Positive Reinforcement Essays (Examples)

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One has to wonder how much positive reinforcement will only be reinforcing the sense of entitlement they have received from their parents vs. The hard work and responsibility required to succeed in business. Even Skinner, the researcher who articulated the major theoretical constructs of reinforcement and who was a strong advocate of positive reinforcement, recognized the possibility to encourage negative behavior with positive reinforcement. On this matter, he said, "The same mistake is made by the teacher who offers a treat of some kind when the class is getting out of hand. If this behavior is a kind of aggression toward the teacher, the treat may have an opposing effect. ut in the long run, the reinforcement of misbehavior will offset any gain. Unfortunately, the reduction in aggression is immediate but the effect of reinforcement apparent only later. Hence, the practice may be continued, even though in the long….

Positive Reinforcement
PAGES 2 WORDS 597

Helplessness Theory and Response Contingent Positive Reinforcement Theory. It would not be entirely incorrect to state that these theories merely emphasize different aspects of a similar type of phenomenon. Both of these theories are utilized as a means of determining the causes of clinical depression without delving very much into cognitive processes. Perhaps their lack of insight into cognitive processes can explain their limitations as far as successfully explaining the source of depression and how it fosters within certain people.
The main similarity between these two theories is that they are based on the external experiences that people go through. Each theory states that the outside factors of these experiences help to determine the internal feelings of depression that people develop. This focus on initial experience is largely why neither one of these theories considers very many cognitive processes as the basis of depression. Instead, these theories posit the fact….

Misbehavior in Students: Positive Reinforcement Strategies to Cope ith Negative Student Behavior" Marsh
Submission to Behavioral Interventions

Misbehavior in Students: Positive Reinforcement Strategies to Cope with Negative Student Behavior

This paper addresses peer praise and reinforcement as a possible positive coping strategy for teachers to employ when dealing with different forms of student misbehavior.

Misbehavior in Students: Positive Reinforcement Strategies to Cope with Negative Student Behavior

There are many reasons a student may misbehave in class. These causes may range from diagnosed or undiagnosed learning disabilities, problems in the students' homes, and students' frustrations with the structured discipline of the classroom environment. One frequently overlooked cause of student misbehavior is a student's desire for attention from his or her peers as well as adults. As with the misbehaviors designed to solicit adult attention, students may attempt to intentionally provoke their classmates in an attempt to be noticed and recognized, even only as an irritation.….

Aversive Control
Punishment can be defined as a way to reduce a given behavior by attaching a consequence to behaving a certain way or doing a particular thing. Some of the consequences that denote positive punishment include loud noise, electric shock and a reprimand. The consequences that denote negative punishment include money, access to a given social environment and food. Several studies have discussed the effects and implications of aversive control. The main topics that have been covered include how they affect the use of nicotine, analysis of man's neuropsychiatric behavior and the use of aversive techniques such as punishment tools.

An aversive stimulus can maintain the behavior of an organism that rids another organism of the targeted aversive stimulus. This is definitely different from positive reinforcement where the reinforcing event is the production of the stimulus. One distinct characteristic of aversive control is an avoidance or escape behavior targeted. The maintained….

It could be as simple as a high-five, pat on the back, praise, a kiss, or a hug. It could also be simple words and actions that could make her mom feel needed around the house since being needed gives the person a feel of being important -- a form of favorable stimulus.
To strengthen the independent behavior, Dorothy may choose to remove the aversive stimulus in her mom's environment. If it irritates Dorothy's mom to be looked over most of the day (aversive stimulus in this case) because it reminds her of her disability, she could be allowed to spend the whole afternoon by herself if she was able to go to the bathroom on her own. Her mom can also be allowed to skip a chore she dislikes, such as feeding the dogs (aversive stimulus in this case), if she was able to prepare their breakfast all by….

Hence, variables that occur outside of the classroom have an impact on the teacher's ability to institute positive behavior support (PBS). That makes it all the more vital that strategies are in place in the classroom designed to deal with all setting events, distant and recent, when possible.
Body of Paper -- Distant Setting Events & Antecedents

How do antecedents effect the behavior of students? Antecedents have a tendency to either pull individuals or push individuals into doing something, or feeling a certain way. Author Edward P. Sarafino points out that a stimulus serves as an antecedent; for example, children seeing other children rope jumping before class starts is a stimulus for an antecedent because it sets the table for behavior. The rope jumping is orderly, fun, and children have smiles when they to their rope jumping (Sarafino, 2010, 71).

Children learn through stimulus generalization, by responding to stimuli, and by physically….


Specific Application of Negative Reinforcement:

Dorothy could also use negative reinforcement to encourage her mother's effort at becoming more independent. For example, if Dorothy's mother strongly dislikes the type of music that Dorothy listens to at home, Dorothy could immediately turn off her music to reward her mother for every instance in which she came downstairs from her bedroom.

Just as in the case of positive reinforcement, the removal of a stimulus perceived by the subject as unpleasant, (such as rock music), this form of negative reward would work whether or not Dorothy provided the reward in conjunction with and explicit acknowledging that it was a specific reward for her mother's efforts.

Likewise, just as in the case of positive reward, the negative reward would probably work much faster if Dorothy does acknowledge that her extra consideration of her mother's likes and dislikes corresponds directly to her appreciating her mother's effort to comply….

Learning Reinforcement
For learning to effectively take place, a number of concepts must be brought together and these include but are not in any way limited to environmental, emotional as well as cognitive influences. One of the most prominent learning theories is the social learning theory whose fronting was most prominently done by Albert andura amongst others.

The Social Learning Theory

The social learning theory is founded on the view that most learning is undertaken within the social context. However, according to Ronald L. Akers, the social learning theory must not only be taken to be a theory of peer influence.

With that in mind, the key concepts in this case include; modeling, imitation as well as observational learning. The social learning theory has four basic principles with the first principle stating that most of the learning is informed by an observation of behavior. Here, the reasoning is that the learning process is triggered….

Inappropriate use of the terms "noncontingent reinforcement" and "differential reinforcement of other behaviors"
Shakespeare would not have anticipated this issue -- labels for procedures when he wrote "What is in a name, a rose with any other would smell as sweet." The controversy is not about the effect of the procedure but rather relates to if the applied behavior analysis on the use of the terms 'noncontingent reinforcement' -- NC and 'differential reinforcement of other behaviors' -- DO are appropriate and the definitions of the process. The irony is that there is no dispute in the effectiveness of the processes but if the use of the terms is confusing and if the definition of reinforcement is contingent on behavior. The question then is if the issue will be dead and if it can be shown that an alternate name may clear the confusion especially with regard to the term 'contingent behavior'….

The employees will alter their behavior accordingly, depending on which behavior they feel will have the most positive outcome.
Clearly the correct course of action for the company is to amend the reinforcement mechanisms. This can be done either through positive reinforcement or negative. Passing the course is mandatory, but passing the first time could receive a reward. The company could also reduce the benefit of taking the course. It probably will need to be paid time, but the company could avoid running the course at a nice hotel, instead using normal meeting rooms that do not convey any sense of reward. Make the course as horrible as possible so that employees will want to pass it as quickly as possible.

As well, the company could use negative reinforcement mechanisms. Employees could be punished for failing to pass the course the first time. There are legal limits as to what this….

The popularized Skinnerian position concerning the inadequacy of punishment in suppressing "instrumental" behaviour is, if correct at all, only conditionally correct."
Still other researchers such as aron (1977) state that punishment can work under certain conditions: "(a) if you can punish almost every time, (b) punish immediately, - punish in socially acceptable ways, and (d) do not punish harshly or become overly angry." Regardless of scientific evidence or suspected measures that would make punishment more effective, the intent of punishment in Reinforcement Theory is to suppress inappropriate behavior, not to solve underlying problems. Considering the scope of the application of punishment, it is, in many instances, neither practical nor desirable to replace punishment with a rewards system. Crime is an obvious example. True, suppression may only be short-term with punishment as the only redress, but this is why the length of the prison sentence is designed to match the severity….

organizational culture and in particularly emphasize the need to design a better Strategic Intelligence, wherein motivation, foresight, vision and partnering are united in a cohesive alignment that fosters leadership and knowledge building (Maccoby et al., 2014, p. 62). In my current organization, co-workers are all too often motivated by selfish principles -- they want the lightest schedule, they want to avoid heavy lifting, they try to get the ear of the managers so as to improve their own working condition at the expense of others. This type of behavior is reflected in management as well. The culture is very dog-eat-dog, and I feel that in a hospital, the culture should be more caring, with more emphasis on solidarity than on selfish desires.
Thus, in my organization, I would promote a culture that is rooted in teamwork and putting patients first; I would promote happy interactions with co-workers and patients by….

The researchers gathered data through face-to-face interviews with sixteen African-American boys over the course of a three-month period during the childrens'2002-2003 academic school year. This was a very limited sampling, albiet with a very specific focus group. All of students were regular education students between the ages of eight and thireen years old. (ilson-Jones & Caston, 2004, p.1)
The study asked what influenced this group of student's success and commitment to school? The interviewers concluded that the collective societal influence of school and home was key in fostering the children's desire to learn. hile other factors were also influential, such as the relative literacy level of the primary caretakers of the child, overall peer and parental attitude to learning, and the willingness to foster such learning in social as well as individual classroom environments played a key factor in student success. The study was said to reinforce findings of the….

Instrumental Conditioning
PAGES 4 WORDS 1331

Instrumental Conditioning
One of the key principals in psychology is instrumental conditioning. This is when punishment or reinforcement is utilized to encourage the subject to engage in particular types of behavior. The basic idea behind this approach is to increase the chances that a specific kind of action will take place in the future. Once this happens, is when there can be a transformation in how the subject is reacting to the stimuli that they will see, hear or feel. (Cherry, 2011) This is significant, because it is showing how this is utilized as a basic strategy to subtly change the way someone is responding to various events. To fully understand this technique we will examine how this kind of conditioning is used by someone who is learning to ride a bike. This will be accomplished by: comparing positive / negative reinforcement that relate to the situation, examining the role of….

respondent behavior and operant behavior, and give a real-Life example of each.
Operant behaviour encompasses the actions of an individual that are purposefully driven to produce a desired effect. Examples of operant behavior would include a driver pushing the gas pedal in a car to produce a faster speed and giving a child a much-desired gift with the expectation of seeing the child's glee in response. Respondent behavior encompasses the actions of an individual that are not purposefully driven but are nonetheless actions that result from external stimulation. These types of behaviours are frequently referred to as reflexes as they are involuntary responses to an environmental stimuli. Examples of respondent behavior include an individual's yelp of pain when he or she hits his or her finger with a hammer or when an individual involuntarily closes his or her eyes when he or she sneezes.

Distinguish between positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, and….

Title: Addressing the Nuances of Oral Work Correction: A Comprehensive Guide

Introduction:
Oral work, encompassing both speaking and listening skills, plays a crucial role in effective communication. As educators, it is imperative that we provide constructive feedback to students to enhance their oral proficiency. This essay explores various strategies and considerations for correcting oral work, ensuring that students receive meaningful and actionable guidance to improve their communication abilities.

1. Establishing a Positive and Supportive Environment:

- Creating a classroom culture where students feel comfortable making mistakes and taking risks during oral presentations.
- Fostering a supportive atmosphere where peers provide constructive feedback to each other,....

1. Encourage social engagement: Encouraging elderly individuals in long term care facilities to participate in group activities, social events, and regular interactions with other residents can combat feelings of isolation and improve mental well-being.

2. Implement regular physical activity programs: Physical exercise has been shown to improve mood, reduce anxiety and depression, and promote general well-being. Facilities should offer a variety of exercise options tailored to different abilities and needs.

3. Provide access to mental health services: Having access to mental health professionals, counselors, and therapists can help elderly individuals manage stress, cope with challenges, and work through emotional issues.

4. Offer cognitive....

Coping Strategies for Students to Enhance Productivity

The academic journey for students is often characterized by a multitude of challenges and demands. To navigate these challenges effectively, students require a robust repertoire of coping strategies that enable them to maintain their productivity, manage stress, and achieve their academic goals. This comprehensive guide explores various coping strategies that students can employ to enhance their productivity. These strategies include setting clear goals, practicing stress management, avoiding multitasking, instilling discipline, embracing micro breaks, and prioritizing adequate sleep.

Goal Setting: The Foundation for Success

Goal setting serves as the cornerstone for productivity. By establishing specific, measurable, achievable,....

One way to demonstrate love and support for struggling readers with reading and language deficits is to provide individualized attention and support. This can be done through personalized one-on-one tutoring sessions, where the reader can receive targeted instruction and practice. Additionally, creating a comfortable and encouraging learning environment can help the struggling reader feel supported and valued.

Incorporating activities that cater to the reader's interests and strengths can also help to boost their confidence and motivation. Providing positive reinforcement and celebrating small successes can show the struggling reader that their efforts are recognized and appreciated. Additionally, offering resources and tools such....

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2 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Positive Reinforcement According to Heffner

Words: 633
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

One has to wonder how much positive reinforcement will only be reinforcing the sense of entitlement they have received from their parents vs. The hard work and responsibility…

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2 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Positive Reinforcement

Words: 597
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Helplessness Theory and Response Contingent Positive Reinforcement Theory. It would not be entirely incorrect to state that these theories merely emphasize different aspects of a similar type of…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Teaching

Misbehavior in Students Positive Reinforcement Strategies to

Words: 1204
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Misbehavior in Students: Positive Reinforcement Strategies to Cope ith Negative Student Behavior" Marsh Submission to Behavioral Interventions Misbehavior in Students: Positive Reinforcement Strategies to Cope with Negative Student Behavior This paper…

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3 Pages
Literature Review

Psychology - Behaviorism

Positive Reinforcement and Nicotine

Words: 991
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Literature Review

Aversive Control Punishment can be defined as a way to reduce a given behavior by attaching a consequence to behaving a certain way or doing a particular thing. Some of…

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2 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Positive & Negative Reinforcements Reinforcement

Words: 595
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

It could be as simple as a high-five, pat on the back, praise, a kiss, or a hug. It could also be simple words and actions that could…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

Teaching

Positive Behavior Support What Are

Words: 1353
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Hence, variables that occur outside of the classroom have an impact on the teacher's ability to institute positive behavior support (PBS). That makes it all the more vital…

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3 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Psychology - Reinforcement Applying Positive

Words: 805
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Specific Application of Negative Reinforcement: Dorothy could also use negative reinforcement to encourage her mother's effort at becoming more independent. For example, if Dorothy's mother strongly dislikes the type of…

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5 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Learning Reinforcement for Learning to Effectively Take

Words: 1504
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

Learning Reinforcement For learning to effectively take place, a number of concepts must be brought together and these include but are not in any way limited to environmental, emotional as…

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5 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Inappropriate Use of the Terms Noncontingent Reinforcement and Differential Reinforcement of Other Behaviors

Words: 1609
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Inappropriate use of the terms "noncontingent reinforcement" and "differential reinforcement of other behaviors" Shakespeare would not have anticipated this issue -- labels for procedures when he wrote "What is in…

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2 Pages
Research Paper

Leadership

Expectation and Reinforcement Theory Expectancy

Words: 635
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Research Paper

The employees will alter their behavior accordingly, depending on which behavior they feel will have the most positive outcome. Clearly the correct course of action for the company is…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Rewards and Punishment Reinforcement Theory

Words: 878
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

The popularized Skinnerian position concerning the inadequacy of punishment in suppressing "instrumental" behaviour is, if correct at all, only conditionally correct." Still other researchers such as aron (1977) state…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
2 Pages
Essay

Business

Negative Reinforcement and Motivation

Words: 603
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

organizational culture and in particularly emphasize the need to design a better Strategic Intelligence, wherein motivation, foresight, vision and partnering are united in a cohesive alignment that fosters…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
2 Pages
Term Paper

Teaching

Reinforcing Positive Behaviors in School

Words: 643
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

The researchers gathered data through face-to-face interviews with sixteen African-American boys over the course of a three-month period during the childrens'2002-2003 academic school year. This was a very…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
4 Pages
Research Paper

Psychology

Instrumental Conditioning

Words: 1331
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Instrumental Conditioning One of the key principals in psychology is instrumental conditioning. This is when punishment or reinforcement is utilized to encourage the subject to engage in particular types of…

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image
2 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Respondent Behavior and Operant Behavior and Give

Words: 580
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

respondent behavior and operant behavior, and give a real-Life example of each. Operant behaviour encompasses the actions of an individual that are purposefully driven to produce a desired effect.…

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