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Patients and Their Doctors Research

Words: 1747 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99275445

To wit, power is a huge influence in any social interaction, and in a study reported by the University of California Press (est, 2008, p. 87), men often interrupt women during conversations because men are generally viewed as the power in any male-female interaction. "Physicians interrupt patients disproportionately" in doctor-patient interactions, est writes, "except when the doctor is a 'lady'; then, "patients interrupt as much or more than physicians, and their interruptions seem to subvert physicians' authority" (est, p. 87). In other words, the stratification of male doctors having the power to interrupt is reversed when a woman is the doctor.

orks Cited

Blumer, Herbert. (1986). Symbolic Interactionism: Perspective and Method. Berkeley:

Breen, Catherine M., Abernethy, Amy P., Abbott, Katherine H., and Tulsky, James a. (2007).

Conflict Associated with Decisions to Limit Life-Sustaining Treatment in Intensive Care

Units. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 16(5), 283-289.

Donovan, Jenny L., and Blake,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blumer, Herbert. (1986). Symbolic Interactionism: Perspective and Method. Berkeley:

Breen, Catherine M., Abernethy, Amy P., Abbott, Katherine H., and Tulsky, James a. (2007).

Conflict Associated with Decisions to Limit Life-Sustaining Treatment in Intensive Care

Units. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 16(5), 283-289.
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Patient Centered Medical Home

Words: 1114 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 82102409

Patient-Centered Medical Home

Medical Home

How the Patient-Centered Medical-Home reducing cost and improving quality and safety for patients.

The patient centered medical home is a platform that fills a need in the current healthcare system. The U.S. healthcare system has been plagued for quite some time with a trend of substantially rising healthcare costs as well as another trend of slipping quality standards. These two trends are argued to be a phenomenon that has emerged at least partly from poor planning and ineffective use of resources. One solution to some of these issues can be found in the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model of primary care. This model has been developed with the coordination of long-term physician-patient relationships in mind. Developing these relationships further can not only reduce costs in unnecessary procedures that are the result of the missed opportunity for preventive care, but also have been shown to improve…… [Read More]

References

Christensen, E., Dorrance, K., Ramchandiani, S., Lynch, S., Whitmeore, C., Borsky, A., . . . Bickett, T. (2013). Impact of a Patient-Centered Medical Home on Access, Quality, and Cost. Military Medicine, 135-141.

Ewing, M. (2013). The Patient-Centered Medical Home Solution to the Cost-Quality Conundrum. Journal of Healthcare Management, 258-266.

Kern, L., Dhopeshwarker, R., Edwards, A., & Kaushal, R. (2013). Patient Experience Over Time in Patient-Centered Medical Homes. American Journal of Managed Care, 403-410.

Nielsen, M., Olayiwola, J., Grundy, P., & Grumbach, K. (2014). The Patient-Centered Medical Home's Impact on Cost & Quality. Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative, 1-38.
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Patient Noncompliance in Patients Advanced

Words: 4937 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 60710636



These studies demonstrate that there are several factors associated with patient noncompliance, regardless of the disease being treated. Medication side effects represent only one of these issues. Nurse practitioners could help to resolve many of these issues by being proactive and asking questions about side effects in patients at risk for becoming noncompliant. They may also be able to predict noncompliance in patients that are prescribed medications with known side effects. By informing the patient of the side effects and giving them practical ways to cope with them, the nurse practitioner can play an active role in helping to eliminate patient noncompliance.

Education was found to play an important role in patient noncompliance. The overall educational level of the patient was found to be important. The nurse practitioner can take positive action by being aware of the patient's overall educational background. Extra care must be taken with those of low…… [Read More]

References

Barber, N., Parsons, J., Clifford, S., Darracott, R., & Horne, R. (2004). Patients' problems with new medication for chronic conditions. Quality and Safety in Healthcare. 13(3): 172-175.

Chatterjee, J. (2006). From compliance to concordance in diabetes. Journal of Medical Ethics. 32(9): 507-510.

Chisholm, M., Lance, C. & Mulloy, L. (2005). Patient factors associated with adherence to immunosuppressant therapy in renal transplant recipients. American Journal of Health- System Pharmacy. 62 (17): 1775-1781.

Eastern, J. "Dismissing Patients Properly." 1 Jun 2006. OB/GYN News. Accessed 11 Sept. 2008.  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0CYD/is_/ai_n26906768 .
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Patients With Relevant Information Required

Words: 6307 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 62180402

Merrill, in the UK. Following his experience with heart surgery using innovating surgical techniques, the physician noted the problems he experienced in understanding all of his alternatives compared to a simpler earlier procedure, and finally trusted to the advice of his cardiologist to surgically intervene. In response to the experience, Dr. Merrill emphasized that, "As a physician talking to colleagues, I had the best information possible under the circumstances. But it wasn't the same as my hernia repair. The experience brought home to me the realization that the progress of medicine has made informed consent impossible -- even for me" (Merrill 1999: 190).

ationale of Study

Taken together, the foregoing issues indicate that there is an ongoing need for an assessment of knowledge levels of informed consent among perioperative nurses and operating department practitioners. Perioperative nurses and operating department practitioners, though, are frequently subjected to an enormous amount of stress…… [Read More]

References

Calloway, S.J. (2009) 'The Effect of Culture on Beliefs Related to Autonomy and Informed

Consent.' Journal of Cultural Diversity 16(2): 68-69.

Cobb, W.G. (2005) 'Defending the Informed Consent Case.' Defense Counsel Journal 72(4):

330-331.
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Patient Centered Medical Homes

Words: 3042 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30529280

Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMH) are often confused as being actual "homes" for patients to be admitted in and given medical treatment and care. PCMH is actually a health care model based on which health care is provided to patients, under the supervision of physicians. The PCMH model of health care provides patients with continuous, comprehensive medical care, in order to increase the chances of achieving the goal of benefitting the patient with as much attention and medical care in order to maximize his/her health outcomes.

Over the years the PCMH model of health care has become widely adopted and preferred. This is because of the philosophy and approach that the model adopts in organizing and delivering the health care initiatives. The PCMH model is based upon delivering medical care and attention to patients with team-based health and medical experts that are focused strongly on the quality and the safety…… [Read More]

Bibliography

109-432, P.L. (2006, December 20). TAX RELIEF AND HEALTH CARE ACT OF 2006. Public Law 109-432 (109th Congress) .

Backer, L.A. (2009). Building the Case for the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Family Practice Management 16 (1), 14-18.

De Geest, S., Moons, P., Callens, B., Gut, C., Lindpaintner, L., & Spirig, R. (2008). Introducing advanced practice nurses/nurse practitioners in health care systems: a framework for reflection and analysis. Swiss Medical Weekly (138), 621-628.

NASHP. (2013, April). Medical Home & Patient-Centered Care. Retrieved from The National Academy for State Health Policy:  http://www.nashp.org/med-home-map
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Patient Perceptions of Maternal HIV Testing Ob-Gyn

Words: 771 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 74299762

Patient Perceptions of Maternal HIV Testing

Ob-Gyn Maternal HIV Testing Study

Coleman et. al., (2009) Patient Perceptions of Obstetrician-gynecologists' Practices Related to HIV Testing. Maternal Child Health Journal 13: 355-363.

The study objectives were to identify the percentage of women who had been tested for HIV, explore the perceptions of women patients about HIV testing and ascertain their knowledge about their own HIV risk status, to determine the primary reasons patients refuse to be tested for HIV, and to learn what patients recall about how their obstetrician-gynecologists' introduced the topic of HIV testing.

The authors hypothesized that pregnant women, women seeking preconception care, and women with risk factors for HIV infection would recall their obstetrician-gynecologists recommending HIV testing" (Coleman, et al., 2009)

Overall research goal & recommendation. The purpose of the study was to identify if patient-physician communication about HIV risks and testing to pregnant women is consistent with current…… [Read More]

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Patient Guide to the Internet

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 63679863

There is also relevant information for specific sectors of society such as women and seniors. The MedlinePlus Magazine includes several links to asthma information. The bottom of the page includes links that contain information such as disclaimers, copyright, and privacy information. It also contains links that provide information on the contributors of information to the Website. The privacy statement clearly provides visitors and subscribers with the assurance that their information will not be shared. All the information on the site is therefore provided on the basis of full disclosure, both of the information itself and on information providers.

This Website is therefore very reliable, and also includes information on a myriad of other health topics, which will be helpful for Amy if she wants more information on her other conditions as well.

Suspicious Website: http://www.asthmaanswersonline.com/cures-asthma/

This Website indicates that asthma can in fact be cured. Prominently displayed at the top…… [Read More]

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Patient Perceptions the Literature Review

Words: 1775 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 94483043



Most of the literature deals with healthcare issues experienced in the United States or Europe. hat small amount of literature there is available on healthcare in Malaysia seldom has anything to do with the clinic(s) in specific. This study could help, in some small measure, to alleviate that problem.

orks Cited

Chowdhury, N., (1999) the Power of Towers, Fortune, Vol. 139, No. 7, pp. 110-112

Kurokawa, I., Takami, M., Cheriex, H., (1999) Futuristic flight plan - the Kuala Lumpur International Airport was designed for the new millennium, Lighting Design + Application, Vol. 29, No. 8, pp. 42-45

Manson, L.A., Baptist, a.J., (2002) Assessing the cost-effectiveness of provider-based status, Healthcare Financial Management, Vol. 56, No. 8, pp. 52-59

Romano, M., (2006) Physicians in pain, Modern Healthcare, Vol. 36, No. 4, p. 40

Shameen, a., (2004) Malaysia: Coining it in Kuala Lumpure - Start-up ECM Libra has capitalized on strong markets, hard…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chowdhury, N., (1999) the Power of Towers, Fortune, Vol. 139, No. 7, pp. 110-112

Kurokawa, I., Takami, M., Cheriex, H., (1999) Futuristic flight plan - the Kuala Lumpur International Airport was designed for the new millennium, Lighting Design + Application, Vol. 29, No. 8, pp. 42-45

Manson, L.A., Baptist, a.J., (2002) Assessing the cost-effectiveness of provider-based status, Healthcare Financial Management, Vol. 56, No. 8, pp. 52-59

Romano, M., (2006) Physicians in pain, Modern Healthcare, Vol. 36, No. 4, p. 40
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Relationship of Information Technology to Organizational Performance

Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 27136484

elationship of Information Technology to Organizational Performance

Enterprises have continually invested in information technologies (IT) to gain competitive advantages by improving their business processes, integrating and aggregating diverse databases, and then transforming the data into a competitive advantage. The paradox of how to invest in IT for an optimal return however has been elusive (Brynjolfsson, Hitt, 1998). Traditional measures of eturn on investment (OI), metrics and key performance Indicators (KPIs) have failed to scale from the operational sides of a business to the data- and knowledge-based processes and functions (Ko, Osei-bryson, 2008). Analysis of information technology investments and their contributions to a firm's financial performance illustrate that the selective use of IT to supplement strategies, not its en masse adoption, is a critical success factor (Osei-Bryson, Ko, 2004). Studies have shown that in a market duopoly characterized by slow to moderate growth, the automating of processes and strategies has the…… [Read More]

References

Barrett, J.. (2007, November). Demand-Driven is an Operational Strategy. Industrial Management, 49(6), 14-19,5.

Brynjolfsson, Erik, & Hitt, Lorin. (1996). Paradox lost? Firm-level evidence on the returns to information systems spending. Management Science, 42(4), 541.

Erik Brynjolfsson, & Lorin M. Hitt. (1998). Beyond the productivity paradox. Association for Computing Machinery. Communications of the ACM, 41(8), 49-55.

Sanjeev Dewan, & Chung-ki Min. (1997). The substitution of information technology for other factors of production: A firm level analysis. Management Science, 43(12), 1660-1675.
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Relationships and Expectations

Words: 673 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35110679

elationships and expectations form one of the three main domains of the PEN-3 model. These three factors, perceptions, enablers, and nurturers, refer to the cultural component of health-seeking behaviors. The relationships and expectations domain can inform healthcare workers about how to encourage health-seeking behaviors in patients, and is a culturally sensitive approach. The PEN-3 concept shows how culture is a major determinant of both individual and public health.

Perceptions refer to the individual's perceptions about health, disease, medication, doctors, and healthcare systems. The perceptions are related directly to the cultural values, beliefs, and norms that are already embedded in the community. Individual and collective group health behaviors may be strongly determined by perceptions. For example, is there a perception that heart disease is not a serious problem in the African-American community? Or, is there a perception that healthcare is too expensive, or that doctors are too paternalistic? Perceptions might also…… [Read More]

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010) A Closer Look at African-American Men and High Blood Pressure Control: A Review of Psychosocial Factors and Systems-Level Interventions. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved November 1, 2011 from  http://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/docs/African_American_Executive_Summary.pdf 

Perez, M.A. & Luquis, R.R. (2008). Cultural Competence in Health Education and Health Promotion. John Wiley & Sons.

US Department of Health & Human Services [USDHHS], Maternal Child Health Bureau [MCHB] (2009). Core Concepts in Cultural Competence. Retrieved November 1, 2011 from  http://support.mchtraining.net/national_ccce/case0/home.html
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Patient's Rights and Responsibilities Why

Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 73896830

2).

A Patient's Rights

There are a number of lists to go by when it comes to the patient's "Bill of Rights," including a patient's rights under the Affordable Care Act. In the American Cancer Society "Patient's Bill of Rights" it begins with the right every patient has to "…accurate and easily-understood information about your health plan, health care professionals, and health care facilities' (www.cancer.org). Of course a patient also has the right to choose health care providers and when it comes to emergency services, a patient has a right to be "…screened and stabilized using emergency services" when injured or seriously ill; so that when one's health is in jeopardy, access to emergency services can be a vital and stabilizing experience (www.cancer.org).

A patient also has the right to be part of decisions regarding what treatment is appropriate, and a patient has a right to be respected and treated…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Cancer Society. (2011). Patient's Bill of Rights: What is the Patient's Bill of Rights?

Retrieved July 31, 2012, from  http://www.cancer.org .

Torrey, Trisha. (2010). Patient's Responsibilities. About.com. Retrieved July 31, 2012, from  http://patients.about.com .
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Relationship Issues Support Group

Words: 1817 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 18945161

elationship Problems Support Group

Support groups are usually created to bring together individuals facing similar problems or issues such as relationship problems. The concept behind the formulation of a support group is that members can get help for their issues through talking with others in a similar situation. In this case, relationship problems support group exist so that people facing relationship issues can share their experiences and advice each other on how to handle them. Support groups help individuals deal with their problems through providing better ways of coping and making members feel less isolated as they make important connections with others in the same situation. While relationship problems support groups are not group therapy sessions, they help members to deal with relational issues through providing emotional support and shared experiences.

Historical Context

A support group is basically defined as a gathering of individuals who share similar interests or concerns…… [Read More]

References

Mayo Clinic Staff. (n.d.). Support Groups: Make Connections, Get Help. Retrieved August 22, 2016, from  http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/support-groups/art-20044655 

Peretti, A.G., Martins, P.P.S. & Guanaes-Lorenzi, C. (2013). The Management of Social Problems Talk in a Support Group. Psicologia & Sociedade, 25. Retrieved from  http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0102-71822013000500012 

"Relationship Support Group."(n.d.). Divorce Dialogue. Retrieved August 22, 2016, from http://www.divorcedialogue.com/relationship-support-group-home.php

Sroufe et al. (2000). 5 Relationships, Development, and Psychopathology. In Handbook of developmental psychopathology (2nd ed). Arnold J. Sameroff, Michael Lewis, and Suzanne M. Miller (Eds). Retrieved August 22, 2016, from  http://www.psychology.sunysb.edu/attachment/online/sroufe_rel_pathology.pdf
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Nurse-Patient Relations the Main Focus of This

Words: 2161 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77240679

Nurse-Patient Relations

The main focus of this essay is going to concern the nurse-patient relationship idea, and why it is important. This was chosen because the researcher desired to achieve a better accepting of how a helpful nurse-patient relationship can be advanced and even from different theorists who have discovered this idea. In this essay, the researcher sets out to demonstrate what they have learnt regarding the nurse-patient relation concept and how this connection can utilized in the clinical practice setting. T The nurse patient connection, according to a study done by Press Gamey Associates Inc., creates the quality of the care experience and generates an influential influence on patient gratification. Nurses will a lot of their time with patients. Patients see nurses' relations with people among the care team and make their own conclusions about the hospital founded on what they are observing. Furthermore, nurses' approaches toward their vocation,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berdes, C. & . (2001). Race relations and caregiving relationships: A qualitative examination of perspectives from residents and nurses aides in three nursing homes. Research on Aging, 23(1), 109-126.

Biering, P. (2002). Caring for the involuntarily hospitalized adolescent: The issue of power in the nurse-patient relationship. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, 16(2), 65-74.

Heijkenskjold, K.B. (2010). The patients dignity from the nurses perspective. Nursing Ethics, 6(3), 313-24.

LaSala, C.A.-B. (2007). The role of the clinical nurse specialist in promoting evidence-based practice and effecting positive patient outcomes. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 38(6), 262-70.
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Care Issler Is a Patient Who Recently

Words: 1314 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36359617

Care:

Issler is a patient who recently moved with his daughter-in-law who is no longer married to his son. As part of her interest in helping to take care of Mr. Issler, she noticed that he was pale and diaphoretic after a two and a half hour flight. The daughter-in-law took him to an emergency room where he was attended to by a cardiologist and set a follow-up check up for an echo cardiogram next week. Mr. Issler has complained of congestive heart failure and a history of deep vein thrombosis. The cardiologist recommended that he seeks out a primary care provider and check up of his thyroid. As the primary care provider, the patient has also expressed his uncertainties on whether he has hyper of hypo thyroidism though he has been under thyroid medication for several years. In addition to being very pale, he has a large bag of…… [Read More]

References:

Bray, D.L. (n.d.). Thyroid Storm and the AACN Synergy Model. Journal of Nursing. Retrieved from http://rnjournal.com/journal-of-nursing/thryoid-storm-and-the-aacn-synergy-model

Drewes at. al. (2012, October). The Effectiveness of Chronic Care Management for Heart Failure: Meta-Regression Analyses to Explain the Heterogeneity in Outcomes. Health Services Research, 47(5), 1926-1959.

Hardin, S. & Hussey, L. (2003, February). AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care Case Study of a CHF Patient. Critical Care Nurse, 23(1), 73-76. Retrieved from  http://ccn.aacnjournals.org/content/23/1/73.full.pdf 

Kaplow, R. & Reed, K.D. (2008). The AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care: A Nursing
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Effects of Outside Interference With the Therapeutic Relationship

Words: 1927 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15862546

Therapeutic elationship

An Analysis of the Potential Detrimental Effects of Interference with the Therapeutic elationship

Virtually any type of treatment setting requires an effective therapeutic relationship to succeed. Therefore, this research paper will examine the potential detrimental effects on the client and the therapeutic relationship when an outside person interferes with the therapy in general, and the following two scenarios in particular: 1) the patient's family, friend, or significant other(s) do not refrain from intervening in the therapeutic relationship once it has begun; and, 2) once the patient develops an affectionate relationship with the therapist, the family member, friend, or significant other develops jealousy and attempts to destroy or undermine the therapeutic relationship. To this end, a discussion of what steps practitioners can take when these events interfere with the therapeutic relationship is followed by a summary of the research and recommendations for clinicians in the conclusion.

eview and Discussion…… [Read More]

References

Adam, E., Egeland, B., Korfmacher, J., & Ogawa, J. (1997). Adult attachment: Implications for the therapeutic process in a home visitation intervention. Personality and Social

Psychology Review, 1(1), 43.

Andolphi M., & Angelo C. (1988). Towards constructing the therapeutic system. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 14(3), 237-47.

Carroll, K.M., Connors, G.J., Dermen, K.H., Diclemente, C.C., Frone, M.R., & Kadden, R.
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Therapeutic Relationships Within the Medical

Words: 967 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86828533

The goals are what the client hopes will happen because of the care needed -- and the bond the specifics that need to be met in order to meet those goals (iddowson, 2010, 83).

The Transference/Countertransference Section -- ithin this section of the therapeutic relationship, transference and countertransference are phenomenons in which feelings between the client and caregiver are directed and redirected to one another. This has been part of clinical psychology since Jung, and may be both harmful or positive. ithin the caregiver model, it is usually heightened empathy for the patient, with the client, a feeling of greater emotional bonding to the caregiver than that of a professional relationship (iener, 2009).

The Real Relationship -- This is the ideal outcome, the real or personal relationship between client and caregiver. It may, of course, include deception on the part of the caregiver or therapist depending on the actuality of…… [Read More]

Watson, J. (1997). The Theory of Human Caring: Retrospective and Prospective. Nursring Science Quarterly, 10(1), 49-52.

Widdowson, M. (2010). Transactional Analysis: 100 Key Points and Techniques. New York: Taylor and Francis.

Wiener, J. (2009). The Therapeutic Relationship: Tranference, Countertranference. Austin, TX: Texas a&M Univeristy.
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Role of Nurse as Patient

Words: 960 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 95621203

(Hummelvoll, 1996, p. 13)

The professional relationship that the client has with the nurse is often one of the most fundamental of all the relationships the client has in his or her life. The nurse can act as an advocate between the client and other health care professional as well as an advocate for the client with his or her own family. The holistic needs of the client are often met through this and other relationships, when they are strong, consistent and productive.

A an authentic caring relationship between clients and nurses. This relationship stimulates mutual empowerment and helps the client pass through the conglomerate of not easily accessible helping systems in the United States. The purpose of this reciprocal and chosen partnership is to increase the client's safety and quality of life. Here too, empowerment is a means to better health, with the nurse acting as the client's advocate,…… [Read More]

Resources

Hummelvoll, J.K. (1996) "The Nurse-Client Alliance Model." Perspectives in Psychiatric Care. 32/4, pp.12-17.

Vuckovich, P.K. (2000) "The Ethics of Involuntary Procedures." Perspectives in Psychiatric Care. 36 / 4. p.111.
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Nursing Client Relationships and How the Study

Words: 4324 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72371497

nursing client relationships and how the study is a valid research for practitioners. It has 26 sources in Harvard Style.

esearch titles must be limited to fifteen words. In this case the author has exceeded the limitation by one count which is negligible. The importance of relevance of the title to the body of the research is that it must collaborate with the core study area. In the first line the author has already specified the relationship of the nurse-client at the beginning and categorizes it as a "partnership" whereas the title of the study must not reveal the results or even the anticipated results.

Authors and Abstracts

The authors T. Hostick and F. McClelland both the authors indicate in their abstract that the article aim in establishing nursing behavior when they are engaged in a nurse-client relationship. The abstract though is limited in expressing the content of the study…… [Read More]

References

Hostick, T. & McClelland, F. 2002, Partnership: a co-operative inquiry between Community Mental Health Nurses and their clients. 2. The nurse-client relationship. Journal of Psychiatry and Mental Health Nursing 9, 111-117.

Beyea, S.C. 1997, Research utilization begins with learning to read research reports, Research Corner, AORN, February. Accessed on 29-9-2003 at  http://www.aorn.org/journal/research/rc297.htm 

Author not available, 2003, Reading Nursing Research to Critique a Study and to Summarize Findings for Use in Practice, Available at http://classes.kumc.edu/son/NURS460smith/460critiquingreseach.html

Forchuk, C. 1989, Establishing a Nurse-Client Relationship. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing vol.27,no.2. Available at http://willmar.ridgewater.mnscu.edu/library/338271.htm
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Critcal Analysis Paper on Patient'satisfaction

Words: 1460 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 78256183

patient satisfaction with the care provided by nursing staff and physicians, as well as how satisfaction can be improved through better communication among physicians and nurses, and with their patients. It will, in particular, deal with a nursing student's own clinical experience with patients and their perception of healthcare provider-patient communication. In addition, the paper will examine the student's project which considered the strategy of updating white boards in patient rooms regularly for better communication.

Ten medical surgical ward patients were interviewed during rounds by a student, who rated patient satisfaction and tried to discover some common theme. While patients expressed satisfaction with how nursing staff delivered care, they felt physicians didn't keep them informed. A number of patients were visited by two or more doctors. However, there was no communication between doctors, leading to issues such as a patient being marked "not ready for surgery" by the cardiologist, owing…… [Read More]

References

(2008). Home - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Improving Patient-Staff Communication Through White Boards - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Retrieved August 6, 2016, from  http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/articles-and-news/2008/06/improving-patient-staff-communication-through-white-boards.html 

(n.d.). Institute for Healthcare Communication. Impact of Communication in Healthcare - Institute for Healthcare Communication. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from  http://healthcarecomm.org/about-us/impact-of-communication-in-healthcare/ 

(2011). JBI COnNECT+. Effective communication between registered nurses and adult oncology patients in inpatient settings. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from  http://connect.jbiconnectplus.org/Viewsourcefile.aspx?0=7112 

(n.d.). Journal of Nursing - RN Journal. The Importance of Communication and Education toward Patient Literacy. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from http://rnjournal.com/journal-of-nursing/the-importance-of-communication-and-education-toward-patient-literacy
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Duties as a Nurse Practitioner How to Counsel a Patient

Words: 1737 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12300572

Ethical Scenario: Skills as a Nurse Practioner

Nurses and other health care suppliers are the ones that are continuously confronted to make ethical choices in regards to things like life and death matters in giving out care to individuals, communities and families. To be pertinent and ethical, these choices need to be measured in the larger context of personal, societal, cultural and professional values and ethical ideologies. As scientific and medical technology advance, persons and society look at dilemmas and hard ethical choices. Nurses, as part of society and as frontline health care specialists, day-to-day face ethical dilemmas connected to life and death and fairness in health care. With that said, this paper examines the scenario of patient and nurse utilizing ethical principles.

As a nurse, the first thing to do is to understand that an unintended pregnancy further confuses the already confusing physical and mental changes of teens. Adolescents…… [Read More]

References

Begley A.M., 2. (2008). Truth-telling, honesty and compassion: a virtue-based exploration of a dilemma in practice. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 8, 336-341.

Lawlor, A. (2015, July 29). Morning-after pill poses moral dilemma for some MDs. Retrieved from  http://www.consciencelaws.org/background/procedures/birth008.aspx 

Marsh, B. (2015, July 29). Nurses' fear for morning-after pill. Retrieved from Daily Mail:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-179092/Nurses-fear-morning-pill.html 

RN, M.S. (2013). The Ethical Component of Nursing Education: Integrating Ethics into Clinical Experiences. LWW; 1 edition.
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Nursing Philosophy Patient Centered

Words: 1185 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30973463

Nursing Philosophy

Perhaps the most fundamental tenet of my nursing philosophy is the administration of care in an intrinsically empathetic manner which benefits the patient. I unequivocally believe in patient-centered care and that nurses who are able to maintain this component of their practice as their primary goal are able to produce the greatest efficacy in administering to patients. Moreover, with all of the concerns of the contemporary healthcare market, including various facets of financial and technological concern, the shortage of various practitioners, and innovations in precision medicine, it is easy to forget that the most vital component of the health care industry is the patients themselves. Quite simply, patients have the most to gain and lose from the health care system. Therefore, I readily believe that keeping those patients as the center of the care delivered by me and others within my profession is the best way we can…… [Read More]

References

Andrist, C., Nicholas, P. and Wolf, K. (2006). The Evolution of the Environment Paradigm in Nursing. A history of nursing ideas (pp. 97- 108). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Bourdeau, M. Auguste Comte. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2015/entries/comte/ 

McEvoy, L., Duffy, A. (2008). Holistic practice -- a concept analysis. Nurse Education in Practice. 8, 412-419.

Zborowsky, T. (2014). The legacy of Florence Nightingale's environmental theory: nursing research focusing on the impact of healthcare environments. Health Environments Research & Design Journal. 7(4), 19-34.
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Role of Hourly Nurse Rounds in Reducing Falls Pressure Ulcers Call Lights Patient Satisfaction

Words: 3560 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59174424

hourly nurse rounds help to reduce falls, pressure ulcers, call light use and contribute to rise in patient satisfaction base on evidence base practice

The healthcare center is faced with numerous challenges affecting clinical results and client satisfaction (e.g., ulcers, use of call light and falls). The above challenges have brought on the need to develop and institute an appropriate framework to improve patient care delivery by means of better and increased interaction between patients and nurses. Chiefly, the creation of this sort of system necessitates striving for required authorization and assistance from leaders and staff members in the organization. This involves meeting with top management at organization appraisal board meetings, in addition to collaborating with peers concerning existing best practices for handling the issue. Taking into account organizational issues and nursing-related evidence-based practices (EBPs), the best answer to dealing with current issues is hourly nurse rounds. Implementing this recommended…… [Read More]

References

AIPPG (2011). Comfort theory. Nursing Theories. Retrieved September 5, 2015 from  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/comfort_theory_Kathy_Kolcaba.html 

Brosey, L., & March, K. (2015).Effectiveness of Structured Hourly Nurse Rounding on Patient Satisfaction and Clinical Outcomes. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 30(2), 153-159. doi:10.1097/ncq.

Carroll, D., Dykes, P., & Hurley, A. (2010). Patients' perspectives of falling while in an acute care hospital and suggestions for prevention. Applied Nursing Research, 23(4), 238-241. doi:10.1016/j.apnr.2008.10.003

Deitrick, L., Baker, K., Paxton, H., Flores, M., & Swavely, D. (2012).Hourly Rounding. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 27(1), 13-19. doi:10.1097/ncq.0b013e318227d7dd
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Patient's General Health Been - The Patient

Words: 704 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21022655

patient's general health been? - The Patient, Mr. Jones has generally been good but with frequent cases of heart complications. The situation has been deteriorating over time.

Any colds in past years that required absences from work?-None

Most important things you do to keep healthy? -- regular jogging exercise and being a vegetarian

Accidents (home, work, driving)?-Twice when the patient experienced a heart attack

In past, has it been easy to find ways to follow suggestions from physicians or the nurses? Yes

F. If appropriate: what do you think caused the illness? I believe the illness was caused by the kind of lifestyle that I had (smoking and eating high cholesterol meals while also leading a sedentary life)

g. If necessary: outline the things important to you in your health care? How can we be most helpful? I require hypertensives and advice on how to live a healthy life

Examination…… [Read More]

References

Gordon, M. (2000). Manual of nursing diagnosis: 1995- 1996. St. Louis: Mosby.

Gordon, M. (1994). Nursing diagnosis: Process and application (3rd ed.). St. Louis: Mosby;
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Relationship Risk Insurance 2 Determine Ethical Concerns

Words: 2350 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63912389

relationship risk insurance. 2. Determine ethical concerns health care management / administrators professionals contend resulting supply demand insurance. 3.

elationship between risk and insurance

isk is defined as the potential of a certain activity or action that would lead to any loss occurring Seog, 2010.

The term risk can also express the probability of a particular outcome occurring following a particular exposure. The potential losses that might occur due an unfavorable cause are also referred to as risk. The probability that damage, liability, loss, injury, or another negative occurrence that is mostly caused by internal or external vulnerabilities, and can be avoided by taking some preemptive actions is also referred to as risk. In insurance terminology, risk is defined as the situation where there is some probability of an action that is known occurring, but when it might occur in unknown. For example, a person might fall sick, but when…… [Read More]

References

Dionne, G. (2000). Handbook of insurance. Dordrecht, the Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Finn, M.J., & University, M.S. (2007). Health Care Demand in Michigan: An Examination of the Michigan Certificate of Need Acute Care Bed Need Methodology. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University.

Mankiw, N.G. (2009). Principles of economics. Cheriton House, North Way, Andover, Hampshire, SP10 5BE: South-Western Cengage Learning.

Paolucci, F. (2011). Health Care Financing and Insurance: Options for Design. London WC1X 8HB: Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
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Patient Autonomy

Words: 1416 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85670763

Patient Autonomy

The concept of patient autonomy, as opposed to medial paternity, is one that has gained much ground in recent years; "... about 30 years ago, issues began to appear that were difficult to solve using traditional ethics. New medical and reproductive technologies, research controversies, and a societal ethos that questioned all authority posed difficult questions." (Czaplyski, Larry, 2002)

At issue in this paper is the meaning and significance of patient autonomy and the way in which is relates to medical paternity. As the discussion will outline, the case for patient autonomy is not only ethically valid but also essential for the moral and practical balance in the medical profession. Underlying this view is the fact that the issue of patient autonomy does not exist in isolation or in the medical field alone - but relates to other issues and ethical problems in the society at large. These larger…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bernstein Maurice, (2004) Social/Political Paternalism vs. Patient Autonomy.

Retrieved October 4, 2004 from Bioethics Discussion Blog: Web site: http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2004/07/socialpolitical-paternalism-vs.-patient.html

Bradley, Gerard V. (1989). "Does autonomy require informed and specific

Refusal of life-sustaining medical treatment." Issues in Law & Medicine, December 22, 1989. Czaplyski, Larry. (2002)
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Relationship between NP Student and Preceptor

Words: 671 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38047730

An efficacious preceptorship is centered on establishing a relationship and outlining expectations. This takes into account offering a strong basis to cultivate and sustain an effective level of mutuality for setting up a working relationship with the nursing practitioner student. It is imperative to note that this relationship is beneficial to both parties. On one hand, the preceptor attains greater competence in rendering service whereas for the NP student, he or she develops clinical expertise and leadership. Directed clinical learning experiences are vital to nurse practitioner education. The objective is to make certain that clinicians are prepared to manage care with ideal health results. The use of preceptors has substantiated to be a vastly beneficial approach for clinical education. It permits education to be customized, connects classroom knowledge to actual patient management issues and complications, and offers for role modeling as the student cultivates principles and approaches for practice (Burns…… [Read More]

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Patient Negligence and Nursing Malpractice

Words: 1859 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91885317

Responsibilities of Nurses to Patients

Why is it important

The role of nurses has a direct implication on the patients. For example, nurses observe and provide direct care to the patients. The physicians give orders and thus are the role of the nurses to implement (Aiken et al., 2014). Often, the work of the physicians is not complete without the help of the nurses. The nurses are responsible for changing clothes and giving the medications to patients. Often, the patients are unable to do basic tasks, and therefore the roles of nurses become very important. Nurses keep medical records for the patients and therefore give medications to the patients in time and monitor their progress.

Another important role of the nurse is assessing the response of the patients to medications. Keep the records for the progress of patients is an invaluable practice. The records help the nurses to monitor how…… [Read More]

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Patient Is a 35-Year-Old Male He Was

Words: 2109 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 70723968

patient is a 35-year-old (male?), he was diagnosed with diabetes twenty five years ago at the age of ten years old, he claims that this is hereditary in his family. He has one sister who has Type 2 diabetes and a brother who has type 1 diabetes. He manages his diabetes and other illnesses from home and through a medical clinic; for most of his life he has known he has diabetes and manages to regulate it through insulin shots, glucose tablets as well as through the right nutrition, however he claims that this is difficult and there are most days where he experiences draw backs. Many complications have arisen from his diabetes. This patient was selected because of the certain case he has in regards to his diabetes and other complications which had developed from it. His treatment and management also includes an extensive study. At the young age…… [Read More]

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Patient's History Taking Is a

Words: 1273 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 60508163



Critique

The article was written quite comprehensively and gave enough information about the different aspects of history taking. The way all the different components of the history taking process were split up and explained in more detail was very helpful. It was noted that the entire information in this article was present in a rather organized way. This organized way of presenting the details helped in teaching the history taking process and left less ambiguity. One thing that could have been improved is that common mistakes in the history taking process should have been mentioned. Surely with the amount of research done on this topic, the common mistakes and questions would have been figured out. If the commonly made errors are highlighted in these articles, then those errors are less likely to be repeated by other nurses as well.

This article did interest me as it provided me with a…… [Read More]

References

Crumbie, A. (2006). Taking a History. In: Walsh, M. eds. (2006). Practitioners: Clinical Skiiis and Proffesional Issues. 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Butterworth-Heinemann, pp. 14-26.

Dougias, G., Nicoi, F. And Robertson, C. (2005). Madead's Ciinicoi Examination. 11th ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.

Kurtz, S., Benson, J., Draper, J. And Silverman, J. (2003). Marrying content and process in clinical method teaching: enhancing the Calgary-Cambridge guides. Academic Medicine, 78 (8), pp. 802-809.

Lloyd, H. And Craig, S. (2007). A guide to taking a patient's history. Nursing Standard, 22 (13), pp. 42-48.
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patient named Eliza

Words: 1284 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34952976

Part 1    

Eliza, a patient aged eighteen, is enrolled at the City University and resides in a dorm with friends. The patient is currently seeking treatment for stress/anxiety and low self-image (Eliza Intake Document Provided by Customer). Eliza has not indicated any life stressors. Her father, Burt, drives a truck for a living, whereas her mom, Joan, is an elementary school secretary. While the father-daughter relationship appears to be quite strong, Eliza appears to have issues that need working on, when it comes to her relationship with her mother. As of now, Eliza is not taking any mental health medication. 
Psychosocial assessment forms a key component of all nursing evaluation, as it aids nursing professionals by informing the disorder management and patient care plan. Individuals usually display diverse kinds of surgical or medical issues. Further, social or psychological aspects might impact their adherence to therapy and their recovery (Conducting…… [Read More]

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Patient Was Admitted Due to a Broken

Words: 1175 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90551981

patient was admitted due to a broken hip which required a total hip replacement (TH). This injury has required two weeks of in-hospital rehabilitation to this point, and Mr. Trosak will probably need more physical rehabilitation to completely recover from the injury. Since there are secondary concerns (such as some loss of cognitive function (text, 462)) after a fall, it will be necessary to monitor M. Trosak. The falling incident could also reoccur due to the fact that the patient resides on the second floor of his apartment building. It will be necessary to ensure that Mr. Trosak understands the risk of a recurrence, and that he has sufficient assistance.

Prior to being hospitalized for the fall, Mr. Trosak was not taking any prescription medication, and he has not had a physical examination for more than ten years. While admitted, the patient was found to have chronic hypertension, which is…… [Read More]

References

Smith, M., & Segal, J. (2011). Depression in older adults and the elderly. Retrieved from  http://www.helpguide.org/mental/depression_elderly.htm 

Vanwanseele, B. (2009). To rehab or not to rehab following a total hip replacement. Retrieved from  http://sydney.edu.au/research/opportunities/opportunities/561 

Text.
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Relationship between effective communication and productivity

Words: 1142 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49596771


The purpose of effective communication is to co-ordinate efforts towards achieving team goals, enhancing quality of meetings for information to be shared, decisions collectively made, and for there to be shared understanding about the tasks to be performed. A necessary component of team work is establishing shared meaning of the work, and appropriate means of delivering high quality consumer care (Borrill et.al, 2000).

Effective healthcare centers heavily rely on effective communication for them to live up to their missions. Productivity at the workplace improves when information flawlessly flows from one level to another. It leads to more tasks completed, consequently leading to the fulfillment of goals. In the workplace too, effective communication usually has a positive effect on employee performance through increased morale, higher retention rates and the overall productivity at the workplace. According to Aramyan (2015), it also leads to reduced misunderstandings, increased empowerment and truthfulness, as well as…… [Read More]

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Patient Analysis for a Nurse Practitioner

Words: 2113 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58240668

1. Subjective
Patient’s chief complaint, reason for visit
Ms. Richards arrived complaining that she was experiencing severe anal pain, so much so that using a tissue was also proving impossible. She claimed the pain began a couple of days earlier and has aggravated considerably since.
History of Present Illness
Ms. Richards arrived complaining of anal pain which commenced a couple of days earlier and has aggravated since. With regard to her intimate relationships, Ms. Richards states that though she has a boyfriend, their relationship isn’t serious as the two are also seeing other people. According to internal assessment reports, patient has normal hair distribution, an intact perineum, and intact urethral meatus without any discharge or inflammation. However, patient experiences unbearable pain on vaginal opening palpation, redness, and edema. Further, a mass has been identified on the right, with spontaneous, dark-yellow, smelly secretion with palpation over the Bartholin's glands.
Physical examination…… [Read More]

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Patient and Coworker

Words: 341 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58254297

Communication Discussion Board Response

I would have to respectfully disagree with the idea that communication is mainly about being clear in one's verbal and nonverbal language. A nurse can clearly communicate how to follow a healthy diet to a diabetic -- or the need to stay clean to a drug addict -- but unless the nurse comprehends the patient's own view of his or her situation, such as the real medical need to follow the diet or the dangers of drug abuse, communication has not transpired in an effectual fashion. It is just as important that the nurse understand the patient's body language, to assess whether he or she is listening, and to ask the patient to restate the treatment plan, and to repeat what he or she feels about his or her condition.

Discussion

You make a very important point that the process of communicating with patients isn't about…… [Read More]

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Relationships and Expectations

Words: 516 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62322483

Christy had some preconceived notions about Roamni people and their motivations, habits, and lifestyle. Being proactive rather than reactive is the best way to deal with different cultural practices and beliefs. Christy could educate herself regarding the cultural practices of bathing, cleanliness, eating etc. This information is available on the internet. Typically when faced with medical condition that a nurse, aide or physician is unfamiliar with it is a common practice to research it. This practice should extend to dealing with certain cultural groups one has not encountered. Obviously, she should have changed the water, sponge, and washed herself after touching the patient's lower body in clear view of the patient's relatives. Perhaps a better approach would have been to offer the patient's family the opportunity to participate in the care of the patient and perform some of these functions or to ask them how she should care for the…… [Read More]

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Patients and Nursing

Words: 900 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94082455

Health Screening

Biographical Data

Cathy is a 17-year-old female. She is suffering from a certain amounts of loneliness and depression (DSM-IV). This is because her mother died in Iraq 10 years ago when serving in the Army eserves. She is currently living with her uncle and often deals with these issues from not being able to talk to her mother. She never knew her father and has no way to contact him. To account for them, she hides her feelings by turning to social networking sites as a way to connect with others. In the process, she places her entire life history for everyone to see and often takes pictures of herself. At the same time, she was elected class President and hides these feelings by being engaged in variety of activities (such as: Future Business Leaders of America and track). Yet, underneath it all, she feels like the world…… [Read More]

References

Ackley, B. (2013). Nursing Diagnosis Handbook. Maryland Heights, MO: Elsiever.

Ladwig, L. (2013). Mosby's Guide to Nursing Diagnosis. Maryland Heights, MO: Elsiever.
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Relationship of Eating Disorders Self-Esteem

Words: 6071 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 52017394

These suppositions allow the researcher to view the world from a certain perspective while ignoring other perspectives. The researcher in this study assumes that his subjects are logical human beings who have a rationale point-of-view. Their thinking is valid and reasonable and their approach is more or less along the lines of scientific thinking. In addition, we assume that commonsense thinking and scientific thinking are more or less identical in nature. With these assumptions in mind, we take a post-positivism philosophical foundation; as in line with Trochim (2000) post-positivism is the outright denial of positivism (which argues that the laws of the nature are perfunctory and therefore deductive reasoning can be the only suitable approach to comprehend nature) and presupposes that day-to-day human and scientific reasoning are more or less the same and in order to understand reality, researchers have to use not only deductive but also inductive reasoning (Trochim,…… [Read More]

References:

Bailer UF, Frank GK, Henry SE et al. (2005). Altered brain serotonin 5-HT1A receptor binding after recovery from anorexia nervosa measured by positron emission tomography. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62, 1032-1041.

Bloks H, Hoek HW, Callewaert I et al. (2004). Stability of personality traits in patients who received intensive treatment for a severe eating disorder. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 192, 129-138.

Bulik CM, Klump KL, Thornton L. et al. (2004). Alcohol use disorder comorbidity in eating disorders: a multicenter study. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 65, 1000-1006.

Byrne, B. (2000) Relationships between Anxiety, Fear Self-Esteem, and Coping Strategies in Adolescence. Adolescence. 35. 137.
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Patient Specific Assessment and Alarm Fatigue

Words: 2771 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 17727235

Alarm Fatigue

Theories in nursing generally center on the relationship of four concepts -- nursing, environment, person and health. These concepts are interrelated and impact one another in diverse ways, often seen in issues of nursing when problems arise that require analysis. The issue of alarm fatigue is one problem in nursing that touches on each of these four concepts. Alarm fatigue can be defined as exhaustion that occurs for nurses when they are exposed to many alarms throughout their shift, which causes "sensory overload" and the nurses to develop a "non-existent response to alarms" (Horkan, 2014, p. 83). Complacency and dissension can follow in the nursing workplace as too many alarms for nurses can render them unresponsive.

Alarms are needed in nursing because they alert nurses and care providers to emergency situations that require immediate action and intervention, especially in the intensive care unit. However, nurses and staff work…… [Read More]

References

Despins, L., Scott-Cawiezell, J., Rouder, J. (2010). Detection of patient risk by nurses:

a theoretical framework. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(2): 465-474.

Horkan, A. M. (2014). Alarm fatigue and patient safety. Nephrology Nursing Journal,

47(1): 83-85.
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patient centered care in healthcare nursing

Words: 4617 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 92870872

Introduction

Patient-centered care is the goal of many healthcare organizations, but the ability of an organization to deliver patient-centered care is influenced by a number of factors both internal and external. Business practices, regulatory requirements, and reimbursement all can impact patient-centered care in any healthcare organization. Promoting patient-centered care requires an organizational culture committed to this paradigm, which also needs to be embedded in the mission and values of the organization.

Executives and administrators create the organizational culture that promotes patient-centered care. All leaders in the organization are responsible for using patient-centered practices and communications styles in their interactions with patients and their families. Furthermore, administrators oversee the policies and procedures that directly impact the culture of care. Analyzing areas of weakness within the organizational structure and culture via established assessments like the Patient-and Family-Centered Care Organizational Self-Assessment Tool, it is possible to create multidisciplinary teams that promote the organization’s…… [Read More]

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Patient Visits

Words: 725 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 2520737

older patients over the age of 80 due to complications in health such as dementia and depressive symptoms, do not go for additional follow-ups. Yes, the authors explain repeated in person visits help better identify risk factors. There is no obvious research question however they do highlight the use of a study to confirm the hypothesis of whether or not repeated in person follow-ups help with problems experienced as patient's age. "We hypothesized that the type of visit would be related to key demographic, lifestyle, health and function characteristics and that the oldest aged participants would have the poorest retention for in-person visits, particularly clinic visits" (Strotmeyer et al., 2010, p. 697). This is a directional hypothesis because the retention rates are directly associated with increase in age. It is a simple hypothesis because it directly states a cause and effect. The hypothesis was tested and it revealed in-home visits…… [Read More]

References

Strotmeyer, E.S., Arnold, A.M., Boudreau, R.M., Ives, D.G., Cushman, M., Robbins, J.A., Newman, A.B. (2010). Long-Term Retention of Older Adults in the Cardiovascular Health Study: Implications for Studies of the Oldest Old. Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, 58(4), 696-701. doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.02770.x
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Impact of ACA From Organizational and Patients

Words: 1470 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78069405

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act/Impact of ACA from the Organizational and the Patients view

Impact of the Affordable Care act (ACA) on the population that it affected

Impact of the economics of providing care to patients from the organization's point-of-view

How will patients be affected in relationship to cost of treatment, quality of treatment, and access to treatment?

Ethical implications of this act for both the organization and the patients

Impact of the Affordable Care act (ACA) on the population that it affected

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), as initially passed, mandated Medicaid expansion, for covering a majority of low-income, as-yet-uninsured American citizens and immigrants (with legal residency in the U.S. for a minimum duration of 5 years). The United States Supreme Court, however, in the historic National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, 132 S. Ct. 2566 (2012), maintained that the obligatory Medicaid expansion proved to be unconstitutionally…… [Read More]

References

ACA. (2015). The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Retrieved on 13th September, 2015 from  http://www.dpc.senate.gov/healthreformbill/healthbill52.pdf 

Howard, P. (2015). The Impact of the Affordable Care Act On the Economy, Employers, and the Workforce. edworkforce.house.gov. Retrieved on 13 th September, 2015 from  http://edworkforce.house.gov/uploadedfiles/02.09.11_howard.pdf 

Kengmana, R.T. (2015). An Ethical Perspective on the Affordable Care Act. MA: Psych Central. Retrieved on 13th September, 2015 from  http://googleweblight.com/?lite_url=http://psychcentral.com/about/feedback&lc=en-IN&s=1&m=101&ts=1442202299&sig=APONPFlqjqQURNK5jFIewCvXRMJzyhz8zA 

NCIOM. (2015a). Examining the Impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in North Carolina. Chapter 7: Quality. Retrieved on 13th September, 2015 from  https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.nciom.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Final-Ch7-Quality-FINAL.pdf&ved=0CCYQFjABahUKEwjv_JDfr_XHAhVIB44KHfLKAPg&usg=AFQjCNEdTlwW2QuvqN5Rn6qM31poi4lBUA
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Dual Relationships the Relationship Between a Service

Words: 1259 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39431166

Dual elationships

The relationship between a service provider and their client is particularly sensitive because the circumstances that bring the two individuals into contact are usually necessitated by a state of mental unrest in the client. Accordingly, the issue of whether or not to engage in a dual relationship (when the doctor has a relationship with their patient distinct from the clinical context) with the client must be treated in a very sensitive manner; the therapist has a responsibility to not only operate in their own best interest but also that of the patient they are hired to assist. This paper examines the relationship between a therapist and an unhappily married Latin American female client, determining whether or not the therapist should advocate divorce and pursue a romantic relationship with his client. Although the therapist has decided that they will pursue the relationship and advocate divorce, this is not recommended.…… [Read More]

References

Dewane, C.J. (2010). Respecting boundaries -- the don'ts of dual relationships. Social Work Today, 10, 1, 18.

Freud, S., & Kreug, S. (2002a). Beyond the code of ethics, part II: Dual relationships revisited. Families in Society, 83(5), 483-492.
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Dealing With Difficult Patients Translation of Evidence and Best Practice

Words: 3786 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 75591008

Difficult Patients

Mitigating isks from Dementia

Providing adequate care for an individual suffering from dementia presents many difficulties for nurses. Patients with dementia often have debilitating conditions such as Alzheimer's or similar neurologic diseases which are progressive, thereby making it challenging for them to remember, think lucidly, communicate effectively or complete activities of daily living. Furthermore, dementia can cause rapid variations in mood or even modify personality and behavior. With the tremendous number of elderly in society more and more nurses are required to care for patients with progressive dementias. It is imperative that a diagnosis be reached early in the course of the cognitive impairment and that the patient is closely monitored for coexisting morbidities. Nurses have a central role in assessment and management of individuals with progressive dementia. This essay provides some evidence-based practical strategies for managing the behavioral problems and communication difficulties often encountered in this population.…… [Read More]

Reference List

Aud, M.A., Oliver, D., Bostick, J. And Schwarz, B. 2011. Effectiveness of Social Model Care Units for Dementia. International Nursing Research Congress 2005.

Care, N.D. 2010. Teaching and Learning. Pulse. Winter Edition.

Fletcher, S. And Zimmerman, S. 2010. Trainee and trainer reactions to a scripted dementia care training program in residential care/assisted living settings and nursing homes. Alzheimer's Care. 11(1): 61-70.

Goodman, C. 2011. The organizational culture of nursing staff providing long-term dementia care is related to quality of care. Evidence-Based Nursing. 47:1274-1282.
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Demographic Perception Survey of Patients With Atypical

Words: 2504 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 2311782

Demographic Perception Survey of Patients with Atypical CP Who Present to Cardiac Care Doctors and Patient Outcomes

This study intends to examine gender differences in individuals who present to cardiac doctors with chest pain and specifically, atypical chest pain in women. The work of Debra L. Issac (2000) states that over the past ten years "there has been increasing awareness of both the importance of CAD in women and of the significant differences between men and women who have the disease. Potential gender biases, both within the medical community and within the general population of women themselves also have been identified. These gender differences and biases have the potential to influence investigation and management of suspected or confirmed CAD in women, and should be taken into consideration when faced with a woman with potential cardiovascular disease." (p.157)

Issac also states that chest pain in women is "common and often non-ischemic.…… [Read More]

References

Cayley, WE (2005) Diagnosing the Case of Chest Pain. American Family Physician. 15 Nob 2005. Retrieved from:  http://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/1115/p2012.html 

Gotzsche PC, Nielsen M. Screening for breast cancer with mammography. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. (1):CD001877, 2011.

Issac, DL (2000) Women with Ischemic Heart Disease. Presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress, Vancouver, British Columbia, October 2000. Retrieved from:  http://www.stacommunications.com/journals/cme/images/cmepdf/oct01/womencv.pdf 

Khan, JJ, Albarran, JW, Lopez, V, and Chair, SY (2010) Gender Differences on Chest Pain Perception associated with Acute Myocardial infarction in Chinese patients: A Questionnaire Survey. J Clin Nurs. 2010 Oct, 19 (19-20)2720-0. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20846222
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Treatment to Patients the Main Objective of

Words: 4516 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Peer Reviewed Journal Paper #: 23316992

Treatment to Patients

The main objective of providing treatment to patients is to relieve symptoms along with decreasing the progression of the disease as well as the mortality or morbidity. However, in some cases, this objective is not fully achieved, especially in the case of the patients who are admitted to the ICU with some serious and almost always a terminal stage of the disease. For example, when old patients are admitted in the ICU, their immunity is extremely low and this is the perfect time for the opportunistic infections to make matters worse for these patients. There are many infections that are specifically associated with patients admitted in the hospitals. Pseudomonas Aurigeonosa is a micro-organism that is well documented to cause bacterial pneumonia and bacteremia in the patients who are terminally ill and are receiving treatment in the hospital setting. Since most of the patients in the ICU are…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Beekmann, SE;Diekema, DJ; Chapin, KC;Doern, GV (2003) Effects of rapid detection of bloodstream infections on length of hospitalization and hospital charges.J ClinMicrobiol, 41:3119-3125.

Boussekey, N, Leroy, O, Georges, H, Devos, P, d'Escrivan, T, Guery, B (2005).Diagnostic and prognostic values of admission procalcitonin levels in community-acquired pneumonia in an intensive care unit.Infection, 33:257-263.

Charles, PE, Dalle, F, Aho, S, Quenot, JP, Doise, JM, Aube, H, Olsson, NO, Blettery, B: Serum procalcitonin measurement contribution to the early diagnosis of candidemia in critically ill patients. Intensive Care Med, 32:1577-1583.

Digiovine, B; Chenoweth, C; Watts, C; Higgins, M (1999)The attributable mortality and costs of primary nosocomial bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit. Am J. RespirCrit Care Med, 160:976-981.
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Supervisory Relationship in Psychology

Words: 1509 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 53608959

Supervisory elationship in Psychology

In psychology, supervision is playing an important role in determining how effectively professionals are able to monitor their colleagues and ensure they are following the highest standards. This takes place by meeting with another associate inside the same discipline and field. The basic idea is to review the techniques that are utilized and seek out alternate avenues for enhancing professionalism. This occurs with both people serving as equals to understand how specific techniques and practices could have an impact on quality. During this process, there is an emphasis on engagement, uncertainty and formation. (Watkins, 2011, pg. 58, para. 2)

These models are serving as a foundation in understanding key challenges and the effects they are having on stakeholders. To fully comprehend this role requires examining how supervision is utilized. This will be accomplished by describing the attributes and the process for an optimal relationship. Together, these…… [Read More]

References

Bennett, S. (2008). The Interface Attachment. Smith College Studies in Social Work, 78 (2), 301 -- 317.

Farber, E. (2010). Introduction to the special section. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 47(1), 1.

Landany, N. (2013). Effective and Ineffective Supervision. The Counseling Psychologist, 41 (1), 28-47.

Lyne, A. (2007). Empathetic Relational Bonds and Personal Agency is Psychotherapy. Psychotherapy, Theory, Research, Practice and Training, 44 (4), 371-377.
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Therapeutic Relationship Utilizing the HAQ-2

Words: 6249 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 79951995

Often the client is unable to take steps to avoid the undesirable emotional attachment. The therapist must take the initiative in maintaining proper distance and personal space. However, it is important to be aware that a positive therapeutic relationship could become too much of a good thing. When it does, a positive relationship can become toxic to the therapeutic outcome.

Comparing and Contrasting the Therapeutic elationship and Client-Therapist Attachment

The therapeutic relationship and client-therapist attachment have many common elements, but the are major differences as well. Both the therapeutic relationship and the client-therapist attachment develop from the relationship between a therapist and their client. esearch cited earlier, tells us that the development of a relationship is necessary for the success of the treatment plan. The more intimate the relationship becomes, the more likely it is to result in the type of shared secrets that result in positive therapeutic outcomes. However,…… [Read More]

References

Barrett-Lennard, G. (1962) Dimensions of therapist response as causal factors in therapeutic change. Psychological Monographs, 76 (43): 1-36.

Butler Center for Research (BCR) (2006): Therapeutic Alliance: Improving Treatment Outcome. Butler Center for Research. October 2006. Retrieved September 22, 2008 at  http://www.hazelden.org/web/public/document/bcrup_1006.pdf 

Cruz, M. & Pincus, a. (2002). Research on the Influence That Communication in Psychiatric Encounters Has on Treatment. Psychiatric Services. 53: 1253-1265.

DeWeert-Van, O., Dejong, C., Jorg, F. & Schrijver, G. (1999). The Helping Alliance Questionnaire: Psychometric properties in patients with substance dependence. Substance Use and misuse. 34 (11): 1549-1569.
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Nurse Patient Ratios

Words: 2236 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 6147

Nurse Patient atios and Quality of Care

This study reviews the broad level of issues that surround the nurse/patient ratio: a critical shortage of trained and experienced nurses; increased political and fiscal demands from all sectors of society; rising costs internally and externally combined with a rising number of under-insured; and the conundrum of nursing ethics and the ability to foster excellence in care and patient advocacy. We note that there remains an issue about hiring more nurses -- where will these nurses come from if the nursing schools do not increase their recruitment efforts and broaden their curriculum. In addition, we note that the large majority of patients and stakeholders primarily want two things when admitted to a healthcare facility: better paid nurses and more highly-trained professionals who are satisfied with their vocation.

Introduction

Modern nursing is, by necessity, a mixture of complex balance: patient care vs. staffing; procedures…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

More Nurses Make the Difference. (February 2012). The Lamp. 69 (1): Retrieved from: http://search.informit.com/au/documentSummary;dn=045435426132502;res=IELHEA

Safe Nurse Staffing: Looking Beyond the Numbers. (2009). Vantage Point, CNA. Retrieved from: https://www.nso.com/pdfs/db/newsletters/Safe_Nurse_Staffing_-_Looking_Beyond_the_Raw_Numbers_20094.pdf?fileName=Safe_Nurse_Staffing_ -_Looking_Beyond_the_Raw_Numbers_2009-pdf&folder=pdfs/db/newsletters

Aiken, L. (2001). The Hospital Nurse Workforce: Problems and Prospects."Draft

For the Council on the Economic Impact of Health System Change. Retrieved from: http://council.brandeis.edu/pubs/hospstruct  / Council-Dec-14-2001-Aiken-paper.pdf
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Ethical Issues Arising From Doctors Relationships With Drug Companies

Words: 1528 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12109375

Doctors Drugs

Although the Affordable Health Care Act represents a step in the right direction towards encouraging all Americans to avail themselves of medical services, the bill fails to address the root causes of problems in the system. The American health care system is flawed because it is a for-profit model that places profits far ahead of patients. When profits come ahead of patients, the result is an inability to fulfill the ethical duties of being a health care worker. A progressive transformation of the American health care system would systematically undo the nefarious link between corporate interests and the interests of health care.

The relationship between doctors and drug companies has been well established and well documented. Major news media resources like The Atlantic, as well as professional peer-reviewed journals like the New England Journal of Medicine cover stories addressing the potential ethical conundrums inherent in a cozy connection…… [Read More]

References

Campbell, E.G. (2007). Doctors and drug companies -- Scrutinizing influential relationships. New England Journal of Medicine 2007;357: 1796-1797.

Carollo, K. (2010). Pay dirt: hundreds of doctors earned big money from drug companies. ABC News. 25 October, 2010. Retrieved online:  http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Wellness/drug-companies-payments-doctors-revealed-database/story?id=11929217 

"Let the Sunshine In," (2013). The Economist. Mar 2, 2013. Retrieved online:  http://www.economist.com/news/business/21572784-new-efforts-reveal-ties-between-doctors-and-drug-firms-let-sunshine 

Moynihan, R. (2003). Who pays for the pizza? BMJ 2003; 326:1189.
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Professional Boundaries and Multiple Relationships

Words: 2295 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52975080

Ethics

Ensuring proper professional behavior

The nurse-client relationship is novel. No formula exists for judging the crossing of boundaries as good / bad, in the absence of considering the features of therapeutic relationship for every scenario. The suitable behavior must be measured with respect to professional's intent, respecting confidentiality, patient-client advocacy and corroborating the CAN Code of Ethics for egistered Nurses (Corey anad Callanan, 2007).

Violations of professional boundary

The crossings of boundaries are deemed as insignificant, but with the increase in frequency of such incidents of professional boundary violations, it could be serious. The nurse works on the patient-nurse relationship and fulfils the therapeutic needs of a patient and neglects his own. The professional boundary violation is not acceptable as it can spark other occurrences. The professional boundaries occur when conflict arises between client's needs and professional's needs. ationalization can be used to justify this behavior. The violation of…… [Read More]

References

Bond T, 1997, 'Standards and Ethics for Counselling in Action', pgs Sage Publications Ltd., London

Brammer LM & MacDonald G, 2003, 'The Helping Relationship, Process and Skills', pgs Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data, United States of America

Corey G & MS & Callanan P, 2007, 'Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions', pgs Thomson Brookes/Cole, a part of The Thomson Corporation, United States of America

Egan G, 2007,'The Skilled Helper', pgs * Thomson Brookes/Cole, a part of The Thomson Corporation, United States of America
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Customer Relationship Management Strategy

Words: 4756 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 37586894

Customer relationship management (CM) is an essential component of organizational management. The purpose of this discussion is to focus on a CM strategy for United Behavioral Health a subsidiary of United Health Care . . United Behavioral Health is dedicated to presenting customers with high quality, cost-effective, managed mental health and substance abuse services to its customers. The investigation suggests that the company's core values have been successfully implemented into the company's CM Strategy. The current CM strategy utilizes technology to allow customers to voice their opinions. Currently the company's website ubhweb.uhc.com provides a page that offers help to members that are experiencing problems. In addition, it provides customers with "coaches" that can help whenever problems arise. The company's customers are currently divided into three different groups; the employer division, the health plan division and the public sector. We found testimonials of customers who were extremely satisfied with the care…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Your Customers are Speaking To You. Do You Hear Them? 2002. 2 December 2004

 http://www.jandlmarketing.com/pages/articles/article13.html 

Gupta S. Binggeli U., Poomes C.D., CRM in the Air. The McKinsey Quarterly. Page Number: 6+.

Jacobs F.A., Claire Kamm Latham, Choongseop Lee. 1998. The Relationship of Customer Satisfaction to Strategic Decisions. Journal of Managerial Issues. Volume: 10. Issue: 2. Page Number: 165+.
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Coping Mediates the Relationship Between

Words: 4919 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 3377734

" (Giovacchini, 1996, pg. 2)

According to Giovachinni research into the psychodynamics of individuals in their experience of current adjustments and symptom formation is "much more interesting and fulfilling than monitoring surface behavior. processes are innately fascinating and their study creates dimensions and viewpoints that expand our appreciation of the versatility of the psyche as our in-depth understanding is increased, in itself, an aesthetic experience." (Giovacchini, 1996, pg. 2) Unconscious motivation is the "essence of the intrapsychic focus..." which serves to transform patients into "interesting human beings rather than the passive recipients of pharmacological ministrations. How the treatment procedures fits into the therapeutic relationship is taken into account, enabling patients to pursue autonomy and mastery of their emotions." (Giovacchini, 1996, pg. 2)

The work of Halil entitled: "Personality and Coping: A Multidimensional Research on Situation and Dispositional Coping" (2004) states that coping is defined "as a constantly changing cognitive and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Intrapsychic (2008) Definition - Biology Online available at  http://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Intrapsychic 

Intrapsychic (2008) Definition - the Free Library. Online available at  http://www.thefreedictionary.com/intrapsychic 

Giovachinni, Peter L. (1996) Intrapsychic Focus Can Have Lasting Benefits for Patients. 1996, December 1, Psychiatric Times, Vol. 13, No. 12. Online available at  http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/display/article/10168/49006?pageNumber=2 

Halil, EKSI (2004) Personality and Coping: A Multidimensional Research on Situational and Dispositional Coping. 2004 Egitim Danishmanligi ve Arastirmalari Iletisim Hizmetleri Tic. Ltd. Sti. (EDAM)
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increasing patient'satisfaction

Words: 1837 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17220135

You have been appointed to chair a hospital-wide committee to develop and implement a plan to improve patient satisfaction in your facility. Your Chief Nursing Officer has provided you a summary report indicating a steady decline in patient satisfaction over the previous six months. You will need to identify the various resources available for tracking patient satisfaction, establish a clear bench mark and design a specific plan of action for reversing this trend. It is essential to note in your development that research has shown nurse communication and hourly rounding to be key drivers in patient satisfaction metric improvements. These points should be a focus of your change initiative.

Roger's Change Theory

The diffusion of innovation theory, or Roger's change theory, was first proposed by Everett Rogers more have a half a century ago. Despite the theories age, it remains relevant to any change process today. The premise of this…… [Read More]

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Systems Theory Discuss Relationship Systems Theory Healthcare

Words: 1238 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68949566

Systems Theory

Discuss relationship systems theory healthcare deliver U.S. - What current concepts healthcare explained helped a system theory approach? - What system theory? - How researchers (Ludwig von Bertalanffy Everett M.

Systems theory and diffusion of innovation theory

Systems theory

Systems theory was not specifically designed to cope with the challenges of the U.S. healthcare system, although it has been frequently applied to some of its issues. Systems theory was originally coined by the scientist Ludwig von Bertalanffy to sum up his idea that the 'whole' of systems -- both biological and otherwise -- were larger than the sum of their parts. According to von Bertalanffy, "in the past, science tried to explain observable phenomena by reducing them to an interplay of elementary units investigable independently of each other, conceptions appear in contemporary science that are concerned with what is somewhat vaguely termed 'wholeness', i.e. problems of organization, phenomena…… [Read More]

Resources

Diffusion of innovation theory. (2013). University of Twente. Retrieved:

 http://www.utwente.nl/cw/theorieenoverzicht/Theory%20clusters/Communication%20and%20Information%20Technology/Diffusion_of_Innovations_Theory.doc/ 

This website contains excerpts from E.M. Rogers' work on diffusion of innovation theory, along with a helpful graphical representation of how the information is disseminated.

Kaminski, J. (Spring 2011).Diffusion of innovation theory. Canadian Journal of Nursing.
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Identifying and Controlling Violent Health Care Patients and Employees

Words: 3181 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67821106

Controlling Violent Health Care Patients and Employees

This is a paper discussion on the identification and control of violence amongst health care patients and employees. It has 11 sources.

An Introduction to Violence

Violence has become a common feature of our society found in every area of the nation from quiet neighborhoods in the suburbs to the urbanized cities of the U.S. To make the matter worse, the media including radio, TV, private cable networks, have become a part of the culture that promotes the concepts of violence, if there is no violence exhibited in either every day programs then these programs, including those of children are presumed to be a failure. Hence, it would not be wrong to assume that our entire culture has been virtually gripped in a sphere of violence to which there is no end.

This culture of violence continues despite the fact that the sociologists…… [Read More]

References

Erickson L. Williams-Evans SA. Attitudes of emergency nurses regarding patient assaults. J Emerg Nurs. 2000; 26(3):210-215.

Felton JS. Violence prevention at the health care site. Occup Med. 1997; 12(4):701-715.

Hegal MT, Ferguson RJ. Differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) to reduce aggressive behavior following traumatic brain injury. Behav Modif. 2000; 24(1):94-101.

Levin PF, Hewitt JB, Misner ST. Insights of nurses about assault in hospital-based emergency departments. Image J. Nurs Sch. 1998; 30(3):249-254.
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Therac-25 Relevant Stakeholders the Patients

Words: 1587 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 30336947

Thus, if any of us was one of the "actors', we would be tempted to judge each alternative in a subjective manner. If we were the patients, the AECL board or the hospitals we would want Therac-25 to be approved. If we were the public or FDA we would want the equipment out of the market.

The main alternative to the reality would have been for AECL to take under consideration a software error. One other alternative would have been for the company to assign more accurate probabilities for hazard occurrence, while running the Fault Tree Analysis. Finally, the third alternative would have been to use a better method to determine hazard occurrence. A better method is a method that would have been capable to return higher risks associated with the use of Therac-25 and which would have determined AECL to adjust the equipment. The first alternative is superior to…… [Read More]

Reference List

Bentham J. (1996) "The Principles of morals and legislation," Oxford, England: Clarendon Press.

Griffin J. (1986), "Well Being," New York: Oxford University Press.

Margolis H. (1996), "Dealing with risk: why the public and the experts disagree on environmental issues," Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Roberts, M.J. & M.R.Reich (2002), "Ethical analysis in public health," the Lancet, Vol. 359: pp. 1055-1059.
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Measuring Improvements in Patient Safety

Words: 2983 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 51656906

Gonzalez (2007), discusses the company WellPoint Inc. that provides its members with the capability to develop their own personal health records, an option to receive test results online, provide a limited set of records to their providers and to allow other family members access to the information. In terms of security safeguards, WellPoint tracks who accesses information and has staff members to monitor the systems for potential breaches. This in turn offers users a certain level of security and quality in services rendered.

As pay-for-performance programs flourish, there is a fear that many EHs cannot accurately capture the data that is required to participate. The biggest obstacles for software makers are the sheer volume of performance measures and the lack of standardization among them. One pressing issue is that some EH systems are still text-based and are therefore not as powerful for reporting and extracting information. (McKinney, 2007)

Wilson (2007),…… [Read More]

References

Burda, D. (2007, June 4). Hey, you asked for it. Modern Healthcare, 37(23), p.25.

Cavolo, D.J. (2007, July). Electronic medical record system: know the cost of ownership. Nursing Homes, 56(7), pp. 17-19.

Evans, M. (2007, July 30). Push for Quality Starts with it. Modern Healthcare, 37(30), pp.22,24,28.

Freudenheim, M. (2005, September 19). Doctors collaborate to find less costly way to add electronic medical records. New York Times, p. C4.