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Psychological Testing
Words: 1536 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64787182
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Psychological Testing

Psychological tests are commonly used to establish individual capabilities and characteristics. Such inference is derived as a result of collecting, integrating and interpreting information about a person (Marnat, 2009). It constitutes measuring variables through the use of procedures and devices crafted to demonstrate a person's behavior (Cohen & Swerdlik, 2009). Assessment of personality is, ideally, the measuring and evaluating of psychological aspects such as one's values, states, world view, personal identity, acculturation, behavior styles, sense of humor and the related characteristics of an individual (Cohen & Swerdlik, 2009). Personality tests are designed to determine the character of a human being or their disposition. The initial personality tests were designed to examine and predict disorders of clinical nature. The tests are still useful today and are applied to determine cases in need of counseling. The latest personality tests are used to measure normal characteristics (Miller, Mclntire, & Lovler, 2011).…

References

Cattell, H. E., & Mead, A. D. (2008). The sixteen-personality factor questionnaire (16PF). The SAGE handbook of personality theory and assessment, 2, 135-178.

Cohen, R. & Swerdlik, M. (2009). Psychological testing and assessment (7th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Friedman, M. (1996). Type A Behavior: Its Diagnosis and Treatment. New York: Plenum Press (Kluwer Academic Press)

Groth-Marnat, G. (2009). Handbook of psychological assessment. John Wiley & Sons.

Psychological Testing Ethical and Legal Use of
Words: 1185 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60730390
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Psychological Testing

Ethical and legal use of psychological testing has a significant impact on the standards and practices of psychological testing to demonstrate intervention for those being tested. The purpose of the ethical boundaries of psychological testing is to ensure that clinicians are utilizing the best test possible and then applying the results ethically to demonstrate assistance with diagnosis and intervention modes in a way that best meets the needs of the subject. This work will discuss the ethical application and utilization of psychological testing instruments to demonstrate the best possible outcomes and interventions for subjects in a way that recognizes tests strengths and limitations and ultimately leads to the appropriate and essential answers needed to aid people with diagnosis and treatment objectives. There are a significant number of psychological tests at the disposal of clinicians and they are in a constant state of revision by the entities that develop…

References

Emanuel, E.J., & Menikoff, J. (2011). Reforming the regulations governing research with human subjects. The New England Journal Of Medicine, 365(12), 1145-1150. doi:10.1056/NEJMsb1106942

Green, B., Li, L., Morris, J., Gluzman, R., Davis, J.L., Wang, M., & Katz, R.V. (2011). Detailed knowledge of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: Who knows what? A framework for health promotion strategies. Health Education & Behavior, 38(6), 629-636. doi:10.1177/1090198110391529

Hogan, T.P. (2007). Psychological testing: A practical introduction (2nd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Nagy, T.F. (2011). Ethics in psychological assessment. In T.F. Nagy (Ed.), Essential ethics for psychologists: A primer for understanding and mastering core issues (pp. 171-183). Washington, DC U.S.: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/12345-009

Psychological Tests and Measurements
Words: 2465 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 65728271
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Psychological Assessment

Confidentiality Disclaimer

eason for eferral

Identifying information

Developmental History

Medical and Psychiatric History

Short Family and Social History

Short History of School Behavior

Tests Administered

Standardized Instruments

Information Assessment Techniques

Mental Status Examination and Behavioral Observations

esults Form Testing

The following results were obtained with respect to the different domain of functioning of Sebastian based on information from multiple sources.

Cognitive-Intellectual-Executive Functioning

Social-Emotional Functioning

Diagnostic Impression

Confidentiality Disclaimer:

There is a chance that the subject of the report or those who are closely associated with the subject of the report could get psychologically and/or emotionally hurt as the report contains sensitive information about the subject. This report is meant only for people trained enough to read such reports and should not be given to the subject named in the report. In order to ensure that the name of the person who is also the subject of the report…

References

Goldfinger, K. And Pomerantz, A. (2010). Psychological assessment and report writing. Los Angeles: SAGE.

Groth-Marnat, G. (2003). Handbook of psychological assessment. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

No authorship indicated, (2003). Psychological Assessment: Editors. Psychological Assessment, 15(1), pp.1-1.

8 | Page

Assessment and Testing
Words: 795 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 61926631
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Measuring special abilities can be limited in its application due to unstructured settings like unstructured interviews eliciting thematic life narratives. These kinds of interviews although useful in examining and measuring abilities, can be confining due to the range of topics "considered and abiguities inherent when interpreting this information; (b) structured interviews and self-report instruments elicit details concerning patients' conscious understanding of themselves and overtly experienced sypmtomatology" (Shum, O'Gorman & Myors, 2006, p. 149). Interviews like these help the psychiatrist/psychologist hone in on any unique or special abilities, even vocational abilities. Personality inventories or self report inventories, along with work and personal values measures like, the importance of family, help determine what kind of interests/abilities the person may be good in or be passionate about. As it concerns possible issues in regards to vocational ability or interest testing, certain things may be lacking such as suitable range of options to explore…

References

Larsen, M., Berglund, E., Joseph, R., & Pratt, H. (2011). Psychological Assessment and Testing. Springer, 29 -- 52.

Shum, D., O'Gorman, J., & Myors, B. (2006). Psychological testing and assessment (1st ed.). South Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Diversity in Psychological Testing
Words: 1346 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 7716003
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Psychological Testing: Establishing Diversity

Psychological testing is the backbone of how psychologists are able to gain a higher level of understanding regarding human beings and how/why they act as they do. Good psychological exams can help tremendously in the task of problem-solving and in getting a better snapshot of a person's psychological or mental health issues while identifying strengths and weaknesses. Furthermore, a precise psychological exam helps to exam an individual's precise point in time in a mode which examines their present-functioning in terms of test data. There are a range of psychological tests which are available, many of which are the results of decades and decades of research and procedures. The four main types of psychological tests are as follows: clinical interviews, assessment of intellectual functioning, personality assessment, and then behavioral assessments.

However, since psychological tests emerged within the field, the issue of diversity in psychological testing was an…

References

Cherry, K. (2013). What Is the Rorschach Inkblot Test? Retrieved from About.com:  http://psychology.about.com/od/rindex/g/rorschach-ink.htm 

Reynolds, C., & Suzuki, L. (2003). Bias in Psychological Assessment. Retrieved from wileypub.com:  http://lp.wileypub.com/HandbookPsychology/SampleChapters/Volume10.pdf 

Wakefield, H., & Underwager, R. (n.d.). The application of images in child abuse investigations.

Retrieved from  http://www.tc.umn.edu/~under006/Library/Images.html

Evaluating Three Psychological Tests
Words: 2152 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23981793
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Psychological Test Report

Tests Administered

NEO-Five Factor Inventory

Sentence Completion Series (Adult Form)

Ways of Coping Inventory

NEO-Five Factor Inventory

The individual scored average ranks in a number of the assessment categories. For the Neuroticism scale there was a total score for this category was a 21, suggesting the individual is in the average range based on comparable female scores. In general, this means that she is "calm and able to deal with stress, but sometimes experience feelings of guilt, anger, and sadness" (Locke, 2013). The individual is most likely not easily stressed to the point of detrimental psychological damage, as she may have coping skills that allow her to deal with her stress in an effective manner. This may mean she takes a calm approach to emotional or stressful situations. Still, the scores suggest she may still have feelings of guilt or empathy, which is a typical human response…

Psychological and Socio-Cultural Theories of Risk
Words: 4457 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67940104
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Psychological and Socio-Cultural Theories of isk

Definition of isk

The term "risk" is often defined differently depending on the particular paradigm. For example, risk is economics is typically defined in terms of differences in possible monetary outcomes and individuals/corporations involved in risk -- seeking behavior are typically seeking higher monetary payoffs (Markowitz 1952). When clinical psychologists, sociologists, law enforcement officials, and lay individuals identify "risky behaviors" they are referring to a broader meaning of the term "risk." In this context behaviors and involve risk are typically defined as behaviors that can be of potential harm to the person performing them or to other people (Steinberg 2008). In this sense the term "risk" is typically viewed in terms of possible negative outcomes as opposed to some other positive outcome such as the potential monetary gain.

This particular paper will assume that the definition of risky behavior includes some type of a…

References

Aristotle .1998. Aristotle: The Nicomachean ethics. In Ackrill J. et al. eds. Oxford World' s

Classics. York: Oxford, pp. 229-301.

Beck, U. 1992. Risk society: Towards a new modernity. New Delhi: Sage.

Boholm, A. 1996. Risk perception and social anthropology: Critique of cultural Theory. Ethnos 61, pp. 64-84.

Psychological Testing and Assessment There Is a
Words: 915 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 42312241
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Psychological Testing and Assessment

There is a distinct relationship between psychological testing and assessment in conjunction with the DSM-IV. First, testing provides a systematic means of assessments that provide insight into the potential mental complications of a patient. Further, psychological testing provides a means of flexible evaluation which can better conform to the changing needs of the public. By providing flexibility in its approach to assessment, psychological testing can better adapt to changing and varying conditions within the mental health profession. Much like the internet, new health issues arise yearly with profound implications for the general public. Psychological testing and assessment attempts to abate or diminish the influence of these changing dynamics on the health profession and the community at large.

What is case history data?

The American Heritage Medical Dictionary defines case history data as, "A detailed account of the facts affecting the development or condition of a person…

References

1) "Clinical Interview (psychology) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia." Encyclopedia - Britannica Online Encyclopedia. Web. 26 Jan. 2012. .

2) "Psychological Report Format." Untitled 1. Web. 26 Jan. 2012. .

Psychological Tests Using the Mental
Words: 1400 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 12669172
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Purpose: The Woodcock-Johnson III Diagnostic eading Battery's designation is for assessment and measurement of the important dimensions of phonological oral language abilities and phonological awareness, both in adult and children.

Population: Both adults and children (age of 3-80 years).

Date of Publication: 2004.

Acronym(s): WJ III (DB).

Score Scales: eading Comprehension, Basic eading Skills, Phonics Knowledge, Broad eading, Brief eading, Total eading, eading Fluency, Spelling of Words, Oral Comprehension, eading Vocabulary.

Time: 50-60 minutes.

Administration: Individual.

Author (s): Fredrick, S.A., Nancy, M. & Woodcock, .C.

Publisher: iverside Publishing, Inc.

Comments: Software Scoring and Paper-and-Pencil.

Sub-tests: Passage Comprehension, Word-Letter Identification, Sound Awareness, Spelling of Sounds, Oral Vocabulary, Sound Blending.

elated eview: 1713318.

Description

The Woodcock-Johnson III Diagnostic eading Battery is for the assessment and measurement of the important dimensions of phonological oral language abilities and phonological awareness, in both adult and children (Brande, 2008). By utilization of software scoring and the…

Risk & Needs Assessment Group. (1986). Substance Abuse Questionnaire (SAQ)-Adult

Probation III. In R.J. Nagle. (Ed.), the ninth mental measurement yearbook (Electronic

version). Retrieved from the Buros University Mental Measurement Yearbook online database.

Psychological Testing Psychological Tests Are an Important
Words: 994 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31249734
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Psychological Testing

Psychological tests are an important aspect of clinical psychology. Psychological tests are normally administered by professional psychologists as a way of learning fact on how people function or in predicting their future. The paper will look at the definition of the term test, give a description of the major categories of tests while identifying the major uses and users of these tests. There will also be comparing and contrasting the concepts of validity and reliability and a discussion of how they affect the psychological testing field.

Definition of tests

A test or examination is defined as an assessment aimed at measuring the knowledge, aptitude, skill, physical fitness or classification in other different topics. Tests can be administered orally, by use of a paper, computer or in the confinement of a specific area which requires the person taking the test to physically perform a specific set of skills. Tests…

References

Renate, R. (2010).The Real Difference between Reliability and Validity. Retrieved September 14, 2013 from http://www.ehow.com/info_8481668_real-difference-between-reliability-validity.html

Dority, J. (2011).Five Common Types of Psychological Tests. Retrieved September 14, 2013 from  http://www.livestrong.com/article/101417-five-common-types-psychological-tests/ 

Edu.com. (2009).psychological Testing. Retrieved September 14, 2013 from http://users.ipfw.edu/abbott/120/PsychTesting.html

Psychological Barriers to Effective Decision-Making
Words: 1226 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64399352
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The recency effect: most manager at times have an overreliance on the most readily available information to make decisions, it commonly occurs when carrying out annual performance evaluations of employees where recent performance of the employees plays a major role than accomplishments that have taken place in the earlier periods of review, this has an adverse effect has it may lead to the deviation of the set desired goals. (John k.bochardt 2010)

Anchoring bias: in most cases the price tags on products often if not always affect the purchasing negations between consumers and retailers, and most of the time consumer's end up paying higher prices for the product than necessary. This notion that sometimes leads us to allow initial reference point to distort our estimates is what professor oberto refers to anchoring bias.

From a marketing point-of-view anchoring bias can come about when negotiating the renewal of a contract with…

References

John k.borchardt (2010): overcoming barriers to effective deciosion making. An examination of cognitive bses that cause us to make poor decisions

Retrieved from: http://www.ncmahq.org/files/Articles/CM0610%20-%2054-61.pdf 

Andrew T. Chadwick and Matthew D. Segall: Overcoming psychological barriers to good discovery

Decisions:

Psychological Testing
Words: 1884 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1422266
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Psychological Testing.

Teachers must test. It is one method of evaluating progress and determining individual student needs. More than two hundred and fifty million standardized tests are administered each year to forty four million students who attend American elementary and secondary schools (Ysseldyke et al. 1992). Testing is only part of the broader conception of assessment. Testing is the sampling of behavior in students to obtain scores (quantitative indexes) or relative standing. In addition teachers and other school personnel assess or collect data through classroom observations, interviews with students' family members or care-givers. Psychological and psycho-educational tests are used in schools to help to identify types and bases and the extent of a student's learning difficulty or school adjustment problem. The assessment is used to make decisions about students.

At a curricular level, tests help to determine the effectiveness of a particular instructional intervention. Teachers give tests before and after…

Shepard, Lorrie A. (1994). The challenges of assessing young children appropriately. Phi Delta Kappan. Vol 76 No.3 206-212.

Taylor, K. And Walton, S. (2001). Testing pitfalls. Guiding students through taking standardized tests. Instructor Magazine October 2001.

Ysseldyke, James E. et al. (1992) Critical issues in special education. Houghton Mifflin Company. Boston, MA.

Psychological Reports Why Good Psychological
Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 94013043
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The final paragraph should summarize the observations of staff about patient behavior and level of motivation regarding the current admission or referral, as well as medications currently being used by the patient, especially if the patient was taking them at the time of the evaluative testing. This may affect the accuracy of the report, and the severity of the patient's symptoms.

Next, there is a section entitled "mental status examination," of the therapist's own observations, impressions, and assessment when meeting with the patient (Nail 1997). Physical health, appearance, and speech should be recorded, even if there are no abnormalities. Next, the "results of the evaluation" should be introduced. While there are several different models for writing reports, for most mental health status evaluations, the Hypothesis Testing Model is favored (Nail 1997). In the MSH model, possible answers are posed to the referral questions included in the "purpose of evaluation section"…

Reference

Nail, Greg. (1997). Psychological evaluation. MS Resource.

Retrieved December 3, 2009 at  http://www.msresource.com/format.html

Psychological Tests Are Pompous Procedures of Intellectual
Words: 684 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53823930
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Psychological tests are pompous procedures of intellectual performance. A good number are objective as well as medical; nevertheless, definite projective tests might engross various height of prejudiced elucidation. The main aim of this paper is to clearly bring the meaning of the term test, describe the main classifications of tests and show the main or significant major uses as well as those who use the varied forms of tests, also offered here are the comparisons and contrasts of the concepts of reliability as well as validity of the methods of tests and how they affect the field of psychological testing.

Tests can be defined as verbal, visual or written assessments administered to evaluate the cognitive as well as emotional performance of individuals regardless of their age. The main purpose of these processes is to evaluate a multiplicity of intellectual capabilities as well as characteristics such as attainment as well as…

Reference

Gregory, R.J. (2007). Psychological testing: History, principles, and applications (5th ed.). Boston, MA:Pearson.. Retrieved August 26th, 2013  http://www.pearsonhighered.com/assets/hip/us/hip_us_pearsonhighered/samplechapter/0137017510.pdf

Psychological Disorder ADHD ADHD Is
Words: 1806 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 61198795
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My final recommendation was that the parents and Adam's teachers should work as a team to help Adam manage his condition. In other words, the parents should communicate with the teachers to determine if the interventions have been effective. I would then talk to the parents themselves every two months to make further recommendations as necessary.

CONCLUSION

While drug interventions for ADHD, especially in children, have been increasingly controversial because of their possible side-effects, their main advantage is the speed and efficacy with which they work. Those who have benefited reported that the effects were almost immediately visible, on the same day the drug was used.

On the other hand, drug therapies for any mental disorder have been imperfect and frequently plagued by side-effects and non-compliance. Continuous research is therefore necessary to improve not only drug therapies and identify potential harmful effects in the long-term, but also to find possible…

References

ADHD Information Library (2008). ADHD Treatment Options: many Good Choices. Newideas.Net. Retrieved from: http://newideas.net/adhd/treatment

Martin, B. (2011). Treatment for Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD). PsychCentral. Retrieved from:  http://psychcentral.com/ lib/2007/treatment-for-attention-deficit-disorder-adhd/

Personal Health Lifestyles, Inc. (2001). Attention Deficit Disorder: Facts, Prevention and Treatment Strategies. Retrieved from:  http://www.healingwithnutrition.com/adisease/add-adhd/add-adhd.html#A1

Psychological Counseling Interview Counselor Tom
Words: 4270 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 81626687
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Okay?

Client: Thank you Christina, I look forward to seeing you next week.

Zal (1990, p. 136) states that it can indeed be a very fragile and emotionally battered individual that comes to your office for evaluation. An adequate treatment plan for panic disorder must therefore comprise many specific aspects. The first of course is to make the diagnosis and share it confidently and directly with the patient. As the first person to encounter the patient with some understanding of his or her symptoms, you are in a unique position to do an enormous therapeutic service by giving them a clear, precise definition of their illness and once and for all showing them that their symptoms have meaning. Let them know that it is only since 1980 that panic disorder has a name and that it is only during this decade that even psychiatry is beginning to understand this malady.…

References www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100339937

Austrian, S.G. (2000). Mental Disorders, Medications, and Clinical Social Work. New York: Columbia University Press. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100339938  www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85908719

Barber, J.P. & Crits-Christoph, P. (Eds.). (1995). Dynamic Therapies for Psychiatric Disorders: Axis I. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85908721  www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6960620

Beck, A.T., Emery, G., & Greenberg, R.L. (1985). Anxiety Disorders and Phobias A Cognitive Perspective. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6960620  www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8992037

Craske, M.G. (1999). Anxiety Disorders: Psychological Approaches to Theory and Treatment. Boulder, CO: Westview Press. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8992037  www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85933111

Psychological Effects the Iraqi War
Words: 1880 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90420779
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This point also emphasizes a cardinal aspect in the recent literature. There has been an increasing research focus on a more discursive and holistic approach which should be adopted in dealing with PTSD and related areas of psychological concern. At present the research into the field is an ongoing process which must be continually updated. The literature also leaves little doubt that PTSD and other related psychological problems as result of the Iraq war can no longer be ignored.

orks Cited

Casualties of war. April 21, 2007. http://www.theage.com.au/news/world/casualties-of-war/2005/10/26/1130302840559.html?page=3

Hare M. 2007. Army psychologist using new ways to treat

Stress. April 20, 2007. http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070422/NES0201/704220321/-1/COLUMNS

Finer J. 2006. Frontline Care for 'At Risk' Soldiers: Army Effort Treats

Psychological Trauma at Source. April 20, 2007. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/06/07/AR2006060702390_pf.html

Friedman M.J. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Overview. Retrieved April 20, 2007, at http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/clients/sub.cfm?source=mhealth/factsheets/overview

Foa, E., & Meadows, E. (1997). Psychosocial Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Critical…

Works Cited

Casualties of war. April 21, 2007.  http://www.theage.com.au/news/world/casualties-of-war/2005/10/26/1130302840559.html?page=3 

Hare M. 2007. Army psychologist using new ways to treat

Stress. April 20, 2007.  http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070422/NEWS0201/704220321/-1/COLUMNS 

Finer J. 2006. Frontline Care for 'At Risk' Soldiers: Army Effort Treats

Psychological Attitudes Toward Risk Is
Words: 626 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57486549
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It is essential that such risks be managed in an appropriate and targeted way.

One way in which to mitigate the risk of problematic interpersonal relationships within the workplace is by means of both formal and informal gatherings. Informal gatherings are beneficial in terms of helping employees to become familiar with each other in a context other than work. Work parties and lunches can for example be used in this way. This kind of informal gathering is perhaps best instituted when there is not a large amount of tension between workers.

For greater tension levels, more formal measures can be taken. Seminars presented by human relations experts can for example help to teach employees the importance of functioning within a diverse environment. Such seminars should be presented in such a way as to not threaten employees or their attitudes, but rather to gradually change their attitudes. Seminars can for example…

Psychological View of Investment &
Words: 1828 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44339313
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" (Grabel, 2004) Good institutions serve as the basis for economic growth due to right market-based and market-guided incentives being created which include those stated in this study and specifically: (1) rule of law; (2) competitive markets; (3) low taxation (4) noninflationary monetary policies; and (5) free trade. (2002) Good institutions serve to "Foster other cultural patterns of conduct, hard work, savings and industriousness, honesty and trustworthiness, creativity, and self-responsibility. These are the bases of the wealth of nations." (Easterly, 2002; as cited in: Ebeling, 2002) These tools are helpful in avoiding and mitigating economic risks in development.

ibliography

Easterly, W (2002) the Elusive Quest for Growth: An Economists Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics (Cambridge, MIT Press) Chapter 2

Krueger, a.O (1998) Why Trade Liberalization Is good for Growth, Economic Journal 108

Demetriades, P. And Hussein, K.A (1996) Does Financial Development Cause Economic Growth? Time-Series Evidence From 16 Countries,…

Bibliography

Easterly, W (2002) the Elusive Quest for Growth: An Economists Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics (Cambridge, MIT Press) Chapter 2

Krueger, a.O (1998) Why Trade Liberalization Is good for Growth, Economic Journal 108

Demetriades, P. And Hussein, K.A (1996) Does Financial Development Cause Economic Growth? Time-Series Evidence From 16 Countries, Journal of Development Economics 51, pp387-411.

Grabel, I. (2003) International Private Capital Flows and Developing Countries, in H-J. Chang (ed.) Rethinking Development Economics, London: Anthem Press.

Online Pediatric Pain Assessment Pain
Words: 2462 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 31301863
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Combining these two methods is one effective strategy in mitigating pain in children (Cohen).

Additional strategies that involve both the patient and family are evident, particularly when dealing with chronic pain. Children sometimes internalize pain, believing that they must restrict their activity, particularly when parents worry and hesitate to allow them to be active. Parents see play as worsening of the situation or a relapse, contributing to an overprotectivness. This, in turn, reflects on the self-image of the child. In any case, experts recommend that parents not react in a negative way -- either by thinking the child is faking pain or becoming so overprotective that the child is a virtual prisoner. Instead, the psychological strategy should be to set realistic and evolving strategies so that there is not a continue pessimism regarding future health outcomes. This, for adolescents, is critical since there is also a self-esteem issue that goes…

REFERENCES

The Handbook of Chronic Pain. (2007). New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Handbook of Pediatric Chronic Pain. (2011). New York: Springer.

Carter, B., & Threlkeld, M. (2012). Psychosocial perspectives in the treatment of pediatric chronic pain. Pediatric Rheumatology, 10(15), 1-11. Retrieved January 2013, from Pediatric Rheumatology:  http://www.ped-rheum.com/content/pdf/1546-0096-10-15.pdf 

Christie, D., & Wilson, C. (2005). CBT in Pediatric and Adolescent Health. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 8(4), 241-47.

Students Encounter Some for Psychological
Words: 667 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7235441
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Ideally, however, students should be subject to a wide variety of tests to paint a clearer picture of their proficiency. Norm-based tests provide an idea of how well a student has performed in relation to peers with a similar educational background; subjective tests can reveal creativity or talents not scored on a standardized test.

Q3. The validity coefficient is calculated in terms of whether the content of what is being tested (such as intelligence) is comprehensive enough; if the 'face' or surface validity meets a commonsensical test; if the construct of the test (such as how intelligence is defined) is valid; and if the outcomes of the test are supported by other, existing measures of validity (criterion-based validity).

Q4.

A reliable test produces the same results on a consistent basis, when it is administered to the same test population. If the same person, or people with similar backgrounds and demographic…

Forensic and Clinical Roles and Assessment While
Words: 1410 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27727725
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Forensic and Clinical oles and Assessment

While psychologists and psychiatrists may engage in both clinical and forensic practice, it important to recognize that clinical and forensic practice are distinct areas of practice. This means that the role of the forensic and clinical practitioner differs in several ways: "who the client of the psychologist is the nature of the relationship between the psychologist and the individual being evaluated, and the psychologist's approach to the material provided by the individual" (Packer, 2008). Moreover, it also means that the professional assesses the individual differently. These differences include: the purpose of the assessment, the goal of the intervention, and psycho-legal vs. psychological assessment. While the differences may seem clear, the reality is that even forensic evaluations can lead to the establishment of the type of relationships that develop in clinical practice, making it difficult for health care professionals and for their clients to differentiate…

References

American Psychological Association. (2011). Specialty guidelines for forensic psychologists.

Retrieved September 8, 2013 from American Psychology-Law Society website: http://www.ap-ls.org/aboutpsychlaw/SGFP_Final_Approved_2011.pdf

Role of Assessment in the Counseling Setting
Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 28744411
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Counseling services are applied with the intent to benefit a patient in the assistance and guidance of solving problems and difficulties within personal, social, or psychological components of their lives (Dictionary.com, 2011). A properly trained professional in the industry of counseling services is responsible for assessing a client in order to determine what route to take in guiding the patient through their life. It is imperative for the counselor to entirely concentrate on testing the client psychologically, cognitively, and in procedures that will better assist clients to make career and life plans successfully (Hood & Johnson, 2002).

Analyses are utilized as a measurement device or technique in order to comprehend and predict a certain behavior demonstrated within the client (Kaplan & Saccuzzo, 2009). A psychological test measures characteristics of human behavior. A psychological test can measure many different human traits and behaviors, including overt behaviors or covert behaviors (Kaplan &…

References

Dictionary.com. (2011). Counselor. Retrieved April 11, 2011 from  http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/counseling .

Hood, A.B. & Johnson, R.W. (2002). Assessment in counseling: A guide to the use of psychological assessment procedures. Retrieved April 11, 2011 from  http://eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch  _SearchValue_0=ED459395&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED459395

Kaplan, R.M., & Saccuzzo, D.P. (2009). Psychological testing: principles, application, and issues. [7th ed.]. Retrieved from  http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=4TIeNj -

MlrsC&oi=fnd&pg=PR19&dq=counseling%2Bpsychological+testing&ots=-

Clinician's Mirror Cultural Self-Assessment in
Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 18764787
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He looks at the methodological and practical problems that can impact assessment research in correctional settings, including the distinctive culture in correctional institutes. Megargee's reason for doing the research is today's huge population of incarcerated persons and the fact that psychological research that has been conducted on people outside of the incarceration setting may not be applicable to people who are incarcerated. He recognizes that there is a need for research in this area to determine whether tools developed elsewhere are applicable. He points out the irony of this lack of applicable research because clinical psychology was developed in the criminal justice setting. He does not really conduct any individual research, therefore the methodology is most akin to a literature review in which he assesses the information available about correctional institutions and draws conclusions from that information to determine why there is a lack of research on assessment in correctional…

References

Author Last Name, First Initial. (Year). Chapter 3: Looking into the clinician's mirror: cultural self-assessment. In Editor's Last Name, First Initial (Ed). Book Title. Place of Publication, Publisher.

Megargee, E. (1995). Assessment research in correctional settings: Methodological issues and practical problems. Psychological Assessment, 7(3), 359-366.

Forensic Assessment in The Role of the
Words: 861 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Discussion Chapter Paper #: 16584089
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Forensic Assessment

In "The role of the Violence isk Appraisal Guide and Historical, Clinical, isk- 20 in U.S. courts: A case law survey," Vitacco et al. discuss the use of the psychological forensic assessment in predicting future dangerousness. The authors are very critical of the use of psychological assessments for these purposes because of their belief, which is affirmed by investigation into case law, that psychologists often get their predictions wrong. In other words, psychologists are not necessarily able to predict future dangerousness, which can make an assessment of future dangerousness little more than guesswork.

One of the cases mentioned by Vitacco et al. was the seminal case of Barefoot v. Estelle, 463 U.S. 880 (1983). The defendant, Thomas Barefoot, was convicted of murdering a police officer. He was charged with a capital offense and the jury had to determine whether or not Barefoot was eligible for the death penalty.…

References

Barefoot v. Estelle, 463 U.S. 880 (1983).

Heilbrun, K., Grisson, T., & Goldstein, A.N. (2009). Introduction in Foundations of forensic mental health assessment. New York: Oxford University Press.

Heilbrun, K., Grisson, T., & Goldstein, A.N. (2009). The nature and evolution of forensic mental health assessment in Foundations of forensic mental health assessment. New York: Oxford University Press.

Heilbrun, K., Grisson, T., & Goldstein, A.N. (2009). Relevant sources of authority for developing best-practice standards in Foundations of forensic mental health assessment. New York: Oxford University Press.

Symptom and Treatment of Psychological Disorder
Words: 965 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34146978
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Treatment of Psychological Disorder

The bipolar disorder is a mental disorder and alternatively known as manic depression elevates the mood and cause depression to the affected individuals. The symptom of bipolar depression is the elevated mood, and it is the significant symptom of the affected person. During mania process, the affected individuals behaves irritably, display abnormally energetic and happy. The affected individuals often make poorly decision with little or no regard to the consequences. During the depression period, the affected individuals may have a negative outlook on life, and having poor eye contact with others. The risk of suicide is another symptom of bipolar disorder where between 30% and 40% of the victims attempt to inflict self -harm. Other mental issues include substance use disorder, and anxiety disorders. While it is difficult to establish the cause, however, the genetic and environmental factors have been responsible for the cause of bipolar…

Reference. Causes of Bipolar Disorder. Retrieved June 5, 2017 from  http://www.webmd.com/bipolar-disorder/guide/bipolar-disorder-causes#1 

Jenkins, M. M., Youngstrom, E. A., Youngstrom, J. K., Feeny, N. C., & Findling, R. L. (2012). Generalizability of Evidence-Based Assessment Recommendations for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder. Psychological Assessment, 24(2), 269 -- 281.  http://doi.org/10.1037/a0025775 

Kerner, B.(2014).Genetics of bipolar disorder. Appl Clin Genet. 7: 33 -- 42.

Measuring Various Psychological Instruments
Words: 2340 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 18298595
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Deconstructing the Utility of the orschach as a Measure of Personality and Psychopathology

This paper explores the enduring relvance of the orschach and finds that this instrument deserves such appositeness. It examines its strengths and weaknesses, and provides a review of literature that elucidates its value. This instrument is useful in numerous fields.

The orschach Inkblot Test is one of the most time honored and widespread assessment instruments within the field of psychology. It has endured in numerous forms ever since its inception in the early part of the 20th century (Meyer and Eblin, 2012, p. 107). During its tenure, it has experienced substantial amounts of criticism as well as various deployments in a number of diverse vertical industries and applications (Wood et al., 2003, p. 30). However, it is worth noting that this instrument has been revised and reformed on a number of occasions to continue delivering value to…

References

Franklin, K. W., & Cornell, D. G. (1997). Rorschach Interpretation With High-Ability Adolescent Females: Psychopathology or Creative Thinking?. Journal Of Personality Assessment, 68(1), 184.

Meehan, K. B., PhD., Ueng-McHale, J., Reynoso, J. S., PhD., Harris, Benjamin H, PhD., M.Ed, Wolfson, V. M., M.A., Gomes, H., PhD., & Tuber, S. B., PhD. (2008). Self-regulation and internal resources in school-aged children with ADHD symptomatology: An investigation using the rorschach inkblot method. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 72(4), 259-82. Retrieved from  http://search.proquest.com/docview/200473131?accountid=25340 

Meyer, G. J., & Eblin, J. J. (2012). An overview of the Rorschach Performance Assessment System (R-PAS). Psychological Injury & Law, 5, 107-121.

Wood, J. M., Nezworski, M. T., Lilienfeld, S. O., & Garb, H. N. (2003, Jul). The rorschach inkblot test, fortune tellers, and cold reading. The Skeptical Inquirer, 27, 29-33,61. Retrieved from  http://search.proquest.com/docview/219286741?accountid=25340

Practice Assessment Clinical Case
Words: 3226 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65358729
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Gender: Female

Birthdate: 01/16/1985

Age: 30 years, 11 months

Dates of Evaluation: 10/25/15 -10/30/2015

eason for eferral

This is a 30-year-old right-handed woman referred by Dr. Smith for a psychological evaluation to determine any lingering psychological and cognitive effects as a result of a mild head injury that she suffered on October 15, 2015 as a result of an automobile accident. The client has complained of severe memory problems, being disoriented at times, feeling depressed and anxious, and having nightmares the accident. Her physical complaints consist of headaches, back aches, poor sleep, nausea, and vomiting.

Identifying Information

The client is a 30-year-old, divorced, Hispanic woman who lives with her children in a home that she rents in XXX (client please insert city). She has been married three times and has three children from two of the marriages.

Developmental History

The client grew up in XXXX (insert). She reported that her…

References

Baddeley, A. (1992). Working memory. Science, 255(5044), 556-559.

Black, D. O., Wallace, G. L., Sokoloff, J. L., & Kenworthy, L. (2009). Brief report: IQ split predicts social symptoms and communication abilities in high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 39(11), 1613-1619.

Groth-Marnat, G. (2009). Handbook of psychological assessment. (5th ed.). Indianapolis, IN John Wiley & Sons.

Hogan, T.P. (2015). Psychological testing: A practical introduction . (3rd ed). Hoboken, NJ.

An Assessment of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory II
Words: 408 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 50154867
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MMPI-II esults:

Scale

T-Score

L (Lie)-Scale

F (Infrequency)-Scale

K (Correction)-Scale

Hysteria Scale

Depression Scale

Hypochondriasis Scale

Psychopathic Deviant Scale

Masculine-Feminine Scale

Paranoia Scale

Psychasthenia Scale

Schizophrenia Scale

Mania Scale

Social Introversion

This individual produced a valid MMPI-II profile with overt attempts to present as being overly virtuous, defensive, or a deviant or an attempt to exaggerate their perceived problems. Individuals with similar scores on the validity scales approach the test in a valid manner but sometimes may display political, social, or religious convictions that could be considered out of the ordinary (Hogan, 2015). The pattern displayed on the validity scales also suggests that these individuals are accurately reporting psychological problems.

Individuals with similar profiles on the clinical scales tend to be anxious and be perceived as high strung or tense. They are often viewed as chronic worriers and these individuals may often ruminate or worry excessively regarding both real and…

References

Friedman, A. F., Bolinskey, P. K., Levak, R. W., & Nichols, D. S. (2014). Psychological

Assessment with the MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF. New York: Routledge.

Groth-Marnat, G. (2009). Handbook of psychological assessment. (5th ed.). Indianapolis, IN John Wiley & Sons.

Hogan, T.P. (2015). Psychological testing: A practical introduction. (3rd ed). Hoboken, NJ.

Psychological Testing and Assessment
Words: 980 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 83254250
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assist counselors in selecting psychological tests and/or assessments?

There are a number of psychology test directories available in reference libraries. Thee directories typically contain a directory of psychology tests organized according to subject matter. For example, there will be separate sections for self-concept, cognitive ability, personality traits, etc. Each reference book will have its own system of classification so this must be taken into account.

For each entry, there is typically a general profile of the psychology tests and related links. The nature of these entries will vary depending on whether the book is a bibliography or whether it is in-depth directory. The four most popular reference book titles are Tests, Tests in Print (TIP), the Mental Measurements Yearbook (MMY), and Test Critiques (APA).

Tests In Print is a bibliographic encyclopedia of information on every published and commercially available test in psychology and achievement. It is published by uros Institute…

Bibliography

American Psychological Association - FAQ/Finding Information About Psychological Tests

http://www.apa.org/science/programs/testing/find-tests.aspx#

Psych Central

 http://psychcentral.com/

Psychological Testing and Its Uses in Practical
Words: 521 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 3013789
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psychological testing and its uses in practical situations. This essay will examine the intelligence test, as means to help illuminate how these assessments can be used for in a given situation. Specifically, this essay will examine how these intelligence tests can be used in the workplace for human resources purpose such as hiring and promotion.

Psychological Testing

The role of psychological testing is to provide a tool to further evaluate the mental frame work of an individual. While there are several types of these assessments such as screening, personality and achievement, this essay will examine how intelligence testing can be utilized in the workplace. Intelligence testing attempts to measure the ability of a person's ability to understand the world around them in their environment. These tests use questions that measures the intellectual potential of the person being evaluated and does not reflect a total or comprehensive model of one's totally…

References

Flynn, J.R. (1987). Massive IQ gains in 14 nations: What IQ tests really measure. Psychological bulletin, 101(2), 171.

Framingham, J. (2011). Types of Psychological Testing. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 26, 2014, from  http://psychcentral.com/ lib/types-of-psychological-testing/0005924

Richardson, K. (2002). What IQ tests test. Theory & Psychology, 12(3), 283-314. Retrieved from http://www.swisswuff.ch/files/richardson2002whatiqteststest.pdf

Assessment Process
Words: 3434 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42011974
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therapy is usually applied in cases such as the one exhibited by Kong, following the loss of a loved one. The procedure is outlined below:

The Semi-Structured Clinical Interview

The informal assessment of individuals faced with the effects of the loss of a loved one such as Kong's case is the semi structured interview. This approach allows the therapist to classify victims according to the symptoms that they exhibit. The approach allows for the recording of changes in profile symptoms demonstrated over time. The information below should be collected from a client.

One's bio-data

The mental illness history of the family

Ones medical history

Any past visits or interactions with a psychiatrist

One's social history

Varying aspects of one's specific information should be collected regarding the loss of a loved one

There is need to focus the interview details on the secondary and primary…

Psychological Efficacy of Debriefing for Trauma &
Words: 1093 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60475847
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Psychological Efficacy of Debriefing for Trauma & Stress

Author's Note with contact information and more details of collegiate affiliation, etc.

The paper will describe what debriefing is. The paper will discuss the nature and prevalence of trauma in American life and culture. The paper will go on to estimate what psychologists are doing to combat this epic rise in traumatic experience, which can lead to stress disorders affecting the daily lives of many. Thus, not only are people victims of trauma, but also, with improper or no treatment, these people can fall victim again to a trauma related disorder. The paper will talk about why and how psychologists are dealing with all these instances of trauma. The paper will summarize two scholarly articles that offer perspective on the issue of trauma and debriefing as treatment. After providing concise summaries of the articles, the paper will provide a comparative analysis of…

References

Raphael, B., Meldrum, L., & McFarlane, A.C. (June 10, 1995) Does debriefing after psychological trauma work?: Time for randomised controlled trials. British Medical Journal. 310(1). 1479 -- 1480.

Rose, S.C., Bisson, J., & Wessely, S. (2009) Psychological debriefing for preventing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Cochrane Collaboration. The Cochrane Library, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1(1). 1 -- 46.

Psychological Testing of African Americans in the Army
Words: 3356 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 90981843
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American writers from both the antebellum South and the North commented on the great differences between the white people in the two regions (Ibid; Samuda).

Note though, the table data below regarding the percentage of males who completed high school by race, 1940-1980, which will provide data for further discussion regarding utilization of testing to stratify recruits:

Table 1 -- Males 18-21 Who Completed High School By Percentile

ace

1940

1950

1960

1970

1970

White

40

49

56

68

78

Black

11

18

33

49

60

(Source: Binkin, p.94)

How is it that tests designed to measure information that was given in school could be administered to populations who did not even attend school? And, when one takes population and demographic statistics into account, this historical bias deepens. At the outbreak of World War I, for instance, African-Americans were about 11% of the general population, and the Selective Service draft…

REFERENCES

Benjamin, L. (2009). "The Birth of American Intelligence Testing." Monitor on Psychology. 40(1): Cited inL

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2009/01/assessment.html

Binkin, M., et.al. (1982). Blacks in the Military. Brookings Institution Press.

Black, E. (2004). War Against the Weak: Eugenics and America's Campaign to Create

Assessment Center Approach
Words: 1832 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Business Proposal Paper #: 57034075
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CEO who asked for a short report on strategic human resource management was impressed with the report. Following the reading of the research on strategic human resource management and considering how senior individuals in the organization are selected the Assessment Center Approach caught the attention of the CEO. The objective of this work is to prepare a proposal that includes a description of this approach as well as methods of measuring the effectiveness of the approach and the costs and benefits anticipated for such an approach.

The "Guidelines and Ethical Considerations for Assessment Center Operations" Task Force on Assessment Center Guidelines states that the Assessment Center "…consists of a standardized evaluation of behavior based on multiple inputs. Multiple trained observers and techniques are used. Judgments about behaviors are made, in major part, from specifically developed assessment simulations. These judgments are pooled in a meeting among the assessors or by a…

References

Byham, William C. (2011a) What is an Assessment Center. Development Dimensions International, Inc. Retrieved from:  http://www.assessmentcenters.org/pdf/AssessmentCenterArticle.pdf 

Byham, William C. (2011b) The Assessment Center Method and Methodology: New Applications and Technologies. DDI. Retrieved from:  http://www.ddiworld.com/DDIWorld/media/white-papers/AssessmentCenterMethods_mg_ddi.pdf?ext=.pdf 

Guidelines and Ethical Considerations for Assessment Center Operations (2000) International Task Force on Assessment Center Guidelines Endorsed by the 28th International Congress on Assessment Center Methods May 4, 2000 San Francisco, California, U.S.A. Retrieved from:  http://www.assessmentcenters.org/pdf/00guidelines.pdf 

Overview of the Assessment Centre Approach Popularity of the Assessment Centre Approach (2011) Canadian Public Service Commission. Retrieved from:  http://www.psc-cfp.gc.ca/ppc-cpp/ac-ovw-ce-aprcu-eng.htm

Assessment and Treatment of Criminal Offenders
Words: 2787 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76109918
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Treatment of Criminal Offenders

As a clinician, how can you apply the knowledge you gained from this course to more effectively serve your clients?

A connection has been established by researchers between brutal and violent susceptibility to impair a particular area of the brain. Till date, several evidence, have assisted to bring into limelight the shady aspect of human attitude and might pave the way for important interference. For instance, several types of spontaneous aggression might be a result of defective balancing of emotion within the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the centre of superior intellectual activities like judgment, analysis and substantial control of impulses. The degree of malfunctions in the core circuits of the brain related to aggressive behavior and if these circuits are capable of being repaired is of course debatable. esearchers have mentioned that individuals inclined to violence have structured blueprints in the brain that can be…

References

Allen, Harry E; Simonsen, C.E. (1998) "Corrections in America" New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Gendreau, P & Goggin, C. (1996) "Principles of Effective Programming with Offenders" Forum on Corrections Research, Volume: 8; No: 3, pp: 38-40.

Hoge, R.D. & Andrews, D.A. (1996) "Assessing the Youthful Offender: Issues and Techniques" New York: Plenum.

Jacobs, B. L; Azmitia, E.C. (1992) "Structure and function of the brain serotonin system" Physiological Reviews. Volume: 72; pp:165-229.

Assessment and Screening of Adolescents with Suicide Ideations
Words: 2233 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 40872454
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Adolescents at isk of Suicide

Today, alarming numbers of young people are contemplating taking their own lives, and many follow through on their suicide ideations to actually kill themselves or to make an attempt. In sum, suicide represents the second-leading cause of death for people aged 15 to 34 years and is the third-leading cause of death among young people aged 10 to 14 years (Suicide facts at a glance, 2015). To gain some additional insights into these issues, this case study provides a description of hypothetical 14-year-old runaway Caucasian adolescent, "Jane," who as referred from a homeless shelter with suicide ideations to determine what screening and testing should be performed, a discussion concerning current recommended treatment protocol, drugs and non-pharmacological interventions, and a description of expected treatment outcomes including a corresponding time frame and follow-up plan. Finally, a summary of the research and important findings concerning adolescents such as…

References

Horwitz, A. V. & Wakefield, J. C. (2007). The loss of sadness: How psychiatry transformed normal sorrow into depressive disorder. New York: Oxford University Press.

Interventions for suicide risk. (2017). Zero Suicide. Retrieved from  http://zerosuicide.sprc.org/  toolkit/treat/interventions-suicide-risk.

King, K. A. & Price, J. H. (2009, April). Preventing adolescent suicide: Do high school counselors know the risk factors? Professional School Counseling, 3(4), 255-257.

Maris, R. W. & Berman, A. L (2000). Comprehensive textbook of suicidology. New York: Guilford Press.

Assessment Strategies K 12 Nationally
Words: 651 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Other (not listed above) Paper #: 95793614
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President X of Education:

Even proponents of high-stakes standardized testing for grades K-12 have argued that such tests should be only one measure amongst many to validate the effectiveness of a school or student. Yet the emphasis placed upon such tests in determining school ratings and the increasing proportion of the day devoted to preparing for such exams has inevitably fostered teaching to the test rather than teaching higher-level concepts. There are concerns as well that students are being placed largely due to their scores based solely on a single result on a high-stakes state test (Hamilton, Halverson, Jackson, Mandinach, Supovitz, & Wayman16). Furthermore, the pressure on many teachers to demonstrate that students are performing well as a collective group often causes them to focus unduly upon 'bubble' students (students who are just below the cutoff) rather than raising the academic performance of the class as a while (Hamilton, et…

References

"Appropriate use of high-stakes testing in our nation's schools." APA. Web.

21 Nov 2015.

Breakstone, J., Smith, M., & Wineburg, S. "Beyond the bubble: New

history/social studies assessments for the Common Core." Phi Delta Kappan.

Assessment of Amazon Is it Ready for Change
Words: 1991 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27822469
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Change at Amazon

Background to Amazon

eason for Change

Diagnostic Models

Diagnosis of Amazon

Amazon are known for providing employees with a harsh workplace environment, with a high level of attrition (Kantor & Streitfeld, 2015). Changes in the H policies and strategies to increase the employee centric practices, such as adopting a more flexible approach to employee personal issues, management by walking around, and increasing recognition for employee hard work and achievements may result in positive outcomes. esearch has clearly indicated that were employees feel that their employer cares, they will display a higher level of commitment and productivity compared to employees who do not feel their employer cares (Buchanan & Huczynski, 2011). This can enhance productivity even in harsh working conditions (McGregor & Doshi, 2015). To consider if this is available strategy the firm and its current issues may be considered along with an assessment for readiness for change.…

References

Amzon. (2016). Leadership Principles. Retrieved from  https://www.amazon.jobs/principles 

Armstrong, M. (2011). Armstrong's Handbook of Strategic Human Resource Management. London: Kogan Page Publishers.

BBC News. (2015). Amazon boss Jeff Bezos defends company's workplace culture. Retrieved from  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-33957484 

Blackman, D., O'Flynn, J., & Ugyel, L. (2013). A Diagnostic Tool for Assessing Organisation al Readiness for Complex Change. In Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management conference. Retrieved from https://www.anzsog.edu.au/media/upload/publication/131_Flynn-and-Ugyel-Diagnostic-Tool-ANZAM-2013.pdf

Social Work Assessment From My
Words: 6527 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 87836590
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Therefore, today's society in the United States is diverse, which is something a social worker needs to understand and know how to deal with each diverse group. Furthermore, through research, it has been discovered most ethnic groups that live in the United States consist of young people, which means by staying in this country, they grow accustom to their surroundings. Once they have grown accustom to living here, they feel like this is their home to start a life with their own families. This continues the growing number of ethnic groups in this country.

Due to the educational accommodations that schools and college campuses make for students that have ethnic backgrounds, there is not enough prejudice of one group to let a Holocaust to occur in the United Stated. Furthermore, this country believes in freedom of speech to allow one ethnic to be isolated from the rest and condone any…

References

Dennen, Johan. THE 'EVIL' MIND: PT. 3. CRUELTY AND 'BEAST-IN-MAN' IMAGERY. Retrieved March 30, 2008, from http://rechten.eldoc.ub.rug.nl/FILES/departments/Algemeen/overigepublicaties/2005enouder/EVIL_CRU/EVIL_CRU.pdf

Citrome, Lesilie,. (2007). Aggression. Retrieved March 30, 2008, from  http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic3005.htm 

Hall, Kathy Jo. (1997). Carl Rogers. Retrieved March 30, 2008, from  http://aolsearch.aol.com/aol/search?query=Throughout+this+Jim+knocks+the+clay+figurines+head+of+and+crushes+the+body+while+shouting&invocationType=spelling 

Seal, B., A. Bradford, and C. Meston. 2009. The Association Between Body Esteem and Sexual Desire Among College Women. Archives of Sexual Behavior 38, no. 5, (October 1): 866-72.  http://www.proquest.com.library.capella.edu  / (accessed April 1, 2010).

Performance Assessment Description Performance Assessment
Words: 1001 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 55576685
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S. have tried to govern themselves. You can use the Internet, but don't use the Internet exclusively. Also, try to research different nations, not just the U.S. I've given a brief overview of the Bill of ights, one of the most important and contested aspects of the Constitution, but look into the British system of government as well (which influenced the creation of our own) and France. And ask why have some constitutions and nations failed, while the U.S. system has remained intact. Bring your research to class with you.

Step 3: Come to an agreement about what rights to include

On Wednesday, we'll have our own Constitutional Congress. I will observe the unstructured debate, which will revolve around how Freedonia will govern itself and what rights will be included in the new constitution and government. Some things you may want to think about: what rights don't Americans have? What…

References

Linder, Douglas. (201). The right of privacy. Exploring constitutional conflicts. Retrieved July 8,

2010 at http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/conlaw/rightofprivacy.html

Slater, Timothy. (2010). Performance assessment. Department of Physics. Montana State

University. Retrieved July 8, 2010 at  http://www.flaguide.org/extra/download/cat/perfass/perfass.pdf

Realm of Psychological Disorder Through the Use
Words: 2202 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14333578
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realm of psychological disorder through the use of a character assessment. The character in question is fictional and the data used to evaluate the psychological profile derives from a movie. Melvin Udall, the main character in the movie "As Good as It Gets" serves as the character used in this assessment. Ultimately, I find and explore specific links to Melvin's condition in the movie to that of one suffering from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

In order to discuss the relationships previously mentioned, I needed to perform several steps in order to logically conclude that Melvin represents someone suffering from OCD symptoms. In order to accomplish this task, I first watched the film and examined many of the traits that Melvin demonstrated. Next, I used a set of ten questions which provided a baseline assessment formula. These questions are each answered separately within the body of this essay. This character assessment…

References

Atkins, L. (2009). A radical treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder patients. The Guardian, 14 Dec 2009. Retrieved from  http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2009/dec/15/obsessive-complusive-disorder - gamma-knife

Brooks, J.L. (1998) As Good As It Gets. Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt, Greg Kinnear. Tristar Pictures.

Bouchard, C. Rheaume, J. Landouceru, R. (1998). Responsibility and perfectionism in OCD. Behavior Research Therapy 37 (1999). 239-248. Retrieved from  http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/Homepage/Class/Psy394Q/Research%20Design%20Clas  s/Assigned%20Readings/Experimental%20Psychopathology/Bouchard99.pdf

Eddy, M.F., & Walbroehl, G.S. (1998, April 1). Recognition and treatment of obsessive- compulsive disorder. American Family Physician, p. 1623-1632.  http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0401/p1623.html

Nursing Assessment Taking the History of a
Words: 1536 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45591901
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Nursing Assessment

Taking the history of a patient is a crucial aspect of patient assessment and treatment. A good history can mean the difference between a successful patient outcome and unsatisfactory outcomes. However, taking a complete and useful history is a skill that is developed by means of training and practice; it is not some talent that is innate (Bickley & Szilagyi, 2007; McKenna et al., 2011). According to Craig (2007) nurses are increasingly being asked to take patient histories. Given these growing responsibilities nurses need training and guidelines to taking an adequate patient history. The following is a summary and critique of Craig, L. H, (2007), A "Guide to Taking a Patient's History" in Nursing Standard, volume 22, issue 13, pages 42-48.

Craig (2007) takes a comprehensive approach to explaining the interview and history taking process. This approach is applicable for most any patient population; however, Craig does not…

References

Alarcon, R.D. (2009). Culture, cultural factors and psychiatric diagnosis: Review and projections. World Psychiatry, 8, 131 -- 139.

Bickley, L.S. & Szilagyi, P.G. (2007). Bates' Guide to Physical Examination and History

Taking. 9th ed. Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Craig, L.H. (2007). A guide to taking a patient's history. Nursing Standard, 22 (13), 42-48.

Heritage Assessment
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Heritage Assessment

Click http://wps.prenhall./wps/media/objects/663/679611/box_6_1.pdf order access "Heritage Assessment Tool." Assess Heritage Assessment Tool answering questions. In 1,000-1,500 words discuss usefulness applying a heritage assessment evaluating person, summarize learned Heritage Assessment Tool.

Heritage assessment tool

The heritage assessment tool acknowledges the different degrees of impact an individual's ethnic heritage may have upon his or her worldview. For some individuals who are very emotionally connected to their family and extended family, their sense of self is defined by their religion, customs and beliefs as they relate to a larger tradition. For example, someone who is Hispanic-American may spend a great deal of time not only with his or her nuclear family, but also with an extended network of cousins, grandparents, and even friends of the family. Even if not particularly religious, the rituals of the Catholic Church might provide a source of joy during traditional holidays and a source of comfort during…

References

Heritage assessment tool. (2013). Prentice Hall. Retrieved:

http://wps.prenhall./wps/media/objects/663/679611/box_6_1.pdf

Biological and Psychological Theory of
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Whereas atavists may commit crimes due to their physiological attributes, "passionate criminals" engage crimes of their own make (C. Bartol & a. Bartol, 2006).

The first advantage in the Lambroso theory lies in the physicality of determining criminal. The attributes that underlines atavists may trigger a trend of caution while dealing with people with the characteristics given. This precaution trend may lessen crime in instances where early detection is done through careful handling of the atavists. With the understanding that physical attributes may relate to chances of committing crimes, reform campaigns may get directed to this group of people to enhance secure communities.

Another advantage arises from the understanding that in communities where crime rates occur at an all-time high, more people tend to commit crimes due to the influence of the adverse environment they live in. In trying to fit into society, people relate with one another. If situations…

References

Bartol, C.R., & Bartol, a.M. (2006). Criminal Behavior: A Psychosocial Approach.

Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education, Inc.

Heather, Z. (2007) Biological, Sociological and Psychological Theories of Crime

May 16, 2007.  http://voices.yahoo.com/biological-sociological-psychological-theories-342380.html?cat=72

Leadership and Self-Assessment Organizational Behavior an Analysis
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Leadership and Self-Assessment

Organizational Behavior

An Analysis of how Self-Evaluation and Self-Assessment relates to Leadership Today

The modern organizational environment must keep pace with changes that are occurring at a historically unprecedented rate. Many of these changes are driven by technology and require that leaders continually learn new skills in order to stay abreast of needed skill requirements. It is often the case that a leader will have difficulty getting performance feedback from their superiors because they generally do not work in close contact with supervisors and in some case may not even have one at all. Therefore a leader must rely on self-assessments primarily to further develop the skill set that will allow them to help their organization create or maintain a competitive advantage.

360 Degree Feedback and Self-Evaluation

Evaluation is an important component of any organization. The use of an evaluation program has been shown to be able…

Works Cited

Alipour, F., K., I. & Karimi, R., 2011. Knowledge Creation and Transfer: Role of Learning Organization. International Journal of Business Administration, 2(3), pp. 61-67.

Avey, J., Luthans, F. & Jensen, S., 2009. Psychological capital: A positive resource for combating employee stress and turnover. Human Resource Management, 48(5), pp. 677-693.

Becker, K., Antuar, N. & Everett, C., 2011. Implementing an employee performance management system in a nonprofit organization. Nonprofit Management & Leadership, 21(3), pp. 255-271.

Halliday, S. & Beddie, F., 2009. Informal Learning. At a Glance. National Centre for Vocational Education Research, 12(1), pp. 1-12.

Psychometric Assessment of Autism
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Psychometric Assessment Autism

Background of Autism

What is autism? Autism is a disease, which poses tons of questions, while providing least of answers. This being said, autism is one of the five diseases coming under Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD). It shows in early years of a human and effects the brain's functioning. An autism website states that, 'it's a result of a neurological disorder, which hampers the proper operations of a brain, hindering the social interactions and communications' (Autism Society of America website). Autism asks us millions questions, its origins, its solutions, its causes and symptoms; none of which are answered. The diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (American Psychiatric Association (APA), 2013), states that, autism is basically pervasive developmental disorder otherwise called Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). It is described as a condition where the person faces severe problem in social communication, interactions, perception and communication. APA (2013) shows…

References

Alpern, G.D. (2007). Developmental Profile 3. Lutz, FL: Western Psychological Services.

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Arlington, VA, American Psychiatric Association, 2013.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2010.  http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/index.html 

Cohen, D., Pichard, N., Tordjman, S., Baumann, C., Burglen, L., & Excoffier, E. (2005). Specific genetic disorders and autism: Clinical contribution towards their identification. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 35, 103 -- 116.

Evidence-Based Assessment Framework Evidence Based
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The abnormal activities observed can point out at many different issues such as anxiety or heart failure.

The interview of the patient is a very vital and essential assessment tool in the hands of the nurse. The nurse can conduct a thorough interview to have the complete and big picture of patient (the nurse can assess the patient both physically and mentally much more efficiently by just asking what is wrong and where are the problems).

The observation is also a very important tool, nurses can make avail of the interactions they made with patients by observing their responses to different kinds of stimuli. This practice assists the nurses in recognizing the overall pain, any sort of emotional disturbances and the patient's reaction towards the treatment applied.

This observation factor is very important especially for those patients who have any sort of difficulty in communicating with the nurses or medical…

Forensic Tests Two Forensic Psychological
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The construction/validation sample of 96 juvenile sexual offenders ranged in age from 9 to 20, with an average age of 14. To administrate the exam, the test is not directly administered to the juvenile: instead the trained professional calculates the boy's relative risk factors, based up his past history, such as a history of violence, of being a victim of abuse himself, caregiver consistency, and history and preoccupation with sexuality. The problem with the test is that it to some degree stereotypes the boy and tries to predict the likelihood of negative behavior based upon negative past and family circumstances. However, it can be useful in family court settings for flagging 'at risk' teens who have already entered the system and may be helped by receiving additional social support to prevent future acts of violence.

orks Cited

Multiphasic Sex Inventory (MSI). Tacoma, A: Nichols & Molinder Assessments.

http://ibs.colorado.edu/cspv/infohouse/vioeval/vioevalDetails.php?recordnumber=312&vio_name=vioeval

Prentky, Robert.…

Works Cited

Multiphasic Sex Inventory (MSI). Tacoma, WA: Nichols & Molinder Assessments.

 http://ibs.colorado.edu/cspv/infohouse/vioeval/vioevalDetails.php?recordnumber=312&vio_name=vioeval 

Prentky, Robert. Sue Righthand, Ph.D. (2003). Juvenile Sex Offender Assessment Protocol-II

(J-SOAP-II) Retrieved May 14, 2009 at http://www.csom.org/pubs/JSOAP.pdf

Organization Assessment Good Shepherd Medical
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For example, because different etiologies require corresponding therapeutic designs and mechanisms (Spector, 2000; Steefel, 2002), specific support group makeup must consider the need to develop different strategies and methodologies for the following types of patients at a minimum if support groups are to provide equal benefit to all patients:

Elderly Patients and Lifelong Laborers - This group typically presents with psychological issues in the realm of a direct link between their sense of purpose and self-worth and their ability to continue to function productively in their community. Their need for acute medical and ancillary services, particularly in the Longview/East Texas community are often precipitated by chronic physical deterioration from a lifetime of relatively hard labor. Therefore, support group rehabilitation services must address the issues of self-esteem as a function of vocational productivity and lifestyle changes necessitated by medical conditions.

Prime-of-Life Victims of Traumatic Injury - This group typically presents with…

References

Clark, C., Robinson, T. (2000). "Multiculturalism as a Concept in Nursing" Journal of the Black Nurses Association, 11(2), 39-43.

Spector, R. (2000). Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness (5th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Stanhope, M., Lancaster, J. (2004). Community and Public Health Nursing (6th ed.)

St. Louis: Mosby.

Evidence-Based Nursing Assessment Item Critical
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Sampling method -117 patients with primary breast cancer; all who had same-day surgery as part of their treatment.

Appropriateness of sample -- Appropriate for circumstances under consideration.

Results (when applicable: credibility, transferability, dependability, & conformability)

Study found significant differences between the control and experimental group in terms of post-surgery mood, confusion, tension, and home management.

Ethical considerations -- All ethical considerations; privacy, etc. followed- professional study.

Relative strengths of each publication -- Peer reviewed strong work and sense of issues surrounding pain, fatigue and emotional disturbances after surgery.

Relative weaknesses of each publication -- Larger sample than previous study, but still limited in scope, demographics, psychographics and geographic extrapolation.

Application of each article in nursing practices -- Using any intervention that helps patient's after a traumatic surgery is helpful; especially if that patient can ventilate their emotions, angst, and stages of healing. Short-term telephone intervention using the AFSMI technique proves…

Yarbo, C., Wujcik, D., Holmes-Gobel, B. (2010). Cancer Nursing: Principles and Practices.

Philadelphia, PA: Jones and Bartlett Learning.

5 | Page

Organizational Assessment Plan
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Organizational Assessment as Impetus for Change at a Vet Center

Organizational Assessment as an Impetus for Change at a Vet Center

Organizational Context. Every type of organization has, or should have, as a major goal, the need to optimize the productivity of its human resources (Farr, Schuler & Smith, 1993). One organization that has recently assumed critical importance in the U.S. is the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Today, the VA is responsible for administering an enormous healthcare and benefits network for its active duty and retired service members and their families at U.S. taxpayer expense.

Among the most prominent of such government-administered programs is the healthcare systems comprised of VA medical centers (VAMCs), outpatient clinics (VAOPCs), community and outreach clinics, and numerous Vet Centers. In fact, taken together, almost one-third of the American population (around 70 million persons who are veterans, dependents and survivors of deceased veterans) are eligible…

References

Alioth, A., Duell, W., Frei, F., Hugentobler, M., & Schurman, S. (1993). Work design for the competent organization. Westport, CT: Quorum Books.

Becker-Reems, E., & Garrett, D. (1998). Testing the limits of teams: How to implement self- management in health care. Chicago: American Hospital Publishing.

Coopman, S.J. (2001). Democracy, performance and outcomes in interdisciplinary health care teams. The Journal of Business Communication, 38(3), 261.

Dallimore, E.J. & Souza, T.J. (2002). Consulting course design: Theoretical frameworks and pedagogical strategies. Business Communication Quarterly, 65(4), 86.

Batteries vs Individualized Assessment Approaches
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Standardized batteries can be assessed by an individual not present in the same room as the test subject: the need for personal attention could be seen as both the strength and the weakness of individualized assessment. Individualized assessment is more cumbersome, but more specific to the needs of the test taker and the environment. It can provide more detailed information. However, it can also be highly subjective, so it is not necessarily more accurate. On one hand, noting the demeanor of the test subject and his or her attitude can be helpful. For example, in autism screening the child's attitude to the test may be just as important as the test itself (Schopler 1990). However, this type of data can often be more revelatory of the assessor's perspective than the test subject. The accuracy of the test will depend upon the ability of the assessor: of course, this is also…

References

McGrew, Kevin. (2004, January 16). The Cattell-Horn- Carroll (CHC): Past, present, and future.

Institute for Applied Psychometrics. Retrieved March 16, 2010 at  http://www.iapsych.com/CHCPP/2.EvolutionofCHCTheory.html 

Rickman, David. (2010). Special services, psychology, and Section 504 information.

Van Dyke Public Schools. Retrieved March 16, 2010 at  http://www.vdps.net/special/test.html

Annotated Bibliography for Performing Need Assessment on Adult Learners
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obert, T.E., Pomarico, C.A. & Nolan, M. (2011). Assessing Faculty Integration of Adult learning needs in second-degree nursing education. Nursing education perspectives, 32(1), 14-17.

obert, Pomarico and Nolan (2011) have presented a model for assessing the learning needs of second-degree nursing education. The study was essentially designed In a way that assessment of interactive teaching model was made possible. The second-degree BSN students were taken as the sample of study. The main research question being investigated was that whether or not the teaching strategies being used at the second-degree nursing education level met the needs of nursing students. The literature review being conducted by the authors is somewhat precise and short and identifies the existing gap that exists in the learning need assessment of nursing students. It was identified in the start of study that for program development for this student segment in nursing, it is essential to evaluate the…

References

Cabaniss, D.L. (2008). Becoming a school: Developing learning objectives for psychoanalytic education. Psychoanalytic Inquiry, 28(3), 262-277.

Dhara, R. (2002). Advancing public health through the assessment initiative. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 8(4), 1-8.

Jo Brixey, M., & Mahon, S.M. (2010). A Self-Assessment Tool for Oncology Nurses: Preliminary Implementation and Evaluation. Clinical journal of oncology nursing, 14(4), 474-480.

Jones, S., & Watty, K. (2010). Vignette 6 Pluri-disciplinary learning and assessment: Reflections on practice. International Perspectives on Higher Education Research, 5, 195-207.

Sexual Risk Assessment Mary Jane
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Mary Jane's laboratory results show there is an elevated white blood count, with CBC with differential within normal limits. Proton and INR were normal. Pregnancy was negative. UA showed occasional bacteria, but normal otherwise. Drug screen was normal, and EKG showed sinus bradycardia, rate of 59 beats per minute. Renal and hepatic functions were within normal limits.

There are four sexual response cycles, marked by physiological and psychological changes. The first stages is excitement, which Mary Jane is not getting with her partners, which is triggered by psychological or physical stimulation, and is marked by emotional changes, and increased heart rate, and vaginal swelling. Second stage is plateau, Mary Jane states she doesn't have this stimulation. The third stage is orgasm, which Mary Jane doesn't getting during intercourse, or she doesn't remember because she in under the influence of alcohol. The final phase, resolution, involves a rush of blood away…