Parkinsons Disease Essays (Examples)

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The Public Policy About Parkinsons

Words: 1617 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33647919

Health Issues for the Aging
One of the diseases that creates a burden on our health care system, especially among the aged, is Parkinson's disease. At present, there is no known cure for Parkinson's, merely treatments that can help to reduce the symptoms. This makes it difficult to develop a public health solution to Parkinson's. On the prevention side, one of the challenges is that while there have been some risk factors potentially identified, the reality is that there is no known cause either. For example, a meta-analysis suggest that living in a rural area, drinking well water, farming and exposure to pesticides all might be risk factors (Priyardashi et al, 2001). The current state of research at present is such that the different forms that Parkinson's takes are being studied (Peto, et al, 1995). Moreover, the different ways that Parkinson's presents can also bring about a number of different…… [Read More]

References

Belluci, A., Navarria, L., Zaltieri, M., Missale, C. & Spano, P. (2012). Alpha-synuclein synaptic pathology and its implications in the development of novel therapeutic approaches to cure Parkinson\\'s disease. Brain Research. Vol. 1432 (2012) 95-113.

Carroll, C., Zeissler, M., Hanneman, C. & Zajicek, P. (2012). ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC) exerts a direct neuroprotective effect in a human cell culture model of Parkinson\\'s disease. Neuropathy and Applied Neurobiology. Vol. 38 (2012) 535-547.

Investors.com (2017). Adamas Parkinson\\'s drug is double the cost of analyst expectations. Investors\\' Business Daily Retrieved November 20, 2017 from https://www.investors.com/news/technology/adamas-parkinsons-drug-cost-is-double-analyst-expectations/

Lee, H. & Pienaar, I. (2014) Disruption of the blood-brain barrier in Parkinson\\'s disease: Curse or a route to a cure? Frontiers in Bioscience. Vol. 19 (2014) 272-280.

Liptak, K. (2017). White House: Feds will step up marijuana law enforcement. CNN. Retrieved November 20, 2017 from http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/23/politics/white-house-marijuana-donald-trump-pot/index.html

Natale, G., Pasquali, L, Ruggieri, S., Paparelli, A. & Fornai, F. (2008). Parkinson\\'s disease and the gut: A well-known clinical association in need of an effective cure and explanation. Neurogastroenterology and Motility. Vol. 20 (2008) 741-749.

NINDS (2017). Focus on Parkinson\\'s disease research. NINDS.NIH.gov. Retrieved November 20, 2017 from https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Current-Research/Focus-Research/Focus-Parkinsons-Disease

Peto, V., Jenkinson, C., Fitzpatrick, R. & Greenhall, R. (1995) The development and validation of a short measure of functioning and well-being for individuals with Parkinson\\'s disease. Quality of Life Research. Vol. 4 (3) 241-248.

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Vowel Acoustics in Individuals with Parkison's

Words: 1558 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47697428

Speech Science – Vowel Acoustics in People with Parkinson’s Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease that contributes to the progressive decline of motor function because of loss of dopamine-creating brain cells. Given the progressive decline of motor function, this disease shows characteristics of hypokinetic dysarthria as well as major signs of rigidity, tremor, and bradykinesia. In light with these effects, vowel acoustics in people with Parkinson’s disease has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Actually, for many individuals with Parkinson’s disease, hypokinetic dysarthria is a common condition, which is an indicator of motor speech disorders. Numerous studies have been carried out to examine motor speech disorders in Parkinson’s disease, particularly in relation to hypokinetic dysarthria. This paper examines some studies that have been conducted to evaluate the issue of hypokinetic dysarthria in people with Parkinson’s disease with regards to vowel acoustics. The article provides a summary of the articles and…… [Read More]

References

Bang, Y., Min K., Sohn, Y. H., Cho, S. (2013). Acoustic Characteristics of Vowel Sounds in Patients with Parkinson Disease. Journal NeuroRehabilitation, 32(3), 649-654. doi:10.3233/nre-130887

Skodda, S., Grönheit, W., & Schlegel, U. (2012). Impairment of Vowel Articulation as a Possible Marker of Disease Progression in Parkinsons Disease. PLoS ONE, 7(2). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0032132

Watson, P. J., & Munson, B. (2008). Parkinson\\\\'s disease and the effect of lexical factors on vowel articulation, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 124(5): EL291–EL295.doi:10.1121/1.2987464


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Parkinson Disease Is Considered to Be an

Words: 568 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17005215

Parkinson disease is considered to be an idiopathic condition. This means that there are no known cures and researchers are still trying to determine its primary causes. When someone is first diagnosed they will exhibit a number of symptoms. The most notable include: shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement, trouble walking and gait. (Sanchez, 2009) (Follet, 2010) (Cummings, 1992) (Leroy, 1998)

As the disease progresses, it will contribute to dementia and depression. This is showing its effects on entire body systems. In this outline, there will be a focus on the team strategy, questions and discussing the sources for the condition. Together, these elements will highlight how the study will be conducted and the way objectivity will be maintained. (Sanchez, 2009) (Follet, 2010) (Cummings, 1992) (Leroy, 1998)

Your team strategy for approaching and completing this project, including a delineation of tasks

The basic team strategy will involve dividing responsibilities among the…… [Read More]

References

Cummings, J. (1992). Depression and Parkinson Disease. American Journal of Psychiatry, 149 (4), pp. 443 -- 454.

Follet, J. (2010). Pallidal vs. Subthalamic. New England Journal of Medicine, 362, pp. 2077 -- 2091.

Leroy, E. (1998). The Ubiquity Pathway in Parkinson's disease. Nature, 395, pp. 451 -- 457.

Sanchez, J. (2009). Genome Wide Association. Nature Genetics, 41, pp. 1308 -- 1312.
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Use of Stem Cells in Parkinson's Patients

Words: 2013 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79904362

Stem Cell Research / Parkinson's

Since Barack Obama has become president, the field of stem cell research has been given new life. One of Obama's campaign pledges

was to allow deeper research -- including the use of federal research funds -- into the use of pluripotent stem cells in order to find solutions for some of the terrible diseases Americans suffer from. Among those medical problems is Parkinson Disease (PD). This paper reviews and delves into the literature in terms of the potential of stem cell interventions into Parkinson Disease (also called "Parkinson's Disease").

ho is the leading authority on stem cell research?

There is no one "leading authority" reflected in the literature; however there are renowned scientists that are considered pathfinders in this field. Dr. Diane S. Krause, Associate Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Associate Director of Stem Processing at Yale University is "…one of the discoverers of previously…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gallup Poll. (2011). Stem Cell Research. Retrieved March 7, 2012, from  http://www.gallup.com/poll/21676/stem-cell-research.aspx .

Gogel, S. Gubernator, M., and Minger, SL. (2011). Progress and prospects: stem cells and Neurological diseases. Gene Therapy, 18(1), 1-6.

Krause, D.S. (2002). Plasticity of marrow-driven stem cells. Gene Therapy, 9(11), 754-8.

Lo, Bernard, and Parham, Lindsay. (2010). Resolving Ethical Issues in Stem Cell Clinical
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Benefits of Rasagiline for Parkinson S Patients

Words: 2918 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96968000

PAKINSON'S & ASAGILINE

One of the drugs that has emerged as promising and at least somewhat effective in the treatment of Parkinson's disease is known as asagiline. This report will explore the neurobiological and psychological implications of the drug as it relates to Parkinson's and in general. The depth and breadth of some of the studies will be discussed as well as how that evidence was found, a general discussion of asagiline and its current/future status as a Parkinson's treatment and how all of the above should be taken with a grain of salt given the limitations that exist. There are some great opportunities for future research when it comes to Parkinson's in general and asagiline in particular.

Introduction

Parkinson's is a very debilitating and difficult disorder to deal with and treat. Even with the prominence of several major celebrities (e.g. Muhammad Ali, Michael J. Fox, etc.) and increase public…… [Read More]

References

Badinter, F., Amit, T., Bar-Am, O., Youdim, M. B., & Weinreb, O. (2015). Beneficial behavioral, neurochemical and molecular effects of 1-(R)-aminoindan in aged mice. Neuropharmacology, 99264-272. doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2015.05.041

Giladi, N., Tal, J., Azulay, T., Rascol, O., Brooks, D., Melamed, E., & ... Tolosa, E. (2009). Validation of the freezing of gait questionnaire in patients with Parkinson's disease. Movement Disorders, 24(5), 655-661 7p. doi:10.1002/mds.21745

Hanagasi, H., Gurvit, H., Unsalan, P., Horozoglu, H., Tuncer, N., Feyzioglu, A., & Emre, M. (2011). The effects of rasagiline on cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease patients without dementia: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study. Movement Disorders, 26(10), 1851-1858 8p. doi:10.1002/mds.23738

Naoi, M., Maruyama, W., & Inaba-Hasegawa, K. (2013). Revelation in the neuroprotective functions of rasagiline and selegiline: the induction of distinct genes by different mechanisms. Expert Review Of Neurotherapeutics, 13(6), 671-684. doi:10.1586/ern.13.60
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Huntington's Disease Huntington's Chorea

Words: 2877 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66784189

Huntington's disease, also known as HD, is an uncommon degenerative disorder that greatly impacts the central nervous system of the individual. It is often characterized by surplus and unneeded choreatic movements, unusual behavioral patterns, disturbances in the mental level and dementia. (Sheth 2013) As far as the Caucasian population is concerned, the Huntington's disease is prevalent in one out of ten thousand persons. The symptoms start to appear when the individual is thirty to fifty years of age. In a few cases, adolescents start to show symptoms of HD (known as JHD or Juvenile Huntington's disease) before the age of twenty by demonstrating behavioral disorders and learning difficulties at school. However, chorea is the major sign of the onset of HD that spreads to all muscles with the passage of time. The affected individual becomes severely retarded as the psychomotor processes are affected gradually. he/she also suffers decline of cognitive…… [Read More]

References

DiMaio MS, Fox JE, Mahoney MJ. 2010. Prenatal Diagnosis: Cases and Clinical Challenges [Internet]. 1. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell; [cited 2013 Nov 10] Available from: http://books.google.com.pk/books?id=Qx2cWaAk2pEC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Prenatal+Diagnosis:+Cases+and+Clinical+Challenges&hl=en&sa=X&ei=9jCCUufnNZOrhQfh0YDACg&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Prenatal%20Diagnosis%3A%20Cases%20and%20Clinical%20Challenges&f=false

Knowles J. 2007. Huntington's Disease [Internet]. 1. New York: Rosen Pub. Group; [cited 2013 Nov 11] Available from: http://books.google.com.pk/books?id=RX2Er7NpMSUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Huntington's+Disease&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ameBUqWBDYjBhAfy9YDQCQ&ved=0CEcQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Huntington's%20Disease&f=false

Lemiere J. 2004. Huntington's disease: Early Detection and Progression of Cognitive Changes in Patients and Asymptomatic Mutation Carriers [Internet]. Leuven: Leuven University Press; [cited 2013 Nov 11] Available from: http://books.google.com.pk/books?id=vdhgGGgLQSIC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Huntington's+Disease:+Early+Detection+and+Progression+of+Cognitive+Changes+in+Patients+and+Asymptomatic+Mutation+Carriers&hl=en&sa=X&ei=aGqBUqDzJ6XG7AbVz4CIDQ&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Huntington's%20Disease%3A%20Early%20Detection%20and%20Progression%20of%20Cognitive%20Changes%20in%20Patients%20and%20Asymptomatic%20Mutation%20Carriers&f=false

Roos R. 2010. Huntington's Disease: A Clinical Review. Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases [Internet]. [cited 2013 Nov 12] 5:40. Available from: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1750-1172-5-40.pdf
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How Huntington's Disease Affects Families

Words: 3858 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83682537

Huntington's disease affects families

What is Huntington's disease, and how does it affect the patient and his family? How does one deal with the patient? Is there any cure for the disease, and what is it? When was the disease discovered? Who discovered it, and how was it discovered? What way is support offered from external sources for the disease, and how can one avail of the support? What, exactly is Huntington's disease? It is a genetic disease that affects the central nervous system, in individuals who are thirty years and above, though it does occur sometimes in people younger than this. When the disease occurs, it occurs as an inherited autosomal dominant condition, and it affects all or most of the family members within the same family. The onset of symptoms and of the rate of the progression of the disease may differ between the different family members, and…… [Read More]

References

A Brief History of Huntington's disease. 8 July, 2004. Retrieved From

http://www.stanford.edu/group/hopes/basics/timeline/r2.html Accessed on 22 March, 2005

Abuse of the patient. Retrieved From

  http://www.kumc.edu/hospital/huntingtons/ abuse.html  Accessed on 22 March, 2005
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Alzheimer's Disease The Onset as

Words: 3283 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31971086

What is worth noting here is the fact that behavior disturbances, ranging in severity from repeated questioning to physical violence, are common (National Institute of Mental Health, 1989).

It is unclear whether Alzheimer's disease represents a single entity or several variants. Some experts believe that there are distinct subtypes of Alzheimer's disease, such as Lewy body disease (in which the signs of Parkinson's disease, visual hallucinations or alterations in alertness or attention, or all of these symptoms, are conspicuous) and frontotemporal dementia (in which disinhibition, misconduct or apathy, or all of these signs, are prominent). The well-established risk factors for Alzheimer's disease are age, a family history of the disease and Down syndrome (National Institute of Mental Health, 1989).

Confusions about Alzheimer's Disease and the Need for Alternative Actions

There have been numerous studies conducted in relation to Alzheimer's disease. At the same time, there are a number of reports…… [Read More]

U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment. Summary, Confused Minds, Burdened Families: Finding Help for People with Alzheimer's and Other Dementias, OTA-BA-404, Washington, DC: Supt. Of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1990.

Vickrey, Peg Gray-. Advances in Alzheimer's Disease. Nursing: Springhouse Corporation, 2002

Whitehouse PJ. Genesis of Alzheimer's disease. Neurology 1997;48(5 Suppl 7):S2-7.
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Alzheimer's Disease Has Developed Into a Major

Words: 2636 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4635387

Alzheimer's disease has developed into a major health concern for the elderly population throughout the world. This degenerative brain disorder was first described by Alois Alzheimer in 1907. Today Alzheimer's is one of the most prevalent forms of brain disorders contributing to as much as 50 to 70% of all reported cases of dementia. Over the years the study of early onset Alzheimer's disease (pre-senile AD) has kind of overshadowed the study of late onset Alzheimer in elderly group. However the disease statistics indicate an increasing susceptibility of the older population. Approximately 5% of the population above 65 years of age and around 20% of the people above 85 years of age are affected by Alzheimer's disease. Hence what was previously ignored as an inevitable old age symptom (senile dementia) is now being properly recognized as an illness. This new perspective of AD has resulted in a drastically altered understanding…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Simon Lovestone and Martin Dunitz, " Early diagnosis and Treatment of Alzheimer's

Disease," Published by Martin Dunitz Ltd., 1998

Gerry Bennett and DR Mark Jones, "The Alzheimer's Handbook," Vermilion

Publishers, 2001
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Children of Parents With Parkinson's

Words: 2083 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23855343

" Does she have faith that a more clear understanding of those problems among the medical establishment will become evident? "I wonder," she wrote, cryptically.

HAT PARENTS HO HAVE PD SHOULD SAY to THEIR CHILDREN: The Parkinson's Disease Society (www.parkinsons.org.uk) offers pertinent advice and counsel to those parents who have both PD and children. "A key message seems to be open and honest" when talking to your kids, the PDS Information Sheet suggests. "Don't keep it a secret." As soon as you are diagnosed with PD, explain to them what it means to your health and to their lives as part of the family as a whole.

Don't be vague or apologetic, the PDS suggests. Be specific and clear, and fully explain that PD is not contagious. Because of the fatigue associated with PD - and the "on-off fluctuations" that are inevitable - parents with PD may not be able…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ali, Rasheda. "Muhammad Ali's Daughter Writes Children's Book on Parkinson's. ABC

News. 2005. Retrieved 23 Oct. 2006 at  http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/print?id=913265 .

Lees, Lesley. "Living with Parkinson's disease - a child's perspective." British Medical

Journal 324.1562 (2002): Retrieved 23 Oct. 2006 at http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/short/324/7353/1562?eaf.
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Alzheimer's Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease

Words: 1174 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30276211



In stage five, the affected person will begin to experience "major gaps in memory and deficits in cognitive function" and may require some type of assistance with "day-to-day activities like preparing meals, taking a bath or putting on clothing. The affected person will also lack the ability to recall very simple, ordinary things like his/her address, telephone number or even the name of his/her spouse or close friend and will be unable to recall where they are in a physical setting, such as in a shopping mall or even their own home, and will not be able to recall what day of the week it is or the exact date (2009, "The Warning Signs of Alzheimer's," Internet).

In stage six, the affected person will experience severe cognitive decline in the form of a change in his/her personality and will not be able to "recollect their personal history, such as where…… [Read More]

References

The Warning Signs of Alzheimer's." Alzheimer's Association. 2009. Internet. Retrieved January 23, 2009 at http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_symptoms_of_alzheimers.asp?gclid=CJfdgdv5o5gCFQrFGgodwnf7mQ.
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Important Factors in Treating Huntington's Disease Patients

Words: 6558 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22789764

Huntington's disease (HD) was the first autonomic dominant disorder for which genetic prediction became possible" (Harper, et al., 2000, Journal of Medical Genetics, p. 567). HD is a disease that occurs due to an inherited disorder leading to the death of brain cells. A diagnosis of HD is accomplished through genetic testing which can be implemented at any age regardless of whether the symptoms manifest or not. Although, the specific symptoms vary between people, nevertheless, symptoms can start with people between 35 and 45 years of age and can also start in some individuals at even anearlier age. The disease may affect successive generations if health interventions are not implemented (Mandel, 2016).

Additionally, "the cause of HD is due to a dominant mutation of autosomal form of the gene called Huntington. This shows that a child born by an affected person has a 50% chance of developing or inheriting the…… [Read More]

References

Causes and risk factors. (2016). Health Communities. Retrieved from http://www. healthcommunities.com/huntingtons-disease/cause.shtml.

Denbo, S. M. (2013, January 1). Balancing the rights of children, parents and the state: The legal, ethical and psychological implications of genetic testing in children. Southern Journal of Business and Ethics, 5, 188-190.

Domaradzki, J. (2015, January 1). Lay constructions of genetic risk. A case-study of the Polish Society of Huntington's Disease. Polish Sociological Review, 189, 107-111.

Draper, B. (2004). Dealing with dementia: A Guide to Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
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The Book Addict and Disease Model

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90425930

Addict, Michael Stein uses a case study approach to exhibit, analyze, and discuss addiction in general and how addiction impacts the lives of individuals specifically. The author takes into account psychological trauma, psycho-social issues, and other situational variables but ultimately ascribes to the disease model of addiction. Stein concludes from his case study with Lucy that substance abuse is a disease just as heart disease is but does not provide any substantial evidence backing up this claim. In fact, Stein (2010) simply calls addiction "the disease of wanting more," which is hardly a scientific assessment of substance abuse (p. 25). If the disease model were supported by the literature, there would be clear outlines of disease etiology and the neurobiological pathways upon which it works. In fact, the disease model has not received unequivocal research support. Although popular and politically effective in terms of freeing up funding for addiction treatment,…… [Read More]

References Not Cited

Lilienfeld, S.O., Lynn, S.J. & Lohr, J.M. (2015). Science and Pseudoscience in Clinical Psychology. New York: The Guilford Press.

Rasmussen, S. (2013). A management model for a chronic disease called addiction. APHA 275427. Retrieved online: https://apha.confex.com/apha/141am/webprogram/Paper275427.html

Volkow, N.D., Koob, G.F. & McLellan, T. (2016). Neurobiologic advances from the brain disease model of addiction. The New England Journal of Medicine 2016(374), 363-371.
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Strategies for Promoting Health or Managing Disease

Words: 2454 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85798346

Obesity

A website for Current Nursing touts a health promotion model as espoused by Nola J. Pender, a former professor of nursing at the University of Michigan. The model's focus is on three areas: 1) individual characteristics and experiences, 2) behavior-specific cognitions and affect, and 3) behavioral outcomes (Current Nursing, 2011). Additionally, the model touts the fact that each individual has unique personal characteristics and experiences that will affect their actions and their health. Employing the Pender health promotion model concerning obesity will necessarily entail understanding each individual's motivation for participating in the study, and gearing the study towards those motivations.

It might be a simple matter to understand the motivating factors an obese person will be feeling regarding participation in the study, but to prepare an individualized course of action for each individual would likely entail a lot more time and expense than developing a more broad based approach…… [Read More]

References

Aitlhadj, L.; Avila, D.S.; Benedetto, A.; Aschner, M.; Sturzenbaum, S.R.; (2010) Environmental exposure, obesity, and Parkinson's disease: Lessons from fat and old worms, Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 119, Issue 1, pp. 20 -- 28

Cliff, D.P.; Okely, A.D.; Morgan, P.J.; Jones, R.A.; Steele, J.R.; (2010) The impact of child and adolescent obesity treatment interventions on physical activity: A systematic review, Obesity Reviews, Vol. 11, Issue 7, pp. 516 -- 530

Current Nursing (2011) Health Promotion Models, accessed on August 1, 2011 at: http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/health_promotion_model.html,

Davin, S.A. & Taylor, N.M.; (2009) Comprehensive review of obesity and psychological considerations for treatment, Psychology, Health & Medicine, Vol. 14, Issue 6, pp. 716-725
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Brain Structures Systems Are Affected in

Words: 2651 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31587043

Alternatively, degeneration of the ascending cholinergic and catechola- minergic neuronal systems may contribute, at least in part, to the occurrence of this frontal-lobe-like symptomatology associated with Parkinson's disease. (Dubois & Pillon, 1996, pp.2-8)

The development of a greater understanding, over time of the causal factors as well as the manifestations and possible interventions for cognitive function in Parkinson's disease has continued since this time. Greater functional understanding of neurotransmitters and receptors as well as brain function in general have also significantly aided in the treatment Parkinson's Disease. esearch has even led to the conclusion that standards dopamine (pharmacological) treatments while they improve some cognitive function (switching between two tasks "thought to depend on circuitry connecting the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the posterior parietal cortex to the dorsal caudate nucleus) might impair others that are usually spared by PD (probabilistic reversal learning, which; "implicates orbitofrontal cortex -- ventral striatal circuitry." involvement)…… [Read More]

References

Aarsland, D. Laake, K. Larsen, J.P. & Janvin, C. (2002) Donepezil for cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled study. Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. 72 (6), 708-712.

Cools, R. Barker, R.A. Sahakian, B.J. & Robbins, T.W. (December 2001) Enhanced or Impaired Cognitive Function in Parkinson's Disease as a Function of Dopaminergic Medication and Task Demands. Cerebral Cortex, 11 (12), 1136-1143.

Drapier, D. Peron, J. Leray, E. Sauleau, P. Biseul, I. Drapier, S. Le Jeune, F. Travers, D. Bourguignon, a. Haegelen, C. Millet, B. & Verin, M. (September 2008) Emotion recognition impairment and apathy after subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease have separate neural substrates. Neuropsychologia 46 (11), 2796-2801.

Dubois, B. Pillon, B. (November 1996) Cognitive deficits in Parkinson's Disease. Journal of Nuerology. 244 (1), 2-8.
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Comparing Cognitive Changes

Words: 956 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83662529

Cognitive Changes

As people age, there are three main types of cognitive changes that can impair or alter cognitive functioning: mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's. All of these syndromes are more severe than the normal decline that is expected with aging, though they do not all reach the severity of dementia. Dementia refers to the "the loss of cognitive functioning- thinking, remembering, and reasoning- and behavior abilities, to such an extent that it interferes with a person's daily life and activities" (NIH, 2013). While there are some similarities between these three conditions, there are also significant differences between the three syndromes. These differences can impact treatment options and also help predict impact on the patient and the family.

MCI is an intermediate stage, which features a more significant cognitive decline than that expected with normal aging, but is not as severe as full-blown dementia. "It can involve problems…… [Read More]

References

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2012, August 21). Mild Cognitive Impairment. Retrieved October 21, 2013

from Mayo Clinic website: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mild-cognitive-impairment/DS00553

National Institutes on Health. (2013, October 17). Alzheimer's Fact Sheet. Retrieved October

21, 2013 from the National Institute on Aging website: http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/alzheimers-disease-fact-sheet
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Prions Proteinaceous Infectious Particles Recent Cases of

Words: 2056 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79151408

Prions:

Proteinaceous Infectious Particles"

Recent cases of Mad Cow Disease have focused the public attention on prion diseases and the small proteins that are believed to cause them. The scientific community has been slow to recognize this mechanism of disease, since prion-caused encephalopathies can demonstrate diverse symptoms, and share characteristics with other disorders, such as dementia.

Prions, as the acronym (Proteinaceous Infectious Particles) suggests, are small proteins that are typically expressed in brain tissue, and may exist in a normal or abnormal shape. The prion protein is encoded by a gene found on the human chromosome 20. Usually, the prion protein is translated in neural tissue, folds into its normal conformation, carries out its cellular role, and is eventually degraded by enzymes. The abnormal prion, however, folds differently from its normal counterpart. This different shape makes it more difficult to degrade, and leads to the brain damage that is seen…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Inherited prion disease. (n.d.). Retrieved April 21, 2004, at http://www.st- marys.nhs.uk/specialist/prion/factsheets/inheritedpd.htm

Kightly, R. (n.d.). Prion replication and spread at the cellular level. Retrieved April

21, 2004, from Mad Cow Disease Images & BSE Pictures

Web site:  http://www.rkm.com.au/BSE/index.html
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Flavonoids the Benefits of Flavonoids

Words: 3595 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46849066



Another hypothesis that has just began to be explored by the academic community is the possibility that flavonoids may alter growth factor signaling, thus limiting the ability of the cell to initiate rapid growth 8). Study into this area are just beginning to emerge and more information will be available in the next several years.

Potential Health Benefits

The key to solving the riddle of why persons that consume large amounts of fruits and vegetables can expect to have certain health benefits depends on the ability to understand the mechanisms at play. Let us first examine current hypothesis regarding the mechanisms that are responsible for the anti-carcinogenic effects of flavonoids. Research into the mechanisms by which certain flavonoids demonstrate anti-carcinogenic effects can be grouped into five categories. Currently these studies are at the in vitro stage, with a few animal studies in the present group. Therefore, it is not known…… [Read More]

(25) U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Program 107, Human Nutrition, Health Promoting Properties of Plant and Animal Foods; usda.gov, NP-107-2006, pg 24-29.

(26) Prior, RL, Wu, X, Gu, L. (2006). Flavonoid Metabolism and Challenges to Understanding Mechanisms of Health Effects, Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. 86(15): 2487-2491

Flavonoids
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Dlb and Patient KM

Words: 2028 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18937120

medication for patient named KM is Prothiaden. Prothiaden is used to treat depression as well as limit the feelings of anxiety in those taking it. The case file indicates a normal MI and no previous diagnosis of neurological disorders like Parkinson's disease. Patient KM has complained of depression and anxiety related to the passing of her mother. Progressive functional and cognitive decline has presented ever since mother died four years ago.

Although the patient worked until the age of 60 as an accountant, within the last 18 months patient has experienced fluctuations in mood, confusion, mild word finding difficulties and spatial disorientation. She also has visual hallucinations and violent dreams. She experienced recent falls and a slowing of motor skills. These symptoms extend to the inability to carry out motor sequences with either hand or double alternating hand movements. Although she can detect shapes well, she has poor ability in…… [Read More]

References

Armstrong, M., Litvan, I., Lang, A., Bak, T., Bhatia, K., Borroni, B., Boxer, A., Dickson, D., Grossman, M., Hallett, M., Josephs, K., Kertesz, A., Lee, S., Miller, B., Reich, S., Riley, D., Tolosa, E., Troster, A., Vidailhet, M. and Weiner, W. (2013). Criteria for the diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration. Neurology, 80(5), pp.496-503.

Ballard, C., Jacoby, R., Del Ser, T., Khan, M., Munoz, D., Holmes, C., Nagy, Z. and Perry, E. (2004). Neuropathological Substrates of Psychiatric Symptoms in Prospectively Studied Patients With Autopsy-Confirmed Dementia With Lewy Bodies: American Journal of Psychiatry: Vol 161, No 5. American Journal of Psychiatry, [online] 161(5), p.843. Available at: http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.161.5.843 [Accessed 19 Sep. 2015].

Burke, A., Yaari, R., Tariot, P., Dougherty, J., Fleisher, A. and Brand, H. (2012). The Shadow People. The Primary Care Companion For CNS Disorders.

Ciro, C., Hershey, L. and Garrison, D. (2013). Enhanced Task-Oriented Training in a Person With Dementia With Lewy Bodies. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67(5), pp.556-563.
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Security Consulting Firm

Words: 3345 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26764992

Critical Pathway: Chronic enal Failure

Advanced Pathophysiology

egents Online Degree Program

Critical Pathway: Chronic renal failure

Chronic renal failure is often occasioned by chronic kidney disease, immune disorder, trauma among other conditions. It does not have any specific symptoms and might include feeling unwell generally and experiencing a reduced appetite. It is diagnosed following screening of individuals who are identified to be at risk of kidney problems, like individuals with diabetes or high blood pressure and others who have blood relative with chronic kidney disease. It always seems complex when trying to come up with the right diagnosis for a patient.

M.A. is a 60-year-old man who has a stage V chronic kidney disease mainly as a result of diabetic nephropathy and a 12-year of type 2 diabetes. He has symptomatic peripheral vascular insufficiency, and 3 years ago he had undergone coronary artery bypass 3. Within the ten months that…… [Read More]

References

Ahern J, Kruger DF, Gatcomb P, Petit W, Tamborlane W.,(1989). The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT): the trial coordinators perspective. Diabetes Educ 15:236 -- 281

Bassilios N, Launay-Vacher V, Khoury N, et al. (2001) Gabapentin neurotoxicity in a chronic haemodialysis patient. Nephrol Dial Transplant.

Blum RA, Comstock TJ, Sica DA, et al.(1994). Pharmacokinetics of gabapentin in subjects with various degrees of renal function. Clin Pharmacol Ther;56(2):154-159

Brawek B, Loffler M, Dooley DJ, Weyerbrock A, Feuerstein TJ.(2008) Differential modulation of K (+)-evoked (3)H-neurotransmitter release from human neocortex by gabapentin and pregabalin. Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol.:376(5):301-307
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Falls Among the Elderly Age GROUP1

Words: 2717 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80389108

Fall Among the Elderly Age Group

Falls among the Elderly Age Group

Biological Factors

Unintentional falls

Expected falls and unexpected falls

isk Elements for Falls

Outline of Several Different Strategies

Counseling and Health Education Strategies

Single Strategies

Primary Strategies

Exercise and physical activity 8

Nursing-Home Strategies

Interventions of Unidentified Effectiveness

Developed Based on your Understanding of the Public Health Problem

Schedule an appointment with your Medic

Keep moving

Wear sensible shoes

According to JM (2009), "As people get older, falls turn out to be a typical and often hurting issue that occurs among those that are in the elderly category, producing a huge quantity of illness, death and use of health care services as well as premature nursing home admittances ( p. 42)." However, falls are a difficult, multi-faceted problem that comprises of social, medical, and financial elements. Medically, the mixture of a high occurs of falls and an increased…… [Read More]

References

A., B. (2012). Research methods in health: investigating health and health services. United Kingdom: Open University Press.

Campbell AJ, R. M. (2013). Rethinkingindividual and community fall preventionstrategies: a meta- regression comparingsingle and multifactorial interventions. Age and Ageing, 21(6), 656-662.

JM., H. (2009). Cognitive and Emotional benefits of exercise may mediate fall reduction. British Medical Journal, 128, 325(.

Lord SR, T. A. (2013). The effect of an individualized fall prevention program on fallrisk and falls in older people: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 14(8), 1296-1304.
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Proposal Review

Words: 751 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34528988

thousand characters (E1 vs. G1 proposals) excluding the title and the reference pages. Likewise, G1-3 is approximately three thousand three hundred characters excluding the title and the reference pages. Both proposals are double spaced as it is the requirement in APA formatted papers.

Generally, the two proposals have adhered to APA formatting guidelines. They have a title page, the main text, and the references page. The main text is aligned at 0.5 inches indention. The pages are well paginated on the top left corner. For the title page, the header is well in line with APA header requirements, however, for both proposals, the header for the pages after the title pages is wrongly done, with the words "Running head" included. According to APA citation guidelines, the pages after the title pages should not contain the words running head (Angeli et al., 2010). Both proposals lack an abstract and the headings…… [Read More]

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Animal Experiments and Testing Pcrm

Words: 1765 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53241280

Mignini, Pradeep Jayaram, and Khalid S. Khan

BMJ 2007 334: 97. Online available at http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/extract/334/7588/274

Perel, et al. (2007) states that only immediate preclinical testing of new drug therapies, but animal research aids medical science in many more ways Animal studies play a part in the initial development of candidate drugs, and the development and testing of medical devices and surgical procedures. Even more crucial, animal research informs clinical research by building the foundation of biological knowledge." (2007)

6. Study on Long-Term Effects of Chemicals on the Environment

Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution. 22 Mar 2007. Online available at http://www.rcep.org.uk/chemicals/chemscop.htm

This work states that diverse organizations including the 'Chemical Industries Association', CEFIC, the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions as well as the Department of Health and Friends of the Earth "...raise the impact of chemicals assessment policy on animal testing. Most of the Department of the Environment,…… [Read More]

16. Study on Long-Term Effects of Chemicals on the Environment

Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution. 22 Mar 2007. Online available at http://www.rcep.org.uk/chemicals/chemscop.htm

This work states that diverse organizations including the 'Chemical Industries Association', CEFIC, the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions as well as the Department of Health and Friends of the Earth "...raise the impact of chemicals assessment policy on animal testing. Most of the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions' postbag on the European Commission Chemicals Strategy concerns the huge increase in animal testing likely to result. It would seem difficult for the Commission to make recommendations on chemical assessment without addressing the issues of the acceptability of alternatives to animal testing, and the implications of the recommendations for animal testing.
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Brain Development Disorders

Words: 627 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15358169

Anomic Aphasia is also known as nominal aphasia, dysnomia, and amnesic aphasia and refers to a disorder that generates difficulties in recalling names or words. This brain disorder is considered as a dearth of expressive language that makes it difficult for an individual to recall names or words. In addition, patients suffering from anomic aphasia experience difficulties in recalling numbers. While an individual has clear understanding of what he/she is attempting to name or write, he/she requires a relatively long period of time to recall it or may experience tremendous challenges in articulating the word, name or numbers. In some cases, patients suffering from anomic aphasia produce jargon words or other words when attempting to recall or express certain words, names or numbers. The other symptom of this condition is the inability for a patient to identify the appropriate word for an object or individual through he/she has the capability…… [Read More]

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Basal Ganglia

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30344555

Basal Ganglia

The control of motor movement progresses from mastery of gross movement to fine motor control as humans develop (Wilson, 2013). This progression depends on the maturation of the extrapyramidal motor system, followed by the maturation of the pyramidal motor system. The extrapyramidal motor system incorporates multiple areas of the brain that are involved in controlling gross motor movements, including the cerebellum and basal ganglia. The cerebellum functions to coordinate muscle movement in response to sensory stimuli generated by muscles, tendons, the reticular formation, and the vestibular system. By comparison, the role of the basal ganglia in regulating muscle movement is still being investigated. In general terms, the basal ganglia serve as an information relay center for various centers within the cerebral cortex; however, researchers seem to agree that one of the functions of the basal ganglia is to inhibit muscle movements before they can begin.

esearchers have also…… [Read More]

References

Rieger, Martina, Gauggel, Siegfied, and Burmeister, Katja. (2003). Neuropsychology, 17(2), 272-282.

Shohamy, D., Myers, C.E., Onlaor, S., and Gluck, M.A. (2004). Role of the basal ganglia in category learning: How do patients with Parkinson's disease learn? Behavioral Neuroscience, 118(4), 676-686.

Stocco, Andrea, Lebiere, Christian, and Anderson, John R. (2010). Conditional routing of information to the cortex: A model of the basal ganglia's role in cognitive coordination. Psychological Review, 117(2), 541-574.

Wilson, Josephine F. (2013). Biological Basis of Behavior. San Diego: Bridgepoint Education, Inc. ISBN: 978-1-62178-103-5.
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Cardiovascular Case Study Management

Words: 3112 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51501524

Although the severities of congestive signs may be similar, medical evaluation should be instructed to determine whether there is accompanying proof of cardiovascular disease. Physical proof of cardiovascular disease contains the narrow pulse pressure, cool arms, and legs, and sometimes changed mentation, with supporting proof sometimes provided by reducing serum sodium level and deteriorating renal function. Cardiovascular disease is frequently difficult to recognize through phone contact but may be suspected when previously effective diuretic increases fail, nurses report lower blood pressure, or patients explain improved lethargy.

Facilitators and barriers to optimal disorder management and outcomes

Environmental factors and cultural beliefs; motivators and hinders

In this case, the client thought he was suffering from a heart attack and feared to come to the hospital. The symptoms had presented for four days before the patient sought help. The patient had been suffering from similar symptoms for the past six months, but thought…… [Read More]

References

American Association of Cardiovascular (2013). Guidelines for cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention programs. John Wiley & Sons.

Bunting-Perry, L.K., & Vernon, G.M. (2007). Comprehensive nursing care for Parkinson's disease. New York: Springer Pub.

Holloway, N.M. (2014). Medical-surgical care planning. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Gulanick, M. (2007). Nursing care plans: Nursing diagnosis and intervention. St. Louis: Mosby.
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Healthcare the Exelon Patch and

Words: 1370 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53451640

.

4. What is the advantage of a "patch"?

Evidently, the drug rivastigmine causes gastrointestinal side effects, but the patch allows only a small amount to be steadily absorbed into the bloodstream and thus creates fewer negative reactions to the drug. The Novartis website makes the case for a patch over a pill by saying "On average, an older American takes 5 prescription medicines. These medicines may need to be taken at different times and managing them all may seem overwhelming" (Novartis, para. 1). In this case, a patch eliminates having to remember several doses each day of one of the medications.

5. What is "moderate" dementia? What is dementia?

Dementia affects brain function. There is no known cure for dementia. It refers to several illnesses (Alzheimer's disease, Lewy or DLB) involving behavior, memory, communication and learning problems. There are other conditions in the brain which damage nerves or blood…… [Read More]

References

Activa. (2008). Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease. Activa Deep Brain Stimulation. Retrieved January 20, 2008 from website: http://www.activadbs.com/symptoms.asp.

Medications and treatment. (2008). Parkinson's Disease Foundation Retrieved January 20, 2008 from website: http://www.pdf.org/AboutPD/med_treatment.cfm.

NHS. (2005). Holding Statement. National Institute for Clinical Excellence. Retrieved January 20, 2008 from website: http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/pdf/Alzheimer_holdingstatement.pdf.

NHS. (2007). Final appraisal determination: Donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine (review) and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Centre Director Report for Guidance Executive. National Institute for Clinical Excellence. Retrieved January 20, 2008 from Website: http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/pdf/GE050705AlzFADSignoffReport.pdf.
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Neurotransmitters Are Chemicals Endogenously Produced in the

Words: 664 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94018370

Neurotransmitters are chemicals endogenously produced in the body for the purpose of sending stimulus across from one neuron to the other through the synapse. Neurotransmitters, packaged in synaptic vessels, are clustered beneath the inner membrane of the axon terminal of the presynaptic membrane. The neurotransmitters upon stimulus are released into the synaptic cleft where they diffuse and attach to their particular receptors on the post synaptic membrane. The flow of action potential is the main stimulus to the release of the neurotransmitters. The main function of the neurotransmitters is to excite or inhibit certain kinds of receptors. Thereby the behavioral effect of the neurotransmitters depends on the kinds of receptors on the post synapse. Noradrenaline, an important neurotransmitter is involved in arousal and dopamine controls motor movements and cognition (Webster, 2001, p. 55).

Synapse consists of dendrites of one neuron and terminus of the other neuron. No physical connection is…… [Read More]

References

Jankovic, J. (2008). Parkinson's disease: clinical features and diagnosis. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 79:368 -- 376.

Neve, A.K. (2009). The Dopamine Receptors, The Receptors. Edition 2. Springer.

Webster, R. (2001). Neurotransmitters, Drugs and Brain Function. John Wiley and Sons.
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Stem Cells Are Non-Specializing Cells

Words: 1687 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11451725

Dimitrios Karussis and Ibrahim Kassis, in the article, "Use of Stem Cells for Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis," conclude,

"In the current review, the various types of stem cells, which were mainly studied in animal models, will be reviewed as a potential therapeutic approach for MS. The main and common mechanisms of action of all stem cells include induction of neuroregeneration and remyelination through the activation of resident stem cells, or production of new CNS cell lineage progenitors, paralleled by local and systemic immunomodulating effects" (Karussis & Kassis, 2007, Conclusion ¶).

The other diseases that are showing promise in treatments resulting from stem cells usage includes: as cancer, diabetes, osteopetrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injuries, heart disease, immune system disorders, blood disorders; the list goes on (Diseases Treated by Cord lood, 2010).

Conclusion

Stem cells are a valuable weapon in the future treatment of disease and in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Adult stem cell Plasticity and Transdifferentiation." 2010. Retrieved on May 20, 2010 from http://www.studentsguide.in/animal-biotechnology/stem-cell-technology/adult-stem-cell-plasticity-and-transdifferentiation.html

"Asymmetric Division of Stem Cells." 2010. Retrieved on May 20, 2010 from http://www.molecular-plant-biotechnology.info/animal-biotechnology-genomics/pluripotent-stem-cell-lines/asymmetric-division-of-stem-cells.html

"Diseases Treated by Cord Blood." 2010. Retrieved on May 20, 2010 from http://www.womens-health.co.uk/diseases_treated.html

Jessen, W. "Exactly What are Stem Cells?" 7, July 2008. Retrieved on May 20, 2010 from http://www.highlighthealth.com/did-you-know/exactly-what-are-stem-cells/
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Human Papilloma Virus and the Description of

Words: 2502 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82241998

human papilloma virus and the description of epidemiology as it relates to the virus. Steps and methods of epidemiology have been discussed in detail alongside statistical data for demographics taken from surveillance records. Moreover, research data have been taken as vital assistance to compliment the study of this research paper and to prove results with evidences from researches (Duncan, 1988).

Statistics have been taken from World Health Organization for the rate of occurrence and risk factors involved with the diseases caused by the virus. Epidemiology cannot be defined unless its steps and methods are explained (Fletcher & Fletcher, 2005). The epidemiology for papillomavirus diseases includes descriptive methods of epidemiology and in this paper; the focus has been made on describing the process steps with respect to papillomavirus. There are five steps, which define how the epidemiology process is carried out; keeping in mind one of the two approaches of the…… [Read More]

References

Duncan, D. (1988). Epidemiology: basis for disease prevention and health promotion. New York: Macmillan Pub. Co.

Fletcher, R.H., & Fletcher, S.W. (2005). Clinical Epidemiology: The Essentials. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Gordis, L. (2009). Epidemiology E-Book. Philadelphia: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Krickeberg, K., Pham, V.T., & Pham, T.M. (2012). Epidemiology: Key to Prevention . New York, NY: Springer.
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Kuru Sorcery

Words: 3293 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54385925

Kuru Sorcery in New Guinea

Introduction to Shirley indenbaum

The author of Kuru Sorcery: Disease and Danger in the New Guinea Highlands, Shirley indenbaum, is a cultural anthropologist and professor in the Ph.D. Program in the Department of Anthropology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. In addition to her ground-breaking research in Papua New Guinea - studying the prion ailment called "kuru" (explored in depth in this paper) and linking cannibalism to kuru - indenbaum has conducted extensive research (and published books and scholarly articles) on cholera in Bangladesh, and on AIDS and HIV in the U.S. And elsewhere. She also has published books titled The Education of Women and the Mortality of Children in Bangladesh, and Knowledge, Power and Practice: the Anthropology of Medicine and Everyday ife, according to her bibliography in the City University of New York Web pages for faculty members (www.gc.cuny.edu/anthropology/fac_lindenbaum.html).

The Kuru…… [Read More]

Lindenbaum, Shirley. Kuru Sorcery: Disease and Danger in the New Guinea Highlands.

Palo Alto: Mayfield Publishing Company, 1979.

Nutrition Health Review. "Kuru, a Meat-Eating Disease that affects Cannibals." (2003)
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West Nile Virus

Words: 1924 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64185724

est Nile virus was first detected in the estern Hemisphere in 1999 and during the last few years has spread cross the North American continent into all forty-eight continental states, seven Canadian provinces, throughout Mexico (est). Moreover, the virus has been detected in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Guadeloupe, and El Salvador (est). According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 15,000 people in the United States have tested positive for the virus since 1999, resulting in over five hundred deaths (est). Most experts believe that many more people have most likely been infected with the virus, but have experienced mild or no symptoms, thus have gone unreported (est). An individual's risk of contracting the est Nile is statistically low, and less than 1% of those infected develop serious illness (est). The elderly population and those with compromised immune systems are at the highest…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Guidelines for Investigating Suspect West Nile Virus Cases in Equine. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Retrieved November 09, 2005 from:

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/issues_archive/wnv/wnvguide.html

NIAID Research on West Nile Virus. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious

Disease. National Institutes of Health. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved November 09, 2005 from:
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Christian Counseling

Words: 901 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62497196

Mr. H

Korea

Mr. H case study

What is the client's most prominent presenting issues (that is, what seems to take priority as being wrong)?

Mr. H has shown a sharp decline in cognitive functioning. He has quit his job without warning and without consulting with his spouse (who is economically as well as emotionally affected by this decision), has shown difficulty remembering basic tasks and words that a man of his education and background should be able to retrieve easily, and is exhibiting signs of disorientation. Despite being an accomplished outdoorsman he has gotten lost while hiking; has difficulty reading; and although he was a science teacher has difficulty doing basic math. He also has trouble performing basic acts of self-care and memory exercises.

Q2. What else do you feel you need to know (or, what might be some areas you may ask about in order to determine what…… [Read More]

References

Alzheimer's disease: Treatment and drugs. (2013). Mayo Clinic. Retrieved from:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/alzheimers-disease/DS00161/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs

Diagnostic criteria for dementia of the Alzheimer's type. (2013). BehaveNet. Retrieved from:

 http://behavenet.com/node/21508
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Christopher Reeve Case Study Christopher

Words: 950 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66192310

hat treatments did the individual seek? ere any available at the time?

Reeve had to have a major operation a few days after his accident to replace the shattered vertebrae through artificial means. After his operation, he was put through physical rehabilitation and occupational therapy. Eventually he was able to move his wrist, fingers, and feet (Hecht & Hecht 2004). He could also breathe without assistance for up to 90 minutes. Intense physical therapy continued throughout the remainder of his life. Other treatments he received included: weight-bearing exercises, calcium supplements, and medication to reverse osteoporosis, or thinning of the bones which happens frequently to paraplegics.

Reeve sought further means of overcoming his disability, particularly with stem cell research. In this therapy, embryonic stem cells or, less often, adult stem cells are introduced to the damaged body which and allows the body to regenerate damaged tissue. It has been shown to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Crews, C. (1998, May 3). The role he can't escape. Washington Post. Washington Post

Company.

Hall, F. (2005). Christopher Reeve. UU World: The Magazine of the Unitarian Universalist

Association.
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Embryo and Stem Cell

Words: 1143 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72184005

Embryo and Stem Cell Therapy

There are numerous studies which have investigated the potential benefits of embryonic stem cell therapy in restoring central nervous system function and other functions in humans with impaired cellular function.

In the article "Dopamine neurons derived from embryonic stem cells function in an animal model of Parkinson's disease" the author's objectives are to investigate stem cell therapy as a plausible treatment for Parkinson's disease using animal subjects. esearchers have widely held the belief that embryonic stem cell research would be useful in alleviating the symptoms of Parkinson's. The disease itself typically results according to the authors when midbrain neurons are lost, particularly those neurons that synthesize dopamine, and important neurotransmitter.

Embryonic stem cells can generate dopamine, thus the authors propose that they become the basis for cell therapies. The scope of the study is limited to examination of stem cell function and dopamine production in…… [Read More]

References:

Kim, J.H., Auerbach, J.M., Rodriguez-Gomez, J.A., Velasco, I., Gavin, D., Lumelsky, N.,

Lee, S.H., Nguyen, J., Sanchez-Pernaute, R., Bankiewicz, K. & McKay, R. (2002). "Dopamine neurons derived from embryonic stem cells function in an animal model of Parkinson's disease." Nature, 418: 50-56. 30, November 2004: Available: http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v418/n6893/full/nature00900_fs.html

Niwa, H. (2001). "Molecular mechanism to maintain stem cell renewal of ES Cells." Cell

Struct. Funct., 26: 137-148. 2, December, 2004: http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/csf/26/3/137/_pdf
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Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Disorder

Words: 1743 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65719540

This may consist of arising and seating in chairs securely. Following the progressive characteristics of this illness, all people gradually lose their capability simply to move and will need to advance and use a wheelchair.

eferences

Burbank, P.M. (2006). Vulnerable older adults: Health care needs and interventions. New York, NY: Springer Pub.

Donaldson, I.M., & Marsden, C.D. (2011). Marsden's book of movement disorders. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press.

Egerton, T., Williams, D. & Iansek, . (2009). Comparison of gait in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease and healthy older adults. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Fabio, ., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2006). Gaze-shift strategies during functional activity in progressive supranuclear palsy. eceived: 20 July 2006 / Accepted: 26 September 2006 / Published online: 8 November 2006. Springer-Verlag 2006.

Fabio, ., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2008). Gaze Control and Foot Kinematics During Stair Climbing: Characteristics Leading to Fall isk in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.…… [Read More]

References

Burbank, P.M. (2006). Vulnerable older adults: Health care needs and interventions. New York, NY: Springer Pub.

Donaldson, I.M., & Marsden, C.D. (2011). Marsden's book of movement disorders. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press.

Egerton, T., Williams, D. & Iansek, R. (2009). Comparison of gait in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease and healthy older adults. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Fabio, R., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2006). Gaze-shift strategies during functional activity in progressive supranuclear palsy. Received: 20 July 2006 / Accepted: 26 September 2006 / Published online: 8 November 2006. Springer-Verlag 2006.
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Solomon N Mckee A And Garcia-Barry S

Words: 743 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75426168

Solomon, N., McKee, A. And Garcia-Barry, S. (2001). Intensive voice treatment and respiration treatment for hypokinetic-spastic dysarthria after traumatic brain injury. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. (10) 51-64.

What was the problem or question the authors were asking?

A young man who had sustained massive brain trauma was examined to see which method would help him to breath and speak properly again.

What research or background information was described?

The efficacy of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) was explored and tested in terms of a patient twenty months after the sustainment of a major injury. LSVT is "an intensive 4-week program that focuses on increased vocal effort" (Solomon 2001,-page 51). It has proven to be successful in helping patients with Parkinson's.

c. Therefore, what was the purpose of the present article?

To see whether or not the LSVT would help a young man with traumatic brain injury (tbi) and…… [Read More]

Currently affiliated with Courage Center, Minneapolis, MN

Submitted on February 18, 2000

Accepted on November 20, 2000
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Grumpier Old Men This Movie

Words: 2869 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22009818

Not only that, the results of eating badly is harmful. Holland and Barrett magazine reports: "If your diet isn't as balanced as you'd hope for, there's a chance you could be missing out on L. Trytophan - an important amino acid that plays a vital role in the production of brain chemicals." If one's diet is lacking it, the safest way to get this supplement is in the form of 5-HTP - a natural compound that the body produces from L-Trytophan. 5-HTP is believed to help the body produce serotonin, a chemical that regulates mood, sleep and other brain-related functions. (Pearce, 1999)

In aging people who seem to have no appetite, there actually may be a sensory dysfunction, which keeps that person from enjoying food and other things that are sensed through taste and smell. Susan S. Schiffman, Ph.D. pointed out that in the elderly these senses are not entirely…… [Read More]

Works Cited

About Dementia. http://www.about-dementia.com/.2006.

Davis, Alison. "Stress -- it might be even worse than you think," a Summary of the Conference "Biology of Stress" co-sponsored by the OBSSR and NIGMS, April 12, 2006.

Huang, Cindy S., et al. "Common Molecular Pathways Mediate Long-Term Potentiation of Synaptic Excitation and Slow Synaptic Inhibition." Cell (Journal), Volume 123, Issue 1, 7 October 2005, Pages 105-118.

Pearce, Gillian. Depression Antidotes Newsletter. Thu, 15 Jul 1999-18:35:21 -0400.
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Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to

Words: 2115 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87064250



3.3 Data Collection

Is maternal UE3A active following iPS treatment: Data will be gathered on the iPS-treated mice via positron emission tomography, and in vivo brain slice preparation, and Western lot Analysis. H1 will essentially be ascertained following these tests.

Does iPS treatment rescue the motor and cognitive deficits associated with Angelman Syndrome: Data will be gathered from testing the treated mice in scientifically recognized tests of cognitive ability in a mouse model. This project proposes using the water maze test, the electric shock test, and the submerged platform test. H2 will effectively be answered using the data gleaned from these tests.

4. Conclusion

4.1. Potential Therapeutic and Other Considerations

The potential of using iPS treatment to rescue/alleviate the severe motor and cognitive deficits witnessed in Angelman Syndrome is theoretically viable. Reliable mouse models of AS exist with which to run the tests. The technology needed to tease iPS stem…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abuhatzira, L., Shemer, R., & Razin, A. (2009). MeCP2 involvement in the regulation of neuronal alpha-tubulin production. Human Molecular Genetics, 1415-1423.

Condic, M.L., & Rao, M. (2008). Regulatory Issues for Personalized Pluripotent Cells. Stem Cells, 2753-2758.

Dindot, S., Antalffy, B., Meenakshi, B., & Beaudet, A. (2008). The Angelman syndrome ubiquitin ligase localizes to the synapse and nucleus, and maternal deficiency results in abnormal dendritic spine morphology. Human Molecular Genetics, 111-118.

Dobkin, B. (2007). Behavioral, temporal, and spatial targets for cellular transplants as adjuncts to rehabilitation for stroke. Stroke, 832-839.
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Stem Cells Are a Hot Topic for

Words: 1341 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76797705

Stem cells are a hot topic for the media today because our understanding of them has potential for incredible scientific advances in the field of biotechnology, yet we struggle because there are questions of morality raised by the methods by which they might be used. While in centuries past, it was commonly accepted within the scientific community to vivisect the mentally insane or criminally convicted for the purpose of scientific knowledge, today religious groups are concerned about the fate of single stem cells being used in experiments. Stem cells have paved the way to cloning and bioengineering of humans, allowing scientists to "bring... A sperm and ovum together to create an embryo, harvesting the cells, and then discarding the embryo." (Celia) The concern for many people is that working with embryonic stem cells especially may somehow he breaching the rights of people and taking science to a point where it…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bell, H. (2000) "Case Study: The Uninsured" American Medical Student Association. < http://www.amsa.org/tnp/uninsured.cfm>

Calafut, T. (2000) "Emerging Applications in Human Stem Cell Therapy." Chemical Market Reporter, March 20.
Celia, F. (2001) "Stem Cell Controversy Heats Up Amid Advances in the Field." Medical Laboratory Observer, April. http://www.findarticles.com/cf_dls/m3230/4_33/74268498/p1/article.jhtml

Fraser, R. (2003) "AMA says use of stem cells for biomedical research is consistent with medical ethics" AMA Media Relations.
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Stem Cells Without a Doubt One of

Words: 2215 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2707824

Stem Cells

ithout a doubt, one of the most controversial topics of popular discourse is stem cell research. Indeed, one would be hard pressed to peruse the newspaper or magazine stand without encountering some reference to the global stem cell debate -- but what, exactly, are stem cells, and why are they so controversial?

Stem cells intended for use in human applications are harvested from humans, umbilical cords and embryos. The reason these cells are so valuable is because of their capability to produce or "become" other cell types -- for example, brain cells, heart cells, skin, etc. In short, these are "master cells," holding the ability to divide in cultures, and to be manipulated allowing it to transform into any type of cell. Of course, this is extremely important due to the fact that scientists can use this capability to either create organs (thereby helping to meet the tremendous…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hall, MiMi and Kiely, Kathy. "Proponents of Stem-Cell Research Put on Pressure." USA Today. Online. July 2001. 10 April 2002. Retrieved from Web site on 15 March, 2004<[

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washdc/july01/2001-07-27-stemcell.htm. Michael J. Fox Foundation.

Laino, Charlene. "Navel 'seeds' Sprout Brain Tissue." MSNBC. Online. Feb. 2002. 20 Feb 2002. Retrieved from Web site on 15 March, 2004 http://www.msnbc.com/news/532672.asp

Rosenberg, Samuel and Civin, Curt. "Scientific Debates Best Left to States." SunSpot.net. Online. April 2002. 09 April 2002. Retrieved from Web site on 15 March, 2004 http://sunspot.net/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.cloning05apr.story.htm
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Baldness and Thinning Hair Are Common and

Words: 1673 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66118409

aldness and thinning hair are common and the ultimate fate of almost all men and women as they age. In fact, hair loss is genetic in origin, and as we come to a greater understanding of the biology and genetics of hair loss, we are beginning to find novel solutions to this age-old "problem" of the human condition. We have come a long way from the treatments for hair loss in ancient Egypt, which used a mixture of crocodile fat and hippopotamus dung to combat baldness. Another ancient cure for baldness included eating fried leeches. Men have been attempting to treat their hair loss for over 5000 years, beginning in approximately 3500 C, when a list of treatments was passed on from generation to generation and incorporated into the medical libraries of Egyptian healers. In 1553 C, the Ebers Papyrus, discovered in Luxor, Egypt, suggested a baldness prescription of iron,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bruning, Nancy Paul. What You Can Do About Chronic Hair Loss (The Dell Medical Library) Dell, 1993.

Jacobs, Sheila. The Big Fall: Living With Hair Loss Next Century Books, 1992

Kobren, Spencer David; Eisman, Diane B; Eisman, Eugene H. The Bald Truth: The First Complete Guide to Preventing and Treating Hair Loss, Pocket Books. 2000

Kobren, Spencer David; Christiano, Angela. The Truth About Women's Hair Loss: What Really Works for Treating and Preventing Thinning Hair. Mcgraw Hill, 2000.
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Schizophrenia Affects the Brain Person & Family

Words: 1596 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79848685

Schizophrenia Affects the Brain, Person, & Family

This paper looks at the how schizophrenia affects the brain, the person, & the family, also looking at the history of the subject and its role within society. Bibliography cites four sources

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is one of a range of mental conditions that is widely misunderstood. May see it as a relatively recent disease, and the term has only been in use for about a century. However the condition is not new. This disease, which is one of the most disabling of the range of metal conditions, can be traced back for millennia. The first documented cases appears to have occurred in Ancient Egypt, where a discretion of the condition is described in the Eber papyrus, in the Book of Hearts (kasha, 1999). The condition was not understood in detail, and the treatment was usually incubation, this was an achieved by spending the…… [Read More]

Okasha A, (1999), Mental Health in the Middle East: An Egyptian Perspective. Clinical Psychology Review, 19, 8, 917-33

RXlist, (2002), [online] accessed at http://www.rxlist.com/

National Institute of Mental Health, (2002), [online] accessed at www.nimh.nih.gov
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Altering the Universe From Gutenberg to Biotech

Words: 1421 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35230641

Altering the Universe: From Gutenberg to Biotech

Revolution is in the air. hile the digital revolution is transforming our view of the universe, the biotech revolution has the potential to alter the universe itself. The parallel with the invention of the printing press and the Renaissance is clear. (Blake, 2001). "Gutenberg's and Caxton's inventions turned the world figuratively and intellectually upside down and heralded new patterns of human activity and organization that were inconceivable prior to the early 15th century." (Blake, 2001, pg. 9). One of the great achievements of that era was the quick adaptation of this communications revolution to every aspect of human life. Today, "we are at the beginning of a new Renaissance...." (Blake, 2001, pg. 9). One of the more controversial elements of this new Renaissance is stem cell research. There is perhaps no field fraught with more possibility along with questions of morality and medical…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000868504

Bartlett, Roscoe G. "Do Stem-Cell Research without Killing Embryos." Insight on the News 3 Sept. 2001: 44.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000903424

Blake, Christopher R.L. "A Different Reason for Worrying about Stem Cell Research." Matrix: The Magazine for Leaders in Higher Education Oct. 2001: 9.
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Stem Cells Since it Is

Words: 550 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80381147

The primary roles of adult stem cells in a living organism are to maintain and repair the tissue in which they are found." (Info 2006)

Adult stem cells are replicators in such a way that they are able to duplicate a variety of different cells. "Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body, serving as a sort of repair system...they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cell...each new cell has the potential to either remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell." (Info 2006).

Researchers tout the belief that a manipulation of stem cells can be beneficial in curing many diseases as well as helping in creating or developing new life, which could be part of the reason why such…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Info Center. (2006) In Stem Cell Information. National Institute for Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, www.stemcells.nih.gov/info.defaultpage, Accessed November 13, 2006
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Evidence-Based Care for Urinary Incontinence

Words: 2065 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99966280

The condition was shown to be the second-most common cause of older adults being institutionalized because of the inordinately demanding nature of caring for them that is typically beyond the ability of many spouses or other family members. In the final analysis, the chances of older adults suffering from urinary incontinence are fairly high given that the population will increasingly include older adults, many of whom will be among the very old.

eferences

Beling, J. (2004). Impact of service learning on physical therapist students' knowledge of and attitudes toward older adults and on their critical thinking ability. Journal of Physical

Therapy Education, 18(1), 13-14.

Burke, M. & Laramie, J.A. (2000). Primary care of the older adult: A multidisciplinary approach. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Ebersole, P. & Hess, P. (1999). Toward healthy aging: Human needs and nursing response.

St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Fantl, J.A., Newman, D.K., Colling, J. et al. (1996).…… [Read More]

References

Beling, J. (2004). Impact of service learning on physical therapist students' knowledge of and attitudes toward older adults and on their critical thinking ability. Journal of Physical

Therapy Education, 18(1), 13-14.

Burke, M. & Laramie, J.A. (2000). Primary care of the older adult: A multidisciplinary approach. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Ebersole, P. & Hess, P. (1999). Toward healthy aging: Human needs and nursing response.
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Stem Cell Policies Scientific Breakthrough

Words: 914 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78401625



This controversial decision drew all kinds of reactions from different groups on each side of the issue. Some adversaries of hESC research expressed admiration for the decision limiting research to existing cell lines, while others said that no research should be allowed under any circumstances. Advocates of hESC research, meanwhile, generally praised the president for allowing some research to go forward, but criticized the restriction to existing cell lines as too strict, questioning whether enough research would be allowed.

Current U.S. Stem Cell Policy under President Obama

The March 9, 2009 EO changes the way the National Institutes of Health (NIH) can support and conduct human stem cell research. The Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), through the NIH Director, is required to review existing NIH and other widely-recognized guidelines on human stem cell research and issue new NIH guidance within 120 days of the date of the EO…… [Read More]

Bibliography

AAAS Policy Brief: Stem Cell Research." 10 March 2009. American Association for the Advancement of Science. 27 March 2009 http://www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/briefs/stemcells/.

Executive Summary." 2009. The National Institutes of Health resource for stem cell research. 27 March 2009 http://stemcells.nih.gov/info/scireport/execSum.asp.

Register, Federal. "Presidential Documents Executive Order 13505." 11 March 2009. Federal Register. 24 March 2009 http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/pdf/E9-5441.pdf.
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Stem Cell Cience Must Be

Words: 852 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86882230



Unfortunately, a tremendous amount of valuable research has been put on hold ever since the ban of federal funding for stem cell research. In the United States, the vast majority of medical research of all types that eventually lead to cures for disease are funded by the federal government. The federal ban on stem cell research does not completely prohibit it, but the effect is nearly the same, just as it would be if the federal government withdrew funding for cancer or diabetes research.

The main opposition to stem cell research comes from the Religious Right who believe that any form of research using fetal stem cells is wrong, because according to their religious views, every fertilized human egg should be considered as much a human being as any living person, even a microscopic zygote consisting of nothing more than four cells of human tissue. Certainly, the concept of religious…… [Read More]

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Unethical Experimentation Issues and Concerns

Words: 4124 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77212600

(Freyhofer 104)

Globalizing clinical research has reportedly proven to be one solution for America's pharmaceutical paradox. Doctors prescribe more than 10 prescriptions for the average American each year. Only one person in 350, however, will submit themselves to be a participant in experimental drug testing. On the other side of the globe, however a profusion of under-treated, poor, physician-trusting patients who live in Latin America, Eastern Europe, and Southeast Asia provide the rapid, positive results needed for new drugs to receive quick approval. One review noted that 99% of controlled trials published in China netted positive results upon the drug/treatment being investigated. (Shah 23) In Nigeria during 2002, thirty Nigerian families filed a class-action suit against Pfizer, who allegedly violated the Nuremberg Code in 1996 as they presided over an experiment on Nigerian children suffering with meningitis. esearchers reportedly forced a risky, unapproved, experiment on unsuspecting subjects who, as a…… [Read More]

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Bagley, Margo A. "Patent First, Ask Questions Later: Morality and Biotechnology in Patent Law." William and Mary Law Review 45.2 (2003): 469+.

Chapter 14: The Federal Policy for Human Subject Protections (The Common Rule)." Retrieved 28 November 2006 at http://www. the.doe.gov/ohre/roadmap/achre/chap14_2.html.

Embryonic stem cell research fails in many ways to reader," The Times Leader, October 27, 2006.

Fence Post." Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL) 27 Aug. 2005: 16.