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We have over 1000 essays for "Psychological Intervention"

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Psychological Factors in Health Traditional

Words: 1772 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80328946

Ultimately, it may be the greatest measure of humanity that we recognize that the relevance of animal sentience in relation to our needs is not a function of their similarity to us or of our chosen relationships with them.

orks Cited

Coren, Stanley. (1995). The Intelligence Of Dogs: A Guide To The Thoughts, Emotions,

And Inner Lives Of Our Canine Companions. New York: Bantam

Gatchel, Robert J.; Polatin, Peter B.; and Kinney, Regina K. "Predicting Outcome of Chronic Back Pain Using Clinical Predictors of Psychopathology: A Prospective Analysis." Health Psychology, 1995 14 (5): 415-420.

Hoffman, Benson M.; Papas, Rebecca K.; Chatkoff, David K.; and Kerns, Robert D.

"Meta-Analysis Of Psychological Interventions For Chronic Low Back Pain."

Health Psychology, 2007 26 (1): 1-9.

Jensen, Maureen C.; Brant-Zawadzki, Michael N.; Obuchowski, Nancy; Modic, Michael

T. Malkasian, Dennis, and Ross, Jeffrey S. "Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Lumbar Spine in People without Back…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coren, Stanley. (1995). The Intelligence Of Dogs: A Guide To The Thoughts, Emotions,

And Inner Lives Of Our Canine Companions. New York: Bantam

Gatchel, Robert J.; Polatin, Peter B.; and Kinney, Regina K. "Predicting Outcome of Chronic Back Pain Using Clinical Predictors of Psychopathology: A Prospective Analysis." Health Psychology, 1995 14 (5): 415-420.

Hoffman, Benson M.; Papas, Rebecca K.; Chatkoff, David K.; and Kerns, Robert D.
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Psychological and Schizophrenia Individuals Suffering

Words: 896 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 50088490

Only a minority of studies have found advantages in social adjustment (four of 16) or employment (three of nine, and these jobs represented mostly sheltered rather than competitive employment)."

A psychological aspect of schizophrenia involves the intervention of patients with the use of cognitive behavior therapy or CBT. Such treatment is used for those whose psychotic symptoms constantly occur despite consumption of medication. The objective of CBT is for schizophrenics who do not respond to their medication and to have their episodes of delusions and hallucinations or other distress to be decreased. As well, CBT's goal is to reduce the risk of relapse and social dysfunction. Bustillo (2001) noted such therapy centers on "rationally exploring the subjective nature of the psychotic symptoms, challenging the evidence for these, and subjecting such beliefs and experiences to reality testing."

n a study led by Kuipers, it was discovered that CBT schizophrenics demonstrated a…… [Read More]

In a study led by Kuipers, it was discovered that CBT schizophrenics demonstrated a significant decrease in their symptoms compared to standard treatment. In an investigation led by Tarrier, CBT has reduced incidences of patients' delusions and hallucinations compared to the results of supportive counseling and routine care. As a result, eleven out of thirty-three patients who received CBT reduced the aforementioned symptoms by 50%, and were maintained at the twelve-month follow-up. In Drury's study, CBT's effect with antipsychotic medicine on acutely psychotic inpatients recovered from their psychotic episodes more rapidly and complete. At their nine-month follow-up, 95% of CBT patients had minor or no incidences of hallucinations and delusions. However, those in the control group, 44% of schizophrenics experienced minimal aforementioned symptoms and episodes. In a study led by Buchkremer, it compared four types of interventions, two of which were CBT, to routine care. Such treatment was given over eight months, assessed after one year, and follow-up of two years. It was shown the group that received CBT with individual and family psychoeducational therapy experienced reduced hospitalizations.

In a study led by Sensky, CBT helped improve the negative and depressive symptoms of schizophrenia. As well, such stance was maintained for at least nine months post treatment. In another investigation led by Kemp, CBT treatment involving motivational interviewing techniques with adherence to the consumption of antipsychotic medication displayed improvements in patients' demeanor toward drug treatment and understanding of their illness compared to those who didn't receive such intervention.

Lewis (2005) described motivational interviewing aimed at psychotic symptom control, substance misuse, and family intervention is that is has, "been used to treat uncomplicated substance dependence. Patients are encouraged to explore the problems of their substance misuse causes and the ways in which it prevents them achieving their goals. They are also encouraged to explore how they could address these problems, including reduction in substance
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Intervention for Improving Grades

Words: 979 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48262037

The achievement gap is a problem for many younger learners that appears to be impacted by racial and socio-economic factors (Harackiewicz, Canning, Tibbetts, Priniski & Hyde, 2016). However, social psychology interventions can be applied to help reverse the negative impacts of these factors and instill confidence in young students on the wrong end of the achievement gap (Spitzer & Aronson, 2015; Yeager & Walton, 2011). This paper will describe an intervention to address the problem of the achievement gap so as to assist in closing it.
The problem of the achievement gap is one that impacts all of society: educational disparities cause disruptions in the balance of economic opportunities for people around the whole country. As one group excels, another falls behind, which means there are fewer opportunities for the latter to succeed. Closing the achievement gap can help to create more equitability in education and allow for more even…… [Read More]

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Efficacy of Unexpected Interventions

Words: 918 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24803293

Psychological Interventions Chronic Pain

Medical science is increasingly aligning with a biopsychosocial treatment perspective that understands pain and symptoms as coming from multifaceted experience characterized by the complexity that is inherently human (oditi & obinson, 2011). Many vectors come together in this biopsychosocial perspective: the physicological and emotional state of the individual tend to dominate, garnering most of the medical attention these variables align with conventional medical and behavioral training (oditi & obinson, 2011). In addition, the influence of culture, ethnicity, and society on the interpretation of health and disease are important considerations (oditi & obinson, 2011). The literature on mind-body connection provides strong evidence of the impact that an individual's emotions can have on their behavior and, interestingly, provides findings that the reverse can also be true (oditi & obinson, 2011).

Chronic pain is considered to be an illness from a biopsychosocial perspective, and not a disease (oditi &…… [Read More]

References

Bishop, S.R. (2002). What Do We Really Know About Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction. Psychosomatic Medicine, 64:71-84.Bishop, (2002).

Elkins, G., Jensen, M.P., & Patterson, D.R. (2007). Hypnotherapy for the Management of Chronic Pain. Int J. Clin Exp Hypn, 55(3):275-287.

Guzman, J., Esmail, R., Karjalainen, K., Malmivaara, A., Irvin, E. & Bombardier, C. (2007). Multidisciplinary bio-psycho-social rehabilitation for chronic low-back pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2.

Goossens, M.E.J.B., Vlaeyen, J.W.S., Hidding, A., Kole-Snijders, A. & Evers, S.M.A.A. (2005). Treatment Expectancy Affects the Outcome of Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions in Chronic Pain. Clinical Journal of Pain, 21(1): 18-26.Kjellgren, A., Bood, S.A., Axelsson, K., Norlander, T. & Saatcioglu, F. (2007). Wellness through a comprehensive yogic breathing program -- a controlled pilot trial. BMC Complimentary and Alternative Medicine, 19, 7: 43.
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Psychological Tests Using the Mental

Words: 1400 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 12669172



Purpose: The Woodcock-Johnson III Diagnostic eading Battery's designation is for assessment and measurement of the important dimensions of phonological oral language abilities and phonological awareness, both in adult and children.

Population: Both adults and children (age of 3-80 years).

Date of Publication: 2004.

Acronym(s): WJ III (DB).

Score Scales: eading Comprehension, Basic eading Skills, Phonics Knowledge, Broad eading, Brief eading, Total eading, eading Fluency, Spelling of Words, Oral Comprehension, eading Vocabulary.

Time: 50-60 minutes.

Administration: Individual.

Author (s): Fredrick, S.A., Nancy, M. & Woodcock, .C.

Publisher: iverside Publishing, Inc.

Comments: Software Scoring and Paper-and-Pencil.

Sub-tests: Passage Comprehension, Word-Letter Identification, Sound Awareness, Spelling of Sounds, Oral Vocabulary, Sound Blending.

elated eview: 1713318.

Description

The Woodcock-Johnson III Diagnostic eading Battery is for the assessment and measurement of the important dimensions of phonological oral language abilities and phonological awareness, in both adult and children (Brande, 2008). By utilization of software scoring and the…… [Read More]

Risk & Needs Assessment Group. (1986). Substance Abuse Questionnaire (SAQ)-Adult

Probation III. In R.J. Nagle. (Ed.), the ninth mental measurement yearbook (Electronic

version). Retrieved from the Buros University Mental Measurement Yearbook online database.
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Psychological Disorder ADHD ADHD Is

Words: 1806 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 61198795

My final recommendation was that the parents and Adam's teachers should work as a team to help Adam manage his condition. In other words, the parents should communicate with the teachers to determine if the interventions have been effective. I would then talk to the parents themselves every two months to make further recommendations as necessary.

CONCLUSION

While drug interventions for ADHD, especially in children, have been increasingly controversial because of their possible side-effects, their main advantage is the speed and efficacy with which they work. Those who have benefited reported that the effects were almost immediately visible, on the same day the drug was used.

On the other hand, drug therapies for any mental disorder have been imperfect and frequently plagued by side-effects and non-compliance. Continuous research is therefore necessary to improve not only drug therapies and identify potential harmful effects in the long-term, but also to find possible…… [Read More]

References

ADHD Information Library (2008). ADHD Treatment Options: many Good Choices. Newideas.Net. Retrieved from: http://newideas.net/adhd/treatment

Martin, B. (2011). Treatment for Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD). PsychCentral. Retrieved from:  http://psychcentral.com/lib/2007/treatment-for-attention-deficit-disorder-adhd/ 

Personal Health Lifestyles, Inc. (2001). Attention Deficit Disorder: Facts, Prevention and Treatment Strategies. Retrieved from:  http://www.healingwithnutrition.com/adisease/add-adhd/add-adhd.html#A1
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Psychological Trauma of Colonization the

Words: 1642 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87537705

You drove him to kill himself; and now he will be buried like a dog...

" This statement shows that the once great leader is nothing in the eyes of the white colonists. This has a trickle-down affect on those around him. When Okonkwo gave in to the struggle, those around him lost their final hope of every overcoming the colonialists.

Through an examination of two African historical novels, one can see many similarities in the psychology of change between colonialism and change management in corporate take-overs. Change begins slowly and there are always some that will readily accept the new regime and others that will put up a resistance. The reasons for resistance to change are similar to corporate change.

One can find examples of the same psychological reactions in both novels. The resistance becomes more violent as it loses ground and the total change and loss of familiar…… [Read More]

References

Achebe, C. Things Fall Apart. New York, NY: Anchor Books.

Ngugi, wa Thiong'o. Petals of Blood. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Sdiffgy-krenke, I. Coping Styles: Does intervention change anything? Eurpoean Journal of Developmental Psychology. 1 (4): 367-382.

Winn, G.A Change in employee attitude IS possible! Change Management, Retrieved April 11,
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Psychological Capital and Learners K-12

Words: 4962 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 33447575

Physical and mental disorders are often comorbid, reflecting an entire system that is out of balance. A healthy state, both physically and mentally reflects a state of equilibrium and stability that every organism wishes to achieve (Wallace, 2008).When one portion of the system is out of balance, the entire system can be out of balance. The degree to which the system is out of balance determines the degree of the disturbance.

A child that has greater resilience skills can recover from a greater disturbance than a child with little resiliency. Everyone has heard stories of the rich and famous who rose up from situations of poverty and despair to become something great. This is exactly what this research is about. Eriksson's psychosocial model sets up the situation that the person must overcome. Wallace's theory on resiliency provides an understanding of what the child needs to overcome these circumstances to become…… [Read More]

References

Anthony, E., Alter, C. & Jenson, J. (2009). Development of a Risk and Resilience-Based Out-of-

School Time Program for Children and Youths. Social Work. 54 (1): 45+. Retrieved from Questia Database.

Brendtro, L. & Larson, S. (2004). The Resilience Code: Finding Greatness in Youth. Reclaiming Children and Youth. 12 (4): 194 +. Retrieved from Questia Database.

Brown, W. (2006). The Value of Role Models in Inspiring Resilience. Reclaiming Children and Youth. 14 (4): 199+. Retrieved from Questia Database.
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Psychological Testing

Words: 1884 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1422266

Psychological Testing.

Teachers must test. It is one method of evaluating progress and determining individual student needs. More than two hundred and fifty million standardized tests are administered each year to forty four million students who attend American elementary and secondary schools (Ysseldyke et al. 1992). Testing is only part of the broader conception of assessment. Testing is the sampling of behavior in students to obtain scores (quantitative indexes) or relative standing. In addition teachers and other school personnel assess or collect data through classroom observations, interviews with students' family members or care-givers. Psychological and psycho-educational tests are used in schools to help to identify types and bases and the extent of a student's learning difficulty or school adjustment problem. The assessment is used to make decisions about students.

At a curricular level, tests help to determine the effectiveness of a particular instructional intervention. Teachers give tests before and after…… [Read More]

Shepard, Lorrie A. (1994). The challenges of assessing young children appropriately. Phi Delta Kappan. Vol 76 No.3 206-212.

Taylor, K. And Walton, S. (2001). Testing pitfalls. Guiding students through taking standardized tests. Instructor Magazine October 2001.

Ysseldyke, James E. et al. (1992) Critical issues in special education. Houghton Mifflin Company. Boston, MA.
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Intervention & Addiction Therapy Theory

Words: 3133 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96162245

.

The two hypothetical systems working on an individual's brain during the experience of addiction are complementary within and between system changes. The first counteradaptation results in a decrease in the transmission of dopamine and serotonin release during withdrawal phases of the cycle (obinson & Berridge 2001). Effectively, dopamine and serotonin transmission is artificially increased beyond the normative range during drug use, then virtually stopped once the drug has left the body. This intensifies not only the "come down" feeling but also the preoccupation anxieties associated with substance abuse as well as the existing emotional, environmental, or social vulnerability which lead to the initial lapse. Sensitization is the component of addiction which compels an individual to continually seek greater quantities of the substance (obinson & Berridge 2001). Effectively once the brain has been exposed to a chemical which alters neural transmission, the body attempts to return to a homeostatic state.…… [Read More]

References

1. Nesse, R. (1994). An evolutionary perspective on substance abuse. Ethology and Sociobiology, 15, 339- 348.

2. Robinson, T, & Berridge, K. (2001). Mechanisms of action of addictive stimuli incentive- sensitization and addiction. Addiction, 96, 103- 114.

3. Koob, G., & Le Moal, M. (1997). Drug abuse: Hedonic homeostatic dysregulation. Science, 278, 52- 58.

4. Brown, J.M., & Miller, W.R. (1993). Impact of motivational interviewing on participation and outcome in residential alcoholism treatment. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors,7, 211-218.
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Intervention Strategy for Grief Long

Words: 2367 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63088772



Utay and Miller (2006) described a study in which researchers observed over 100 individuals with unresolved grief reactions. There were three phases of treatment employed with these individuals. The first stage of treatment involved cognitive structuring for the decision to grieve again and for procedure clarification. The second stage involved guided imagery for reliving, revising, and revisiting the scenes at which the loss occurred. The third and final stage involved future-oriented identity reconstruction. The researchers reported that the reliving of the event through guided imagery effectively changed the client's view of reality, and furthermore helped along their grief resolution (Melges & DeMaso (1980), as cited by Utay & Miller, 2006). Moreover, Guided imagery has been established as a versatile and effective intervention.

The importance in assisting the children's mother with the grief process lies in the fact that bereavement is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and it…… [Read More]

References

Elliott, K. (2000). Long QT syndrome. Alberta RN, January/February.

Firth, Hurst (2005). Clinical Genetics, New York: Oxford University Press, 378-9.

Gravitz, MA. (2001). Perceptual reconstruction in the treatment of inordinate grief. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 44(1), 51-5.

Joffrion, L.P., Douglas, D. (1994). Grief resolution: faciliatating self-transcendence in the bereaved. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 32(3), 13-9.
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Interventions for ED Students Interventions

Words: 2681 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 20386765



Realty therapy, which was developed by psychiatrist illiam Glasser during the 1960's, requires those working with a student with emotional disturbance to develop a positive, friendly relationship, especially with those particular students who do not want such a relationship (ong 2004). Realty therapy differs from other psychological models because it urges everyone who works with the student to enter into a counseling relationship with them, not simply the psychologist (ong 2004).

Research on the use of reality therapy for students with emotional disturbance has demonstrated a positive effect on student behavior. According to Glasser, "Counseling is just one human being helping another with a problem. This is not hard to do, if the person with the problem wants to be counseled" (ong 2004). However, students with emotional disturbance may be defensive and resistant to counseling, thus the school psychologist's job is to motivate them to participate in counseling and to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Harris, Karen M. (2002, June 22). A school, family, and community collaborative program for children who have emotional disturbances. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Nelson, Ron J. (2003, September 01). Status of and trends in academic intervention research for students with emotional disturbance. Remedial and Special Education. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Sabornie, Edward J. (2004, September 22). Characteristics of emotional disturbance in middle and high school students. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Sugai, George. (2000, September 22). A Self-Management Functional Assessment-
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Psychological Foundations Towards Education

Words: 1898 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 57954418

Psychological Foundations Towards Education

Major characteristics of Freud's theory and Erikson's theory

Looking at pages 143-164 of the article, Freud and Erikson address the basic issue of self-definition. According to Freud believes that a person's sense of self stems from parental projections in the course of the genesis of super-ego. In addition, he argues that these introjects form the foundation of a person's self-definition in childhood and that such parental identifications are not significantly updated or revised during childhood or adolescence. Either way, an individual's self-concept is believed to be a function of the fundamental identification process, which takes place during one's pre-school years. Although Freud has extensively written on the human development process, Erikson was the pioneer in writing about the formation of identities. In his works, Erikson has gone far and beyond Freud's parental introjects and childhood identifications (Austrian 37). He argues that the presence of self-selected identity…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Austrian, Sonia G. Developmental Theories Through the Life Cycle. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. Print.

Lipsitt, Lewis P, and David S. Palermo. Research Readings in Child Psychology. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 2011. Print.

Miller, Patricia H, and Ellin K. Scholnick. Toward a Feminist Developmental Psychology. New York: Routledge, 2010. Print.

Harris, Margaret. Exploring Developmental Psychology: Understanding Theory and Methods. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications, 2008. Print.
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Psychological Reactions to Writing Revisions

Words: 2212 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8341957

present this article in a scholarly fashion, which lends credibility to the authors -- an issue that is extremely crucial considering their audience. hile Germano et al. cite nearly no evidence for their argument, Lehr's article is packed with research regarding not only how students see revision and the writing process, but also about how teachers can address the problem. The information is specific, pointing to certain grade levels, activities, etc.

A closer look at these two articles, then, reveals that they have more similarities than differences. In fact, the only major difference between the two is the audience and factual information contained in the articles. In addition, these differences are warranted given the articles' different purposes. Germano et al.' s article can almost be seen as an extension of Lehr's -- encouraging professionals to take the same advice that they give their students. In fact, it is expressly because…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Germano William et al. "Revision as Writing, Writing as Revision." Modern Language

Association. 2007. 15 May 2009.

Lehr, Fran. "Revision in the Writing Process." B. NET. n.d. 15 May 2009.

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Psychological Precursors for Impulsive Shopping

Words: 2330 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 6962965

Psychological Parameters of Impulse Buying

Personality -- Impulse Buying

Defining the Psychological Parameters of Impulse Buying

Impulse buying (IB) represents unplanned, impulsive purchases that make little economic sense. The occasional, inexpensive impulsive purchase may do little harm and may even be healthy, but a pattern of chronic IB can lead to financial ruin. For this reason, understanding the psychological precursors for IB will be important for the creation of effective interventions. Towards this goal, the psychological states that predict IB behaviors were examined. In addition to the cognitive and affective domains included in the Impulse Buying Tendency Scale (IBTS), this study includes for the first time an analysis of the relationship between IB and the two most relevant time perspective domains of future-oriented and present-hedonistic-oriented from the Zimbardo Time Perspective Instrument (ZTPI). In addition, six questions were incorporated into the questionnaire to assess a consumer's perspective on IB consequences that…… [Read More]

References

Lin, Y.H. & Chen, C.F. (2013). Passengers' shopping motivations and commercial activities at airports -- The moderating effects of time pressure and impulse buying tendency. Tourism Management, 36, 426-34.

Silvera, DH, Lavack, A.M., & Kropp, F. (2008). Impulse buying: The role of affect, social influence, and subjective well-being. Journal of Consumer Marketing, 25(1), 23-33.

Verplanken, B. & Herabadi, A. (2001). Individual differences in impulse buying tendency: Feeling and no thinking. European Journal of Personality, 15, S71-83.

Zimbardo, P.G. & Boyd, J.N. (1999). Putting time in perspective: A valid, reliable individual-differences metric. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 77(6), 1271-88.
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Psychological Effect the Media Has

Words: 3154 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 95044860

but, the interesting thing is that their peers, family, friends and young boys are basing their opinion of what these girls should look like from what they see in the media.

Main Cause of Poor ody Images in Young Girls

The media has been with us for years and it is here to stay. There are good aspects of this industry because it serves to keep us informed and aware of what is happening in the world around us. The media can also be viewed negatively because of some of the television programs that are out there today. Technology is so advanced that we can now watch our favorite television shows and read our favorite fashion magazines right from our cell phones. We can assume that as the years go by, technology will get more advanced and the role of the media will become even more prominent.

Such outlets as…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ata, R.N., Ludden, AB. And Lally, M.M. (2007). The effects of gender and family, friend, and media influences on eating behaviors and body image during adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 36(8), 1024-1037.

Bell, B.T., Lawton R., and Dittmar, H. (2007). The impact of thin models in music videos on adolescent girls' body dissatisfaction. Body Image, 4(2), 137-145.

Dohnt, H.K. And Tiggemann, M. (2006). Body image concerns in young girls: The role of peers and media prior to adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 35(2), 141-151.

Worell, J., & Goodheart, C.D. (2006). Body Image. Handbook of Girls' and Women's Psychological Health (pp. 68-75). New York: Oxford University Press.
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The Youth Mental Health and the Place of Psychosocial Interventions

Words: 2055 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47323471

social and psychological interventions are important in youth mental health

The most productive and creative generation of any nation are the youth, Australia included. Nations largely depend on the youth for almost everything hence the need to be in the best shape physically and more importantly psychologically. The mental health of the youth has been widely viewed as a subject of concern among the medical fraternity and one that needs constant and continuous intervention in order to have a sound mental health. This paper will delve into the prevalent mental disorder and the different ways in which they manifest themselves and the relevant social and psychological interventions that are appropriate in the intervention especially among the youth. Through understanding of these mental health conditions or disorders and the available interventions, one is able to evaluate whether the interventions have been sufficient and if not, interrogate the inefficiencies and the possible…… [Read More]

References

Lee R.S.C., et.al, (2012). Cognitive Remediation Improves Memory and Psychosocial Functioning in First-episode Psychiatric Out-patients. Psychological Medicine. Cambridge University Press.

Mario A.J., (2011). Preventing the Second Episode: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Psychosocial and Pharmacological Trials in First-Episode psychosis. Schizophrenia Bulletin Vol.37. Oxford University Press.

Mathew S. et.al., (2008). Recent Advances in the Neurobiology of Anxiety Disorders: Implications for Novel Therapeutics. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Wiley-Liss Inc.

Peters A.T & Nierenberg A.A., (2011). Stepping Back to Step Forward: Lessons From the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD). American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology Corner.
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Psychosocial Smoking Cessation Interventions for Coronary Heart

Words: 3420 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23044103

psychosocial smoking cessation interventions for coronary heart disease patients effective?

The association with smoking and coronary heart disease (CHD) has been well documented. To prevent further heart attacks, as well as to preserve their life, smokers have been consistently and strongly advised to quit smoking, and associations such as the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology Task Force have drafted recommendations and reams of advice to assist patients in doing so. Nevertheless, many patients diagnosed with CHD continue to smoke despite the possibility of interventions and programs (many of them free) helping them to stop. Mortality can be reduced by as much as 36% if smokers with CHD determine to stop smoking 3-5 years after diagnosed (Critchley, 2003) aside from which dramatic reductions in cardiac attacks have been discovered when smokers have stopped smoking for as short a time as a year (Quist-Paulsen, & Gallefoss, 2003). The Coronary…… [Read More]

References

Barth, J., Critchley, J., & Benget, J. (2008). Psychosocial interventions for smoking cessations in patients with coronary heart disease, Cochrane Heart Review.

Critchley JA, Capewell S. Mortality risk reduction associated with smoking cessation in patients with coronary heart disease. J Am Med Ass;290:86 -- 97.

Frothingham, S. et al., (2006). How much does smoking cessation cut CHD risk? Clinical Inquiries, 57, 10, 675-679

Huey-Ling W., Harrell, J & Funk, S (2008). Factors Associated With Smoking Cessation
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Sarc Psychological Services Concept Note

Words: 1485 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77412225

Curfews, military incursions, targeted killing, movement restrictions, arrests, terror acts, humiliation, poverty, and economic condition have affected every single person, right from infants to aged people. Volatility on a daily basis aggravates anxiety and stress - these unfortunate people cease to have any control over their lives (SAC, 2015; PCS Mental Health Department, 2003; Irwin & Scali, 2010).

The present situation in Syria is devastating, aggravated by memories of past conflicts and the ultimate loss of identity and land. Coping methods attack religious beliefs, cultural traditions, and community lifestyle vigorously. The most prominent impacts of relentless conflict include hopelessness; such situations have a lasting effect on people, their family, and the overall community. Discovering methods for overcoming the ordeal they have experienced is the lone means to a better future, for these people (SAC, 2015; Zimiles, 2009).

Epidemiology of the health/mental health issue

The collective effect of conflict elements deeply…… [Read More]

References

Allotey, P., Verghis, S., Alvarez-Castillo, F., & Reidpath, D. D. (2012). Vulnerability, equity and universal coverage - a concept note. BMC Public Health, 12 (Suppl 1), 1-3. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-S1-S2

DeSavigny, D. and Adam, T. (2009). Systems thinking for health systems strengthening: Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research. World Health Organization.

Irwin A, & Scali E. (2010). A conceptual framework for action on the social determinants of health. Social determinants of health discussion paper 2: Debates, policy & practice, case studies Geneva: World Health Organization.

PRCS Mental Health Department (2003).Capacity Building for PRCS Psychosocial Services: Vision and Framework -- A Concept Paper. Palestine Red Crescent Society
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Setting the Stage for the Group Psychological

Words: 4820 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96691655

Setting the stage for the group

Psychological intervention might be most efficient when females start modification by leaving the abuser and get in a shelter. Shelters are an essential resource for victims because they offer females and kids security and link them with social, legal, and financial resources (Dutton, 1992). Furthermore, battered females in shelters have a greater threat for PTSD than those who do not look for shelter (Jones et al., 2001). Provided the problems connected with PTSD, these signs might disrupt victims' capability to successfully utilize resources made to enhance their security once they leave the shelter (Foa, Cascardi, Zollner, & Feeny, 2000).

Unlike various other PTSD victims, damaged ladies in shelters deal with continuous security issues. Numerous of their viewed dangers are genuine (Foa et al., 2000). For that reason, conventional PTSD therapies that include exposure are contraindicated, as habituation to feared stimulations might enhance their danger…… [Read More]

References

Baer, R.A. (Ed.). (2006). Mindfulness-based treatment approaches: Clinician's guide to evidence base and applications. New York: Academic Press.

Bagshaw, D., Chung, D., Couch, M., Lilburn, S. And Wadham, B. (2000), Reshaping Responses to Domestic Violence: Final Report, University of South Australia.

Beauchamp, T.L., & Childress, J.F. (2001). Principles of biomedical ethics (5th ed.). New York: Oxford.

Betan, E.J., & Stanton, A.L. (1999). Fostering ethical willingness: Integrating emotional and contextual awareness with rational analysis. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 30, 295-301.
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Psychological Testing Ethical and Legal Use of

Words: 1185 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60730390

Psychological Testing

Ethical and legal use of psychological testing has a significant impact on the standards and practices of psychological testing to demonstrate intervention for those being tested. The purpose of the ethical boundaries of psychological testing is to ensure that clinicians are utilizing the best test possible and then applying the results ethically to demonstrate assistance with diagnosis and intervention modes in a way that best meets the needs of the subject. This work will discuss the ethical application and utilization of psychological testing instruments to demonstrate the best possible outcomes and interventions for subjects in a way that recognizes tests strengths and limitations and ultimately leads to the appropriate and essential answers needed to aid people with diagnosis and treatment objectives. There are a significant number of psychological tests at the disposal of clinicians and they are in a constant state of revision by the entities that develop…… [Read More]

References

Emanuel, E.J., & Menikoff, J. (2011). Reforming the regulations governing research with human subjects. The New England Journal Of Medicine, 365(12), 1145-1150. doi:10.1056/NEJMsb1106942

Green, B., Li, L., Morris, J., Gluzman, R., Davis, J.L., Wang, M., & Katz, R.V. (2011). Detailed knowledge of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: Who knows what? A framework for health promotion strategies. Health Education & Behavior, 38(6), 629-636. doi:10.1177/1090198110391529

Hogan, T.P. (2007). Psychological testing: A practical introduction (2nd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Nagy, T.F. (2011). Ethics in psychological assessment. In T.F. Nagy (Ed.), Essential ethics for psychologists: A primer for understanding and mastering core issues (pp. 171-183). Washington, DC U.S.: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/12345-009
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Intervention Plan for Carlos

Words: 3420 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98342039

The following multimodal evaluation procedure is recommended for Carlos:
Semi-Structured Clinical Interview

The foremost component of an informal evaluation of traumatized individuals entails semi-structured interviewing, in which the following details of the patient ought to be garnered:

• Demographic facts

• Employment history

• Medical history

• Educational history

• Social history and • Several specific facts.

Such an interview must be closely founded on minor and major trauma disorder facets (James, 2008). Particular questions to be posed to Carlos are linked to:

• Trauma nature and level of exposure

• Definite trauma integral to PTS (post-traumatic stress) symptoms

• Intrusive thoughts, recollections, emotions, imagery, responsiveness/awareness freezing, avoidance response and other similar symptoms

• Related elements of anxiety, depression, drug/alcohol abuse, anger or violent behavior

• Pre-morbid family and social life, and adjustment

• Familial history of psychological ailments. Essentially, therapists must seek comprehensive information on individual PTS symptomatology elements,…… [Read More]

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Psychological Testing Movement History and

Words: 2251 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1536882

The opposing side, which sports a more eclectic set of disciplinary backgrounds and prides itself on a more sophisticated and inclusive perspective, divides human abilities into broad classes -- logical, spatial, interpersonal, verbal, etc. -- and labels each class an "intelligence." The two sides then proceed to talk past each other. (Casse, 1998, p. 33)

The resulting controversy then falls back to the idea of socio-cultural differences, and race/gender/culture/environment. (Skidmore & Aagaard, 2004, p. 304) Casse claims that by differing on core definitions of intelligence scientists are not good at comparing anything but data or defining concepts,

Scientists make bad dictionary writers and worse philosophers. Their main skills are in constructing experiments and generating explanations for what they observe. Neither of these endeavors requires agreement on what the words involved "mean" in any deep or absolute sense, only on ways of converting the elements of the theory at issue into…… [Read More]

References

Casse, D. (1998, August). IQ since "The Bell Curve." Commentary, 106, 33.

Intelligence. (2004). In the Columbia Encyclopedia (6th ed.). New York: Columbia University Press.

Daly, W.C. (1997). Some Mentally Retarded Children Can Benefit from Placement with Peers. Education, 117(4), 553.

Figueroa, R.A. (1989). Psychological Testing of Linguistic-Minority Students: Knowledge Gaps and Regulations. Exceptional Children, 56(2), 145.
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Psychological Efficacy of Debriefing for Trauma &

Words: 1093 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60475847

Psychological Efficacy of Debriefing for Trauma & Stress

Author's Note with contact information and more details of collegiate affiliation, etc.

The paper will describe what debriefing is. The paper will discuss the nature and prevalence of trauma in American life and culture. The paper will go on to estimate what psychologists are doing to combat this epic rise in traumatic experience, which can lead to stress disorders affecting the daily lives of many. Thus, not only are people victims of trauma, but also, with improper or no treatment, these people can fall victim again to a trauma related disorder. The paper will talk about why and how psychologists are dealing with all these instances of trauma. The paper will summarize two scholarly articles that offer perspective on the issue of trauma and debriefing as treatment. After providing concise summaries of the articles, the paper will provide a comparative analysis of…… [Read More]

References

Raphael, B., Meldrum, L., & McFarlane, A.C. (June 10, 1995) Does debriefing after psychological trauma work?: Time for randomised controlled trials. British Medical Journal. 310(1). 1479 -- 1480.

Rose, S.C., Bisson, J., & Wessely, S. (2009) Psychological debriefing for preventing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Cochrane Collaboration. The Cochrane Library, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1(1). 1 -- 46.
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Psychological Diagnosis Related Children Topic Generalized Anxiety

Words: 3739 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 71398487

psychological diagnosis related children. TOPIC: GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER. Topics selected Diagnostic Statistical Manual Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR). The research paper discuss: a.

Anxiety disorders are presently responsible for interfering in people's lives and preventing them from being able to successfully integrate society. hen considering the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), matters are particularly intriguing as a result of the fact that many people have trouble identifying it and actually go through their lives thinking that their thinking is perfectly normal. In spite of the fact that there are no motives to provoke the exaggerated worry seen in people with GAD, they are unable to realize that they are overstressed. Millions of people from around the world are currently suffering from GAD, with the malady affecting virtually everything about their lives.

hile some individuals actually acknowledge the fact that their worries are unfounded, it is very difficult for them to put across rational…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Gliatto, M.F. "Generalized Anxiety Disorder." American Family Physician. October 1, 2000.

Kendall, Philip C. Pimentel, Sandra Moira Rynn, A. Angelosante, Aleta and Webb, Alicia "12 Generalized Anxiety Disorder," Phobic and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Clinician's Guide to Effective Psychosocial and Pharmacological Interventions, ed. Thomas H. Ollendick andJohn S. March (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004)

Murray, Megan "Treading Water: Self-reflections on Generalized Anxiety Disorder," Human Architecture 2.1 (2003)

Nutt, David; Bell, Caroline; Masterson, Christine and Short, Clare Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Psychopharmacological Approach (London: Martin Dunitz, 2001)
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Interventions That Improve the Workplace

Words: 1513 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Introduction Paper #: 6678283

" (p. 2)

The work of Van Pelt (2010) reports that ADHD is often hidden due to comorbid conditions including "anxiety and substance abuse." (p. 1) The World Health Organization reports that worldwide there are approximately 3% to 4% of adults have ADHD and 4.5% of adults in the United States. There is reported to be approximately 8 to 10 million who do not know that they have ADHD.

Summary of Chapter One

This chapter in this study has presented the topic to be researched or that of ADHD among adults as it relates to the impact upon their behavior in the work environment and the intention to examine intervention strategies for managing work environment behavior among these adults. The study will be a qualitative study although complemented with data presented in a quantitative manner as well. The research is to be conducted through an extensive review of literature and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adler, LA, Spencer, TJ, Stein, MA and Newcorn, JH (2008) CNS Spectrums. Expert Roundtable Supplement. Best Practices in Adult ADHD: Epidemiology, Impairments and Differential Diagnosis.

Adult ADHD -- Hidden Diagnosis (2010) Social Work Today. Vol 10 No. 3. Retrieved from:  http://www.socialworktoday.com/archive/052010p14.shtml 

Clay, R. (2013) Easing ADHD without Meds. American Psychological Association Monitor on Psychology. Feb 2013, Vol. 44 No. 2. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/monitor/2013/02/easing-adhd.aspx

Ramsay, R. (2013) Psychosocial Interventions for ADHD in Adults: A Guide for Primary Care Providers. Adult ADHD Toolkit. Professional Education. Retrieved from:  http://www.naceonline.com/AdultADHDtoolkit/professionalresources/ramsaytranscript.pdf
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Psychological Tests and Measurements

Words: 2465 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 65728271

Psychological Assessment

Confidentiality Disclaimer

eason for eferral

Identifying information

Developmental History

Medical and Psychiatric History

Short Family and Social History

Short History of School Behavior

Tests Administered

Standardized Instruments

Information Assessment Techniques

Mental Status Examination and Behavioral Observations

esults Form Testing

The following results were obtained with respect to the different domain of functioning of Sebastian based on information from multiple sources.

Cognitive-Intellectual-Executive Functioning

Social-Emotional Functioning

Diagnostic Impression

Confidentiality Disclaimer:

There is a chance that the subject of the report or those who are closely associated with the subject of the report could get psychologically and/or emotionally hurt as the report contains sensitive information about the subject. This report is meant only for people trained enough to read such reports and should not be given to the subject named in the report. In order to ensure that the name of the person who is also the subject of the report…… [Read More]

References

Goldfinger, K. And Pomerantz, A. (2010). Psychological assessment and report writing. Los Angeles: SAGE.

Groth-Marnat, G. (2003). Handbook of psychological assessment. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

No authorship indicated, (2003). Psychological Assessment: Editors. Psychological Assessment, 15(1), pp.1-1.

8 | Page
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psychological case'study using IPT

Words: 1039 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59760068

Dawn's presenting problems, such as a sleep-related disorder and anxiety symptoms, it is possible that she may be diagnosed with a mild depression, or to use the DSM-V code, F32.0 Major depressive disorder, single episode, mild. Measured on the Ham-D scale of depression, Dawn's score will likely fall between 9-12 (Weissman, Markovitz & Klerman, 2007). However, monitoring Dawn over time will be necessary to see if the depression is recurrent.

It is unclear when her "feeling stressed" about her grades began, exactly, or when her sleep patterns started to be disrupted. Therefore, if a DSM-V diagnosis is necessary, the F32.0 diagnosis is the most sensible for now. As Hayes, Pistorello & Levin (2012) also point out, the DSM diagnoses are limited in applicability and accuracy. They have "failed to give rise to functional diagnostic entities, which is a major goal of syndromal diagnosis," (p. 976). The process of diagnosis also…… [Read More]

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Psychological Stress Can Result From

Words: 897 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 79766285

For that reason, employers routinely provide stress-management programs for their employees (Archer, 2005; Probst, 2005; ichardson & othstein, 2008) and some hospitals have begun implementing stress-relieving programs and services because patient stress has been demonstrated empirically to inhibit recovery and suppress the immune system (Archer, 2005).

Strategies for educing Stress

There are many different strategies for reducing stress, depending on the type of stress involved and the source of its origin (Probst, 2010). In general, some kinds of stress can be reduced by making changes that address their source; meanwhile, other kinds of stress cannot necessarily be reduced at their source but their negative effects on the individual can be reduced through the use of coping strategies (Probst, 2005; ichardson & othstein, 2008). For example, certain kinds of self-induced stress (such as fear of failure, social anxiety, and performance anxiety) can be addressed by cognitive psychological therapy. Other kinds of…… [Read More]

References

Archer, R. (2005). "Hospitals design stress-reduction treatment to speed recovery."

Westchester County Business Journal. Westfair Communications, Inc. Retrieved

November 30, 2010 from HighBeam Research:  http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-132120351.html 

Jancin, B. (2005). "Bright light therapy also looks promising for primary insomnia."
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Psychological Health and Individuality

Words: 1308 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 98580011

Self as a Mental epresentation

Today, all directions of psychological study recognizes the importance of an individual's understanding of him- or herself in order to achieve and maintain mental health. Indeed, it is often when such a self-concept malfunctions that mental health begins to suffer. Feenstra's concept of self-schema is a good starting point for understanding the self. The concept of self-schema refers to an individual's conscious and unconscious beliefs and assumptions about him- or herself. This can be used not only by each individual to understand the self better and to promote mental health and functioning, but also by professional psychologists and researchers in their aim to understand and assist those whose self-schema have malfunctioned in some way.

Self-schema, by definition, refers to a set of memories about the self created over the long-term. Generally, these memories have achieved stability and refers to a person's beliefs, experiences, and generalizations…… [Read More]

References

Horowitz, M.J. (2012). Self-Identity Theory and Research Methods. Journal of Research Practice. 8(2). Retrieved from:  http://jrp.icaap.org/index.php/jrp/article/view/296/261 

Renner, F., Van Goor, M., Huibers, M., Arntz, A., Butz, B., and Bernstein, D. (2013). Short-term group schema cognitive-behavioral therapy for young adults with personality disorders and personality disorder features: Associations with changes in symptomatic distress, schemas, schema modes and coping styles. Behaviour Research and Therapy 51. Retrieved from: www.elsevier.com/locate/brat.

Schlegel, R.J., Hicks, J.A., King, L.A., and Arndt, J. (2011, Mar. 14). Feeling Like You Know Who You Are: Perceived True Self-Knowledge and Meaning in Life. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Retrieved from:  http://psp.sagepub.com
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Interventions for Childhood Obesity

Words: 888 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86157104

Doctors of nursing practice have an ethical and professional obligation to disseminate findings that emerge from relevant and timely research. One area of ongoing concern is the near-epidemic levels of childhood obesity that have emerged in recent years due in large part to increasingly sedentary lifestyles and poor eating habits among young people. This paper provides an assessment and reflection on the success of the program design for disseminating the results of childhood obesity research, the challenges that were encountered, and the ethical considerations that may warrant additional attention. A summary of the research and important findings concerning these issues are provided in the conclusion.

Assessment and eflection

Over the past several weeks, my understanding of the national health-promotion and disease-prevention issue has become far more acute. The extent of the childhood obesity problem in this country became increasingly apparent as study after study confirmed the existence of the problem…… [Read More]

References

Berkowitz, B. & Borchard, M. (2009, January). Advocating for the prevention of childhood obesity: A call to action for nursing. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 14(1), 37-41.

Cawley, J. (2006, Spring). Markets and childhood obesity policy. The Future of Children, 16(1),

69-75.

Hannan, M. (2014, April 1). Setting the standard. National Recreation and Parks
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Psychological Implications of Disasters

Words: 889 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68229708

Technological Disasters

Japan Tsunami Disaster March 2011 -- Present

Societal Consequences Discussion

The earthquake and following tsunami that hit Japan was truly a disaster -- part natural and part technological. It affected the Japanese population in many ways. There were the initial consequences that included massive loss of life and population displacement. However, there are also lasting consequences that can even include factors such as the mental health, physical health, and other societal consequences that can be long lasting. This analysis will look at the impact to the citizenry from multiple perspectives, discuss the roles of non-governmental agencies (NGOs) in the after math of the disaster, and discuss what organization would lead a recovery response if such an event occurred in the United States.

Societal Consequences Discussion

The societal consequences that have come as a result of the disaster can be thought of from different perspectives and on many different…… [Read More]

References

IASC. (2007). IASC Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings. Retrieved from IASC:  http://admin.psychology.org.au/Assets/Files/IASC-Guidelines-Mental-Health-Psychosocial.pdf 

Kormino, T. (2015). Role of International NGO in an Uprecedented Disaster in Japan. Disaster Risk Reduction, 13-26.

Pietrangelo, A. (2011, April 12). Feeling for Japan: Coping and Recovering from Disaster. Retrieved from Natural Choice:  http://www.naturalchoice.net/blogs/greenies_0411.html 

PSID. (N.d.). Recovery. Retrieved from Psychosocial Support in Disasters:  http://www.psid.org.au/recovery
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Immigrant Experience and Its Psychological Toll Information

Words: 3416 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91176917

Immigrant Experience

And Its Psychological oll

Information Competency & Library Use

San Francisco, CA

he theoretical framework centers of the immigrant experience and how it changes the individual while navigating his or her new society. he topic statement seeks to explore these phenomena by focusing on the psychological experience and its relationship to violence and economics. he idea that the action of immigrating is profoundly disruptive on ideas of self-worth, identity and economic status are explored.

I address the various experiences of dislocation arising from migration. Distinctions are made between experiences of voluntary immigrants and refugees and asylum seekers and between legal and undocumented immigrants in their risk for trauma exposure and differential impacts of trauma in the context of immigration. Refugee status as inherently founded in trauma is analyzed, with a brief description of torture survivors among refugees. he issue of trafficked migrants is also discussed. What is core…… [Read More]

This dissertation is remarkable as it uses a post-traumatic stress framework to explore the acculturative experiences and offers means of reducing the challenges of the experience. Psychological health requisites for immigrants are compounded by pre-existing needs along with the pressure of residing in a new society. This work explores acculturative stress (AS) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in immigrants by performing a data analysis of the 2002 to 2003 National Latino-American and Asian-American Study. The key acculturative stressors were influenced family factors, challenges interacting with their new society as a result of language problems and social standing. In addition, the dissertation reports that Hispanics suffer from greater acculturative stress than Asians when gender, age, ethnicity, educational attainment and time in the U.S. are accounted for statistically.

Learning Experience

This course has been intellectually stimulating and thought provoking. I have gained significant insight into the field of research which will serve me well in my future endeavors. This course is unlike my other graduate studies as it forces one to take ideas and to ground them in evidence and scholarly work. I had completed some annotations before but not from online databases in this depth. In conducting the research, I found that I gathered much more material than was needed which helped expand my knowledge base even if I did not use the material in my work. This process of editing and deciding what to include helped me to apply critical inquiry and commit to my chosen research topic. Without a doubt, I feel much more confident in conducting scholarly research and formulating my ideas. A second value skill learned from this course is that I feel that I have the ability to conduct online research regardless of the subject matter. In addition, I have developed familiarity with APA formatting.
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Response to Intervention RTI

Words: 6803 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43957081

TI

esponse to Intervention

esponse to Intervention (TI)

Over the past decade, rapid changes have occurred in general educational practice to increase the focus on early identification of and intervention for students considered at risk. The aptly named response-to-intervention (TI) model of service delivery is generally described as a multi-tiered model whereby students receive interventions of increasing intensity, with movement from one level to another based on demonstrated performance and rate of progress (Gresham, 2007). This sizable paradigm shift has been influenced in part by recent special education legislation, which allows the practice of TI as an alternative to the traditional "IQ- achievement discrepancy" model of learning disability identification and allows 15% of federal special education funding to be allocated toward early intervening services (Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, 2004). Moreover, TI has gained favor in light of mounting evidence suggesting that intensive intervention during the primary grades is…… [Read More]

References

Aikens, N.L., & Barbarin, O. (2008). Socioeconomic differences in reading trajectories: The contribution of family, neighborhood, and school contexts. Journal of Educational Psychology, 100(2), 235 -- 251.

Barnett, D.W.,VanDerHeyden, A.M.,&Witt, J.C. (2007).Achieving science-based practice through response to intervention: What it might look like in preschools. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, 17, 31 -- 54.

Berkeley, S., Bender, W.N., Peaster, L.G., & Saunders, L. (2009). Implementation of response to intervention: A snapshot of progress. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 42, 85 -- 95.

Bradley, R., Danielson, L., & Doolittle, J. (2005). Response to intervention. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 38, 485 -- 486.
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Nursing Intervention in Disaster the Possibility of

Words: 1365 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3266108

Nursing Intervention in Disaster

The possibility of occurrence of disasters is a reality. With this in mind there should be efforts made to prevent any upcoming or potentially disastrous events. These efforts are what are known as disaster prevention. Disaster prevention therefore refers to efforts put in place to ensure that adverse effects of events that are potentially disastrous are prevented even when the disaster cannot be controlled. Disaster prevention is done at various levels of the society and is undertaken so as to prevent all types of disasters. Nurses are involved to a large extent when it comes to the prevention and mitigation of disasters. Nurses are involved in institutions that can influence change and due to the unique skills that they posses they can make interventions in disasters. To perform efficiently, a nurse must be always prepared to make changes in plan actions at any time and at…… [Read More]

References

Harden, E.G., (2004). The role of nursing in disasters. Retrieved march 22, 2013 from  http://helid.digicollection.org/en/d/Jdi018e/2.html 

Rittenmeyer, L., (2007). Disaster preparedness: Are you ready? Retrieved march 22,2013 from  http://www.nursingcenter.com/prodev/ce_article.asp?tid=726331 

Wolters Kluwer Health, (2007). LWW Journals - Beginning with A. Retrieved March 22, 2013, from  http://journals.lww.com/smajournalonline/fulltext/2007/09000/spiritual_issues_in_the_aftermath_of_disaster.32.aspx
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School-Based Intervention Trials for the

Words: 14493 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 7664904

, 1999). In many areas of the country this may be very accurate.

Another problem that comes into the picture where obesity in children is concerned is that many parents must work very long hours today to pay bills and have money for what their family needs (Mokdad, et al., 1999). ecause of this, many children are latchkey kids and are not watched as closely by their parents as they used to be (Mokdad, et al., 1999). Children used to come home from school and go and play with others, but many now live in neighborhoods where this is unsafe or where there are no children their age so they remain inside watching TV or playing video games and snacking on whatever is available (Mokdad, et al., 1999).

If there is healthy food in the house this is often not a problem, but many households are full of potato chips,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, J.G. (1987). Structural equation models in the social and behavioral sciences: Model building. Child Development, 58, 49-64.

Arlin, M. (1976). Causal priority of social desirability over self-concept: A cross-lagged correlation analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 33, 267-272.

Averill, P. (1987). The role of parents in the sport socialization of children. Unpublished senior thesis, University of Houston.

Bandura, a. (1969). A social-learning theory of identificatory processes. In D.A. Goslin (Ed.), Handbook of socialization theory and research (pp. 213-262). Chicago: Rand McNally.
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Gap Early Childhood Intervention and the Development

Words: 6336 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 82658447

Gap: Early Childhood Intervention and the Development of the Disabled Child

Children with special needs include those who have disabilities, developmental delays, are gifted/talented, and are at risk of future developmental problems. Early intervention consists of the provision of services for such children and their families for the purpose of lessening the effects of their condition. Early intervention may focus on the child alone or on the child and the family together. Early intervention programs may be center-based, home-based, hospital-based, or a combination. Early intervention may begin at any time between birth and school age; however, there are many reasons for it to begin as early as possible. Early Intervention is the key to achieving the most positive outcome in aiding the disabled child to develop as normally as possible.

There are three primary reasons for intervening early with an exceptional child: to enhance the child's development, to provide support…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bayley, N. (1970) "Development of mental abilities." In P.H. Mussen (ed) Carmichael's manual of child psychology, 1, New York: Wiley.

Bayley, N. (1955) "On the growth of intelligence," American Psychologist, 10, 805, Dec.

Burts, Diane C.; Hart, Craig H.; Charlesworth, Rosalind; DeWolf, D. Michele; Ray, Jeanette; Manuel, Karen; & Fleege, Pamela O. (1993). "Developmental appropriateness of kindergarten programs and academic outcomes in first grade." Journal Of Research In Childhood Education, 8 (1), 23-31. EJ 493-673.

Cooper, J.H. An Early Childhood Special Education Primer. Chapel Hill, NC: Technical Assistance Development System (TADS), 1981.
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Detection and Intervention in Childhood Mental Health

Words: 10566 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 97642961

detection and intervention in childhood mental health help prevent mental health problems in adult life?

Disregarding the mental well-being requirements of children is an intolerable violation of our basic undertaking to protect their well-being. Unfavorable mental disposition amidst our children is a less acknowledged difficulty that influences their literary, societal, and emotional enhancement. Mental well-being is a wide attribute to be analyzed. The mental well-being requirements of children and youth demand introspection. There is prevalent refuting that mental well-being is comprehensive of the influence on the children -- amidst all age distinct ions, variety of cultural sections, and all income sections. Such miscomprehensions are recurring, and involvement and care are unlikely to be found. Many people have the belief that children having mental well-being difficulties are just under the impact of a particular passing cloud. (Promoting Access for Children to Mental Health Screens and Assessments in Medicaid and the Children's…… [Read More]

References

AAMR. "Mental retardation: Definition, classification, and systems of supports," 9th edition (1992).

Caplan G. "Principles of Preventive Psychiatry," Basic Books, New York, 1964

Children's Mental Health: Current Challenges and a Future Direction Traditional Mental Health Services for Children: Current Arrangements and Challenges." Retrieved at  http://www.healthinschools.org/mhs3.asp . Accessed on 12/08/2003

Children, Youth and Mental Disorders." The Primer May, 2003
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Teacher Intervention in School How

Words: 2517 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 54896337



Now, teachers are complaining that they feel abused and harassed with the young students.

The students tend to become abusive. They do not respect the teachers. They swear and shout at the teachers. They throw things at the teachers and in some instances, the students physically assault the teachers.

This is the reason why most teachers feel threatened and would want to resign from their works.

Thus, without the corporal punishment, the students do not learn the real value of discipline and they do not maintain proper conduct. The students who did not receive any corporal punishment when they were still on their younger years tend to have deviant behaviors as they grow older.

Meanwhile, there are also studies which have proven that corporal punishment offers nothing but negative effects to both the psychological and emotional aspects of a child. Some of the proven negative impacts of corporal punishment are:…… [Read More]

Reference List

Curry, Lisa M. Effective Teaching through High Expectation and Class Management. 2000. USA Gymnastics. http://www.usa-dymnastics.org/publications/technique/2000/4/effective-teaching.html

Effective Instructional Strategies. http://www.flstw.fsu.edu/integrate/efins.html

Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew. 2004. "The effect of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior in children." Social Work Research

Lombardo, Lucien X. And Polonko, Karen A. 2000. "Comparative Analysis of the Corporal Punishment of Children: An Exploration of Human Rights and U.S. Law," International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice. Vol. 29, No.2, Fall 2005 pp. 173
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Debriefing Post-Crisis Stress Debriefings Psychological Debriefing Is

Words: 598 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47482379

Debriefing

Post-Crisis Stress Debriefings

Psychological debriefing is a structured crisis intervention meeting that is commonly used as a post-trauma support intervention strategy in a wide range of settings, including the emergency services, the military and mental health services and the technique consists of a discussion and review of the traumatic event or critical incident through a series of phases (Regel, 2010). The methodology uses a period of about ninety minutes to talk to the victims about what they experienced and what they might expect as a result of what happened. One of these debriefings will generally have seven stages and should be conducted between seventy-two hours and fourteen days after the event.

It is argued that this program should not act as a standalone program for trauma victims. That is, the value of the debriefing is largely a result of the beginning of the development of a support network. The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lewis, G. (2002). Post-Crisis Stress - More Harm then Good? Behavioral Health Management, 22-25.

Regel, S. (2010). Psychology Debriefing -- does it work? Healthcare Counseling & Psychotherapy Journal, 14-18.

Siegel, R. (2005, September 13). Outsourcing Compassion: Stress and the Brain. Retrieved from NPR:  http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4842962
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Child Abuse Prevention and Intervention

Words: 1700 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17856720

232).

eferences

Ashley, O.S., Brady, T.M., & Marsden, M.E. (2003). Effectiveness of substance abuse treatment programming for women: A review. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 29(1), 19.

Bradley, .H., & Corwyn, .F. (2002). Socioeconomic status and child development. Annual eview of Psychology, 371.

Dane, B. (2000). Child welfare workers: An innovative approach for interacting with secondary trauma. Journal of Social Work Education, 36(1), 27.

Dodds, T.L. (2006). Defending America's children: How the current system gets it wrong. Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, 29(2), 719.

Eisler, . (2000). Tomorrow's children: A blueprint for partnership education in the 21st century. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Garcia, P., & Holt, C.B. (2005, December). Preparing teachers for children in poverty: The Nashville District picks up the mantle for qualified instruction in high-needs schools. School Administrator, 62(11), 22.

Gilbert, N. (1997). Combating child abuse: International perspectives and trends. New York: Oxford University…… [Read More]

References

Ashley, O.S., Brady, T.M., & Marsden, M.E. (2003). Effectiveness of substance abuse treatment programming for women: A review. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 29(1), 19.

Bradley, R.H., & Corwyn, R.F. (2002). Socioeconomic status and child development. Annual Review of Psychology, 371.

Dane, B. (2000). Child welfare workers: An innovative approach for interacting with secondary trauma. Journal of Social Work Education, 36(1), 27.

Dodds, T.L. (2006). Defending America's children: How the current system gets it wrong. Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, 29(2), 719.
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Counseling Interventions on the Academic

Words: 2827 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 98781309

(McGannon, Carey and Dimmitt, 2005)

To address this need in the field of school counseling, the CSCOR has developed the National Panel for School Counseling Evidence-ased Practice, which is composed of school counseling educators and practitioners who have been identified as experts in the field. Panel members are currently evaluating existing methods of evidence-based practice by reviewing the research literature so that they may establish rules of evidence to determine whether a practice can be identified as evidence-based. The panel is identifying rules for judging strong evidence, identifying needed research, and communicating their findings to other practitioners and researchers. (McGannon, Carey, and Dimmitt, 2005)

The work of Jeremy M. Linton entitled: "Perceived Therapeutic Qualities of Counselor Trainees with Disabilities" states that a learning disability (LD) is present when the person's achievement in a specific academic area is significantly below the level expected for age, schooling, and level of intelligence. In…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Carey, John; Dimmitt, Carey McGannon, and Carey, Wendy (2005) the Current Status of School Counseling Outcome Research. School of Education - University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Research Monograph, Number 2, May 2005.

Problem Solving and RTI: New Roles for School Psychologists by Andrea Canter, 2006, February, Communique, 34(5). Available from www.nasponline.org

Linton, Jeremy M. (1999) Perceived Therapeutic Qualities of Counselor Trainees with Disabilities. Journal of Instructional Psychology March 1999.

Elbaum, Batya; and Vaughn, Sharon (2008) Can School-Based Interventions Enhance the Self-Concept of Students with Learning Disabilities? National Center for Learning Disabilities. 2008. online available at  http://www.ncld.org/content/view/518/
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Educational Intervention on the Balance

Words: 9613 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34346457



Literature eview

1. The dilemma of Obesity

Mokdad et al., (1999) in his study found that the issue of unhealthy weight, overweight and obesity are perhaps one of the rising concerns for the Americans in the 21st century as more and more U.S. citizens become vulnerable to the circumstantial risks and dangers of the phenomenon (Mokdad et al., 1999). It is usually the body mass indexes (BMI) that indicate whether a person is actually overweight or not. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) carried out a study for the years 1999 to 2002 using the BMI phenomenon and concluded that about 65% of U.S. citizens in the adulthood years were categorized under the overweight group because of their BMI (Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2005).

To understand the phenomenon of obesity and its rise, it's important to understand…… [Read More]

References

Adam Drewnowski and S.E. Specter (2004), Poverty and Obesity: The Role of Energy Density and Energy Costs, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 79, no. 1: 6-16.

Akande, a. & Akande, B.E. (1994). On becoming a person: Activities to help children with their anger. Early Child Development and Care, 102, 31-62.

Akande, a. Wyk, C.D.WV. And Osagie, J.E. (2000). Importance of Exercise and Nutrition in the Prevention of Illness and the Enchancement of Health. Education. 120: 4.

Alexander, M.A., & Blank, J.J. (1988). Factors related to obesity in Mexican-American preschool children. Image, 20(2), 79-82.
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Peer-Counseling as an Intervention for College Freshman Substance Abuse

Words: 2466 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 73376768

educing Substance Abuse Among College Freshman

Nursing

Motivational Interviewing as an Intervention for Substance Abuse Problems among College Freshman

Motivational Interviewing as an Intervention for Substance Abuse Problems among College Freshman

Kazemi and colleagues (2013) were interested in understanding whether a behavioral intervention would reduce the prevalence of substance abuse among college freshman in the United States. The independent variable was motivational peer-counseling sessions (motivational interviews) about the risks of alcohol abuse and illicit drug use. The dependent variables were scores obtained on two questionnaires. These scores were then used to determine if there was a statistically significant association between blackout frequency, illicit drug use, and alcohol consumption. Demographic information (attribute variables) was also collected and the attributes of primary interest were ethnicity and gender. The hypothesis tested by the researchers is whether the intervention could reduce the prevalence of self-reported high risk behaviors among college freshman at a representative…… [Read More]

References

Barnett, E., Sussman, S., Smith, C., Rohrbach, L.A., & Pruijt-Metz, D. (2012). Motivational interviewing for adolescent substance use: A review of the literature. Addictive Behaviors, 37(12), 1325-34.

DiClemente, C.C. & Prochaska, J.O. (1982). Self-change and therapy change of smoking behavior: A comparison of processes of change in cessation and maintenance. Addictive Behaviors, 7(2), 133-42.

Dimitrov, D.M. & Rumrill, P.D. Jr. (2003). Pretest-posttest designs and measurement of change. Work, 20(2), 159-65.

Grucza, R.A., Norberg, K.E., & Bierut, L.J. (2009). Binge drinking among youths and young adults in the United States: 1979-2006. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 48(7), 692-702.
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Afro-Caribbeans What Works Best Adherence Intervention for

Words: 2415 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95302816

Afro-Caribbeans

WHAT WORKS EST

Adherence Intervention for Afro-Caribbeans

Recent improvements on prescription medications are beneficial only if patients adhere to them faithfully. Non-adherence is common and results in adverse conditions (Ho et al., 2009). This is a problem both to patients and heir care providers as well as the healthcare system itself. The solution consists of identifying the causes and motivations of non-adherence and the design and implementation of better interventions to improve adherence (Ho et al.). The following studies present and suggest more effective interventions for a variety of health conditions among Afro-Caribbean people who have been reported to have a high level of non-adherence to therapy.

Literature Review

Culture-Specific Interventions

Many health providers contend that more effective interventions in reducing risks for diseases, especially HIV / AIDS, through greater adherence need to culturally conform to the specific culture of the subject population (Archibald, 2011). This study used a…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Adams, O.P. And Carter, A.O. (2010). Diabetes and hypertension guidelines and the primary health care practitioners in Barbados: knowledge, attitudes, practices and barriers -- a focus group study. Vol 11 # 96, BMC Family Practice: BioMed Central.

Retrieved on February 1, 2013 from  http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2296/11/96 

Archibald, C. (2011). Cultural tailoring for an Afro-Caribbean community: a naturalistic approach. Vol 18 # 4, Journal of Cultural Divers: Pubmed. Retrieved on January 27,

2013 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408883
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Changing Psychological Contract Implications for HRM

Words: 1715 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51964907

The Changing Employer-Employee Relationship and Implications on HRM

Organizations now operate in a rapidly changing world. Changes in consumer behavior, increased competitive pressure, technological advancements, as well as regulatory shifts in the last few decades have generally compelled organizations to adjust their strategies, objectives, policies, and actions in an attempt to enhance organizational efficiency and profitability (Freese, Schalk & Croon, 2011; Ulen, 2015; Abu-Doleh & Hammou, 2015). In fact, the ability to accommodate change has been marked as a vital ingredient of success in the constantly evolving operational environment (Wellin, 2007). Whereas its importance cannot be overemphasized, adapting to change has had a significant impact on the psychological contract, which essentially denotes the intangible employer-employee relationship, particularly exemplified by mutual expectations between the employer and the employee (Smissen, Schalk & Freese, 2013). The shifting psychological contract has consequently presented a significant challenge for organizations, specifically their human resource management (HRM)…… [Read More]

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Factors Effecting Childhood Obesity and Interventions

Words: 2001 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37658469

Childhood Obesity and Interventions

There is a strong relationship between childhood obesity and exposure to environmental factors -- most notably socio-economic status. There are exposures that trigger both positive and negative outcomes, and these have to be discussed along with the possible interventions that can be undertaken. Low socio-economic status (E) has been associated with a large number of problematic outcomes where health is concerned, including obesity and related issues in childhood (Kallem, et al., 2013). Despite this correlation, though, there are plenty of children with low E who grow up slim and apparently health, so it is clear that environment is not the only factor (Kallem, et al., 2013). The objective of the study by Kallem, et al. (2013) was to examine the "shift-and-persist" strategy and how (or if) it was what was protecting low E children from obesity in some cases. This strategy involves how a person deals…… [Read More]

Studies have found that racial and ethnic disparities can be just as significant as SES, diet, and exercise issues -- largely because SES and related concerns are often tied to specific racial and ethnic groups more than others (Carroll-Scott, et al., 2013). Preschool age children who are in minority racial and ethnic categories have a statistically higher prevalence of obesity when all other variables have been controlled for by researchers (Carroll-Scott, et al., 2013). That is a serious indication that there is more at play in the overall environment, and that study of all factors that could contribute to obesity is needed. That would include analyzing a larger area of environmental factors, because there are many causes for the tripling of obese children and adolescents throughout the last three decades (Dixon, et al., 2012). That much of a change in that short of a time period is a significant problem for society, and can raise the rates of health care for everyone.

If the obesity epidemic in children is not dealt with now, society can expect to see increases in the rates of many chronic diseases, and these diseases will be particularly obvious in populations that already have a disparity in their health (Dixon, et al., 2012). In the study conducted by Dixon, et al. (2012), the associations between SES and social characteristics of the residential environment were considered. Then, these were looked at as compared to diet, physical activity, and BMI (Dixon, et al., 2012). The participants consisted of students in the fifth and sixth grade at a school in New Haven, Connecticut (Dixon, et al., 2012). That was done to narrow down a population in order to determine the environmental factors associated with it (Dixon, et al., 2012). Multilevel modeling was used in order to collect information on the area and the students (Dixon, et al., 2012).

It was discovered that students living within a close walking distance of fast food outlets had higher BMI numbers than those who lived farther away (Dixon, et al., 2012). Additionally, high fast food outlet densities were linked to higher BMIs and more unhealthy eating (Dixon, et al., 2012). When students had close access to gyms, parks, and playgrounds, though, they were more likely to get exercise, helping to offset some of the unhealthy eating patterns (Dixon, et al., 2012). More affluent neighborhoods were also linked to healthier eating behaviors and better exercise regimens, where students who were on the low end of the SES scale ate poorly and got little exercise (Dixon, et al., 2012). One of the ways to help lessen the problems with childhood obesity could be to provide more parks, playgrounds, and other areas where students could get good exercise, and to lower the number of fast food establishments in residential areas.
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Link Between Dietary Quality and Psychological Well Being

Words: 3791 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14389994

Diet on a Univesity Student's Psychological Well-being

This aticle povides a eseach poposal fo a study to be conducted on the impact of a diet on the psychological well-being of a univesity student. The pape poposes conducting an expeiment on univesity students using Mediteanean diet as the basis of exploing the impact of diet on psychological well-being. The eseache demonstates that thee is evidence in existing liteatue egading the impact of diet on psychological well-being, especially Mediteanean diet. The poposed independent vaiable fo the study is Mediteanean diet while the dependent vaiables include physical and mental health, isk of depession, and cognitive decline. The eseache poposed conducting a coss-sectional study on students fom the univesity's nusing depatment using a self-administeed questionnaie. The data analyses will entail the use of SPSS statistical softwae and Chi-squae tests. The final section of the pape discusses potential impotance of findings if the hypotheses ae…… [Read More]

references and have addictive properties.

Highly-processed snack and takeaway food products, rich in tasty fat and sugar, have now displaced much of the fruit, vegetables and other nutritious, unprocessed foods in our diets.

Largely as a result of these changes, there has been a staggering increase in the proportion of overweight and obese people across many countries. Common non-infectious illnesses, many driven by poor diets, are now the leading cause of death worldwide.

And we're now realizing that unhealthy diets may also be contributing to poor mental health.

Appendix C
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Social Psychological Principles to Create

Words: 1965 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91670573

Psychological studies have confirmed 'altruistic behavior' can be elicited in people. 'Peer Pressure' could also be utilized as an effective psychological tool in reducing resource consumption and in promoting other healthy environmental practices. [Center for Naturalism] A case in point is the Chinese governments 'Grain to Green' Program that offered cash incentives to farmers to convert marginal farmlands to forests. As Alan Tessier, program director in the National Science Foundation (NSF) says, "Much of the marginal cropland in rural communities has been converted from agriculture to forests through the Grain-to-Green Program, one of the largest 'payment for ecosystem services' programs in the world," "Results of this study show that a community's social norms have substantial impacts on the sustainability of these conservation investments." [ScienceDaily] uilding this collective self-control at the community, national and international level holds the key to the success of an environmentally sustainable future. Motivated and environmentally conscious…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Su-Houn Liu, Yu-Hsieh Sung & Hsiu-Li Liao (2006), 'Developing Sustainable Digital Opportunity: The Case of Lalashan DOWEB Model', Issues in Information Systems,

Volume VII, No. 1, 2006, retrieved Dec 30th 2009, from  http://www.iacis.org/iis/2006_iis/PDFs/Liu_Sung_Liao.pdf 

2) BIO, (Nov 2009) 'Agricultural Biotechnology Benefits Farmers and the environment', retrieved Dec 30th 2009, from,  http://www.bio.org/foodag/positions/Benbrook_Report_PUBLIC_111709.pdf 

3) John Vidal, (2009), 'Rich Nations to Offset Emissions with Birth Control', retrieved Dec 30th 2009, from  http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/dec/03/carbon-offset-projects-climate-change
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Prevention and Intervention Treatment Programs

Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15397920

Juvenile ehabilitation Programs

Prevention and Intervention Treatment Programs

ehabilitation of juveniles: Four critical factors

Two of the universal characteristics of successful juvenile rehabilitation programs include beginning early (i.e., offering services while the child is still young and has only committed his or her first offense) and dealing with multiple settings and systems (i.e., incorporating the family and school instead of merely focusing on the individual) (Bartol & Bartol 2010: 153-156). This is the aim of one evolving approach to counseling juveniles which focuses on giving juveniles important communication skills. This enables them to better cope with life stressors and is an important part of rehabilitation. According to Sanger & Spilker (2006), social skills training (SST) is an important part of any rehabilitation program and may encompass story-telling, guided conversation, and instruction in how to use language effectively.

Learning these skills can also enhance teens' future vocational prospects and enable them…… [Read More]

References

Bartol, Curt & Bartol, Anne. (2010). Criminal Behavior: A Psychological approach. Prentice Hall.

Sanger, D., Maag, J.W., & Spilker, A. (2006). Communication and behavioral considerations in planning programs for female juvenile delinquents. Journal of Correctional Education, 57(2), 108-125.
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The Benefit of Environmental Intervention for Dementia Patients

Words: 2695 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 48688369

Environmental Interventions for Patients With Dementia

Dementia is a neurocognitive disorder that has been treated in various ways throughout all history. The modern era has proposed pharmacological interventions in the past but these have proved dangerous and degrading to the quality of life that dementia patients and their loved ones prefer. For this reason, environmental interventions have emerged as an alternative method for treating elderly dementia patients. This intervention method consists of altering the environment in which the patient lives by accommodating for the needs of the patient with clearly identifiable pathways, open spaces for communication, naturalistic settings, adequate stimuli and private rooms for quiet. This paper discusses the fundamental principles of environmental interventions for patients with dementia and includes a justification for this approach as a suitable alternative to prevailing psychoactive drug interventions. It also includes a discussion of the historical context of the disorder, its current description according…… [Read More]

References

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2015). Non-pharmacologic Interventions

for Agitation and Aggression in Dementia. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from  http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/index.cfm/search-for-guides-reviews-and-reports/?productid=1999&pageaction=displayproduct 

Bupa. (2015). A dementia friendly society. Bupa. Retrieved from https://www.bupa.com/corporate/our-purpose/healthy-ageing-and-dementia/reports-and-publications/a-dementia-friendly-society

Fleming, R., Purandare, N. (2010). Long-term care for people with dementia:
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Pediatric Nursing Interventions for Separation

Words: 1158 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 77079010

Distracting a child while their parent is treated may lessen stress for a SAD child (Hillard, 2006).

Nurses may also want to incorporate preventative methods into their routines, especially if they are pediatric nurses. Encouraging work in this area has been done at Mount Sinai Hospital, where nursing departments participated in the incorporation of supportive methodology in handling children who are in treatment (Justus et al., 2006). If a child may need long-term care requiring extended or overnight stays in hospital, nurses can use Comfort Theory methods and other means of familiarizing the hospital environment. If a child feels at ease with nurses and the hospital environment they are less likely to cling to parents and exacerbate medical conditions through anxiety (Justus et al., 2006). General stress reduction techniques apply to children with SAD, and may include aromatherapy, deep breathing, and relaxed lighting or music may help (Hillard, 2006).

SAD…… [Read More]

References

Fontain, K.L. (2003). Mental Health Nursing (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

Hillard, D. (2006). Course: Treating anxiety. Retrieved November 15, 2006, from Advance for Nurses Online:  https://nursing.advanceweb.com/Common/CE/Content.aspx?CourseID=4&CreditID=1&CC=7816&sid=602 

Justus, R., Wyles, D., Wilson, J., Rode, D., Walther, V, & Lim-Sulit, N. (2006). Preparing children and families for surgery: Mount Sinai's multidisciplinary perspective. Pediatric Nursing, 32(1), 35-43. Retrieved Wednesday, November 15, 2006 from the EBSCO Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition database.

Pincus, D.D., Eyberg, S.M., & Choate, M.L. (2005). Adapting parent-child interaction therapy for young children with separation anxiety disorder. Education and Treatment of Children, 28(2), 163-181. Retrieved Wednesday, November 15, 2006 from the EBSCO Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition database.
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Devices and Childhood Obesity Interventions

Words: 1504 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 70333180

This approach can take the focus off of the child, and instead treats the child's environment as a way of holistically treating his or her condition. Also, if time and the nurse's relationship allows for the use of such an open-ended tool, a great deal of information can be yielded about the family system that cannot by other models.

orks Cited

Chen, J.L, C.H. Yeh, & C. Kennedy. (2007, Jun 22). eight status, self-competence, and coping strategies in Chinese children. Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 22.3:176-85.

Cochran, Jill. (2008). Empowerment in adolescent obesity: State of the science. Online Journal of Rural Nursing and Health Care. 8. 1. Retrieved 19 Mar, 2009 at http://www.rno.org/journal/index.php/online-journal/article/viewFile/159/190

Cox, Cheryl L., Julia M. Cowell, Lucy N. Marion, & Elaine H. Miller. (2007, January 19). The Health Self-Determinism Index for Children. Research in Nursing and Health.

13. 4: 237-246. Retrieved March 18, 2009 at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/114079089/abstract

Skybo, Theresa…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chen, J.L, C.H. Yeh, & C. Kennedy. (2007, Jun 22). Weight status, self-competence, and coping strategies in Chinese children. Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 22.3:176-85.

Cochran, Jill. (2008). Empowerment in adolescent obesity: State of the science. Online Journal of Rural Nursing and Health Care. 8. 1. Retrieved 19 Mar, 2009 at  http://www.rno.org/journal/index.php/online-journal/article/viewFile/159/190 

Cox, Cheryl L., Julia M. Cowell, Lucy N. Marion, & Elaine H. Miller. (2007, January 19). The Health Self-Determinism Index for Children. Research in Nursing and Health.

13. 4: 237-246. Retrieved March 18, 2009 at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/114079089/abstract
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Bipolar Psychological Model Most Appropriate

Words: 963 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 28265981

Sixteen percent of people taking Zyprexa for a year gained more than sixty-six pounds, according to documents obtained for a potential class action suit against the drug's manufacturer (Berenson 2007). The drugs used to treat depression are of limited use in treating the repeating depressive episodes of bipolar illness, both in terms of long-term efficacy and their danger in causing the bipolar sufferer to enter a manic episode, not merely recover from depression (Balkalar, 2007). Abilify, a new drug, has demonstrated less significant weight gain, although it can still produce tics, "headache, anxiety, insomnia, nausea, vomiting, constipation, dizziness, upset stomach, and an inner sense of restlessness or need to move" ("Commonly Asked Questions About Side Effects," 2007, Abilify: Bristol-Meyers Squib Official ebsite).

Susie's future

Finding the right drug for Susie may take time, and her drug treatment plan will likely take a series of adjustments over the course of her…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Balkalar, Nicholas. (10 Apr 2007). "Long-Term Therapy Effective in Bipolar

Depression." The New York Times. Retrieved 8 Sept 2007 at  http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/10/health/psychology/10therapy.html?ex=1189396800&en=19ecf79bc3128398&ei=5070 

Berenson, Alex. (20 Jan 2007). "States Study Marketing of Lilly Pill." The New York

Times. Retrieved 8 Sept 2007 at  http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/20/business/20drug.html?ex=1189396800&en=93d3bd739e2e5f70&ei=5070
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Psychology and Education Psychological Studies

Words: 874 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40420546

253). When asking questions the teacher begins the cognitive process of understanding how the parents think and this is an important step for the educator to gather pertinent information to further analyze the learner's needs with the parents or guardians.

Step three in the LAFF process is for the teachers to focus on the issues throughout the communication process with the parents. The cognitive perspective encourages focusing and problem-solving when focusing on the mental process of how individuals think, perceive, remember, and learn (Sternberg & Mio, 2006). McNaughton and Vostal describe this as the time when a teacher begins the process of "checking for understanding" and once the understanding of the issues has been explored the teacher and parent can move forward on problem-solving solutions (2010, p.254).

The final step of the LAFF process is for the teacher to identify the first step. This part of the cognitive process displays…… [Read More]

References

McNaughton, D., & Vostal, B. (2010, March). Using active listening to improve collaboration with parents: The LAFF don't CRY strategy. Intervention in School and Clinic, 45(4).

Sternberg, R.J., & Mio, J.S. (2006). Cognitive psychology (4th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Higher Education.
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Efficacious Treatment Interventions in an

Words: 317 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 30489094

The closed meetings would consist of 15 or fewer members, would be conducted on a weekly basis for approximately 2 hours in a private university classroom or meeting area, and informed consent, eligibility screening and other relevant issues would be addressed in a meeting to be conducted prior to the first formal group meeting.

Possible Social Change Impact

The possible impact of this initiative is difficult to gauge without a comprehensive longitudinal study of the participants involved; however, the importance of regaining lost self-esteem and a sense of self-worth to each person is immeasurable.

eferences

Corey, G. & Corey, M.S. (2006). Groups: Process and practice (Seventh Edition). Belmont, CA: Thomson Brooks/Cole.

Markey, C.N., & Markey, P.M. (2005). elations between body image and dieting behaviors: An examination of gender differences. Sex oles: A Journal of esearch, 53(7-8), 519.

Winter, M. (2005). Obesity shows…… [Read More]

References

Corey, G. & Corey, M.S. (2006). Groups: Process and practice (Seventh Edition). Belmont, CA: Thomson Brooks/Cole.

Markey, C.N., & Markey, P.M. (2005). Relations between body image and dieting behaviors: An examination of gender differences. Sex Roles: A Journal of Research, 53(7-8), 519.

Winter, M. (2005). Obesity shows socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities. Human Ecology, 33(3), 21.
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Team Development Intervention

Words: 771 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 46577046

Team Development

The macro level problem is that there is no coordinated, integrated approach to product development. Structurally, the task of identifying opportunities, developing products and then developing manufacturing capabilities is split among several units. This is a major issue because it causes conflict among the different units, and it likely reduces the company's ability to respond to opportunities as well.

On a micro level, there are a number of issues. The first is that there is no real coordination between the different units. The left hand does not know what the right hand is doing. This is sloppy for dealing with customers and a real problem when dealing internally as well because of the conflict that it creates. Several people have identified this problem, yet there is no leadership of product development. The person in charge of this is the Administrative Vice President and they are nowhere to be…… [Read More]