization and has needed vasoactive medications to support her blood pressure. Her renal function has declined and plans are being made for hemodialysis. Today when speaking with A.J.'s husband, he conveys to you her nurse that "she would not have wanted all of this." "

Discuss the pros and cons of continued therapy and what role nursing can play in helping the patient and family.

This case deals with…… [Read More]

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Elderly Care

Words: 1299 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39198111

Caring for the Old

The End of Life Care

End of life care refers to the total care of a person that has an advanced illness that is incurable and does not equate with death. This end of life care can last for a number of weeks, months or even years depending on the state an individual is.it is usually the care which helps those that have advanced, progressive and illnesses that can not be cured to live life as well as possible until they meet their death. End of life care makes it possible for the patient and their family to get supportive and palliative care needs identified and met throughout the last phase when they are living and into the bereavement period. Supportive care is care which helps a patient and the family to cope with the condition and the treatment of that condition right from the pre-diagnosis…… [Read More]

References

Boswell, Kahana & Worth-anderson, 2006). Spirituality and Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors: Stress Counter-balancing Effects on the Well-being of Older Adults. Retrieved April 30, 2014 from http://www.case.edu/artsci/soci/documents/Spiritualityandhealthylifestylebehaviors.pdf

U.S. Department of State, (2012).Legal & Financial Issues In Caregiving for Older Adults. Retrieved April 30, 2014 from http://www.state.gov/m/dghr/flo/142266.htm

American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), (2014). Caregiving Considerations. Retrieved April 30, 2014 from  http://www.cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/older-adults/caregiving-considerations 

The Joanna Briggs Institute, (2011). Age-friendly nursing interventions in the management of older people in emergency departments. Retrieved April 30, 2014 from http://connect.jbiconnectplus.org/ViewSourceFile.aspx?0=7127
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Life Care in the United

Words: 1208 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20114513

However...generally a vast difference exists between what healthcare providers understand and what laypersons are able to comprehend. This immeasurability of knowledge was evident in the participants' narratives and was exacerbated by the conveying of "false hope" or "false optimism" to patients and patients' family members.

Seconding Robichaux's argument is ackstrand's (2006) findings that hospital-based EOL programs are not the "ideal" form of healthcare that elderly patients should receive, according to a survey of nurses. For the nurses, "no patient should face death alone," which ultimately happens when patients are confined in a hospital facility receiving palliative care. Comparing ICU EOL care against the hospice and nursing home care programs, 'dying with dignity' is remote in this kind of program, since "[t]he ICU is no place to die. It would be nice to have a comfortable, quiet, spacious room for those who are dying. Let everyone in and let the rest…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, R. (2003). "Nursing home quality, chain affiliation, profit status, and performance." Journal of Real Estate Research, Vol. 25, Issue 1.

Backstrand, R. (2006). "Providing a "good death": critical care nurses' suggestions for improving end-of-life care." American Journal of Critical Care, Vol. 15, Issue 1.

Elliot, D. (2006). "Determining the financial impact of hospice." Healthcare Financial Management, Vol. 60, Issue 7.

Imhof, S. (2005). "What do we owe the dying? Strategies to strengthen end-of-life care." Journal of Healthcare Management, Vol. 50, Issue 3.
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Boundaries Between Care and Cure

Words: 1458 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22123748



The study was reported as qualitative and to have been conducted by the 'Australian National Health and Medical Research Council' research study. It is stated as follows of the study: "The nursing insights indicate that an understanding of end-of-life care in hematology needs to be set in a trilogy of overlapping models (labeled functional, evolving, and refractory) that address the complexity of issues associated with professional and hospital culture." (McGrath, 2007)

Findings include the development of a working model focused on enabling the "integration of palliative care into adult hematology. The model is accredited the development of a new language for understanding and fostering the integration of palliative care and hematology." (McGrath, 2007)

One reason that palliative care is so important for hematology patients are necessary provisions of informed consent and other end-of-life issues. That is because many of these issues have to do with factors related to survival and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Finlay, Ilora (2001) UK Strategies for Palliative Care. JR Soc Med 2001;94. Online available at: http://jrsm.rsmjournals.com/cgi/reprint/94/9/437.pdf

Audrey, Suzanne et al. (2008) What Oncologists Tell Patients About Survival Benefits of Palliative Chemotherapy and Implications for Informed Consent: Qualitative Study. BMJ 2008, 337:a752. Online available at: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/337/jul31_3/a752

McGrath, Pam D. (2007) Description of an Australian Model for End-of-Life Care in patients with Hematological Malignancies. Oncology Nursing Forum. Vol.43 No.1 2007. Online available at: http://ons.metapress.com/content/w1l1mx43646772k3/

Maganto, Vincente Valentin, Gonzalez, Maite Murillo and Moreno, Maria Valentin (2004) Continuous Care in the Cancer Patient: Palliative Care in the 21st Century. Clinical and Translational Oncology. Vol. 6 No. 7 October 2004.
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Vocational Nurse in Multi-Disciplinary Palliative

Words: 516 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71585166



Most palliative care vocational nurses are generalists. However, there are specialties in palliative care, such as oncology and geriatrics. Hospice and palliative care nurses can become Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurses (CHPN).

Palliative nurses practice in a variety of settings. The most common setting is the patient's home. Palliative nurses also work in the hospice units of medical facilities, such as hospitals, nursing homes, and other long-term care settings. Patients typically die within a month of enrolling in a hospice program. In contrast, palliative care nurses are more likely to practice in long-term care facilities and have more extended involvement in their patients' end of life.

In order to be an effective palliative care nurse, the vocational nurse needs an understanding of a specific group of practice areas. Those areas include: pain management, end-stage disease process, loss and grief, and bereavement care. However, in addition to medical knowledge, palliative care…… [Read More]

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Rural Healthcare Facilities Context of

Words: 5552 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48009947



Provide sustained technical assistance (Expert Panel Meeting: Health Information Technology: Meeting Summary, 2003)

Evaluation of the process in rural and small communities includes: (1) scope of the project; (2) goals; (3) critical success factors; and (4) technical assistance." (Expert Panel Meeting: Health Information Technology: Meeting Summary, 2003) Community grants have been focused on the provision of 'personal digital assistant (PDA) systems in assisting with the decision support role. The initiative is stated to include: (1) development of toolkits; (2) leveraging known tools; (3) developing capacity; and (4) disseminating best practices. (Expert Panel Meeting: Health Information Technology: Meeting Summary, 2003)

Ormond, Wallin, and Goldenson report in the work entitled: "Supporting the Rural Health Care Safety Net" (2000) state: "The policy - and market-driven changes in the health care sector taking place across country are not confined to metropolitan areas. Rural communities are experiencing changes impelled by many of the same forces…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Healthcare and Healthcare Insurance Country Report: India (2004) Tata Consultancy Services and Microsoft. WebHealthCentre.com. 2004 August. Online available at http://download.microsoft.com/documents/customerevidence/7144_WebHealth_CS.doc

Expert Panel Meeting: Health Information Technology (2003) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) 23-24 July 2003. Online available at http://www.ahrq.gov/data/hitmeet.htm

Silberman, P. And Slifkin, R. (nd) Innovative Primary Case Management Programs Operating in Rural Communities: Case Studies of Three States. Working Paper No. 76 North Carolina Rural Health Research and Policy Analysis Program.

Ormond, Barbara a.; Wallin, Susan Wall; and Goldenson, Susan M. (2000) Supporting the Rural Health Care Net. 15 May 2000 Urban Institute
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Vulnerable Adults in Healthcare Settings

Words: 998 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24855774

Older people are associated with increased risk for hospitalisations due to illness or trauma (Seymore & Cannon, 2010). The nature and burden of the illness that the older person faces is related to the quality of health care services they may receive when admitted to a hospital or other clinical setting (Dossa & Capitman, 2010). In terminal cases, the patient may choose to engage Hospice services, either in the clinical setting or at home. The human rights of such patients are ethically fundamental in their quality of care through palliative care services (Brenna, Carr, & Cousins, 2007).

The care received in the clinical health care setting for elderly patients may be substandard due to staffing and regulation issues (Maas, Specht, Buckwalter, Gittler, & Bechen, 2008). There is a need to identify the failings in quality of care and promote the human rights of elderly patients in healthcare settings (Gittler, 2008).…… [Read More]

References

Barry, P., & Planalp, S. (2008). Ethical issues for hospice volunteer. The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, 458-462.

Brenna, F., Carr, D., & Cousins, M. (2007). Pain management: a fundamental human right. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 205-221.

Dossa, A., & Capitman, J. (2010). Community-based disability prevention programs for elders: predictors of program completion. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 235-50.

Gittler, J. (2008). Governmental efforts to improve quality of care for nursing home residents and to protect them from mistreatment: a survey of federal and state laws. Research in Gerontological Nursing, 264-284.
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Compare and Contrast U S and Norway Healthcare Systems

Words: 1593 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82095003

U.S. & Norway Healthcare Systems

healthcare system has many advantages and disadvantages which are most revealing when compared to the other health care systems of the world. An analysis between the U.S. healthcare system and a government run healthcare system of Norway provides a deeper understanding of the similarities and differences in the two systems.

Almost every other developed nation in the world has some form of universal coverage which reduces this disparity in care. However, many of these systems are purportedly ridden with their own issues such as high cost and long waiting times. By comparing the U.S. system with the universal system like that of Norway, I can investigate the effectiveness of each in terms of the quality of care provided and the equality of distribution of that care.

A Comparison and Analysis of Healthcare Systems in the United States and Norway

A. United States

The healthcare system…… [Read More]

References

Goldman, Dana P. And Elizabeth A. McGlynn. (2005). U.S. Healthcare Facts About Cost, Access and Quality [Online]. Retrieved from http://www.rand.org/pubs/corporate_pubs/2005/RAND_CP484.1.pdf

Johnsen, Jan Roth. (2006). Health Systems in Transition: Norway. Retrieved from  http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/95144/E88821.pdf 

Tanner, Michael D. (March, 18, 2008). Policy Analysis: The Grass is Not Always Greener: A Look at National Health Care Systems Around the World (policy number 613). Retrieved from http://lib.trinity.edu/research/citing/APAelectronicsources.pdf

The University of Maine. (2001). The U.S. Health Care System: Best in the World, or Just the Most Expensive? [Online]. Retrieved from http://dll.umaine.edu/ble/U.S.%20HCweb.pdf
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Futile Care Policy for Hospitals

Words: 1108 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36347983

The hospital should always defer to the patient and family that has an advanced directive in place, and if the patient cannot speak for themselves but has an advanced directive, then a proxy must make the decision. The only case where the hospital should be allowed to make the decision on futile care is in the absence of a proxy, in the absence of an advanced directive, and only if it is in the best interest of the patient.

In this psychological-based model, the healthcare professional and hospital is put in the position of negotiating with the family and/or patient. Burns and Truog (2007) state that in these situations the healthcare professional should always follow the wishes of the patient's family in futile care efforts (Burns & Truog, 2007). However, that view places a burden on the healthcare professional to compromise medical principles when that professional deems the care to…… [Read More]

References

Burns, J., & Truog, R. (2007). Futility: A Concept in Evolution. Chest, 1987-1993.

Forde, R. (1998). Who is to define the futility of treatment -- the patient or the physician? Tidsskr nor Laegeforen (Norwegian), 2652-2654.

Jonson, a., Seigler, M., & Winslade, W. (2002). Clinical Ethics 5th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Lachman, V. (2009). Ethical Challenges in Health Care: Developing Your Moral Compass. New York, NY: Springer Publishing.
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Healthcare Administration Functions of Healthcare

Words: 559 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72488342

Administrative boards routinely reevaluate general institutional compliance with federal and state legislative statutes and also with stated hospital policies. Ethics guidelines regarding procedures, treating minors, and admission to clinical research trials are only some of the legislative guidelines necessary when making healthcare decisions. Chains of command, appropriate disciplinary and appeals procedures, and health and safety guidelines for patients and employees are some examples of legislative functions a board may perform. Additionally, conduct between employees will also be governed, including sexual harassment policy, chains of command regarding institutional decisions, and human resource policies such as bonuses, performance reviews, and seniority.

Judicial

The judicial roles of the administration involve evaluating specific individual's compliance with legislative policies, and the legality or wisdom of institutional policies in general. For example, an appeal might be made about the justice of certain guidelines, like the maximum amount of hours nurses may work, the institution's policies regarding…… [Read More]

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Government Regulations Affecting Health Care in Hospice

Words: 6236 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8359913

Government Regulations and Hospice

Government Regulations Affecting Health Care in Hospice

Hospice

Regulations Affecting Health Care in Hospice

Impact of rules on Hospice services

Annotated Bibliography

This paper focuses on how government regulations impact hospice. The paper starts off with an introduction to the hospice system that was revived by a nurse, Cecily Saunders, who then went on to become a physician, establishing one of the first modern hospices. The concept of total pain is explained in some detail. The body of the paper then includes the studies that have been conducted on patients and caregivers in hospice systems as well as on people who died after they were diagnosed with terminal illness resulting in death in six months following the prognosis. The overall conclusion that can be drawn here is that while in Japan there is a marked need for improving the Day hospice system, the American hospice industry…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Medical Directors Association. (n.d.). White Paper on Palliative Care And Hospice In Long-Term Care. Retrieved March 10, 2012, from American Medical Directors Association: http://www.amda.com/governance/whitepapers/palliative_care.cfm

Carlson, M.D., Morrison, R.S., Holford, T.R., & Bradley, E.H. (2007). Hospice Care: What Services Do Patients and Their Families Receive? Health Services Research, 42(4), 1672-1690.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (2008). Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospice Conditions of Participation; Final Rule. Federal Register, 73(109), 32088-32220.

Christakis, N.A., & Escarce, J. j. (1996). Survival of Medicare patients after enrollment In hospice programs . The New England Journal of Medicine, 172-179.
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Planning for End of Life Care

Words: 657 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64611423

The death of elderly individuals takes place in different circumstances and settings such as painless death at home or painful death in a healthcare facility. Social workers have an important role in planning end-of-life care as part of providing essential social support to elderly individuals. The role of social workers in this process is attributable to the significance of their professional practice in a multidisciplinary palliative care team in hospice and hospital settings (Watts, 2013). Since the death of elderly individuals occurs in a variety of conditions and settings, social workers need to plan for end-of-life care. The planning and delivery of end-of-life care helps in helping the elderly cope with serious illness, face mortality or manage the process of dying in an effective manner.

One of the major functions of social workers in their role in planning for end-of-life care is providing psychosocial and practical support to individuals who…… [Read More]

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Organization of the U S Healthcare System

Words: 540 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31751846

Predict the economic impact (e.g., costs, benefits, efficiency, cost containment) on healthcare delivery at the local, state, national, or international level if the legislative bill were enacted.

This paper examines the economic impact upon the nation if the bill, the Palliative Care and Hospice Education and Training Act, were passed. Fundamentally, the economic impact of the bill would ultimately be a positive one. The bill proposes the necessity for better training and support for the clinicians who will ultimately work in palliative care. The bill represents a long-term investment: more expenditure to better train and educate these professional healthcare personnel, but with the understanding that definitive savings will be substantial. First of all, there's almost always a substantial amount of fiscal savings when the quality of care is improved; this has been demonstrated in a range of studies and is something which is experienced at the local and national level.…… [Read More]

References

Ascan.org. (n.d.). Evidence-based research: cost savings of palliative care to hospitals and the medicaid program. Retrieved from http://acscan.org/ovc_images/file/action/states/or/QoL/Cost_savings_of_Palliative_Care.

pdf
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Patients vs Healthcare Opinions

Words: 1774 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34987779

PATIENT & HEALTH POFESSIONAL PESPECTIVES

Patient & Professional Perspectives

Quality of care is a massive concern when it comes to healthcare in general. The issue is so multi-dimension and complicated. Even further, there are a lot of ideological bents and perspectives that further shape and form the issue as it exists today. A significant part of the paradigm mentioned above would be the perspectives of both patients and healthcare professionals as it relates to the aforementioned quality of care. Obviously, there are going to be some differences and similarities when talking to any large swath of patients or healthcare providers. The differences could be huge divides in some cases due to what is being expected being too different than what is able to be delivered given the resources or even the perspective or opinion of the healthcare professionals or providers. While there is no simple or neat answer to how…… [Read More]

References

Bagchi, A., af Ursin, R., & Leonard, A. (2012). Assessing Cultural Perspectives on Healthcare Quality. Journal of Immigrant & Minority Health, 14(1), 175-182.

doi:10.1007/s10903-010-9403-z

Butala, N. (2010). Perspectives on efficiency and quality in an ever changing system:

Healthcare 2010. The Yale Journal Of Biology And Medicine, 83(2), 93-95.
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Health Care -- Regulatory Scheme and Licensure

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54878500

Health Care -- Regulatory Scheme and Licensure Requirements -- Operating a Health Care Organization

California's licensing process for health care organizations is governed by the State's Health and Safety Code, with responsibility for licensing, licensing, inspecting, regulating and/or certifying shouldered by State and Federal agencies. In a straightforward yet rigorous process aided by online application packets and checklists, these agencies are intent on ensuring compliance with State and Federal laws and regulations.

The process for becoming licensed to operate as a health care organization in California is governed by §1200 -- 1209 of the California Health and Safety Code (California State Legislature, 2003). These code sections broadly deem the term "clinic" or "primary care clinic" to mean an "organized outpatient health facility," whether a community clinic, free clinic, specialty clinic or clinic corporation required to be licensed (California State Legislature, 2003). The requirements and processes outlined in these code sections…… [Read More]

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Advanced Care Planning Asessment

Words: 1164 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32411094

Cae Planning Analysis

In eality, sound healthcae-elated advanced planning is a continuous convesation, involving pioities, values, QOL (quality of life) and what one's life means. Tool kits, in this context, compise vaious self-help esouces, woksheets, and ecommendations. They aid individuals in pefoming the moe complex tasks of identifying, confiming, and shaing impotant facts with an individual faced with a seious ailment (Ameican Ba Association, 2005). Iespective of whethe the individual is teminally ill o suffeing fom an acute ailment o chonic, long-tem ailment, advanced cae planning (ACP) is capable of facilitating the alleviation of unnecessay suffeing, impoving QOL and offeing a bette gasp of decision-elated challenges faced by the ailing individual, his/he family, and othe caegives. Advanced cae plans may be implemented at any junctue in the patient's life and must be updated when changes occu in patient cicumstances. A peson who contacts a pogessive disease that leaves him/he disabled…… [Read More]

references? A Study of the U.S. Medicare Population. Medical care, 45(5), 386.

Centers for Disease Control. (2013). Advance care planning: ensuring your wishes are known and honored if you are unable to speak for yourself. Retrieved 16 February 2016 from http://www.cdc.gov/aging/pdf/advanced-care-planning-critical-issue-brief.pdf

Wehri, K. (2011). Living well at the end of life: a national conversation. Caring: National Association for Home Care magazine, 30(9), 38.
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Jewish Client When Discussing Medical Care With

Words: 376 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44599599

Jewish Client

When discussing medical care with Sara, one must keep in mind that she is alone now, having been married for 50 years, but now widowed. She seems to have a rather active social circle, and is more of a middle-of -- the road practitioner of Judaism. Her belief system is likely sensitive to end-of-life issues, but she seems to be a candidate for hospice, rather than palliative care due to her age and the progression of her illness.

In response to Sara's initial decision to have surgery and treat the cancer with chemotherapy, medical personnel would be required to allow her this choice, but ensure that the principles of fidelity and benevolence are followerd. In other words, tell Sara the truth about odds and any prognosis, as well as side-effects. Inform her in a way that is non-paternalistic so that she may make up her own mind about…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Edgedorf, L. (2005). Medical Ethics. New York: Greenhaven Pres.

Jewish Home Lifecare (2013). How Does Pallative Care Differ From Hospice Care? Retrieved from: http://www.jewishhome.org/our-services/palliative-care/how-does-palliative-care-differ-from-hospice-care
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Full Spectrum Health Care as a Core Competency

Words: 666 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28740999

Nurse Practitioners Providing the Full Spectrum of Health Care Services

As the National Organizatoin of Nurse Practitioner Faculty (NONPF, 2013) competencies indicate, full spectrum of health care services should include health promotion, disease prevention, health protection, anticipatory guidance, counseling, disease management, palliative care and end of life care. This is a standard that is vital to primary care nursing because patients expect and have a need to obtain each of these services, as they are all part of quality care.

As the study by Flanagan-Kaminsky (2013) points out, end of life care is something that more and more patients in the Veterans Affairs Hospice program and looking to receive (p. 69). This is just one example of the type of quality care that patients and their families expect from nurse practitioners and health care providers. Counseling is another aspect of this type of care and is included in the study…… [Read More]

References

Flanagan-Kaminsky, D. (2013). Intentional Anticipatory Mourning, Caregiver and Bereavement Support Program for Terminally Ill Veterans, Their Families & Caregivers in the VA Contract Home Hospice Program. Omega, 67(1-2): 69-77.

Manheim, C., Haverhals, L., Jones, J., Levy, C. (2016). Allowing family to be family:

end-of-life care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes. Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Paliative Care, 12(1-2).

Matthews, A. (2014). Care of military service members, veterans, and their families.
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Analyzing Elder Care Professionals

Words: 6936 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15648392

Hawaiian elde cae pofessionals impove patient eldecae sevices to Japanese nationals, taking into consideation Japanese cultual noms and expectations

Caegiving fo eldely paents in Japan

Japan has witnessed a significant gowth in its elde population. In the yea 1950, 4.9% of the Japanese population was aged 65 yeas and above. This figue inceased to 14.8% (1995). By 2025, it is estimated to gow to 25.8% (Yamamoto & Wallhagen, 1997). Japan's 'vey old' population goup (aged 85 and above) is swiftly inceasing in numbe. It has been pojected that by 2025, the nation's 'vey old' population will account fo 4.3% of its total population -- a five-fold ise in thee decades. Futhemoe, it was pojected that as many as 2.62 million Japanese would be suffeing fom senile dementia by the yea 2015; the 1990 estimate fo senile dementia was about one million individuals (11WSA 1996).

Change in the pecentage of Japan's…… [Read More]

references, and Arrangement of End-of-life Care and Decision-Making among Japanese-American Older Adults, ProQuest LLC.

National Asian Pacific Center on Aging. (1998). Growing APA elderly population adds urgency to improving health services. Asian Pacific Affairs, 6 (Dr. 2-3.

SALDOV, M., KAKAI, H., McLAUGHLIN, L. & THOMAS, A. (1998). Cultural barriers in oncology: Issues in obtaining medical informed consent from Japanese-American elders in Hawaii, Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 13: 265-279.

Sato, S. (2015). THE IMPACT OF GENDER AND CULTURAL FACTORS ON THE PATTERNS OF ELDER CARE SERVICE UTILIZATION AMONG FAMILY CAREGIVERS OF JAPANESE ANCESTRY IN THE STATE OF HAWAII, ProQuest LLC

SOROCCO, K.H. (1998). BECOMING A HEALTH ACTIVE OLDER ADULT: THE EFFECTS OF A WORKSHOP FOR JAPANESE-American OLDER ADULTS. ProQuest Information and Learning
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Provider Education Key to Improving End-Stage Dementia Care

Words: 486 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27844702

Blog -- APN Quality Improvement Project

Blog: Provider-Associated Barriers to Hospice eferrals

The process of writing the quality improvement project for improving hospice referrals for patients suffering from end-stage dementia care was very instructive. eading the relevant literature revealed which research questions in dementia care are considered important by scientists and care professionals and which questions have yet to be asked. Aside from helping to outline appropriate goals for the quality improvement project, this task revealed that end-stage dementia care is a relatively understudied area of medicine. Writing the literature review also uncovered a list of best practice recommendations for palliative care, in relation to dementia, which was previously unknown to me. Overall, writing the quality improvement project helped me collect best practice recommendations authored by dementia care experts and understand the state of research in palliative care for patients suffering from end-stage dementia. This in turn increased my proficiency…… [Read More]

References

Mitchell, S.L., Miller, S.C., Teno, J.M., Davis, R.B., & Shaffer, M.L. (2010). The Advanced Dementia Prognostic Tool: A risk score to estimate survival in nursing home residents with advanced dementia. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 40(5), 639-51. Doi: 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2010.02.014.

Snyder, S., Hazelett, S., Allen, K., & Radwany, S. (2013). Physician knowledge, attitude, and experience with advance care planning, palliative care, and hospice: Results of a primary care survey. American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care, 30(5), 419-24. Doi: 10.1177/1049909112452467.
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Serving Elderly Patients in Acute Care Facilities

Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53387740

Geriatric Population

hat is the best way to assure that older people are well cared for in an acute healthcare setting? hat are the roles that nurses should play when it comes to providing the best possible care to older, frail people? These questions will be addressed in this paper using scholarly research from the available literature.

Advanced nursing skills for frail older people

Sarah Goldberg is a senior clinical academic nurse at the University of Nottingham's University Hospitals, and she writes in the journal Nursing Older People that an "innovative solution" in terms of providing the necessary skilled care to older people is to train experienced nurses to become "advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs) (Goldberg, 2014). An advanced nurse practitioner will be able to conduct comprehensive geriatric assessments, which will be important given that many very old and frail patients have "cognitive impairment, depression and anxiety," which can lead to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Goldman, S. (2014). Developing Advanced Nursing Skills for Frail Older People. Nursing Older People, 26(4). 20-24.

Krail, E., Close, J., Parker, J., Sudak, M., Lampart, S., and Colonnelli, K. (2012). Innovation

Pilot Study: Acute Care for Elderly (ACE) Unit -- Promoting Patient-Centric Care. Herd Journal, 5(3), 90-98.
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a healthcare plan for a nursing'situation

Words: 735 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99633024

care in the situation of Mr. and Mrs. P would be holistic in nature, grounded in a philosophy of caring. There are serious existential issues at stake, as Mr. P has wondered why God has not "taken him" already, while Mrs. P may be suffering from depression given her inability to leave the house or handle the life affairs like paying the bills. Therefore, a recommended treatment plan would focus more attention on the mental and spiritual health of the couple without taking attention away from Mr. P's physical needs. It would also look after the physical health of Mrs. P as well as her psychological needs. As holistic nursing takes a "whole person" approach, it is the ideal philosophical framework for working with this small family unit.

As the AHNA (2016) puts it, holistic nursing aims "to integrate self-care, self-responsibility, spirituality, and reflection." From the holistic nursing framework, the…… [Read More]

References

AHNA (2016). What is holistic nursing? Retrieved online:  http://www.ahna.org/About-Us/What-is-Holistic-Nursing 

Cameron, R. (2016). Look again at psychedelic drugs. Nursing Standard. Retrieved online:  http://journals.rcni.com/doi/abs/10.7748/ns.30.44.29.s28 

Shumate, T. (2013). The Benefits of Psychedelic Drug Application for Clinical Treatment of Mental Illness. Journal of Undergraduate Nursing Writing 6(1). Retrieved online:  http://archie.kumc.edu/bitstream/handle/2271/1175/STTJUNW-2013-Shumate.pdf?sequence=1
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environmental and'strategic analysis of health care

Words: 1546 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72308575

environmental analysis helps any organization to recognize factors that impact its performance. The factors impacting an organization's performance may be internal to the organization and they can also be external. Environmental analysis is therefore critical to an overall strategic plan. Several methods of performing environmental analysis can help organizations like the Carolina Health Care System, including the PESTLE and SWOT analyses ("What is Environmental Analysis?" n.d.). These types of analyses help to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT), as well as political, economic, social, technological, legal, and environmental (PESTLE) factors impacting the organization. Without performing systematic environmental analyses, business and public sector administrators would be working blindly and likely lead their organizations to fail in key preventable ways. On the other hand, a skillful and deft environmental analysis helps managers to develop strategic plans for the future, buffer against possible challenges, mitigate crises, and ensure long-term success.

The Carolinas…… [Read More]

References

Arthur, L. (n.d.). The implications of environmental analysis on strategic plan. Houston Chronicle. Retrieved online:  http://smallbusiness.chron.com/implications-environmental-analysis-strategic-plan-35303.html 

Carolinas Health Care System (2016). About Carolinas Healthcare System. Retrieved online: http://www.carolinashealthcare.org/about-us

Henry Schein Medical Systems (2016). Advantages of electronic medical records. Retrieved online: https://www.micromd.com/emr/advantages.html

"What is Environmental Analysis?" (n.d.). Pestle. Retrieved online:  http://pestleanalysis.com/what-is-environmental-analysis/
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Moral Meanings of Caring for the Dying

Words: 788 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65881748

Moral Meanings of Caring for the Dying

When it comes to taking care of the dying, there is so much to consider. Nurses who care for dying patients are often forced to start seeing the world differently, mostly because they become very close to the people they care for. The article Moral Meanings of Caring for the Dying, by Bouchal, addresses some of that from the personal standpoint and insights of nurses who work in end-of-life care situations. Some of them work with the elderly, but many of the patients are middle-aged and younger people, including children. It can be very hard to care for a dying person, especially if that person is still young, and nurses who do so shed many tears, often crying with the patient and/or the family (Cook, et al., 2012). This is a release for the nurses and the stress they must deal with when…… [Read More]

References

Cook, K.A., Mott, S., Lawrence, P., Jablonski, J., Grady, M.R., Norton, D., Liner, K.P., Cioffi, J., Hickey, P., Reidy, S., & Connor, J.A. (2012). Coping while caring for the dying child: Nurses' experiences in an acute care setting. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 27(4): e11-e21.

Peterson, J., Johnson, M., Halvorsen, B., Apmann, L., Chang, P-C., Kershek, S., Scherr, C., Ogi, M., & Pincon, D. (2010). What is it so stressful about caring for a dying patient? A qualitative study of nurses' experiences. International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 16(4): 181-187.
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Team Communication

Words: 2456 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74915879

Team Communication

An interdisciplinary team is formed from a group of health care providers belonging to different fields of health sciences; they work together as a team to bring the best possible outcome for patient. The efficiency of this team is achieved by following three basic steps that include communication, coordination and sharing of responsibilities. In order to provide quality care in primary health care system, the hospitals need to get closely integrated with the whole health service system (Ilyas, 2006).

Who makes up the membership of the interdisciplinary team in this agency?

Members of the interdisciplinary team vary according to the age and the degree of disability of an individual. Main aim of such team is to provide support to the patient in the best possible manner. The interdisciplinary team members of Hospitals at Ontario, includes Physicians, Nurses, Midwife, Dietitian, Pharmacist, Psychologist, Podiatrist, Physiotherapist, Chiropractor and Occupational Therapist. In…… [Read More]

References

Grech, H. (2012, October 28).Communication Skills in Health Professionals. Map-n.net. Retrieved on January 10, 2013 from  http://map-n.net/pastevents/violence%20and%20aggression/Prof.%20Helen%20Grech%20-%20Communication%20Skills%20in%20Health%20Care%20Professionals.pdf 

Ilyas, M .(2006).Public health and Community Medicine. Karachi:Time Publisher.

Ontario (2005, July 5). Guide to Interdisciplinary Team Role and Responsibilities.Health.gov.on.ca. Retrieved on January 10, 2013, from  http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/pro/programs/fht/docs/fht_inter_team.pdf 

Salgado, C.D., Farr, B.M., Hall, K.K. And Hayden, F.G. (2002, March).Influenza in Acute Hospital setting. Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 2(3),145-55
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Appreciating Diversity in a Hospital Setting

Words: 1295 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62709592

Cultural Diversity

Healthcare providers deal with people and family during stressful and difficult situations. Professionals delivering palliative care must understand how culture and religious background affect this interaction. The provision of a favorable healing environment is possible via the understanding of culture and religion.

How cultural diversity affects the quality of services and health outcomes

egardless of the similarities, fundamental variations among people arise from nationality, culture, ethnicity, as well as from personal experience and family background. These variations affect the health behaviors and beliefs of both providers and patients have of each other. The provision of high-quality palliative care that is accessible, effective, affordable and requires medical care practitioners to exhibit an in-depth understanding of the socio-cultural backgrounds of a patient, their families, and the environments in which they live. Culturally competent palliative care facilitates clinical experiences with more favorable outcomes, support the possibility for an extremely rewarding patient…… [Read More]

References

Andrews, M.M., & Boyle, J.S. (2008). Transcultural concepts in nursing care. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Coward, H.G., & Ratanakul, P. (2009). A cross-cultural dialogue on health care ethics. Waterloo, Ont: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Daniels, R. (2014). Nursing fundamentals: Caring & clinical decision-making. Australia: Delmar Learning.

Srivastava, R. (2007). The healthcare professional's guide to clinical cultural competence. Toronto: Mosby Elsevier.
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Gerontological & Griatric Nursing Nursing Paper-Gerontological &

Words: 1693 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9956260

GEONTOLOGICAL & GIATIC NUSING

Nursing Paper-Gerontological & Griatric Nursing

End of Life Issues and the Elderly

(2) "Identify and discuss the role of the nurse in providing family centred care to an elderly client who is palliative and living at home with his/her spouse or another family member."

Palliative care is an approach to provide a coordinated medical, nursing, and allied health service to address the patient's physical, social emotional and spiritual needs for people with progressive incurable illness. Palliative care seeks to deliver allied health service within the environment of person's choice to improve quality of life for both an ill person and the family or friends. In the United States, Europe and other part of the world, number of people reaching the advanced age and having the need of specialities for the management of pain control continues to increase. (oyal College of Nursing, 2004).

Meanwhile, a nurse plays…… [Read More]

References

Bliwise, D.L. Bliwise, N.G. Partinen, M. et al.(1988). Sleep Apnea and Mortality in an Aged Cohort. Am J. Public Health.78:544-547.

Bruce, S.D. & Hendrix, C.C. (2006). Palliative Sedation in End-of-Life Care: The Role of The Nurse in Palliative Sedation. Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing.8(6):320-327.

Canadian Nurses Association (2008). Providing Nursing Care at the End of Life. Ottawa Canada.

Davies, E. & Higginson, I.J. (2004). Better Palliative Care for Older People. World Health Organization.
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Analyzing a Quantitative Study

Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96486556

led by Venkatesan Prem conducted a research on nurses' knowledge regarding palliative care. This research was influenced by the fact that inadequate knowledge of a palliative care among these professionals is well-documented across various studies on palliative care. The lack of sufficient knowledge by nurses and other health care professionals regarding this health issue is considered as one of the major hindrances in providing high-quality palliative care services. This cross-sectional quantitative research provides important information that may be used in nursing practice through effective measures of enhancing the knowledge of these professionals in providing palliative care.

Summary of the Study:

One of the major obstacles to the provision of high-quality and effective palliative care in the recent past is inadequate knowledge by nurses and other health care practitioners. There are various reasons attributed to the lack of adequate knowledge on the issue such as deficiencies in nursing education, lack of…… [Read More]

References:

Prem et. al. (2012, August). Study of Nurses' Knowledge about Palliative Care: A Quantitative

Cross-Sectional Survey. Indian Journal of Palliative Care, 18(2), 122-127. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3477365/ 

Qadire, M.A. (2014, February). Nurses' Knowledge About Palliative Care: A Cross-Sectional

Survey. Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, 16(1), 23-30.
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Rating 3 Although the Paragraph

Words: 2097 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77426525

These included guidelines fom the Austalian National Beast Cance Cente and the Austalian National Cance Contol Initiative; an updated systematic eview of the eseach evidence, and a consensus by the Clinician -- Patient Communica-tions Woking Panel of the Pogam in Evidence- Based Cae of Cance Cae Ontaio.

The eliability of these studies also lends cedence to the outcome measues in that the study gains intenal validity due to the fact that the pocess measues matched the objective of the study.

The fact, howeve, that only 33 paticipants esponded endes the sample small and detacts fom its eliability making it difficult to eplicate to othe instances. This endes the outcome measues uneliable.

On the othe hand, simila online and offline eseach, both quantitative and qualitative, time and again, indicates the impotance of communication in tems of hospice patient cae. Cance patients, it is shown, too pofit fom impoved docto-patient communication (e.g.…… [Read More]

references

Significant news should be given carefully, one-to-one, in a quite place

Communication should be honest and optimistic, showing concern for patient and willingness to be there for him or her

Use memory heuristics, such as visual aids, or recording the consultation to help patient remember details.

Allow patients to express feedback and articulate their feelings
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Beneficence the Field of Nursing Is Shaped

Words: 1580 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57082843

Beneficence

The field of nursing is shaped by a range of ethical principles; while all of these concepts are important, one could argue that perhaps the most crucial ethical principle is that of beneficence. "Beneficence is the obligation to do good and avoid harm. Nurses help others to gain what is beneficial to them, which promotes well-being and reduces the risk of harm" (Young et al., 2009, p. 75). Having a clear understanding of beneficence is important as nurses are often presented with a range of complex ethical situations and dilemmas and they need strong principles to help guide their actions and nursing practice. As Young and colleagues explain, avoiding the harm that comes to a patient involves balancing this against the perceived amount of benefit. Other theorists see this concept in a slightly different perspective: "Beneficence is the principle of promoting the legitimate and important aims and interests of…… [Read More]

References

Addington-Hall, J.M., Bruera, E., Higginson, I.J., & Payne, S. (2007). Research methods in palliative care. Oxford: Oxford Publishing.

Cedar, S.H. (2006). Stem cell and related therapies. Nursing Ethics, 13(292),

Hitchcock, J.E., Schubert, P.E., & Thomas, S.A. (2003).Community health nursing: Caring in action. Clifton Park: Delmar.

Randall, F.M. (1999). Ethical issues in palliative care. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand, 43(9), 954-6.
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Health Promotion Strategies and Methods DQ

Words: 2450 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15047224

Nursing Case Study and Theoretical Knowledge of Healthcare System

Significant evidence shows that the responsibilities of the primary and acute care nurses vary significantly. The variation creates differences in the scope of work for the nurses, as they are engaged in different job perspectives. Primary and acute care nurses provide an array of services that aim at promoting health, preventing the occurrence of diseases, treating the sick, and providing the e clients with services, meeting their needs alongside creating public awareness to issues that affect their health and well-being. The difference of the services provided by the two becomes evident by the fact that the acute care nurses provide their services to patients who are critically sick, creating continuum variation in the services provided. In addition, nurses involved in the provision of nursing care services in the acute setups require specialized knowledge, skills, and expertise that allows them to provide…… [Read More]

References

Brown, L., Burton, R., Hixon, B., Kakade, M., Bhagalia, P., Vick, C., et al. (2011). Factors Influencing Emergency Department Preference for Access to Healthcare. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 13(5), 410-415.

Brown, S., & Stenner, P. (2009). Psychology without foundations history, philosophy and psychosocial theory. London: Sage Publications.

Crowe, M., & Carlyle, D. (2003). Deconstructing risk assessment and management in mental health nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 43(1), 19-27.

DiClemente, R.J., Crosby, R.A., & Kegler, M.C. (2002). Emerging theories in health promotion practice and research strategies for improving public health. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
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In-Service Teaching Portfolio One of

Words: 2630 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84446587

For elderly patients who have no one to appoint as their proxy, completing a living will that outlines their wishes is preferable to not providing any information at all about care preferences. This is equally so for patients who want to provide their proxy with some guidance about their treatment preferences and end-of-life care wishes, including artificial nutrition, ventilator support, and pain management. A living will (LW) provides specific instructions to health care providers about particular kinds of health care treatment that an individual would or would not want to prolong life. Living wills are often used to declare a wish to refuse, limit, or withhold life-sustaining treatment when an individual is unable to communicate. All but three states (New York, Massachusetts, and Michigan) have detailed statutes recognizing living wills. The usefulness of LWs is limited, however, to those clinical circumstances that were thought of before the person became incapable…… [Read More]

References

Burnell, G.M. (1993). Final Choices: To Live or to Die in an Age of Medical Technology. New York: Insight Books.

Fisher, C.B. (2002). A Goodness-of-Fit Ethic for Informed Consent. Fordham Urban Law Journal, 30(1), 159.

Galambos, C.M. (1998). Preserving End-of-Life Autonomy: The Patient Self-Determination Act and the Uniform Health Care Decisions Act. Health and Social Work, 23(4), 275.

Hardwig, J. (2000). Spiritual Issues at the End of Life: A Call for Discussion. The Hastings Center Report, 30(2), 28.
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Transitioning From Closed to Open Systems How

Words: 1191 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45973265

Transitioning From Closed to Open Systems: How Effective Nurse Leaders Approach Problem Solving and Decision Making in Organizations

The objective of this study is to examine transitioning from closed to open systems and how effective nurse leaders approach problem solving and decision making in organizations. This study will utilize systems theory in identifying an issue or process that could be improved and apply knowledge and strategies related to systems theory.

The problem addressed in this study is the excessive trust vested in unlicensed personnel resulting in some to make decisions reserved to licensed health professionals.

Responsibilities of the Nurse Manager

It is reported that the licensed nurse manager or supervising nurse has the responsibility to "delegate professional responsibilities only to persons who are qualified by education, experience or licensure to carry out the responsibility." (New York Office of the Professions, Division of Professional Licensing Services, 2009, p.27) It is additionally…… [Read More]

Works Cited

2013 NACNS Annual Conference: Clinical Nurse Specialists Leading Innovation for Healthcare Change. April 2013. Vol. 27. No. 2. Retrieved from: http://www.nursingcenter.com/lnc/journalarticle?Article_ID=1505534

Explanation of RN Scope of Practice and Nurse Practitioner Practice (1996) Board of Registered Nursing, Sacramento, CA. Retrieved from:  http://www.rn.ca.gov/pdfs/regulations/npr-b-19.pdf 

Health Care Liability and Inju8red Patients and Families Compensation. (2013) State of Wisconsin. Chapter 655. Retrieved from:  https://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/statutes/statutes/655.pdf 

Nursing Guide to Practice (2009) New York Office of the Professions, Division of Professional Licensing Services. Retrieved from:  http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/nurse-guide-april09.pdf
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Ethics Scenario

Words: 1053 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22531808

Ethics Scenario

Public health ethics relates to the ethics as it relates to an entire population, in contrast to medical ethics, which relates more to the rights of individuals. osenau and oemer (2013) note that there are often ethical conflicts that emerge when individual rights conflict with the greater good. They highlight the overarching public health principles, that provision of care is regardless of external factors, that there should be equity in the distribution of resources, and that there should be respect for human rights. The case of the burn patient is primarily regarding the human rights dimension.

The human rights dimension results in an ethical dilemma here for a couple of reasons. The first is that the individual in this instance has rights -- or the family members have rights -- and there is question as to whether those rights were respected. The outcome might have been the same…… [Read More]

References

Curtis, J. & Vincent, J. (2010). Ethics and end-of-life care for adults in the intensive care unit. Lancet. Vol. 375 (2010) 1347-53.

Rosenau, P. & Roemer, R. (2013). Chapter 15: Ethical issues in public health and health services. Introduction to Health Services In possession of the author.

Sprung, C., Cohen, S., Sjokvist, P., Baras, M., Bulow, H., Hovilehto, S., Ledoux, D., Lippert, A., Maia, P., Phelan, D., Schobersberger, W., Wennberg, E. & Woodcock, T. (2003). End-of-life practices in European intensive care units. Journal of the American Medical Association. Vol. 290 (6) 790-797.
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Equal Access to a Comprehensive

Words: 2462 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66333312



A third approach in this area is the establishment of new co-pay programs which force patients to bear the costs of more procedures and treatments. This theory tends to shift part of the blame for over treatment back on the patient. Doctors claim that they order additional treatments because their patients insist on them. Forcing patients to share a greater portion of the costs of these additional treatments should arguably result in their being less demanding about receiving them.

Bureaucracy and overhead created in the delivery of health care and the administration of insurance benefits has also contributed to the substantial increase in health costs (Woodhandler 2003). The health insurance industry has campaigned to reduce health care costs but, in the process, has created a bureaucratic system that has effectively contributed to the problem. Additionally, compliance with governmental regulations has contributed to the bureaucratic difficulties as well. Practicing physicians and…… [Read More]

References

Avraham, Ronen. The Impact of Tort Reform on Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance Premiums. Research, Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 2009.

Bodenheimer, T. "High and rising health care costs ." Annals of Internal Medicine, 2005: 932-937.

Davis, K. Mirror, mirror on the wall: an international update on the comparative performance of American health care. Research Study, New York: The Commonwealth Fund, 2007.

Epstein, Arnold M. "Health Care in America - Still too Separate, Not Yet Equal." New England Journal of Medicine, 2004: 603-605.
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Health Psychosocial Model of Health Use Questions

Words: 1354 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59055296

Health

Psychosocial Model of Health

Use questions 2, 3, 5, 11, and 12

Many times a health professional will look at a health issue and see only the problem at hand. The difficulty with this approach is that most health problems affect the entire person whether or not the issue is localized or not. The psychosocial model of health looks at more than an individual's physical state to determine how they will respond to treatments in the short- and long-term. A patient's psychological well-being and their support system are as important as a willingness to see a treatment through to the end. The following paper looks at two patients and whether they were well-served from a psychosocial perspective, and, if not, what improvements could be made to serve the patient better.

In the documentaries, two of the patient interviews stood out as especially relevant to this discussion. One of these…… [Read More]

References

Back, A.L., Arnold, R.M., Baile, W.F., Fryer-Edwards, K.A., Alexander, S.C., Barley, G.E., Gooley, T.A., & Tulsky, J.A. (2007). Efficacy of communication skills training for giving bad news and discussing transitions too palliative care. Arch International Medicine, 167, 453-459.

Douglass, J.L., Sowell, R.L., & Phillips, K.D. (2003). Using Peplau's Theory to examine the psychosocial factors associated with HIV-infected women's difficulty in taking their medications. Journal of Theory Construction & Testing, 7(1).

Ellingson, L.L. (2002). Introduction to the field of healthcare communication. Communication Research Trends, 21(3).

Holland, D.J., Bradley, D.W., & Khoury, J.M. (2005). Sending men the message about preventive care: An evaluation of communication strategies. International Journal of Men's Health, 4(2).
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Caregiver Burnout and Compassion Fatigue Caregiver Compassion

Words: 1387 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16574481

Caregiver Burnout and Compassion Fatigue

Caregiver Compassion Fatigue

Those who care for others as part of their professional duties must understand the nature of caregiver fatigue and the basics of caring for oneself. Generally, the focus of a caregiver remains on the care recipient to such a degree that personal limitations are ignored and self-care principles are shunted to the background. Caregivers rarely have realistic expectations about the long-term impact of caregiving, and invariably consider themselves up to the challenge. The immediacy of caregiving tends to obfuscate considerations about self-care and the end result is that caregivers tend not to develop a long-term plan for their own health and care. Simple issues such as pacing oneself seem unreasonable or impossible to attain in the stressful environment of caregiving.

Warning signs of compassion fatigue. It is normal for people who are engaged in long-term care of others to experience stress and…… [Read More]

References

Bush, N.J. (2009). Compassion fatigue: Are you at risk? Oncology Nursing Forum, 36 (1).

Chen, C.K., Lin, C., Want, S., and Hou, T. (2009, September). A study of job stress, stress coping strategies, and job satisfaction for nurses working in middle-level hospital operating rooms. Journal of Nursing Research, 17 (3).

Ekedahl, M. And Wengstrom, Y. (2008). Coping processes in a multidisciplinary healthcare team: A comparison of nurses in cancer care and hospital chaplains. European Journal of Cancer Care, 17, 42-48.

Espeland, K.E. (2006, July / August). Overcoming burnout: How to revitalize your career. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 37 (4).