Patient Rights Essays (Examples)

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Patient ights
The major objective of informed consent is to give the patient an opportunity play a role in his health care decision. The law requires physicians to get an informed consent of their patients before any medical procedure. The patient has a right to be informed and to be made aware of the nature of the procedure, available alternatives to the medical operation, the risks, benefits and uncertainties related to the operation as well as the patient's acceptance of the operation.

For a patient's consent to be valid, he must be considered competent to voluntarily make the decision (Edwards, 1998). However, there are conditions that may render a patient incompetent to make treatment decisions. In the case of Mr. Jones who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, the law provides for an option. According to section 5 article a of the National Conference of Commissioners;

"A surrogate may make a health-care decision….

org).
ere those rights violated in the case of Robert Courtney's unlawful behavior? Yes those rights were violated in several ways. First, the information Courtney's patients received was both false and incomplete. They did not realize they were not getting what they paid for; they were treated shabbily by a man who specialized in providing fraudulent medications. Second, the patients getting prescriptions from Courtney were not given the opportunity to take part in treatment decisions; in this case, it would have been impossible for Courtney to show them the truth without opening himself up for investigation. Thirdly, Courtney's patients were not treated with respect, in fact they were discriminated against through the delivery of phony, watered-down medications.

hat role did Courtney have as a patient advocate? Did he uphold that obligation? He certainly did not prove to be an advocate; rather he engaged in criminal activities while putting on the pretense of….

Patient Rights and Informed Consent
The relevant legal issues at stake in this case are those related to the question of whether Mr. Jones is indeed incompetent and if Mr. Jones is indeed incompetent then what is the authority that should be assigned to the surrogate daughter of the patient in this case. The hospital physician and staff must avoid legal liability and ensure that they are in adherence to relevant laws and regulations informing the proper actions in this particular case. The patient has a legal right to be fully informed on any treatment that is considered and has the right to either provide consent or alternatively to refuse to consent to any proposed treatment. In this particular case, Mr. Jones has been found to have the condition of Alzheimer's and to be incompetent. Proof has been provided for the treating physician and nursing staff of Mr. Jones incompetency.….

" (South Australia, p. 8)
This demonstrates the balance which is necessary in protecting the rights of the patient and simultaneously ensuring that physicians have the freedom necessary to perform to the best of their abilities. In a respect, this underscores the nature of the strategies used for the protection of patients' rights. The intention is primarily to provide a basic forum for the constructive interaction of patient and physician with legal recourse serving as a failsafe. So is this implied by the LSCSA, which indicates that the demands of existing Patients' Rights standards are designed to make the physician actively accountable to the patient's interests. Therefore, the LSCSA indicates a strategy for preserving the right to consent, reporting that "although the first step usually should be to speak to the doctor or other health care provider who has treated the patient, if any doubts remain, a patient should not….

Patient Centered Medical Homes
In the 1960s, the medical home concept referred to as patient centered medical home was developed.In order to reform the healthcare in the U.S.; the patient centered medical homes are evolving as a centerpiece of efforts (Bates, 2010). Basically, PCMH can be defines as a primary care model that offers coordinated and comprehensive care to the patients in order to improve health outcomes. PCMH is also recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). Patient centered medical homes can be portrayed as a team of people working together in form of a community. The purpose is to improve the health as well as healing of the people in that community. In comparison with the primary care, PCMH is more responsive towards the needs of local patients.

PCMH offers a number of benefits including complementary nutrition as well as wellness counseling along with providing prevention education so as….

SARS and Patient Rights
PAGES 2 WORDS 632

The key ethical issues raised in the case study involving the SARS research, were that the center for disease control wanted blood samples from individuals who may have come into contact with the index case—i.e., the person who had SARS. If that person was on, say, a flight, the center wanted information from as many people on that flight as possible. The point was not to contact individuals to alert them of any danger, as they would have already passed out of danger or been placed into the hospital if they were in danger by the time they were located. The point was merely to obtain data so that the center could better understand the disease and how it spread. Thus, the key ethical issues involved obtaining consent from the participants in the study. Every participant in a study has a right to take part or not take part in….

Intersection of Technology and HealthcareIn the past, medical records were kept on paper and stored in file cabinets. This system had its own set of problems, such as lost records and difficulty sharing information between doctors. The advent of electronic health records (EHs) was supposed to solve these problems and make it easier for doctors to provide better care (Atasoy et al., 2019). However, EHs come with their own risks, such as the potential for errors and breaches of patient privacy. To avoid these unintended consequences, there are a few recommended practices.First, all entries into the EH should be carefully checked for accuracy. The accuracy of the EH relies on the quality of the data entered into it. Incomplete or inaccurate entries can lead to errors in diagnosis and treatment, as well as putting patients at risk. This includes not only verifying the information entered, but also making sure that….

Patient Acuity System
PAGES 3 WORDS 1153

Patient acuity system provides the nurses and other healthcare practitioners in health cares' information that can guide them in their attention towards the patients. The nurses track information and then weigh them in accordance to the urgency of assessment. The basis that the nurses use is the complexity of the level to which patients are unwell. An example is the determination of whether the patients immediately require ventilation and those who do not need any. The nurses are able to pick on the various patients in the healthcare and then record the data. In a single healthcare, there are many patients with different degrees of illnesses. As a result, they all require varying levels of evaluations from the nurses. It is, therefore, imperative that the nurses spread their attention appropriately to avoid any inconveniences. This system helps the nurses to determine the attention that patients require within a short period.….

Right to Life
PAGES 8 WORDS 2898

ight to Life
For all human beings death is one of the most intricate truths to cope with. In spite of this, people take decisions to finish their lives, which in turn result in ending their pain and suffering. This practice is known as euthanasia, or even commonly called as assisted suicide by those who are against the practice completely.

However, whatever term we may use to label it, it is an issue that society should become more familiar with. For instance few countries like Switzerland have legalized the practice and extend great support to those who want to end their lives so as to get away from the detriment of their disorders. However, this practice is only legal and offered only to those who are going through terminal illnesses or vegetative states. Although there are many controversies that surrounds euthanasia, there are numerous religious activists and humanitarian groups that are totally….

This can be as relatively minor as a night without sleep every few weeks or a continual struggle to sleep every night. Curing insomnia by just trying to Google a response to the problem only unleashes a flood of websites that offer all sorts of over-the-counter and prescription medications. The person wants to find relaxation techniques and also understand how they can overcome the insomnia on their own without having to take the trouble of going into a physician's clinic. In choosing which website to trust, using the evaluation criteria provided will be very useful. An example of a website that meets the criteria as defined is WebMD.com. Let's take a look at this website to see why. First, the website makes it clear they have an editorial policy, and their mission and purpose are to provide accurate, valid healthcare information to its website visitors. The WebMD Medical eview….

Right to Die Why Patients
PAGES 5 WORDS 1794


Fact sheet on end-of-life care. American Psychological Association. http://www.apa.org/pi/eol/factsheet1.pdf

Fact sheet on end-of-life care, published by the American Psychological Association discusses the adult's mental health needs near the end of life and the obstacles they confront to having a comfortable death.

Foley, K.M., (1995). Pain, Physician assisted dying and euthanasia. Pain 4, 163-178.

Foley discusses how access to and delivery of pain treatment are seriously deficient in the present health care systems in the United States. The author advocates expanding services and resources to care for the dying patient.

Isaacs, S.L. And Knickman, J.R (1997). To improve health and health care. San Francisco, CA: Jossey ass.

Isaacs and Knickman examine programs of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a health care philanthropy. They reports its history, evaluates its effect, and discusses lessons learned as well as provide a frank discussion of why some problems can't be easily solved.

Langer, G. (2003, March 19). Opposing assisted suicide. AC….

ights and esponsibilities
How do the rights and responsibilities of patients differ from the rights and responsibilities of employees? How are they similar?

Until recently, patient responsibilities were seldom directly 'spelled out' in the American healthcare system. This changed with the passage of HIPAA in 1996. HIPPA "sets forth policies and standards for how patient information, including doctors' notes, medical test results, lab reports, and billing information may be shared" (Torrey, 2012, HIPPA). It gives patients the right to access their information and demands that patient data be treated in a secure fashion. Also under the law, patients have a right to informed consent over the procedures they undergo, so that they or a designated caregiver can make decisions about what they perceive to be their best interests. Ultimately, the healthcare system must serve the needs of patients, not physicians and other healthcare employees. That is why patients must give consent if,….

Patient Access to Experimental Drugs
Experimental drugs are being used in treating cancer and other life-threatening diseases in the hopes that effective cures and treatments can be identified. There are however, ethical questions relating to the use of experimental drugs and this work seeks to answer the question that asks whether patients should have access to experimental drugs and to answer why or why they should not have this access.

Experimental Drugs

Experimental drugs have carved inroads to treating cancer patients and most recently; this has been reported in the form of a drug that serves to "neutralize two mechanisms cancers need to survive." (Coghlan, 2012) The new drug is Cabozantinib. This drug is reported by one individual interviewed in this study to have been used by a family member who died while taking the drug for non-small cell carcinoma in the form of lung cancer. When asked the question of how this….

Right to Life - Terri
PAGES 5 WORDS 1634

On this matter, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi stated, "Congressional leaders have no business substituting their judgment for that of multiple state courts that have extensively considered the issues in this intensely personal family matter." (Euthansia and Terri Schiavo b). Federal Judge James Whittemore heard the Schiavo case and ruled on March 22, 2005 that the Schindlers had not established a "substantial likelihood of success" at trial and refused to order the reinsertion of Terri Schiavo's feeding tube. Two days later, the United States Supreme Court would deny the Schindler's request to hear the case. Terri died on March 31, 2005.
This paper has presented only the most noted court rulings and proceedings regarding the Schiavo case. "Nineteen different judges at various times considered the Schindler's request on appeal in six state courts. All have sided with Michael Schiavo" (Euthanasia and Terri Schiavo b). In the absence of a living….

Patient, Mr. D., is a 74-year-old male Caucasian, married and retired. Mr. D. complains of dizziness and weakness. Type-2 diabetes was diagnosed in 1994, hypertension in 2002, and arthritis in 2007. Mr. D. is currently taking 20mg Lipitor/daily; 81 mg Aspirin/daily; 333mg Calcium/daily; 5mg zinc/daily, and 500mg Vitamin C/3X day. He denies any drug or herbal use, and uses 650 mg of Tylenol for pain as needed. He has no known food allergies, does not use tobacco or illicit drugs, but has a family history of diabetes and heart disease with both mother and father. His general health acuity is strong (bowels, urinary, etc.), but has occasional slurred speech, weakness in right lower limb, syncope, vertigo, and vision fluctuations. Mr. D. reports that his wife complains he asks the same question repeatedly within a short time period.
Areas for Focused Assessment- The combination of syncope, vertigo, vision, and memory issues combined….

## Delving into the Realm of Clinical Psychology: A Comprehensive Guide to Essay Topics

Introduction

Clinical psychology, a multifaceted field rooted in the practice of evidence-based techniques, offers a captivating landscape for scholarly exploration. Its vast scope, encompassing assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of mental health disorders, presents an array of compelling essay topics. This comprehensive guide will navigate you through the intricacies of clinical psychology, providing a wealth of essay topics that resonate with the field's theoretical foundations and practical applications.

Theoretical Perspectives in Clinical Psychology

1. Psychodynamic Theory: Exploring the Unconscious Roots of Psychopathology
2. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Unveiling the Interplay of Thoughts, Emotions, and....

1. The role of hospice care in providing comfort and support at the end of life
2. The importance of advance care planning and discussing end of life wishes with loved ones
3. Ethical considerations surrounding end of life decision-making and assisted dying
4. The impact of grief and loss on family members when facing the end of a loved one’s life
5. Cultural differences in beliefs and practices surrounding death and dying
6. The stigma and fear surrounding death and how to approach the topic openly and honestly
7. The role of palliative care in managing symptoms and improving quality of life at the end....

Unveiling the Enigma of Retained Surgical Items: A Journey into Prevention

Introduction

Retained surgical items (RSIs) represent a grave threat to patient safety and the integrity of healthcare systems. These inadvertent remnants left behind after surgical procedures can lead to severe complications, protracted suffering, and even death. This essay explores the multifaceted nature of RSIs, delving into their prevalence, consequences, and the critical measures necessary for prevention.

Prevalence of RSIs

RSIs are a global problem affecting both developing and developed countries. Studies estimate that the incidence ranges from 1 in 4,000 to 1 in 15,000 surgical procedures. This variability highlights the need for robust....

Upholding Ethical Standards in the Treatment of AIDS Patients
Healthcare professionals play a crucial role in upholding ethical standards in the treatment of AIDS patients. By adhering to ethical guidelines, healthcare professionals can provide comprehensive and compassionate care, protect patient rights, and promote the well-being of both patients and the community.
Confidentiality and Privacy:
Maintaining patient confidentiality is paramount. Healthcare professionals must respect the privacy of patients by not disclosing any sensitive information without their consent, except as required by law. This includes protecting electronic health records, test results, and communications with patients.
Non-Discrimination:
Healthcare professionals must treat all patients with dignity and respect, regardless....

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4 Pages
Essay

Healthcare

Patient Rights the Major Objective of Informed

Words: 1091
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Patient ights The major objective of informed consent is to give the patient an opportunity play a role in his health care decision. The law requires physicians to get an…

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3 Pages
Essay

Healthcare

Patient Consent Patient Rights

Words: 999
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

org). ere those rights violated in the case of Robert Courtney's unlawful behavior? Yes those rights were violated in several ways. First, the information Courtney's patients received was both false…

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4 Pages
Essay

Healthcare

Patient Rights and Informed Consent the Relevant

Words: 1302
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Patient Rights and Informed Consent The relevant legal issues at stake in this case are those related to the question of whether Mr. Jones is indeed incompetent and if…

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3 Pages
Essay

Healthcare

Rights of Patients Patients' Rights

Words: 944
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

" (South Australia, p. 8) This demonstrates the balance which is necessary in protecting the rights of the patient and simultaneously ensuring that physicians have the freedom necessary to…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Healthcare

Patient Centered Medical Homes

Words: 964
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Patient Centered Medical Homes In the 1960s, the medical home concept referred to as patient centered medical home was developed.In order to reform the healthcare in the U.S.; the patient…

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2 Pages
Essay

Ethics / Morality

SARS and Patient Rights

Words: 632
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

The key ethical issues raised in the case study involving the SARS research, were that the center for disease control wanted blood samples from individuals who may have come…

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1 Pages
Admission Essay

Nursing

Securing Patient Data and Protecting Patient Rights

Words: 332
Length: 1 Pages
Type: Admission Essay

Intersection of Technology and HealthcareIn the past, medical records were kept on paper and stored in file cabinets. This system had its own set of problems, such as lost…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Healthcare

Patient Acuity System

Words: 1153
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Patient acuity system provides the nurses and other healthcare practitioners in health cares' information that can guide them in their attention towards the patients. The nurses track information and…

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8 Pages
Essay

Criminal Justice

Right to Life

Words: 2898
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Essay

ight to Life For all human beings death is one of the most intricate truths to cope with. In spite of this, people take decisions to finish their lives, which…

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2 Pages
Essay

Healthcare

Patient's Guide to the Internet

Words: 642
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

This can be as relatively minor as a night without sleep every few weeks or a continual struggle to sleep every night. Curing insomnia by just trying to…

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5 Pages
Term Paper

Healthcare

Right to Die Why Patients

Words: 1794
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Fact sheet on end-of-life care. American Psychological Association. http://www.apa.org/pi/eol/factsheet1.pdf Fact sheet on end-of-life care, published by the American Psychological Association discusses the adult's mental health needs near the end of…

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2 Pages
Research Paper

Healthcare

Rights and Responsibilities How Do the Rights

Words: 718
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Research Paper

ights and esponsibilities How do the rights and responsibilities of patients differ from the rights and responsibilities of employees? How are they similar? Until recently, patient responsibilities were seldom directly 'spelled…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Business - Ethics

Patient Access to Experimental Drugs Experimental Drugs

Words: 1002
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Patient Access to Experimental Drugs Experimental drugs are being used in treating cancer and other life-threatening diseases in the hopes that effective cures and treatments can be identified. There are…

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5 Pages
Thesis

Business - Law

Right to Life - Terri

Words: 1634
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Thesis

On this matter, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi stated, "Congressional leaders have no business substituting their judgment for that of multiple state courts that have extensively considered the…

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4 Pages
Essay

Exercise

Patient Mr D Is a 74-Year-Old Male

Words: 1216
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Patient, Mr. D., is a 74-year-old male Caucasian, married and retired. Mr. D. complains of dizziness and weakness. Type-2 diabetes was diagnosed in 1994, hypertension in 2002, and arthritis…

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