Psychology Essays (Examples)

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psychology

Pursuing an undergraduate degree in psychology is a fantastic way to gain general insight into human beings and can provide a foundation for graduate coursework in psychology as well as a launching pad for other careers with intensive human interaction, such as legal studies, education, or counseling. It is important for aspiring psychology students to realize that a bachelor’s level degree in psychology is not generally going to be sufficient to do actual field work as a psychologist, because research, clinical, and counseling positions all require additional education. In fact, a psychologist must have a doctoral degree. However, the knowledge and skills acquired in a psychology undergraduate program are critical for pursuing that additional education.

According to the American Psychological Association, “Psychology is the study of the mind and behavior. The discipline embraces all aspects of the human experience — from the functions of the brain to the actions of nations, from child development to care for the aged. In every conceivable setting from scientific research centers to mental healthcare services, ‘the understanding of behavior’ is the enterprise of psychologists.” In other words, while many people think of psychology as focusing on abnormal psychology and psychopathology, the reality is that much of psychology focuses on normal human behavior. This approach is logical, since it is impossible to identify whether behavior is abnormal without knowing what normal human behavior is. Moreover, psychologists and other mental health professionals cannot help clients identify whether behaviors are adaptive or maladaptive without knowing the range of human behavior.

Understanding normal versus abnormal psychology requires an understanding of the normal curve, a term used to describe the distribution of the particular construct being described in the population at large. In fact, while many people think of psychology as a “soft science,” much of modern psychological theory has developed through very specific testing. As a result, an understanding of statistics and the scientific method are both critical for anyone studying psychology. The scientific method is used in psychology not only to help describe behaviors, but also with the goal of predicting those behaviors. Important components of the scientific method are: the hypothesis; independent and dependent variables; and operational definitions. Psychology students must also understand: univariate and multivariate research designs; data analysis; and qualitative and quantitative designs.

In addition, most people who study psychology spend time learning about the history of psychology. While not all psychologists endorse the theories of those who are considered founders of the field, there is no denying the important role that these men and women played in describing human behavior. Some important figures in psychology include: Franz Mesmer, Philippe Pinel, Charles Darwin, G. Stanley Hall, Wilhelm Wundt, Sigmund Freud, Sir Francis Galton, William James, Alfred Binet, Alfred Adler, Carl Jung, John Watson, Rosalie Rayner, Carl Rogers, Jean Piaget, Karen Horney, Erik Erikson, and B.F. Skinner. Studying these figures highlights several factors about psychology. First, a psychology student needs to understand history and sociology, because historical attitudes influenced controversial psychological theories like eugenics. Second, there is no single accepted psychological theory that can be said to describe any aspect of human growth and development or functioning. Instead, there are competing theories put forth by advocates of different approaches to human behavior, which influenced by: culture, society, morals, ethics, and genetics.

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Psychological Research Methods

Words: 949 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54138677

Research practices depend on clearly defined guidelines. Those guidelines include general suggestions for how to conduct research effectively, how to apply research to clinical practice, and also how to maximize research reliability and validity. The scientist-practitioner model has become the “framework for many training programs in clinical psychology,” (Belar & Perry, 1992, p. 71). However, it is also important to pay attention to specific statistical analyses due to the potential for misinterpreting data. Cortina (1993) points out the significance of coefficient alpha, noting that proper interpretations of alpha enhance research validity and reliability. Alpha can often be misunderstood, particularly in the realm of scientist-practitioner and other types of applied research. It is not just misinterpretation of the alpha coefficient that can stymie research validity in the social sciences. Measurement errors, attenuation, and related biases can also impede research validity (Schmidt & Hunter, 1996).
Another core area of concern in applied…… [Read More]

References

Bacharach, S. B. (1989). Organizational theories: Some criteria for evaluation. Academy of Management Review, 14(4), 496-515.

Belar, C. D., & Perry, N. W. (1992). National conference on scientist–practitioner education and training for the professional practice of psychology. American Psychologist, 47(1), 71–75.

Cortina, J. M. (1993). What is coefficient alpha? An examination of theory and applications. Journal of Applied Psychology, 78(1), 98-104.

Judge, T. A., & Kammeyer-Meller, J. D. (2012). General and specific measures in organizational behavior research: Considerations, examples, and recommendations for researchers. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 33(2), 161–174.

Schmidt, F. L., & Hunter, J. E. (1996). Measurement error in psychological research: Lessons from 26 research scenarios. Psychological Methods, 1(2), 199–223.


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Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation

Words: 1029 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51221580

The Psychology of Motivation
Deci, E. L., & Ryan, R. M. (2008). Facilitating optimal motivation and psychological well-being across life's domains Canadian Psychology, 49(1), 14-23.
This article examines the appositeness of Self Determination Theory (STD) in optimizing motivation and psychological health for people. The predominant notion explored within this work is that of STD, which is significant for propounding two alternative theories of motivation. The first is that people are motivated by what is known as “autonomous” (Deci and Ryan, 2008, p. 14) motivation, which entails an active choice on the part of the subject. There are positive connotations associated with this type of motivation. The second is called “controlled” (Deci and Ryan, 2008, p. 14) motivation and correlates to feelings of pressure or compulsion to do something which does not necessarily reflect the volition of the individual. This theory is examined within the context of more traditional theories, one of…… [Read More]

Deci, E. L., & Ryan, R. M. (2008). Facilitating optimal motivation and psychological well-being across life's domains Canadian Psychology, 49(1), 14-23.

Graham, S., & Weiner, B. (2012). Motivation: Past, present, and future. In K.R. Harris, S. Graham, & T. Urdan (Eds.), APA educational psychology handbook: Volume 1. Theories, constructs, and critical issues (pp. 367-397).

Mischel, W., & Shoda, Y. (1995). A cognitive-affective system theory of personality: Reconceptualizing situations, dispositions, dynamics, and invariance in personality structure. Psychological Review, 102(2), 246-268.

Moore, J. (2013). Tutorial: Cognitive psychology as a radical behaviorist views it. The Psychological Record, 63(3), 667-680.

Niemiec, C. P., Ryan, R. M., & Deci, E. L. (2009). The path taken: Consequences of attaining intrinsic and extrinsic aspirations in post-college life. Journal of Research in Personality, 43(3), 291-306.


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John Watson Founder of Behaviorism

Words: 667 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95330310

What are John Watson's primary critiques of psychology (i.e., the study of consciousness via introspection)? How does he propose to solve these issues? Do you believe that introspection is important in changing behavior? Why or why not?
First, Watson believed that psychology used “esoteric methods,” and could not establish itself as a natural science (p. 163). Second, Watson noted that unlike the sciences, it is impossible to improve upon the methods used in an experiment in any meaningful way. “The attack is made upon the observer and not the upon the experimental setting,” (Watson, 1913, p. 163). Psychology depends too much on introspection, as Watson calls it. Consciousness is simply too nebulous to study using the scientific method. Watson does not claim consciousness is not a worthwhile subject, but that it is simply not a scientific subject.
To resolve the tension between psychology and the social sciences, and to infuse psychology…… [Read More]

References

“Psyography: John Broadus Watson,” (n.d.). https://faculty.frostburg.edu/mbradley/psyography/johnbroaduswatson.html


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Biological Psychological and Social dimensions of Anna

Words: 1930 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48522966

Introduction
This paper reviews a case vignette, “Anna”, determines the developmental stage of the individual and assesses how well the individual is achieving the developmental tasks and issues present at the Biological, Psychological, and Social dimensions.
Anna’s Biological/physical functioning
(1) Completion of physical development tasks:
Anna is a 47-year-old Latina divorcee with two children, 23 and 26 years of age, residing in another state. Biological changes typical to the midlife phase, in which Anna currently is, include increased joint aches, weight gain and vision impairment (Lachman, 2004). By midlife, hearing and sight gets impaired among roughly 14% of individuals (Lumen, 2017). However Anna reports hardly any changes in these areas. Elevated blood pressure rates, stroke and smoking aggravate vision and hearing impairment; the above factors are absent in Anna and her healthy lifestyle makes her unlikely to experience them in the near future.
(2) Significant illness/disease:
Anna's mom and dad,…… [Read More]

References

Bumpass, L. L., & Aquilino, W. S. (1995). A social map of midlife: Family and work over the life course. Prepared for the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Midlife Development.

Cliff Notes. (2017). Developmental Psychology. Intellectual Development: Age 45–65. Retrieved from: https://www.cliffsnotes.com/study-guides/psychology/development-psychology/physical-cognitive-development-4565/intellectual-development-age-4565

Durkin, K. (NA). Adolescence and Adulthood. Retrieved from: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/intropsych/pdf/chapter10.pdf

Lachman, M. E. (2004). Development in Midlife. Annual Review of Psychology, 55(1), 305-331. doi: 10.1146/annurev.psych.55.090902.141521

Lumen. (2017). Introduction to Middle Adulthood. Retrieved from: https://courses.lumenlearning.com/lifespandevelopment2/chapter/introduction-to-lesson-9-middle-adulthood/

Papalia, D.E., Olds, S.W. and Feldman, R.D. (2017). Human Development, 10/e. Retrieved from: http://highered.mheducation.com/sites/0073133809/student_view0/landmarks_table.html

Saint Leo University. (2017). The First Florida Catholic University. Retrieved from: http://www.saintleo.edu/about/florida-catholic-university.aspx

Wink, Paul & Dillon, Michele. (2004). Religiousness, Spirituality, and Psychosocial Functioning in Late Adulthood: Findings From a Longitudinal Study.. Psychology and aging. 18. 916-24. 10.1037/0882-7974.18.4.916.

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Theodore Millon Theorist

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52547408

I. Background
Premier personality psychologist, Theodore Millon has been described as the “primary architect for the personality disorders” that have appeared in every Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) edition since the third (Choca & Grossman, 2014, p. 541).
Millon’s biosocial model of personality also helped the American Psychiatric Association remain steadfast to its multi-axial system of diagnosis, upon which personality is Axis II (Millon & Grossman, 2015).
Million was also the architect of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI).
Millon’s personality theory is evolutionary and biosocial, and the theorist was undoubtedly influenced by the evolutionary biology theories of Charles Darwin (American Psychological Association, 2009).
A. Historical Overview
Millon was born in Manhattan in 1928, and was an only child. He died in 2014 (“Theodore Millon – obituary,” 2014).
He began studying psychology in undergraduate school and showed an early predilection towards the understanding of abnormal psychology and personality disorders (“Theodore…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association (2009). Evolutionary theory and psychology. http://www.apa.org/science/about/psa/2009/05/sci-brief.aspx

Choca, J.P. & Grossman, S.D. (2014). Evolution of the Millon clinical multiaxial inventory. Journal of Personality Assessment 97(6): 541-549.

Grossman, S.D. (2015). Millon\\'s Evolutionary Model of Personality Assessment: A Case for Categorical/Dimensional Prototypes, Journal of Personality Assessment, 97:5, 436-445

Millon, T. & Grossman, S. (2013). Evolution-Based Personality Theory. http://www.crossroadscounselingchicago.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Evolution.pdf

Millon Personality Group (2015). Dr. Theodore Millon. http://www.millonpersonality.com/dr-millon/

“Theodore Millon – obituary,” (2014). The Telegraph. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/10647042/Theodore-Millon-obituary.html


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Big Five Trait Theory

Words: 795 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12529722

The Big Five Trait Theory is used to describe the five core traits of personality: openness to experience, conscientiousness, extroversion-introversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. These traits are often used to help predict relationships between different personality types, as well as predictors of success in different aspects of life (Psychology Today, 2018).
Ackerman (2017) argues that the Big 5 traits have been verified across different cultures and countries, thus making them relatively neutral in terms of culture bias, and findings involving the traits to be more or less universal.
In practice, the Big 5 is used in settings such as human resources departments, rather than as a comprehensive explanation of personality. For example, conscientiousness was found to be reliably correlated with success in the workplace, moreso than other traits. So an HR department might run an entire test but only be looking for a high conscientiousness score. The Big 5 trait theory…… [Read More]

References

Ackerman, C. (2017). The big five personality theory: The 5 factor explained Positive Psychology Program. Retrieved March 14, 2018 from https://positivepsychologyprogram.com/big-five-personality-theory/

Psychology Today (2018). Big 5 personality traits. Psychology Today. Retrieved March 14, 2018 from https://www.psychologytoday.com/basics/big-5-personality-traits


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Mary Ainsworth

Words: 1136 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90534325

Mary Ainsworth: Her Impact on Early Childhood Practices
Background
Mary Ainsworth was born in Ohio in 1913. When she was five, her family moved to Toronto and Mary spent the rest of her childhood in Canada (O’Connell & Russo, 1983). Mary read a book entitled Character and the Conduct of Life when she was fifteen years old and that is what led her to want to pursue a career in psychology (O’Connell & Russo, 1983). The following year, she enrolled at the University of Toronto, earned her BA in 1935, her MA in 1936 and her PHD in Psychology in 1939 (Ravo, 1999). Mary taught at the University of Toronto, researched at Tavistock in England, worked at Johns Hopkins, and then settled at the University of Virginian beginning in 1975, where she stayed till she ended her professorship in 1992 (Ravo, 1999).
While in graduate school, Mary was introduced to…… [Read More]

References

McLeod, S. (2016). Mary Ainsworth. Retrieved from https://www.simplypsychology.org/mary-ainsworth.html

O’Connell, A. & Russo, N. (1983). Models of achievement: Reflections of eminent women in psychology. New York, NY: Columbia University.

Ravo, N. (1999). Mary Ainsworth, 85, theorist on mother-infant attachment. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/1999/04/07/us/mary-ainsworth-85-theorist-on-mother-infant-attachment.html


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Theory Foundations of Personality

Words: 3860 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23310779

Abstract
Dozens of research studies have supported the hypothesis that personality traits change as one becomes older. However, what triggers these changes in personality traits? How do these changes take place? This paper investigates some of the answers to these complex questions. It does so by comparing six theories on personality development. All the theories are backed by evidences which will also be discussed. The paper ends by providing a conclusion on the factors that are driving personality changes and development.
Introduction
Personality traits change with time. In fact, it is well-accepted that the changes are lifelong. There is no single moment in time that personality remains the same. However, the sources of these changes are not known. Of course, there are multiple theories that try to explain this. Some theories argue that personality changes are caused by the environment, others argue that personality changes are caused by social roles…… [Read More]

References

Santrac, A. S. (2016). Towards the possible integration of Psychology and Christian faith: Faculties of human personality and the Lordship of Christ. In die Skriflig, 50(1), 1-8.

Specht, J., Bleidorn, W., Denissen, J. J., Hennecke, M., Hutteman, R., Kandler, C., ... & Zimmermann, J. (2014). What drives adult personality development? A comparison of theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence. European Journal of Personality, 28(3), 216-230.

McCrae, R. R., & Costa, P. T. Jr. (2008). The five-factor theory of personality. In O. P. John, R. W. Robins, & L. A. Pervin (Eds.), Handbook of personality: Theory and research (3rd ed., pp. 159–181). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Roberts, B. W., Wood, D., & Smith, J. L. (2005). Evaluating Five Factor Theory and social investment perspectives on personality trait development. Journal of Research in Personality, 39, 166–184. doi:10.1016/j.jrp.2004.08.002

Kandler, C. (2012). Nature and nurture in personality development: The case of neuroticism and extraversion. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 21(5), 290-296.

Nature vs Nurture in Behavioral Determination. (2017, November 13). Retrieved May 31, 2018, from https://www.paypervids.com/nature-vs-nurture-behavioral-determination/

Bryner, J. (2006). Nature vs. Nurture: Mysteries of Individuality Unraveled. Live Science, 19.

Xavier, A. (1996). Integrated Approach to Personality Theories.

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psychoanalysis and the different types of research

Words: 714 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42310716

1. The basic structure of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic theory revolve around the idea that mental processes are automatically regulated by "the pleasure principle" and avoidance of pain. Why are these principles important to psychotherapy? Support your reasoning.

The tendency to avoid pain and seek pleasure is universal to humanity, noted Freud, who devised the term “the pleasure principle,” (“Pleasure Principle,” 2015). The pleasure principle became one of the central ideas and pivotal focal points of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic theory. The pleasure principle is an embedded function of the subconscious mind, suggesting that it is immutable and inevitable. However, the pleasure principle is driven primarily by the needs and desires of the id. The other two parts of the subconscious, in Freud’s model, can help regulate reactions to the pleasure principle. Those other two parts of the subconscious include the ego and superego. Together with the id, the ego and superego…… [Read More]

Reference



University of British Columbia (2017). Scholarly vs. popular sources. Retrieved online: http://help.library.ubc.ca/evaluating-and-citing-sources/scholarly-versus-popular-sources/

 


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Makari Rieff and Schorske Write about Freud

Words: 2400 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95831297

Rieff, Schorske and Makari on Freud: Comparing and Contrasting Perspectives
George Makari argued that Freud was a product of his environment. The culture of Vienna at the time was ripe for something new—but Freudian psychology still needed some external help getting moving, and that came by way of Carl Jung and his experiments which brought a great deal of attention to Freud. Karl Schorske, on the other hand, contends that Freud was less the passive recipient of environmental effects and more the active thinker, whose goal was to give “a meaningful interpretation of Western civilization, and to find his own place in it.” Phillip Rieff, on the third hand, views Freud less as an interpreter of Western civilization and more as a re-maker of civilization—a man of revolutionary ideas that would reshape the West and redirect its course; Rieff saw Freud’s sense of “sublimation” as an essential concept in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Makari, George. Revolution in Mind. NY: HarperCollins, 2008.

Rieff, Phillip. The Triumph of the Therapeutic. IL: University of Chicago Press, 1987.

Schorske, Karl. “Freud’s Egyptian Dig.” NYBooks.

www.nybooks.com/articles/1993/05/27/freuds-egyptian-dig/





 


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Unconscious Mind and Self-Development

Words: 1107 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16195259

Annotated Bibliography
Hebbrecht, M. (2013). The dream as a picture of the psychoanalytic process. Romanian Journal of Psychoanalysis, 6(2), 123–142. Retrieved from http://www.revista.srdp.ro/
How can we better understand the various unknowns regarding the mind’s conscious as well as unconscious embedded aspects? This, according to Hebbrecht (2013) could be accomplished via an exploration of the underlying structure of dreams so as to better perceive or infer their relationship with psychological and personal connections that are implanted deep in the dream world? Dreams, as had been expressed by Freud, cannot merely be regarded as the unconscious thought’s expressive or direct form. The author, in this article, invokes Freud’s explication or elucidation of dreams in an attempt to initiate debate on the entire proposition as a product of an analytic process. Hebbrecht, in this enlightening article, seeks to elucidate the outcome of the psychoanalytic process, with the dream taking on a prominent role in the examination/evaluation.…… [Read More]

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Assessment Development Analysis WAIS IV and MMPI 2

Words: 674 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84512962

Introduction
A mother of 2, Ms. Z is an African American who has in the past attempted to commit suicide, after which she was admitted in a psychiatric hospital. She is 35 years old. Her depressed mood, which has presented since she was 18 years old, continues even after she was prescribed antidepressant medication. Ms. Z has since returned to work, after receiving ECT. It is important to note that Ms. Z intends to return to school so as to complete her four year degree. Given her mental health history, Ms. Z’s WAIS-IV and MMPI-2 scores will be of great relevance in seeking to offer her the relevant diagnostic insight.
Test and Assessment Development Analysis: WAIS-IV
Describe how the test is administered:
The test is presented in various formats, and has several core subsets. In general, the test takes approximately 60 to 90 minutes to complete. It is the said…… [Read More]

References

Groth-Marnat, G. (2009). Handbook of Psychological Assessment (5th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.

Spores, J.M. (2012). Clinician\\'s Guide to Psychological Assessment and Testing. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.


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Multicultural Competence and Professional Counselling

Words: 684 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88525047

Thesis statement
Multicultural competence is a necessary skill for a professional counsellor to succeed in working with mental health patients.
Introduction
Multicultural counselling refers to situations when a professional counsellor handles patients from different cultural groups and how such interaction holds the potential to interfere with what transpires in the course of their counsellor –patient relationship. The difference in culture is extended to cover differences in religion, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic class, age, geographic location and family history. Effective multicultural counselling calls for the professional to, firstly, acknowledge the existence of such differences between them and the mental health disorder patient (Faculty, 2014).
The necessary steps to attain cultural competence
How to understand and address problems in multicultural counselling setting
Acknowledging cultural differences is an effective tool that counsellors can utilize to handle patients from other cultural up-bringing. A counsellor must engage the mental health patient in such a way…… [Read More]

References

Faculty. (2014). Five important aspects of multicultural counselling competencies. Accessed from: http://www.delval.edu/blog/five-important-aspects-of-multicultural-counseling-competencies

Sue, D. W., & Sue, D. (2013). Counselling the culturally diverse: Theory & practice (6th ed.). New York, NY: John Wiley.


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Evaluation of a Dissertation on Neurofeedback

Words: 1137 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25326144

Introduction
The Wigton (2014) dissertation is about the efficacy of 19-channel z-score neurofeedback (19ZNF), one of the newer types of neurofeedback methods. Wigton (2014) uses quantitative methods in a clinical setting to evaluate the effectiveness of 19ZNF. According to the author, there has been a lack of empirical evidence supporting the use of this particular neurofeedback mechanism, in spite of the fact that neurofeedback itself is widely used in clinical practice. The specific outcome meausures used include attention, behavior, executive functioning, and electrocortical functioning.
Background
Neurofeedback, also known as elecroencephalographic (EEG) feedback, is a type of biofeedback using brainwaves. As a biofeedback process, neurofeedback is ultimately based on the basic premises of behaviorism and operant conditioning. Neurofeedback can be used to provide immediate insight into how the brain reacts to specific behaviors or stimuli, thereby enabling individuals to change their behavior or responses to their environments. With neurofeedback, the person…… [Read More]

References

Wigton, N.L. (2014). Evaluating 19-Channel Z-score Neurofeedback: Addressing Efficacy in a Clinical Setting. A Dissertation Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Doctorate of Philosophy, Grand Canyon University.


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Health and Human Services

Words: 477 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30904154

Jimmy and his family have multiple unmet needs, which can be meaningfully assessed and addressed through mental health services. Focusing on Jimmy, it would be crucial to first work with a team of psychologists that could offer tests to determine whether attention deficit/hyperactivity is indeed the source of Jimmy’s behavioral problems. While it is true that ADHD is associated with oppositional behavior, aggression, defiance, and conduct disorders, it is also true that medications used to treat children with these issues do tend to show marked improvement (Pringsheim, Hirsch & Gardner, 2015). The fact that Jimmy’s symptoms have worsened may seem to suggest that ADHD is not an accurate diagnosis and that the pharmacological intervention was either premature or unwarranted. Counseling services—especially family and group therapy—may be of particular use in this case.
Jimmy’s family situation, dynamics, and structure are complex but by no means unusual. Therefore, case workers can effectively…… [Read More]

References

Pringsheim, T., Hirsch, L., & Gardner, D. (2015). The Pharmacological Management of Oppositional Behaviour, Conduct Problems, and Aggression in Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, and Conduct Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Part 1: Psychostimulants, Alpha-2 Agonists, and Atomoxetine. The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 60(2): 42-51.


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Assessing the Family Goals Strengths and Needs

Words: 2896 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24816141

Statement of purpose/intent
This piece is dedicated to examining the different challenges Jimmy and his family are going through. The objective is to identify the family and mental disorders present in each of the members and a suggestion at the appropriate treatment methods. As a Case manager the objective would be to recommend the best process aimed at achieving this goal. The greatest challenge is to identify what is ailing each family member and to fashion a pathway towards helping each member and the family as a whole endure their situation. This research recommends ways of handling the different situations with the hope that an expected outcome is achieved.
* Assess the goals, strengths and needs of this family
Family Goals: The priority at this moment is to get some professional help, first for Jimmy and then for Linda, his biological mother. There is enough evidence to the effect that…… [Read More]

References

Chih-Jui, H. R., & Walker, Leslie, R. (2016). Substance use disorders. Pennsylvania: Elsevier

Douaihy, A., & Daley, D. C. (2014). Substance use disorders. Substance use disorders. New York, NY, US: Oxford University Press

Mayo Clinic (2018). Antisocial personality disorder, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). Retrieved 13, February, 2018 from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/antisocial-personality-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20353928

National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. (2010). Antisocial Personality Disorder: Treatment, Management and Prevention. Antisocial Personality Disorder: Treatment, Management and Prevention (p. 360). 

Rotgers, F., & Maniacci, M. P. (2006). Antisocial personality disorder: A practitioner\\\\'s guide to comparative treatments. New York: Springer Pub.


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Mood and Anxiety Disorders

Words: 617 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31891960

Article Critique: Mood and Anxiety Disorders
Just like certain psychological disorders like depression and anxiety are frequently comorbid, certain physical conditions are associated with psychological problems. A good example of this is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, which is caused by “abnormal stimulation of the cupula by free-floating otoliths (canalolithiasis) or otoliths that have adhered to the cupula (cupulolithiasis) within any of the three semicircular canal” (Kozak et al. 2018, p. 49). The association between the physical disorder and the psychological disorders may be due to both physical and psychological factors. The sensation of vertigo itself can be destabilizing and anxiety-provoking. Additionally, it may also stimulate neuronal circuits in the parabrachial nucleus which trigger feelings of anxiety.
The study involved a comparison of an experimental group of 49 individuals suffering from paroxysmal positional vertigo and a control group of 74 members of hospital workers and relatives from the hospital at which…… [Read More]

References

Kozak, H., Dundar, M., Uca, A., Uguz, F., Keziban, T., Atlas, M….Aziz, S. (2018). Anxiety, mood, and personality disorders in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Archives of Neuropsychiatry, 55:49?53


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Jean Watson and his Human Caring theory

Words: 1005 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38916657

Grand Theorist Report
Introduction
Nursing theory is delineated as an organized, methodical set of conceptions, delineations and statements that outline nursing phenomena and can be employed to forecast or elucidate outcomes. Specifically, grand nursing theories are intangible abstract structures that emanate from nursing models and propose results on the basis of use together with application of the model. The grand theorist selected for this analysis is Jean Watson specifically for the Human Caring theory. The Theory of Human Caring was in the beginning deemed a perspective regarding nursing and started in 1979 in Watson’s book titled Nursing: The Philosophy and Science of Caring. It was initially an endeavor to lay emphasis of connotation to nursing as its own line of work and discipline. What is more, the theory was developed as a viewpoint regarding nursing and care and was primarily envisioned to express an assimilated and precise nursing curriculum (Goldin…… [Read More]

References

Goldin, M., & Kautz, D. (2010). Applying Watson’s Caring Theory and caritas processes to ease life transitions. The International Journal for Human Caring, 14, (1), 11-14.

Watson, J., & Woodward, T. K. (2010). Jean Watson’s theory of human caring. Nursing theories and nursing practice, 3, 351-369.

Wayne, G. (2016). Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. Nurse Labs. Retrieved 28 May, 2018 from: https://nurseslabs.com/jean-watsons-philosophy-theory-transpersonal-caring/#description

 


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Personality Disorder

Words: 741 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81842733

Diagnosis and Treatment
Axis II of the DSM covers personality disorders extensively, illuminating the criteria by which personality disorders can be diagnosed, and allowing clinicians to effectively distinguish between them in order to provide the most accurate diagnosis and treatment plan for the client. As a multi-model model, the DSM also allows clients like Mary to be treated for additional clinical conditions and accounts for comorbidity. Alternative models of personality disorder assessment and diagnosis can also be used alone or in conjunction with the DSM (Oldham, 2015). Using any model of assessment, the clinician is advised to take into account the client’s health history with a long range view of behavioral and other presenting symptoms. Clinicians can also take into account what prior treatments Mary has received and the assessments given by her former therapists.
In Mary’s case, personality disorder symptoms are diverse, including self-harm behaviors, suicidal ideation, substance abuse,…… [Read More]

References

Dingfelder, S.F. (2004). Treatment for the ‘untreatable.’” APA Monitor 35(3):http://www.apa.org/monitor/mar04/treatment.aspx

National Institute of Mental Health (2017). Borderline personality disorder. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/borderline-personality-disorder/index.shtml

Oldham, J.M. (2015). The alternative DSM-V model for personality disorders. World Psychiatry 14(2): 234-236. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4471981/


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Gregory in Life on the Color Line Assessment

Words: 1829 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98965014

A Biopsychosocial Assessment of Gregory from Life on the Color Line
Introduction
Gregory Williams was ten years old before he realized his own black heritage. He was a self-described “white boy” whose father, Buster, had led him to believe he was half-Italian. It was not true: Buster was half-African American, and when Gregory’s parents separated and Buster took Gregory and his brother Mike with him back to Buster’s family’s town in an African American neighborhood, Gregory realized the truth of his heritage: he himself was not “white” but rather a quarter African-American. Gregory went from being a star student and star athlete as a “white boy” to being prejudiced against by schools and athletics directors because of his African American heritage. His biology played a part in his psychosocial development—but never to his detriment, as he grew up to be a successful leader in his own right. Instead, Gregory’s biopsychosocial…… [Read More]

References

Williams, G. (1996). Life on the Color Line. New York, NY: Penguin.