Respiratory System Essays (Examples)

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Respiratory Syncytial Virus RSV Is

Words: 2800 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57245085



It has also been suggested that low-level viral replication associated with SV may be a driver in chronic inflammation in some sufferers of chronic lung disease, although this is so far uncertain (Openshaw, 2005). It is estimated that infants who develop a wheeze as a result of SV contraction develop a recurring wheeze in around two thirds of all cases. It is also estimated that around half of these children will develop some form of asthma (Lehtinen et al., 2007). It is unclear why there are some who experience delayed onset of SV, although both immune 'imprinting' and viral persistence have been implicated (Openshaw and Tregoning, 2005).

Diagnosis

The condition is diagnosed through rapid antigen-detection tests. It is difficult to diagnose SV in adults as the tests are insensitive in persons other than children, and practitioners rarely request tests for SV in adults. This means that it is difficult to…… [Read More]

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2005) Respiratory Syncytial Virus. National Center for Infectious Diseases: Respiratory and Enteric Viruses Branch. Retrieved on November 11, 2007, at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/revb/respiratory/rsvfeat.htm.

Feltes, T.F. And Sondheimer, H.M. (2006) Palivizumab and the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus illness in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease. Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy, 7(9): 1471-1480.

Flynn, J.D., Akers, W.S., Jones, M., Stevkovic, N., Waid, T., Mullett, T. And Jahania, S. (2004) Treatment of Respiratory Syncytial Virus pneumonia in a lung transplant recipient: Case report and review of literature. Pharmacotherapy. Retrieved on November 11, 2007, at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/482817?src=mp.

Health-Cares.net (2005) "How is RSV infection diagnosed?" Retrieved on November 11, 2007, at  http://respiratory-lung.health-cares.net/rsv-infection-diagnosis.php .
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Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis

Words: 715 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39583971

Subtype a is the one that predominates in many of the outbreaks that are seen and presents much more severe clinical illness. It affects both the lower and the upper respiratory tract but is most prevalent in illnesses of the lower respiratory tract such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The obstruction of the airway in RSV can be very dangerous, and this is especially true of infants because their peripheral airways are much smaller than adults. Because of this it is very important to know what the warning signs of the illness are so that children can be treated properly and can recover fully. Infants between age two months and six months are most at risk for RSV, as are premature babies and babies that have other problems that may make their immune system not as efficient such as those that have lung conditions, congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, a lack…… [Read More]

Works Cited www.cdc.gov.(2005). Respiratory Syncytial Virus. Retrieved 8 February 2005 at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/revb/respiratory/rsvfeat.htm.

A www.rsvinfo.com.(n.d.). RSV. Retrieved 7 February 2005 at http://www.rsvinfo.com/diagnosing/diagnosing.html.
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Respiratory Ethics Nursing Ethics in

Words: 1940 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19560657

2008).. This points to the ethical responsibility of nurse educators -- it is not enough to treat the disease, bit one must treat the patient.

Failure to provide the proper level of education to a patient is certainly one way to fail them both ethically and medically, bit the opposite can also be true. That is, it is possible to provide too much care -- what is deemed "medically futile care" -- and this also raises very serious ethical issues in the realm of respiratory illnesses (Sibbald et al. 2007). This particular stuffy found that insufficient communication among the medical team was one of the primary causes for prolonging futile care, which often means increasing and/or prolonging a patient's discomfort without any reasonable expectation of an improvement in their condition (Sibbald et al. 2007).

The ethical choice here, of course, is to end care (with the consent of the patient…… [Read More]

References

Efraimsson, E.; Hillverik, C. & Ehrenberg, A. (2008). "Effects of COPD self-care management education at a nurse-led primary health care clinic." Scandinavian journal of caring sciences, 22(2), 178-85.

Selecky, P.; Eliasson, A.; Hall, R.; Schneider, R.; Varkey, B. & McCaffree, D. (2005). "Palliative and end-of-life care for patients with cardiopulmonary diseases." Chest 128(5), pp. 3599-610.

shiao, J.; Koh, D.; Lo, L.; Lim, M. & Guo, Y. (2007). "Factors predicting nurses' consideration of leaving their job during the SARS outbreak." Nursing Ethics, 14(1), pp. 5-17.

Sibbald, R.; Downar, J. & Hawryluck, L. (2007). "Perceptions of 'futile care' among caregivers in intensive care units." Canadian medial association journal, 177(10), pp. 1201-8.
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Tissue Maturation Body System Effects

Words: 1400 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40406059

e. hypertrophy). In the elderly, this process is reverse. Hence, the functional reserve capacities of the skeletal muscles decline with age, largely due to diminished levels of physical activity. As a result daily tasks once taken for granted become progressively more difficult, and eventually impossible, to perform. In illustration, a great deal of muscle force is required to simply stand up or to climb stairs. Therefore, skeletal system is relying upon the reserve capacity of the heart to provide the endurance needed to perform such activities. If an elderly person does not engage in some sort of endurance-based activities, he or she will not have the cardiac reserve capacity needed for daily tasks. More importantly, diminished capacity may not counteract illnesses or diseases. Although strength-based activities help the cardiac reserve, it may not benefit the skeletal system. "While resistance exercise promotes fiber hypertrophy in skeletal muscles, the explosive power of…… [Read More]

References

Bailey, R. (2011). Muscle tissue. About.com Guide. Retrieved from http://biology.about.com/od/anatomy/a/aa022808a.htm

Carpi, A. (1999). Basic anatomy - tissues & organs. Retrieved from http://web.jjay.cuny.edu/~acarpi/NSC/14-anatomy.htm

Lakatta, E.G. (1994). Cardiovascular reserve capacity in healthy older humans. Laboratory of Cardiovascular Science, Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, 6(4): 213-23.

Courtesy of Musculartory System BlogSpot
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China's Healthcare System China Is

Words: 2216 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41770052

"

More unfavorable publicity came in June when Jintao had to undergo medical checkups to ensure he was SARS-free when meeting President Bush and other G-8 leaders in France. There is little doubt that China's international standing was clearly badly damaged by its government's mishandling of the SARS epidemic.

On July 21, 2004, Dr. Bates Gill, Freeman Chair in China Studies Committee on House International Relations Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific, stated official Chinese estimates show China now has roughly 840,000 persons living with the HIV virus and as of the end of 2003, only 62,159 persons had been tested and officially confirmed to be HIV-positive. "The remaining HIV-positive individuals in China, estimated at 780,000 persons or more, are not known to public health authorities, and the individuals themselves probably do not know their status, posing significant risks for the further spread of HIV." Yet, outside observers believe that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

China. World Health Organization. http://www.wpro.who.int/chips/chip01/chn.htm. Accessed 16 November 2004 review of evidence: China's path to better health and development. World Health

Organization. http://www.google.com/u/who?q=cache:dMwKxNx4q4YJ:www.who.int/entity/macrohealth/action/en/ShanghaiPaperRevJuly2004.pdf+china's+health+care+system&hl=en&ie=UTF-8. Accessed 16 November 2004

The Specter of SARS: China's failure to contain severe acute respiratory syndrome has economic causes and consequences. World and I. 01 July 2003; Pp.

Rask, Kolleen J. Healthcare Reform in Transitional China: Its Impact on Accounting and Financial Management. Research in Healthcare Financial Management. 01 January 2001; Pp.
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Human Circulatory System and Oyster

Words: 1722 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65511169

"An electrical analogue of the entire human circulatory system ." Medical Biological and Engineering and Computin 2.2 (1964): 161-166. SpingerLink. eb. 15 Nov. 2010.

Inlander, Charles B.. The people's medical society health desk reference: information your doctor can't or won't tell you - everything you need to know for the best in health care. New York: Hyperion, 1995. Print.

Jodrey, Louise, and Karl ilbur. "Studies on Shell Formation. IV. The Respiratory Metabolism of the Oyster Mantle." Biological Bulletin 108.3 (1955): 346-358. JSTOR. eb. 15 Nov. 2010.

Ruppert, E.E., and Karen Carle. "Morphology of metazoan circulatory systems." Zoomorphology 103.3 (1983): 193-208. SpringerLink. eb. 15 Nov. 2010.

Southgate, Paul C., and John S. Lucas. The pearl oyster . Amsterdam: Elsevier Science, 2008. Print.

"The onders of the Seas: Mollusks." Oceanic Research Group. N.p., n.d. eb. 15 Nov. 2010. .

eight, Ryan, John Viator, Charles Caldwell, and Allison Lisle. "Photoacoustic detection of metastatic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arnaudin, Mary, and Joel Mintzes. "Students' alternative conceptions of the human circulatory system: A cross-age study." Science Education 69.5 (2006): 721-733. Wiley Online Library. Web. 15 Nov. 2010.

De Pater, L, and JW Van Den Burg. "An electrical analogue of the entire human circulatory system ." Medical Biological and Engineering and Computin 2.2 (1964): 161-166. SpingerLink. Web. 15 Nov. 2010.

Inlander, Charles B.. The people's medical society health desk reference: information your doctor can't or won't tell you - everything you need to know for the best in health care. New York: Hyperion, 1995. Print.

Jodrey, Louise, and Karl Wilbur. "Studies on Shell Formation. IV. The Respiratory Metabolism of the Oyster Mantle." Biological Bulletin 108.3 (1955): 346-358. JSTOR. Web. 15 Nov. 2010.
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Performance Reward System An Organization Can Achieve a

Words: 1027 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 347755

Performance/Reward System:

An organization can achieve a competitive edge only and only with the help of its employees. Therefore, it is necessary that right employees are selected then trained and developed and a performance-based reward system. The question then comes to the performance measurement system. In a furniture retail store where I work they stick to the old practice of a meeting of top managers and supervisor who sit down annually and critically review the performance of all customer service personnel. They carry out a thorough examination of employee performance with respect to the goal set for them by the management. In this setting where only goals are there to guide employees and performance appraisal system is vague and subjective, most employees are just interested in meeting their targets and they do not strive to exceed their employers expectations. Performance evaluation should be an evaluation and development tool with the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Sims, R. (2002). Organizational Success through Effective Human Resources Management. Quorum Books. Westport, CT.

Kreiner, J. (2000). Examining the human Body. The Washington Times. March 18.

Prasad, S., Tata, J., & Thorn, R. (1999). The Influence of Organizational Structure on the Effectiveness of TQM Programs. Journal of Managerial Issue. Vol. 11.
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Cardiac Exercise and Cardiac Respiratory Health Heart Health

Words: 940 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40796659

Cardiac

Exercise and Cardiac/Respiratory Health

Heart health is positively correlated with exercise and, according to the research, physical activity can be a good way to diagnosis, detect or treat emerging heart conditions in individuals. Connections are also made in general research between exercise and both aerobic and anaerobic gains for individuals. Indeed, as the discussion hereafter will show, exercise is among the most consistently effective and proven methods of preventing heart disease and such causal conditions as obesity or hypertension. Research points to a host of indicators that suggest exercise should in some form be a regular part of every individuals lifestyle. Chief among these indicators is the evidence demonstrating that exercise and physical activity are directly related to cardiovascular and respiratory health.

e find that there are a wide array of methods to diminishing the risk of heart disease, which can be associated with a sedentary lifestyle, a poor…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Blair, S.N. & Church. (2004). The Fitness, Obesity, and Health Equation: Is Physical

Activity the Common Denominator? The Journal of the American Medical Association,

292(10), 1232-1234.

Brannagan, M. (2010). The Effect of Exercise on the Cardiac Cycle. Live Strong.com.
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Oxygen Hypoventilation and Hyperventilation Are Respiratory Conditions

Words: 680 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11898862

Oxygen

Hypoventilation and hyperventilation are respiratory conditions related to differential intakes of air. Hypoventilation refers to the inadequate (hypo) intake of air, causing decreased levels of oxygen and increased levels of carbon dioxide in the body. The necessary gas exchanges for maintaining equilibrium become upset. Hypoventilation is caused and characterized by shallow and/or excessively slow breathing. As a result of inadequate gas exchange, carbon dioxide cannot be properly removed and levels of CO2 in the blood become elevated, a condition called hypercapnia. When levels of CO2 in the blood change, the body's pH changes too. Hyperapnia causes the blood to become more acidic, a condition called espiratory Acidosis. A person who has lost control over his or her respiratory system may not be able to self-regulate by breathing deeper or faster (Agrawal, n.d.).

Hyperventilation is the opposite of hypoventilation. Too much (hyper) air is being taken in and cannot be…… [Read More]

References

Agrawal, S. (n.d.). Understanding hypoventilation and its treatment. Retrieved online: http://www.articles.complexchild.com/april2010/00197.pdf

American Society for Hematology (n.d.). Clots and travel. Retrieved online: http://www.hematology.org/Patients/Clots/Travel.aspx

"Hyperventilation And Hypoventilation," (n.d.). Retrieved online: http://www.nataliescasebook.com/tag/hyperventilation-and-hypoventilation

"Hypoventilation and Hyperventilation Syndromes," (n.d.). Providence. Retrieved online: http://oregon.providence.org/health-library/h/hypoventilation-and-hyperventilation-syndromes/
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New Respiratory Drugs

Words: 1672 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24708838

new respiratory drugs that have been approved for medical use over the past decade. The paper will highlight the diagnoses of the drugs i.e. when and why it is prescribed, how it is meant to be used and how often, its side effects, the impact for a missed dose or an overdose along with any other relevant information that will add depth to it appropriate use.

The main purpose for the respiratory drugs is to help cure the ailments directly or indirectly related to the functioning of lungs or general breathing of an individual. There are numerous sectors where studies on new respiratory drugs can be carried out and some of the most recent studies to include this particular aspect include allergies, asthma attacks, Acute espiratory Distress Syndrome (ADS), pneumonia and sinus infections.

In this paper we will focus on the following new respiratory drugs: Arcapta, Daliresp, Dulera, Tyvaso, Alvesco,…… [Read More]

References

Beeh, K.M., Derom, E., Kanniess, F., Cameron, R., Higgins, M., van As, A. (2007). "Indacaterol, a novel inhaled beta2-agonist, provides sustained 24-h bronchodilation in asthma." Eur. Respir. J. 29 (5): 871 -- 8.

Cerner Multum, Inc., (2010). Dulera Inhaler. Accessed 02-02-12 from:  http://www.drugs.com/dulera.html 

Cerner Multum, Inc., (2010a). Tyvaso. Accessed 02-02-12 from:  http://www.drugs.com/tyvaso.html 

Cerner Multum, Inc., (2010b). Alvesco. Accessed 02-02-12 from:  http://www.drugs.com/alvesco.html
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Grid-Connected Photovoltaic PV Systems Though

Words: 2702 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59047870

Batteries are common in individual household systems. Inverters could help, though their technology is not standardized. Automated demand response using smart meters with microclimate forecasting research is well funded (St. John). Building dedicated (express) feeders for larger PV systems with bidirectional voltage regulators is one response. Avoiding fixed capacitator banks and having the PV system absorb volt-ampere reactives are two other possible solutions (Katiraei and Romero Aguero 69-70). On the other hand, PV can be useful to a utility by improving the voltage profile and reducing electrical line losses (Srisaen and Sangswang 855), as well as "relieved transmission and distribution congestion, environmental impact reduction, peak shaving, and enhanced utility system reliability" (Ramakumar and Chiradeja 722-723).

PV has environmental issues. Making solar cells is an energy-intensive process, using significant amounts of water and toxic chemicals. Most good monocrystalline silicon is produced by the highly inefficient (80% waste) trichlorosilane (SiHCl3) distillation and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

BrighterEnergy.org. SunPower offers solar modules boasting 19% efficiency. 3 May 2010. Web. 20 October 2011.

Chen, Hong Wen. "Exposure and Health Risk of Gallium, Indium, and Arsenic from Semiconductor Manufacturing Industry Workers." Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology (2007): 5-9.

Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE). Home. n.d. Web. 20 October 2011.

Edelman, Philip. "Environmental and Workplace Contamination in the Semiconductor Industry: Implications for Future Health of the Workforce and Community." Environmental Health Perspectives 86 (1990): 291-295.
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Designing a Safety System Safety Management System

Words: 1790 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98207505

Designing a Safety System

Safety management system is a management policy to prevent or minimize injury within a workplace. Top organizations across the United States are increasingly investing in safety management because of the general believe that safety is central precondition to market competitiveness and "an integral part of high quality business operations." (Tervonen, Haapasalo, & Niemela, 2009 P. 17). Safety is defined as a state where all the business related risks are managed at acceptable level. Typically, safety management is a management policy used to protect workers from undetermined accidents. Safety management is very similar to corporate safety where corporate safety is a holistic management strategy to protect an organization as a whole against accidents, misuse, harm and crime.

Objective of this project is to design safety management system for Hobart Brothers Co. To design safety management system for the company, the paper provides essential components that could prevent…… [Read More]

References

Azadeh M.A.(2000). Creating highly and reliable manufacturing systems: an integrated approach. Intern J. Reliabil Saf Eng. 7(3): 205-22.

Honkasalo A. (2000). Occupational health and safety and environmental management systems. Environ Sci Policy. 3(1): 39-45.

Miettinen J. (2002). Corporate Safety Manual Jyvaskyla: Gummerus Printing Ltd. .

New South Wales Government (2012).Unit 2: Managing Workplace Hazards, and Consultation in the Workplace. NSW Education and Communities.
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Learning and Respiratory Care Problem-Based

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5012745

In fact it has been proposed that the positive impact observed of PBL on motivation may come from these academically talented individuals rather than the intervention itself (Hwang & Kim, 2006). GPAs and demographic characteristics were not found to be correlated to PBL (Ceconi et al., 2008).

White et al. (2004) found in a study regarding that PBL was not shown to be superior to other learning styles in assisting students to acquire or retain knowledge regarding asthma management. This finding is consistent with the majority of research that has not found greater knowledge acquisition or retention amongst PBL students vs. traditional teaching methods (Albanese, 2000; Beers, 2005; Rogal & Snider, 2008). However, it is not that PBL produces inferior results, most studies have found that there are no significant differences between PBL students and those from traditional curricula on standardized knowledge tests (Beachey, 2007). Beers (2005) points out that…… [Read More]

Many studies have shown that PBL students experience greater motivation toward learning than their traditional counterparts (Hwang & Kim, 2006; Beachey, 2007, Rogal & Snider, 2008). Further PBL has been associated with greater satisfaction in the learning process by physicians than its traditional counterpart (Beachey, 2007; Op't Holt, 2000; Rogal & Snider, 2008). Evaluations of PBL programs have found that not only do students take pleasure in the process, they also believe that they have the capacity to out perform their peers from traditional curricula in clinical settings (Op't Holt, 2005; Kaufman & Mann, 1996). Studies have shown that the teaching method has little bearing on the learning of academically talented students (Hwang & Kim, 2006; Distlehorst, Dawson, Robbs, & Barrows, 2005; Op't Hoyt, 2005). In fact it has been proposed that the positive impact observed of PBL on motivation may come from these academically talented individuals rather than the intervention itself (Hwang & Kim, 2006). GPAs and demographic characteristics were not found to be correlated to PBL (Ceconi et al., 2008).

White et al. (2004) found in a study regarding that PBL was not shown to be superior to other learning styles in assisting students to acquire or retain knowledge regarding asthma management. This finding is consistent with the majority of research that has not found greater knowledge acquisition or retention amongst PBL students vs. traditional teaching methods (Albanese, 2000; Beers, 2005; Rogal & Snider, 2008). However, it is not that PBL produces inferior results, most studies have found that there are no significant differences between PBL students and those from traditional curricula on standardized knowledge tests (Beachey, 2007). Beers (2005) points out that one would expect significant improvement in clinical knowledge and performance in order to advocate for the use of PBL in the classroom due to the extensive resources that are required to utilize PBL curricula.

One would expect that PBL students would be at a significant advantage over their traditional peers due to the clinical application in the classroom (Colliver, 2000). Some
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Fuel Systems Confined Space Training

Words: 2078 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7939057



The cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, Self-Aid uddy Care and the Fire Extinguisher training are mandatory to all fuel systems personnel. Initial and annual recertification is conducted during squadron block training. Each personnel must possess a current CPR card.

All personnel are trained to use and care for all protective equipment in the work center.

And they are trained to recognize potential hazardous symptoms while working in confined spaces and to immediately evaluate the confined space as directed by the attendant.

Maintenance Requirements

efore the start of fuel systems maintenance, the shift supervisor insures that the applicable aircraft checklist is accomplished, the required fuel systems equipment are inspected and maintained in serviceable condition, emergency communications established by radio or emergency phones, and the Fire Department of Job Control Department notified of fuel systems maintenance.

efore entering the fuel systems repair area, all non-fuel systems personnel shall check in and get briefed by the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baird, R.L. (1996). Fire protection and health program. Air Force Occupational and Environmental Safety. 58 pages. Retrieved January 31, 2007 at http://www.epublishing.af.mil/pubfiles/af/91/afi91-301/afi91-301.pdf

Breed, P. (1998). Respiratory protection program. Air Force Occupational Safety and Health 48-138. Aerospace Medicine. 37 pages. Retrieved January 31, 2007 at http://152.229.169.35/pubs/info_asp?shorttitle=30SWI48-103

Millar, J. Donald. (1986). Preventing occupational fatalities in confined spaces.

NIOSH Publications 80-110. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 9 pages. Retrieved January 31, 2007 at  http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/86110v2.html
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US Public Health System

Words: 1303 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5397711

U.S. Public Health System to better assess and defend against threats from bio-terrorism and infectious disease. This report discusses public health agencies that are "exemplary" in providing public health services in some way or another. That only thirteen were chosen out of seventy-three initially studied indicates how difficult it is to find exemplary public health protection against infectious disease and bio-terrorism threats. Data collection and surveillance are two areas that need improvement, especially in the field, as this report clearly notes.

This report contains information about thirteen agencies that offer the best of public health services. It shows what other agencies need to do to come up to a level of exemplary services, and how far some have to go to catch up. For example, the authors cite the "Citywatch" computer monitoring system for the Illinois Department of Health. They write, it is "A sophisticated computer-assisted emergency notification system that…… [Read More]

References

Tanielian, T. et al. (2005). Exemplary practices in public health preparedness. Retrieved 26 Oct. 2009 from the Rand.org Web site: http://www.rand.org/pubs/technical_reports/2005/RAND_TR239.pdf.
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Buffer Systems in the Body

Words: 1495 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80104274

Hypokalemia occurs when the blood plasma level of potassium is too low (below 3.5 mcg). This is the most common electrolyte imbalance. It effects cardiac conduction and function.

Calcium

Calcium is a cation that is stored in the bone, plasma and body cells. In plasma, it binds with albumin. It is well-known that calcium is necessary for healthy teeth and bones. However, it is also necessary for blood clotting, hormone secretion, maintaining the integrity of cell membranes, cardiac conduction, transmission of nerve impulses and muscle contraction. Calcium levels in the body are regulated by bone resorption.

Hypercalcemia occurs when calcium levels rise above 5 mcg in the plasma. One of the most common symptoms is cardiac arrhythmia. X-rays will show calcium loss in the bones when blood plasma levels are high. This is frequently a symptom of and underlying disease with excess bone resorption and the release of calcium. It…… [Read More]

References

Levitsky, M. (2007) Pulmonary Physiology. Sixth Edition. New York, New York; McGraw Hill Professional. pp.163-187.
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Standardized Coding Systems and Nursing

Words: 666 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48833173

Each standardized nursing language is designed for use in a number of clinical settings, including home care, ambulatory care, and inpatient treatment, with certain languages providing decided advantages within particular circumstances. Although it is true that "improved communication with other nurses, health care professionals, and administrators of the institutions in which nurses work is a key benefit of using a standardized nursing language" (utherford, 2008), the proliferation of several nursing languages throughout the years has inevitably resulted in discrepancies, wherein the personal preferences of nurses, the policy of a hospital's corporate ownership, or other factors determine when, where, and why a specific language is used.

To address the growing concern over the inability of nurse's to communicate through a single standardized language system, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) commissioned a comprehensive study which resulted in the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) being selected as the most advantageous option.…… [Read More]

References

Cho, I., & Park, H. (2006). Evaluation of the expressiveness of an ICNP-based nursing data dictionary in a computerized nursing record system. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 13(4), 456-464. Retrieved from http://171.67.114.118/content/13/4/456.full

Rutherford, M. (2008). Standardized nursing language: What does it mean for nursing practice?. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 13(1), 57-69. Retrieved from http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ThePracticeofProfessionalNursing/H ealth-it/StandardizedNursingLanguage.html
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Magnetic Resonance System on Patients Magnetic Resonance

Words: 1278 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80574645

Magnetic esonance System on patients

Magnetic resonance System (Imaging), here after referred to as (MS), or nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMI), is a medical imaging technique widely used in radiology to visualize detailed internal structure and limited function of the body. It provides great contrast between the different soft tissues of the body, making it particularly useful in neurological (brain), musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and ontological (cancer) imaging. MS uses a powerful magnetic field to align the nuclear magnetization of (usually) hydrogen atoms in water in the body (Adams, 1989). To systematically alter the alignment of this magnetization, adio frequency (F) fields are used, enhancing the generation of a rotating magnetic field by the hydrogen nuclei that can be detected using a scanner.

MS can detect the chemical composition of diseased tissue and produce color images of brain function. This signal can be controlled by more magnetic fields to build up adequate…… [Read More]

References

Adams, R.D. & Victor, M. (1989). Intracranial neoplasm: Principles of neurology. (4th Ed.) New

York. McGraw-Hill.

Clark, C.A., et al. (2003). White Matter Fiber Tracking in Patients with Space-Occupying Lesions of the Brain: A New Technique for Neurosurgical Planning? Neuroimage 20: 1601-1608.

Hammell K. (1994). Psychosocial outcome following spinal cord injury. Paraplegia 32: 771 -- 779.
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Problem-Based Learning vs Traditional Teaching in Respiratory Care Education

Words: 2324 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71070351

PBL vs. Traditional

Two of the methods of pedagogy that are currently employed in respiratory therapy are Problem-Based Learning and Traditional Teaching. Both instructional methods can provide a strenuous curriculum for the student interested in comprehensive training in the field of respiratory therapy, and each method has its advantages and (of course) its disadvantages. The focus of this study will be to determine which pedagogical methodology provides the most efficient and effective results in a respiratory therapy educational setting.

To accomplish that objective, the study will administer surveys in questionnaire form to students attending two separate schools that offer training in respiratory therapy. The questionnaires will provide a quantifying response to qualitative, and quantitative, information. Each school's pedagogy will represent either problem-based or traditional teaching methods and students from each school will be asked to complete pre and post training questionnaires and surveys. Additionally, students will be tested on their…… [Read More]

References

Albanese, M.A. & Mitchell, S. (1993) Problem-based learning: A review of literature on its outcomes and implantation issues, Academic Medicine, Vol. 68, Issue 1, pp. 52-81

Ali, M.; Gameel, W.; Sebai, E.; Menom, N.A.; (2010) Effect of problem-based learning on nursing students' approaches to learning and their self-directed learning abilities, International Journal of Academic Research, Vol. 2, Issue 4, pp. 188 -- 195

Allie, S.; Armien, M.N.; Bennie. K.; Burgoyne, N.; Case, J.; Craig, T.; (2007) Learning as acquiring a discursive identity through participation in a community: A theoretical position on improving student learning in tertiary science and engineering programmes, Cape Town, South Africa, accessed at http://www.cree, uct.ac.za., on January 15, 2011

Biggs, J. (2003) Teaching for quality learning at university (2nd ed.), Buckingham: The Society for Research into Higher Education and Open University Press
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Smoking Health Care System

Words: 1505 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73437226

Health

Smoking and the Health Care System

Smoking causes ischemic heart disease, cancer, stroke, and chronic lower respiratory diseases which are the leading causes of death and disability among adults. Smoking-attributed diseased are an economic burden due not only to health care expenses, but also productivity losses related to disability or early death.

~California Department of Health, 2010

Smoking is a major health hazard, and since nonsmokers are healthier than smokers, it seems only natural that not smoking would save money spent on health care. Yet in economic studies of health care it has been difficult to determine who uses more dollars -- smokers, who tend to suffer more from a large variety of diseases, or nonsmokers, who can accumulate more health care costs because they live longer.

~Barendregt et al., 1997

There is now scientific proof that concludes that smoking cigarettes affects both the smoker and those in proximity…… [Read More]

References:

Barendregt, J.J., Bonneux, M.D, J., & Van Der Maas, PhD, P.J. (1997). "The Health Care Costs of Smoking." The New England Journal of Medicine, 337(15), 1052 -- 1057.

California Department of Public Health -- California Tobacco Control Program. (2010). "Health & Economic Consequences." California Department of Public Health, Web, Available from: cdph.ca.gov/programs/Tobacco. 2013 March 15.

Sturm, R. (2002). "The Effects of Obesity, Smoking, and Drinking on Medical Problems and Costs." Health Affairs, March/April, 245 -- 253.

Warner, K.E., Hodgson, T.A., & Carroll, C.E. (1999). "Medical costs of smoking in the United States: estimates, their validity, and their implications." Tobacco Control, 8, 290 -- 300.
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Nursing Healthcare Information Systems Key

Words: 3682 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9839470

Others include delays in data accessibility, albeit shorter delays and the continued need for source data verification (Donovan, 2007).

Other obstacles have occurred in the developing of mobile healthcare applications. These have included mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust (Keng and Shen, 2006).

A third problem that has been encountered is that of a lack of education on not only the importance of the information technology but also training on how to use the specific pieces of equipment. The tools that are provided to people are only as good as the training that is provided on how to use them. The tools may be able to do wonderful things, but if those that are using them do not know how to get the best use out of them they will in the end be less efficient.

Medical Errors

According to an Institute of…… [Read More]

References

Al-Assaf, Al F., Bumpus, Lisa J., Carter, Dana, and Dixon, Stephen B. (2003). Preventing Errors

in Healthcare: A Call for Action. Hospital Topics. 81(3), 5-12.

Brommeyer, Mark. (2005). e-nursing and e-patients. Nursing Management -- UK. 11(9), 12-13.

Damberg, Cheryl L., Ridgely, M. Susan, Shaw, Rebecca, Meili, Robin C., Sorbero, Melony E.,
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Affect of Tylenol Overdose on the Cardiopulmonary System

Words: 2649 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63499844

Tylenol Overdose

Health Sciences 101

The Health Impact of Acetaminophen Overdose

Acetaminophen (APAP) is a common over-the-counter (OTC), antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic that is more commonly known as Tylenol®, a product of Johnson & Johnson1. Overseas the drug is called paracetamol and is manufactured and sold by countless generic drug makers.

A number of concerns regarding the safety of APAP have arisen over the past several years, including liver and kidney toxicity and adverse cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary effects. This essay will provide an overview of APAP, its uses, and safety issues, with an emphasis on the cardiopulmonary system.

Mechanisms of APAP Activity

The analgesic and antipyretic activity of APAP was thought to be similar to other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications because it was believed to inhibit prostaglandin (PGE2) synthesis2,3. This assumption has not withstood the test of time, for either APAP or other popular OTC non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The main evidence…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine. Tylenol (TN): Substance summary (SID 7847284). PubChem 2011. Accessed 5 Nov 2011 at http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/summary/summary.cgi?sid=7847284

2. Hamza M, Dionne RA. Mechanisms of non-opioid analgesics beyond cyclooxygenase enzyme inhibition. Curr Mol Pharmacol 2009; 2(1):1-14.

3. Kaufman G. Basic pharmacology of non-opioid analgesics. Nurs Stand 2010; 24(30):55-61.

4. Chan AT, Manson JE, Albert CM, Chae CU, Rexrode KM, Curhan GC, et al. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and the risk of cardiovascular events. Circulation 2006; 113(12):1578-1587.
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Contrast Between Healthcare Systems in Developed and Developing Countries Focus on India

Words: 2099 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23062620

Health Care Systems ndia

Malnutrition, Mortality, Malaria: Health Care in ndia

Perri Klass in her article "ndia" describes a situation when she is unable to diagnose a case of tuberculosis in a South Asian child. As a pediatrician, her repertoire of knowledge of first world diseases is unable to assist her amongst the medical travails of the children of ndia. Klass describes scenarios where she is unable to comprehend the magnitude of poverty, malnutrition and disease in ndia, and can only mobilize the word "different" to encapsulate it.

Klass states that even "expectations are different." n Boston, "they expect every child to live to grow up" but here early death is a possibility. Klass tries to fight this resignation for the most part. She states that these diseases are preventable, through vaccinations, hygiene and proper food. First world medical care is taken for granted, as well as its wealth, Klass…… [Read More]

India has the largest program in the world addressing problems of malnutrition and child development, the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS). The program began in 1975, and now covers almost all of the low-income blocks in India. This program provides six main services to children through a village worker (anganwadi worker) who is paid a small honorarium, not a salary. Children are helped to get immunizations and health checkups, pregnant and lactating women receive counseling and additional food, children's growth is monitored on a regular basis, children are given a preschool education, and supplementary food is provided five days a week. Adolescent girls are also supported (Engle 2002).

In addition to poverty and social marginalization, the status of women may be an underlying variable explaining the Asian Enigma; children are better nourished in most African countries than in South Asia, even though incomes are similar. The authors suggest that the lower status of South Asian women affects not only their care practices, but also their ability to provide care -- they may have less autonomy in decision-making, less control over time and resources, and lower access to resources, health, and nutritional well-being. The research agenda should focus on formative research into variations in feeding practices, and beliefs supporting those practices, in the various regions of India. These investigative studies should be followed by intervention research on changes in feeding practices and care behaviors. Intervention studies, then, can be used to develop improved behavior change strategies. Effectiveness of components of interventions needs to be compared. Is it cost-effective to include deworming, hand pumps, and hygiene information with a complementary feeding intervention? To what extent is the quality of the complementary food a critical factor? Should micronutrients be added to complementary food in addition to feeding interventions? (Engle 2002)

There is also a need for operational research. How the quality and implementation of existing nutrition programs can be improved within the constraints of government budgets needs to be explored. The system to provide feedback to community workers and community elected bodies needs to be developed. Care and feeding practices need to be more explicitly targeted as interventions in health and ICDS systems. Growth monitoring needs to be improved and promotion made a stronger component. Communities need to be made aware of the number of malnourished children in the community so that they can take an active role in helping rates decline. Finally, links between programs should be strengthened so that the multiple government workers in each area are working together to improve the nutrition status of India's children (Engle 2002).
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A concise Analysis of US health care'system delivery in comparison with other nations European Canada

Words: 1202 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56448938

health care system delivery with other nations (European/Canada) with emphasis on its relative strengths and weaknesses?

Michael Moore's Sicko reveals that nearly 50 million U.S. citizens are not insured, whereas many usually fall prey to insurance firm red tape and frauds. Interviews are carried out with individuals believed to be sufficiently covered; in truth, these individuals do not receive health services at all. Ex-workers of insurance firms explain cost-cutting efforts which provide insurance firm physicians and other individuals with excuses to avoid fulfilling the costs of policy holders' essential medical treatments, thereby increasing the companies' profitability (Heart, 2012).

The documentary-maker then moves over to Canada, where he introduces Tommy Douglas, the man voted in 2004 as the best Canadian citizen for the role he played in improving the nation's healthcare structure. The director interviews a Canadian micro-surgeon and emergency room patients at a public hospital in Canada. His interviews in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adams, M. (2007, June 19). Why Michael Moore's Sicko is a health care documentary every American must see. Retrieved from Natural News: http://www.naturalnews.com/021906_SiCKO_Michael_Moore.html

Black, S. (2009). "Sicko" and The Health Care Impact. Retrieved from Timbooktu: http://www.timbooktu.com/spence/healthcr.htm

Gowans, S. (2007, July 12). A Review of Michael Moore's "Sicko." Retrieved from Global Research: http://www.globalresearch.ca/a-review-of-michael-moore-s-sicko/6308

Heart, G. (2012, May 03). Sicko; Movie Compares Health Care Systems In U.S., Canada, United Kingdom, France And Cuba. Retrieved from A Green Road Journal: http://www.agreenroadjournal.com/2012/05/sicko-michael-moore.html
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Nursing Related Case Study Tom's Vitals in

Words: 3386 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27331105

Nursing elated Case Study

Tom's vitals, in the emergency department, revealed an elevated respiratory rate, heart rate and blood pressure. His oxygen saturation was also considerably low. Tom's Body Mass Index (BMI) falls in the overweight category. He was also a-febrile, at presentation, indicating that infection was not a precipitating cause.

Initially the ABGs were normal, indicating an acute severe exacerbation or life threatening asthma. Later, when the ABGs were repeated, carbon dioxide levels were above normal. A raised carbon dioxide level is the differentiating bench mark between life threatening and near fatal asthma. The ABG analysis also reveals acidemia which cannot be solely attributed to a respiratory or metabolic cause alone, and hence can be safely classified as a mixed disorder.

Tom's history is typical of atopic asthma which usually begins in childhood and is triggered by antigens from the environment, such as pollen, animal dander or dust. Upper…… [Read More]

REFERENCES:

Brandis, K. (n.d.). The physiology viva. Retrieved from  http://www.anaesthesiamcq.com/downloads/odc.pdf 

Guyton, A., & Hall, J. (2011). Guyton and hall textbook of medical physiology. (12 ed.). Mississippi: Elsevier.

Kumar Abbas, & Robbins, (2007). Basic pathology. (8 ed.). London: Saunders Company.

Myron, K. (2005, May 10). Is obesity a risk factor for asthma. Retrieved from  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/24118.php
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Living Things Are Characterized by the Following

Words: 4492 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61564004

living things are characterized by the following seven characteristics namely mobility, respiration, excretion, sensitivity or response to external stimulus, growth, feeding, and reproduction. Though there may be variations between animal and plant kingdom (ex, plants take in carbon dioxide and prepare their own food), these characteristics are commonly observed among all living things.

iology is a very broad field that encompasses the study of characteristics of living things. It includes botany, zoology and all other sub-disciplines that range from microbiology to evolution and ecology.

Evolution is the branch of biology that deals with the study of natural development of living organisms and the changes in them over time. Evolution refers to the heritable changes that occur in a population over a period of time. All the diversity that is observed currently in plant and animal kingdom can be ascribed to evolution over a long period of time.

Atoms are the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Mark Rothery, "Cells," Accessed on Sep 20th 2005, Available from  http://www.mrothery.co.uk/cells/cellnotes.htm
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Causes of Chronic Bronchitis in Workers This

Words: 3638 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50753050

Causes of Chronic Bronchitis in Workers

This review shows the literature and research available in the issue of respiratory diseases and the various occupations. The review shows that there is a pressing need to evaluate and conduct research in the known areas like coal, cement, and pesticides, but alarmingly agriculture and other industries have also to be included.

It is not only the factories that are hazardous. There are arguments to show that even farming can cause allergies. osenman (2012) in viewing "respiratory hazards that farmers and family members" argues that the grains that can be "contaminated with fungi, bacteria or microbial toxins; pesticides; solvents; gasoline and diesel fuels; and irritant gases such as oxides of nitrogen and ammonia." This may lead to occupational asthma and the allergens in such cases could be grain dust, cow dander, cow urine, egg yolk proteins, alternaria, aspergillus, cladosporium, meal worm, poultry mites, fungi,…… [Read More]

References

Attfield, Michael D; Hodous, Thomas K. (1992) "Pulmonary Function of U.S. Coal Miners

Related to Dust Exposure Estimates" Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med, vol. 145, no. 3, pp: 605-609.

Baumgartner, Kathy B; Samet, Jonathan M; Coultas, David B; Stidley, Christine A; et al.

(1999) "Occupational and Environmental Risk Factors for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A Multicenter Case-Control Study" American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 152, no. 4, pp: 307-315.
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Lungs What Are the Lungs

Words: 3387 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31909477

However, it was 1953 that the formation of serotonin was from the lungs was substantiated. It is also observed that detoxification of the blood takes place in the lungs. Later, it was observed that one of the important activities of the lung is to provide chemical filtration by shielding the regular circulation of blood from the attack of vasoactive mixtures and other exogenous compounds present in the arteries. The physiology of the lungs and its location makes the lung exclusively suitable to perform these activities. (Wet; Moss, 1998)

The total output from the cardiac system is obtained by the lungs whereas other organs acquire only a very small quantity of output. The blood that circulates the lungs is subject to the vast capillary endothelial plane of the body which is of seventy square meters. This aspect of output and circulation enable the lung to perform the efficient function of biochemical…… [Read More]

References

Bennett, Taylor. B. (1996) "Essentials for Animal Research: A Primer for Research Personnel"

Diane Publishing.

De Reuck, a.V. S; O'Connor, Maeve. (1962) "CIBA Foundation Symposium on Pulmonary

Structure and Function" a. Churchill Ltd.: London.
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Scientific Effects of Smoking on the Human

Words: 942 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96151006

scientific effects of smoking on the human body especially on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We will give a brief analysis on how smoking affects the mentioned systems and see how the human body system works if the individual does not smoke. We will also support our paper with scientific and statistical evidence regarding the facts related to smoking.

Smoking and its effects

Before looking at smoking and its effects lets review on how the respiratory and cardiovascular systems work. When we breathe air it first enters Trachea/windpipe through which it enters on each of the bronchi present at both of the lungs. The bronchus is spread throughout the lungs like branches on trees and at its tips is as thin as a hair (bronchioles). Each lung has about thirty thousand bronchioles. At the tip of every bronchiole lies an area which leads to tiny air sacs known as alveoli.…… [Read More]

References

Timmins, William. (1989). Smoking and the workplace. New York: Quorum Books.

Klarreich, Samuel. (1987). Health and fitness in the workplace. New York: Praeger.

Weiss, Stephen. (1991). Health at work. New Jersey: Laurence Erlbaum Associates.

Bunton, Robin. (2002). Health Promotion. London: Routledge.
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Case Study and Nursing

Words: 1831 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41057430

Advance Nursing Practice

In order to sustain life, the human body has to have oxygen. When a person cannot breathe, or there is not enough oxygen coming into the body through the act of breathing, it is not possible for life to continue. The respiratory system is what provides the person with the opportunity to breathe and take in oxygen. Carbon dioxide is also expelled that same way. If oxygen is not received, the brain cells will start dying, followed by other cells, organs, and tissues. Addressed here is a case study dealing with the respiratory system, conditions it may face, and how those issues can be treated.

Patient Initials: Unknown Age: 65 yo Sex: Female

Subjective Data:

Client Complaints: The patient complains of a dry cough that is rarely productive. She has had the cough for two weeks, and for the last two days has also been running a…… [Read More]

References

American Lung Association (2014). COPD: Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. Retrieved from http://www.lung.org/lung-disease/copd/about-copd/symptoms-diagnosis-treatment.html

Buttaro, T.M., Trybulski, J., Baily, P.P., & Sandburg-Cook, J. (2013). Primary care: A collaborative practice (4th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier/Mosby.

Cenzon, M. (2014). Emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Retrieved from  http://www.symptomfind.com/health/emphysema-chronic-bronchitis/ 

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2014). Oral thrush. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/oral-thrush/basics/basics/definition/con-20022381?_ga=1.193450093.1798610931.1412555487
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Gordon's Functional Health Pattern Teen Adolescent Summary

Words: 995 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41375479

Gordon's Functional Health Pattern (Teen)

Adolescent Summary - Gordon's Functional Health Pattern

Biographical Data

Date of Visit: 8/31/2012, 10:30am.

Age

DOB: 3/2/1999

ace/Gender Hispanic, Female

Weight: 34 kg.

Height: 4ft. 7 inches

BMI: Normal ange 16.6 kg/m2

Phone [HIDDEN]

eason for Visit: Evidence of exasperated asthmatic conditions. (Not an acute asthma attack). Became overexerted at school, 8/30/12. estless night and complaints of tightness in chest and inability to catch breath. Slight wheezing can be heard during exhales. Potential asthma complications; albuterol has proven slightly ineffective in easing symptoms and discomfort.

Financial History: Patient is fully covered under parent's insurance. Mother works; serving as informant and escort to physician. Single parent household.

Past Health History: Patient is fully immunized and receives all routine health and wellness physicals and exams as appropriate. Last physical exam 5/30/2011, prior to beginning of summer camp. History includes struggle with exercise-induced asthma (albuterol use via bronchodilator).…… [Read More]

Reference

Hull, J., Hull, P., Parsons, J., Dickinson, J., & Ansley, L. (2009). Approach to the diagnosis and management of suspected exercise-induced bronchoconstriction by primary care physicians. BMC Pulmonary Medicine, 929.
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Veterinary Nursing Anesthesia and Analgesia Case Journal

Words: 1318 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88864222

Veterinary Nursing Anesthesia and Analgesia Case Journal

The objective of this study is to address anesthesia needs in two specific cases with the first being a 12-week-old Jack Russell puppy and the second being a 12-year-old geriatric cat.

12-Week-old Jack Russell Puppy

This 12-week-old Jack Russell Puppy has eaten a babies dummy. This case study will highlight the anesthesia requirements and protocol and highlight the relevance of effect on renal function, speed of recovery, analgesia, emphasis on knowledge and understanding. Even at 12-weeks of age, this puppy is considered a pediatric patient according to the work of Gleed and Seymour (1991). This means that the patient has a higher oxygen requirement that the adult. The tongue of this patient due to his age is large and the airway is small in diameter. As well, there is a lower functional renal capacity in this age patient all of which make the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bennett, RC, et al. (2008) Comparison of sevoflurane and isoflurane in dogs anaesthetized for clinical surgical or diagnostic procedures. Journal of Small Animal Practice. 49, 392-397.

Gleed, R and Seymour C (Eds) (1991) Manual of Small Animal Anesthesia and Hall, LW Clarke KW Trim CM 2001 Veterinary Anesthesia 10th edition Myerscough College 2011 Drugs used for Premedication

HEDip CVN VN 2020 Veterinary Anesthesia: Anesthesia for Specific Scenarios. Session Introduction Myerscough College 2011.

Hollingshead KW & Mckelvey D (2000) Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia 3rd Edn Mosby Missouri
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Faith and Science Today

Words: 2014 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28790437

Anatomy/Christianity

The Breath of Life

Throughout scripture the concept of breath represents life. Genesis 2:7

It is evident that we need to breathe to live and that without our respiratory system, we would die. But why is this? Can we know why other than to say that this is how our Creator designed us to be? Perhaps an understanding of our own respiratory system can help us to better understand our Creator? I think so.

What do we find in our nose? A kind of filter that keeps out of our lungs harmful particles and spores that would otherwise pollute them. This can be a symbol of how we should filter our minds of impure thoughts so as to keep our souls clean. It can also be a symbol of how important God's grace is in our souls -- it is to our souls as oxygen is to our bodies.…… [Read More]

South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press.

Sheen, F. (1951). Three to Get Married. Princeton, NJ: Scepter Publishers.

Holy Bible, New Living Translation. (2004). IL: Tyndale House Publishers.
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Fire Hazards of Trusses

Words: 2599 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90741919

Fire Hazards of Trusses: Sample Report

Structures often play the important role when a building is on fire. Upon many reviews, there are a lot of fires claiming for lives of the inhabitants of the building, but there are also some cases, which had taken the firefighters' lives as well. Such cases should not have happened, but limited information of the building's structures and length of fire could have caused it.

Chesapeake automobile warehouse happened to be a fatal case of fire (NFPA, 2002). The 12-year-old building was constructed under lightweight wood trusses. There were two steel frames and another brick construction located at the building. The trusses were built using the combination of wood and metal plates that joined them altogether.

On Monday morning, March 18, 1996, the repair shop operated as usual. The employees were coming along to start their first day of the week, taking up service…… [Read More]

Bibliography

A&R Truss Company. Mar 2001. Frequently Asked Questions About Roof Trusses. A&R Truss Company. November 20, 2002. http://www.artruss.com/faqroof.htm

Brannigan, Francis. Brannigan on Building Construction. Dec, 2001. Know Your Enemy #17. Firehouse.com. November 20, 2002. http://www.firehouse.com/brannigan/2001/0712.html

Federal Alliance for Safe Homes. Blueprint for Safety Glossary. 2001. Federal Alliance for Safe Homes. November 20, 2002. http://www.blueprintforsafety.org/bluepages/glossary.html.

National Fire Protection Association. 2002. Truss Collapse. NFPA Homepage. November 20, 2002. http://www.nfpa.org/Research/FireInvestigation/AlertBulletins/TrussCollapse/TrussCollapse.asp
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Diagnosis and Treatment of TB

Words: 1771 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44261432

Tuberculosis

Causative agent

Tuberculosis is an infectious disease of animals and humans. The most common causative agent of the disease is a bacterium a mycobacteria known as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This bacterium was first discovered by obert Koch in 1882. The physiology of this bacterium is aerobic and hence requires very high oxygen levels. This is primarily a pathogen of the mammalian respiratory system which infects the lungs. The most common methods used to diagnose tuberculosis are acid-fast stain, tuberculin skin test and chest radiations. M. tuberculosis requires oxygen in order for it to grow. Due to the presence of mycolic acid, M.tuberculosis has an waxy coating on its surface which is unusual making the cells impervious to Gram staining It can not retain any bacteriological stain as a result of a high lipid content on its wall therefore acid-fast staining or ziehl-Neelsen staining are used. Despite this M.tuberculosis is still…… [Read More]

References

Mandal, A. (2014). History of Tuberculosis. Retrieved October 17, 2014 from  http://www.news-medical.net/health/History-of-Tuberculosis.aspx 

Knechel, N. (2009). Tuberculosis: Pathophysiology, clinical Features, and Diagnosis. Retrieved October 17, 2014 from  http://ccn.aacnjournals.org/content/29/2/34.short 

Mathema, B., Kurepina, N., Bifani, P., & Kreiswirth, B. (2006). Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis: Current Insights. Retrieved October 18, 2014 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1592690/
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Adrenal Gland Keeping the Body

Words: 2250 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25520423

S. Congress that the prospects of stem cell research were so vast that it could touch all the realm of medicine (Connor 2000). An unlimited source of embryonic stem cells will solve the problem of shortage of transplants. Embryonic stem cells will save lives by curing generative diseases of the brain, hepatitis, diabetes, leukemia, rheumatoid arthritis, muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis and diseases of the heart and kidneys. ut current laws restrict the use of stems cells on embryos less than 14 days old and for correcting fertility, reproduction or congenital disorders. The restriction is grounded in the belief that the embryo is a potential human being from the moment of conception. It thus possesses a soul and a dignity just like any other viable person (Connor). Previous scientific research presented evidence that genetically engineering cells could partly repair a defective immune system (Travis 2002). Two new studies bolstered this…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bauer, D.G. (2005). Review of the endocrine system. MedSurg Nursing: Jannetti Publications, Inc.

Connor, S. (2000). Science: the miracle cure with a catch. The London Independent: Newspaper Publishing PLC

Degen. D (2008). Body organization and homeostasis. 1 page. Bones, Muscles and Skin. Pearson Education, Inc.: Pearson Prentice Hall

Farabee, M.J. (2006). Animal organ systems and homeostasis. 18 web pages. Estrella Mountain Community College. Retrieved on February 1, 2006 at http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/biobk/BioBookMUSSKEL.html
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Weapons of Mass Destruction Wmds

Words: 3700 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85661565

By continuing with a "business as usual" attitude, the terrorists would not have a long-term psychological impact on American society, culture and economic development.

hile the long-term psychological impact appears to be the most prominent value that a weapon of mass destruction has for a terrorist, it seems reasonable to argue that these weapons also serve as a means for terrorist groups to have their political voices heard. Terrorist attacks bring to light the activities, beliefs and values of a specific terrorist group. Although many in the U.S. were familiar with Osama bin Laden before 9/11, his implication in the terrorist attacks made him and Al-Qaeda household names. In this context, bin Laden was able to bring to light the organization's hatred of the United States and the organization's political agenda for the entire international community. The publicity gained from terrorist events clearly has value for terrorist groups.

4. Given…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The dynamic terrorist threat." RAND Corporation. [2005]. Accessed October 31, 2007 at http://www.rand.org/pubs/monograph_reports/2005/MR1782.pdf.

Thornburgh, Dick. "Balancing civil liberties and homeland security." Albany Law Review, 68(4), (2005): 801-813.

Weapons of mass destruction." Global Focus. [2006]. Accessed October 31, 2007 at http://globalfocus.org/GF-WMDs.htm.
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Contingency Management Alcohol & Marijuana

Words: 11354 Length: 41 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27822679

" (1995)

The authors state: "The amphetamines occasioned dose-related increases in d- amphetamine-appropriate responding, whereas hydromorphone did not. Amphetamines also occasioned dose-related increases in reports of the drug being most like "speed," whereas hydromorphone did not. However, both amphetamines and hydromorphone occasioned dose-related increases in reports of drug liking and in three scales of the ARCI. Thus, some self-report measures were well correlated with responding on the drug-appropriate lever and some were not. Lamb and Henningfield (1994) suggest that self-reports are complexly controlled by both the private event and the subject's history of experience with the drug. Some of the self-reports they observed (e.g., feels like speed) are probably occasioned by a relatively narrow range of stimuli because in the subject's experience with drug administration, these reports have been more selectively reinforced by the verbal community relative to other reports (e.g., drug liking). They also suggest that these results imply…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Budney, Alan J. et al. (2006) Clinical Trial of Abstinence-Based Vouchers and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Cannabis Dependence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 2006. Vol.. 74 No. 2. 2006 American Psychological Association.

McRae, a.; Budney, a.; & Brady, K. (2002) Treatment of Marijuana Dependence: A Review of the Literature. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 24 (2003)

Pathways of Addiction: Opportunities in Drug Abuse Research (1996) Institute of Medicine (IOM)

Kamon, J; Budney, a. & Stanger, C. (2005)a Contingency Management Intervention for Adolescent Marijuana Abuse and Conduct Problems. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. 44(6):513-521, June 2005.
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Public Awareness and Human Diseases

Words: 2069 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71634531



A way to better distribute the information that is being taught in the classrooms is also through the community so that the changes are also effecting the parents to the students, as a change on their part as well would be helpful in the battle against obesity. It would be useful to initially target pamphlets, an informational booth or table at grocery stores, where the foundation of the problem lies. It would be effective if information is given before families go grocery shopping so they are more conscious of the items that they are purchasing. Furthermore, information should also be initially presented on TVs, in newspapers and magazines and other mediums that would likely be used in the more low-key and sedentary setting in order to galvanize individuals to get outside. Once outside, in order to sustain the physical activity, it would be nice to have water and juice at…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ahuja, Gitika, & Salahi, Lara. (11, February 2010). School nutrition program takes up obesity fight. Retrieved from  http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/OnCall/school-nutrition-program-takes-obesity-fight/story?id=9802468 

CausesofChildhoodObesity.org, Initials. (2010). Causes of childhood obesity. Retrieved from  http://causesofchildhoodobesity.org/ 

Facts about obesity in the United States. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/pdf/facts_about_obesity_in_the_united_states.pdf

Mayo Clinic Staff, Initials. (2011, May 06). Risk factors. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/obesity/DS00314/DSECTION=risk-factors
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Michael Lauren Who Is Struggling With Drug

Words: 1215 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82482908

Michael Lauren who is struggling with drug problem. Michele Lauren is twenty-one-year-old girl, single and a resident of New York City. Michele lives with her parents and is addicted to marijuana. She was arrested on various circumstances, each time for the violation of Health & Safety Code 11357 (Samaha, 2007) that is the possession of large quantity of drugs and was locked up behind the bars on trials during the years 2002 to 2008.

Lately, she had been arrested three times in a month for the violation of such law. Michele had also encountered the problem of alcohol along with her problem of smoking pot and marijuana, but she has not been arrested for excess drinking and violation of Health and Safety laws related to alcohol. She had not been arrested for any other related crimes, as she normally filched her mother's purse for money whenever needed.

a) Casual drinks…… [Read More]

References

Samaha, J. (2007). Criminal Procedure, Seventh Edition, Cengage Learning, USA.
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Nursing and Issue of Falls Are Responsible

Words: 1482 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97600896

Nursing and Issue of Falls

Falls are responsible for considerable morbidity, immobility, and mortality among older persons, especially those living in nursing homes. Falls can occur in a home, community, long-term rehabilitation, or acute care Setting (Laurence Z.. et.al, 1994). The risk of falls can be related mostly to mobility status, exposure to hazardous environments and risk-taking behaviors such as climbing ladders for seniors living in the community setting. Factors for a fall in hospitalized adults are greatly influenced by acute illness that often has a marked, albeit temporary, impact on physical and cognitive function compounded by care provided in unfamiliar surroundings in the long-term care setting, the risk factors for falls are influenced by impaired cognition, wandering or impulsive behavior, use of psychotropic medications, incontinence and urgency, lack of Exercise, unsafe environments, and low staffing levels. Patient falls are serious problems

In acute care hospitals and are used as…… [Read More]

References

Anuradha Thirumalai, (1998). Nursing Compliance with Standard Fall Prevention

Protocol Among Acute Care Hospital Nurses. Retrieved September 26, 2012 from http://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1191&context=thesesdissertations&sei-redir=1&referer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.co.ke%2Furl%3Fsa%3Dt%26rct%3Dj%26q%3Dnursing%2520compliance%2520with%2520standard%2520fall%2520preventionprotocol%2520among%2520acute%2520care%2520hospital%2520nurses%26source%3Dweb%26cd%3D1%26ved%3D0CCAQFjAA%26url%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fdigitalscholarship.unlv.edu%252Fcgi%252Fviewcontent.cgi%253Farticle%253D1191%2526context%253Dthesesdissertations%26ei%3Dg-NiUPW8CuLB0QW_r4DgAw%26usg%3DAFQjCNE6__5zNu8vjRxc-jIFBXbBfKVIng#search=%22nursing%20compliance%20standard%20fall%20preventionprotocol%20among%20acute%20care%20hospital%20nurses%22

Dykes, P.C., Carroll, D.L., Hurley, A.C., Benoit, A., & Middleton, B. (2009). Why do patients in acute care hospitals fall? Can falls be prevented? Journal of Nursing Administration, 39(6), 299-304. doi:10.1097/NNA.0b013e3181a7788a

Laurence Z. Rubenstein, Karen R. Josephson & Alan S. Robbins, (1994). Falls in the Nursing
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Risks of Epidural Anesthesia in

Words: 4208 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81902786

Howeve, befoe giving the medicine, anesthesiologist caefully examines the condition of the pegnant woman to whom anesthesia is to be given. Epidual anesthesia duing labo and nomal delivey does not cause unconsciousness; thus, patients do not lose thei psychological aletness (Halpen and Douglas 2008).

Dissetation Pat

Accoding to (Oebaugh 2011), epidual anesthesia is commonly administeed by injecting the medicine in the lumba egion of the back, specifically in the epidual egion. The detailed pocedue egading the administation of epidual anesthesia has aleady been discussed in the pevious section of the pape. Howeve, the anesthetic dug injected in the epidual space inteupts the passage of neve impulses that oiginate in epoductive ogans and tavel though neves to lowe spine and then to bain. This hindes the feeling of sensation/pain that is poduced in the lowe pats of the body.

The degee of insensitivity induced depends on few factos that include the…… [Read More]

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Influence of Mean Airway Pressure on Cardiovascular Performance

Words: 2734 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88942822

Airway Pressure on Cardiovascular Performance

HEART-LUNG CONNECTION

The Influence of Mean Airway Pressure on Cardiovascular Performance

reathing, also known as pulmonary ventilation, is the basic connection between the heart and lungs (Williams & Whitney, 2006). The connection allows air between the lungs and the atmosphere and the exchange of gases between the air and the alveoli in the lungs. ody receptors can detect changes involved in the movement of air and the pressure that accompanies it. These receptors can either increase or decrease breathing rate. They encourage slower breathing when blood pressure rises and faster breathing rate if the blood pressure goes down. Meanwhile, an exchange of gases between body tissues and capillaries is needed to maintain life. It brings in the gases living tissues need for survival. lood carries oxygen molecules when leaving the heart and distributes it throughout the body. Very small capillaries coordinate in the flow and…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Byrd, R.P. And Mosenifar, Z. (2010). Mechanical ventilation. Medscape: WebLLC.

Retrieved on August 18, 2011 from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/304068-overview

Daoud, E.G. (2007). Airway pressure release ventilation. Vol 2 (4) Annals of Thoracic

Medicine: Pub Med Central. Retrieved on August 12, 2011 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2732103
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Mold Spore Analysis and Toxicity

Words: 4404 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11291106

Mold Spore Trapping

Current Scientific Knowledge

People are exposed to aeroallergens in a variety of settings, both at home and at work. Fungi are ubiquitous airborne allergens and are important causes of human diseases, especially in the upper and lower respiratory tracts. These diseases occur in persons of various ages.

Airborne spores and other fungi particles are ubiquitous in nonpolar landscapes, especially amongst field crops, and often form the bulk of suspended biogenic debris. The term mold often is used synonymously with the term fungi. A more precise definition would specify that molds lack macroscopic reproductive structures but may produce visible colonies. Respiratory illness in subjects exposed to rust and dark-spored imperfecti fungi was described more than 60 years ago, and physicians worldwide now recognize a sensitization to diverse fungi.

Since fungus particles commonly are derived from wholly microscopic sources, exposure hazards are assessed largely through direct sampling of a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brinton, W.T., Vastbinder, E.E., Greene, J.W., Marx, J.J., Hutcheson, R.H., Schaffner, W. (1987). An outbreak of organic dust toxic syndrome in a college fraternity. Journal of the American Medical Association 258:1210-1212.

Ceigler, A., & Bennett, J.W. (1980). Mycotoxins and Mycotoxicoses. Bio-Science 30:512-515.

CDC. 1994. Acute pulmonary hemorrhage/hemosiderosis among infants -- "Cleveland, January 1993-November 1994. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) 1994; 43:881-3.

CDC. 1997. Update: Pulmonary hemorrhage/hemosiderosis among infants -- "Cleveland, Ohio, 1993-1996. MMWR 1997; 46:33-35.
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Harmful Health Effects of Chronic

Words: 2208 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57971802

"The IOM report recognized the therapeutic benefits of medical marijuana and urged that marijuana be made available to individual patients while research continued on the development of new drugs developed from marijuana" (Zeese).

Conclusion

In conclusion, there are two schools of thought on this issue. One view sees very little difference in terms of health implication between marijuana and cigarette smoking. However, there is some resistance to the idea that marijuana is as unhealthy or as dangerous as cigarettes. This had led to the notion that marijuana is less harmful to the user than tobacco. However, many reports and studies tend to stress that while the effects of each substance on the individual differ, in the long - term both have negative effects that should be emphasized. (Vlahov et al., 2004)

While there is a strong case for the benefits of marijuana in certain instances and for certain conditions, this…… [Read More]

References www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=98432636

Bock, a.W. (2000). The Politics of Medical Marijuana. Santa Ana, CA: Seven Locks.

Executive Summary: Institute of Medicine (1999). Retrieved July 3, 2008, from http://www.nap.edu/html/marimed/es.html

Fact Sheet Cigarette Smoking-Related Mortality. (2006) Retrieved July 3, 2008, at http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/factsheets/cig_smoking_mort.htm

Gieringer D. (1994) Marijuana Health Mythology.
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Neurofibroma Genetic Traits and Impact

Words: 5537 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52789543

However, recently, anesthesiologists have suggest a low to mid thoracic epidural combined with adequate general anesthesia. This anesthetic technique will allow for adequate inter-operative monitoring. After the operation, the anesthesiologist must continue to monitor the patient for either hypertension, hypotension and hypoglycemia. The presence of either of these conditions may alter the course of the medication given to the patient once the patient is removed from the anesthesia.

Respiratory System

Neurofibroma can cause systemic problems within the various components of the Respiratory System. As has already been presented, Neurofibromas can cause partial blockages within upper parts of the trachea. However, Neurofibromas can also pose challenges or the anesthesiologist when dealing with nasal, sinus or maxilofacial cavities with Neurofibromas present within. One example of how devastatingly complex the Neurofibroma can become is seen when a benign neurofibroma can cause a superior vena cava compression. Such was the case of a 21-year-old…… [Read More]

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Agricultural Health in Pennsylvania Nursing

Words: 1173 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35450226

" (Murphy, 2009)

This is held by Murphy to be what is wanted since high carbon dioxide levels help to maintain high quality silage." (2009) Simultaneously, the gas that is "odorless and colorless" is stated to be that which is dangerous. The gas is stated to replace the oxygen in the silo and since this gas is present in high concentrations the individual receives very little in the way of warning that the gas is about to overcome them. This gas is stated to be characterized by "…a strong bleach-like odor and low lying yellow, red, or dark brown fumes. Unlike carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide levels reach a peak about three days after harvesting and rapidly begin to decrease thereafter particularly is the silo is ventilated." (Murphy, 2009)

Sealed silos are specifically designed so that there is no necessity to enter them however, there are various gases present in convention…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Murphy, Dennis J. (2009) Silo Gases the Hidden Danger. College of Agricultural Sciences -- Cooperative Extension. Agricultural and Biological Engineering. Penn State E-16. Online available at: http://www.age.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/e/E16%20.pdf

Murphy, Dennis J. (2009) Farm Respiratory Hazards. College of Agricultural Sciences -- Cooperative Extension. Agricultural and Biological Engineering. Safety 26. PennState. Online available at: http://www.age.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/e/E26.pdf

The Dirt on Pennsylvania Agriculture (2004) Trends in Rural Pennsylvania. March/April 2004. Online available at: http://www.ruralpa.org/dirtonpaag.pdf
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Mold Assessment and Indoor Exposure

Words: 2524 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34077722

quality of indoor air has received and increasing amount of attention, including a large amount of discussion about sick building syndrome, which has been recognised since the 1970's. Certainly, most North Americans spend the majority of our lives indoors, and the quality of our indoor air environment has been shown to play a huge role on our health. A wide variety of indoor pollutants can have an effect on human health, including environmental tobacco smoke, volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) and biological pollutants. iological indoor pollutants include dust mites, cockroaches, effluvia from pets like birds, rodents, dog and cats and mold.

Early investigations into sick building syndrome often gave a multi-factorial explanation for the symptoms of occupants. However, these investigations often could not explain the long duration of effects. Further, investigations into indoor air quality have historically ignored the problem of mold, and failed to give a clear history of water…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ammann, Harriet M. Ph.D., D.A.B.T. Is Indoor Mold Contamination a Threat to Health? (20 May 2002). http://www.doh.wa.gov/ehp/oehas/mold.html

Carlile, M.J. The Fungi, 2nd ed. San Diego, Calif.: Academic Press, 2001.

Indoor Air - Mold/Moisture. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (20 May 2002). http://www.epa.gov/iaq/molds/moldresources.html

Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings. United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air and Radiation, Indoor Environments Division. (20 May 2002). http://www.epa.gov/iaq/molds/index.html
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Using Antibiotics

Words: 1386 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98812868

Antibiotics

Penicillin

Mechanism of Action

Penicillin G, when injected into the patient, will act against actively proliferating penicillin-sensitive strains of bacteria (Drugs.com, 2011). This does not include several strains of staphylococci producing penicillinase or bacteria that are quiescent. The mechanism of action is inhibition of cell-wall mucopeptide biosynthesis. Penicillin G. works best against staphylococci groups A, B, C, G, H, L, and M, pneumococci, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Treponemapallidum, and many others.

Clinical Uses

Penicillin is used to treat serious infections, such as septicemia, pneumonia, endocarditis, pericarditis, empyema, and meningitis (Drugs.com, 2011). Penicillin is also indicated in cases of anthrax, botulism, actinomycosis, diphtheria, listeria infections, erysipelothrix endocarditis, severe infections of the oropharynx, lower respiratory tract, and genitals. Penicillin is also used to treat gonorrhea, syphyilis, rat-bite fever, and Haverhill fever. Only penicillin-sensitive bacteria should be treated due to the risk of creating penicillin-resistant strains. Although treatment should begin immediately in…… [Read More]

References

Drugs.com. (2011). Penicillin G. Sodium Injection (FDA prescribing information). Drugsite Trust. Retrieved from http://www.drugs.com/pro/penicillin-g-sodium-injection.html.

Drugs.com. (2013). Septra (FDA prescribing information). Drugsite Trust. Retrieved from http://www.drugs.com/pro/septra.html.

Drugs.com. (2014a). Gentamicin Sulfate (FDA prescribing information). Drugsite Trust. Retrieved from http://www.drugs.com/pro/gentamicin-sulfate.html.

Drugs.com. (2014b). Zithromax (FDA prescribing information). Drugsite Trust. Retrieved from http://www.drugs.com/pro/zithromax.html.
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Microbial Volatile Organic Compounds as Indoor Air Pollutants

Words: 4019 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24251196

Air pollution pertains to substances and gases in the air that threaten health and life. Among these are pollutants and irritants, such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide; particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), toxic substances and some natural substances, like pollen. ut most of the pollution comes from the by-products of industrialization - fossil fuel combustion, transportation, transportation, power plant emissions and those from other industrial processes. The burning of fossil fuels to generate electricity alone is the greatest source of air pollution in the U.S.A. These outdoor pollutants can undermine health and cause environmental disturbances, such as acid rain, and are toxic.

Studies show that we now spend more than 90% of our lives inside buildings and other constructed environments. ecause of this, such structures - including homes and office buildings - are constructed with energy efficiency and comfort foremost in mind. The installation of central heating,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Alpha nutrition Programs. Indoor Air-More Contaminated Than Outdoor Air?

Medical Information

2. Ammann, Harriet M. Is Indoor Mold Contamination a Threat to Health?

Office of Environmental Health Assessments, Washington State Department of Health
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Benefits After Quitting Smoking

Words: 1370 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13629470

enefits After Quitting Smoking

Among the many health risks that toll life, smoking is considered as the most preventable cause of mortality. Globally, smoking has been one of the principal factors that lead to diverse type of diseases, such as cancer, coronary heart disease, lung disease, and many others. The number of smokers worldwide grows everyday, both in developed and developing countries. According to Karl Fagerstrom's Epidemiology of Smoking, from a 1995 estimate, the rate of smoking-related mortality will grow from 3 million to 10 million annually by 2030.

In response to the risks that smoking causes to the increasing number of smokers', many health organizations worldwide conduct different programs that are hoped to minimize and prevent people from smoking. This includes the provision of enough information on the effects of smoking to one's health, as well as information on how to quit from the smoking habit.

Many research and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Fagerstrom, Karl. "The Epidemiology of Smoking."

Fagerstrom Consulting (2002): 1-9.

Benefits of Quitting Smoking."

Texas Medical Association. 02 April 2004. http://www.texmed.org/cme/phn/ndt/benefits_quitting.asp
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Physiological Effects of Endurance Training

Words: 2589 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97922192

Physiological Effects of Endurance Training

Endurance training produces many physiological changes, both during training and after the training period is complete. These changes are biochemical and also involve changes in the cardio-pulmonary system. The correct way to perform endurance training has been a subject of controversy in recent years. There are many differences in training methods. These differences and the effects of endurance training will be the subject of this research. The jury is still out as to what constitutes the perfect duration and intensity of training program.

Studies have shown that a focused training program can increase maximum oxygen intake by 15-30% over a three-month period (7) and that can increase to 50% if the training is sustained for over 2 years. The body makes many metabolic adaptations as well. These adaptations drop rapidly in the first few weeks after training is stopped (1).

Duration and Intensity of Different…… [Read More]

References

1. Acevedo EO, Goldfarb AH. Increased training intensity effects on plasma lactate, ventilatory threshold, and endurance. Med and Sci in Sports Exercise, (21), 563-568, 1998

2. Finn, C, Effects of High-Intensity Intermittent Training on Endurance Performance. Sportscience (5)(1), sport sci.org. Jour. 1-3, 2001.

3. Foss M.L., and Keteyian S.J. Fox's Physiological Basis for Exercise and Sport. WCB Boston, Mass., McGraw-Hill. 1998.

4. Hawley JA, Myburgh KH, Noakes TD, and Dennis, SC. Training Techniques To Improve Fatigue Resistance And Enhance Endurance Performance. Jour of Sports Sci, (15), 325-333, 1997.
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Anesthesia Means Temporary Loss of

Words: 3728 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12779152

In year 1799 anesthetic properties of Nitric Oxide were discovered by Humphery Davy (1778-1829) he advised that the by using nitric oxide, pain and shock of the surgical procedure can be negated. Third person who continue with Morton and ells philosophy was Charles T. Jackson. The Fourth man who contributed to anesthetics was Thomas Mortan (Blatner, 2009). In the year 1848 James Simpson used chloroform in obstetric surgery, he used diethyl ether to anesthetize a women with a pelvic deformity for delivery (kodali, 2009) and in year 1853 John Snow did a successful induction of chloroform to her Majesty Queen Victoria at the time of Prince Leopold's Birth and also on Fenny Longfellow who wrote to her poet brother that this use of ether is certainly the greatest blessing of this era (Longfellow, 1956). In the year 1885-illiam Halsted introduced the nerve block. In 1891 Heinrich Quincke demonstrated the process…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Bergman, Norman. History of Anesthesia. chua2.fiu.edu.  http://ahahq.org/Bulletin/AHA_GB_1991-10.pdf  .Retrieved from 14th Jan 2013.

Conquering surgical pain: Four men stake their claims. (2012). Massachusetts General

Blatner, Adam. The discovery and invention of Anesthesia. Blatner.com.  http://www.blatner.com/adam/consctransf/historyofmedicine/4-anesthesia/hxanesthes.html . Retrieved on 14th Jan 2013.

Fadden, John. Cultural, Environmental and Genetical influences on drug therapy. Jbpub.com. http://samples.jbpub.com/9780763786076/86076_CH03_FINAL.pdf . Retrieved on 14th Jan 2013.
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Tourism in Southeast Asia Since SARS Outbreak

Words: 2262 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60463974

2003 was marked by a number of natural disasters throughout the world, but none more devastating and threatening than the outbreak of a new virus now known as SARS. In this paper, I will focus primarily on the economic affect of the disease to the tourism industry in Southeast Asia. I argue that the magnitude of the affect SARS had on the tourism industry is attributable to three factors: the nature of the virus, the reaction by World Health rganization officials, and finally, the inadequacy in which local governments (specifically the Chinese) handled the epidemic. Finally, I will touch on the affects SARS has had on the tourism industry thus far, and its future implications.

In order to understand the effects of SARS in the world economic climate, specifically that of tourism, it is important to explore the disease itself. SARS (Sever Acute Respiratory Syndrome) is a form of pneumonia…… [Read More]

Online Version)  http://209.157.64.200/focus/f-news/898390/posts .

Runckel, Christopher. Tourist Arrivals Plunge as Government Tries to Restore Region as Touris

Destination. Business in Asia Website. Accessed June 24, 2003. (Online Version) http://www.business-in-asia.com/sars_article1.html.
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Confined Space Electrodes Chromium

Words: 1172 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30441404

Confined Space, Electrodes, Chromium

Confined spaces

A confined space is an enclosed or partially enclosed space that is not primarily designed or intended for human occupancy, it has a restricted entrance or exit by way and size, fined spaces as well poor ventilation. Confined spaces can be below or above ground, it can be found in almost any workplace. A confined space, despite its name, is not necessarily small. Examples of confined spaces include silos, vats, hoppers and utility vaults.

The AS defined confined spaces as having limited space and modes of ingress and egress as well as poor ventilation (American elding Society, 2003a). hile the NIOSH defined confined spaces as sufficient space enough for a person to enter and conduct work, limited means of entry and exit, and does not suit continuous employment. The AS definition is more restricted than that of the broader (Hammer & Price, 2001).

Safety…… [Read More]

Work Cited

American Welding Society. (2003). Chromium and Nickel in Welding Fume. Safety and Health Fact Sheet No. 4. http://files.aws.org/technical/facts/FACT-04.PDF

Argonne National Laboratory. (2005). Human health fact sheet: Thorium. Retrieved November 21, 2008, from http://www.ead.anl.gov/pub/doc/Thorium.pdf

Goetschs, L.D. (2008). Occupational safety and health, for technologists, engineers, and managers (6th ed.). New Jersey: Pearson Education, Inc.

NOTE
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H5N1 Avian Influenza Much Like

Words: 1376 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50652036

, 1378).

Much like other influenza a viruses, the virion of the H5N1 virus is enveloped and is either spherical or filamentous as to its formation and in clinical isolates, the virus has been shown to be more filamentous, while in some laboratory strains, it appears more spherical (eigel, et al., 1379). As to the genome of the H5N1 virus, this is composed of eight single non-paired RNA strands, containing a code with eleven specific proteins; the overall size is estimated at 13,588 bases (eigel, et al., 1379). According to Wang and Jiang, the entry of the H5N1 virus into a host cell is mediated by hemagglutinin, "a virus surface glycoprotein that can bind terminal sialic acid residues on host cell glycoproteins and glycolipids (2009, Internet).

In most cases, treatment of the H5N1 influenza virus includes immediate hospitalization in the intensive care unit and being placed on a ventilator, along…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

"Avian Influenza -- Bird Flu." CDC. 2009. Internet. Retrieved September 25, 2009 from http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian.

Beigel, John H., et al. "Avian Influenza (H5N1) Infection in Humans." New England

Journal of Medicine. Vol. 353 (September 29, 2005): 1374-1385.

"History of Avian Flu." 2009. Internet. Retrieved September 25, 2009 from http://www.
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Vertebrate Natural History

Words: 2619 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17061104

Vertebrates

It is common knowledge that the human body consists of about 65% water. People cannot live any longer than five days without H20. Individuals of all ages love to sail the oceans, swim in the sea and soar under or speed across the waves. It comes as no surprise, then, that some part of the human psyche remembers millions and millions of years ago before animals came on shore. What is still questionable is how or why these animals made the move from water to land. The journal articles discussed below give some of the latest findings on this topic.

Early in the Devonian Era, close to 400 million years ago, all the continents were grouped closely together and surrounded by the seas. The climate ranged from dry weather to torrential rains as some tropical areas do today. Even flowers had not yet evolved on land, let alone vertebrates.…… [Read More]

References Cited

Clack, J.A. "An Early Tetrapod from Romer's Gap." Nature (2002) 418: 72-76. [electronic version]

Clack, J.A. "From Fins to Fingers." Science 304.5667 (2004): 57-59. [electronic version]

Coates, M.I, and J.A. Clack. "Polydactyly in the Earliest Known Tetrapod Limbs"

Nature. (1990) 347: 66-69. [electronic version]
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Military Retirees Are Entitled to

Words: 12717 Length: 46 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18599361



First of all only a scant few of these Veterans groups will acknowledge the "promise" of free health care; for the most part these groups will tout the benefits already promised by the Veterans Administration and assert that cuts in these benefits are the same a broken promise-or contractual breach in legal terms. The idea of the United States military making a "promise" or forging a legally binding agreement between individual veterans or groups of veterans is barred by the United States Constitution. As will be demonstrated in the Literature eview, specific Constitutional language from Article I give Congress and only Congress the express authority to make laws and regulations pertaining to the armed forces. Therefore, the idea the military breached a contract with service members is, ultimately, inherently inaccurate. Combining the lack of specific language within the materials provided by any governmental agency with the clear language of the…… [Read More]

References

.... (n.d.). The RETIRED MILITARY ADVOCATE. The RETIRED MILITARY ADVOCATE. Retrieved November 29, 2010, from  http://mrgrg-ms.org/ 

Best, R. (2003, August 7). Military Medical Care Services: Questions and Answers. Congressional Research Service, 1, 1-17.

Birkey, a. (2010, July 21). Fraudulent vets charity raised big money in Minnesota. The Minnesota Independent, p. 3.

Burrelli, D. (2008, August 12). Military Health Care: The Issue of Promised Benefits. Congressional Research Service, 1, 1-14.
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Stress Definition of Stress Researchers Define Stress

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5991786

Stress

Definition of stress

esearchers define stress as a physical, mental, or emotional response to events that causes bodily or mental tension. Simply put, stress is any outside force or event that has an effect on our body or mind. Acute stress is the most common form of stress. It comes from demands and pressures of the recent past and anticipated demands and pressures of the near future. Acute stress is thrilling and exciting in small doses, but too much is exhausting. Acute stress can be episodic or chronic.

Depending on the stressors and the types of changes or events, stress can manifest itself physically, emotionally and/or mentally. Physical stress occurs when the body as a whole starts to suffer as a result of a stressful situation. Symptoms can manifest in a variety of ways and vary in their seriousness. Emotional stress are responses due to stress affecting the mind…… [Read More]

References

AIS (NDI). Stress, definition of stress, stressor, what is stress?, Eustress?" The American institute of stress. Retrieved October10, 2011, from http://www.stress.org/topic-definition-stress.htm

Barr, N. (2008, August 14) What stress does to your body. Marie Claire. Retrieved October 10, 2011, from http://www.marieclaire.com/health-fitness/news/stress-effects-body

Mayo Clinic Staff (2010). Stress symptoms: Effects on your body, feelings and behavior. American psychological association's "Stress in America report." Mayo Clinic. Retrieved October 10, 2011, from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/stress-symptoms/SR00008_D

Miller, L.H. & Smith, A.D. (1993). Stress: The different kinds of stress. American psychlolgical association. In The Stress Solution. Retrieved October 10, 2011, from http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/stress-kinds.aspx
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Hospital Report Dermatology- the Dermatology Department Deals

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22971883

Hospital Report

Dermatology- The dermatology department deals mostly with skin related illnesses. The most common issues within this department pertain to skin, scalp, hair and nails. Many of our clients are female with more cosmetic needs. Many would like to retain their youthful appearance and believe minor surgery is the best solution. As such, our departments offer many cosmetic treatments including hair removal, hair transplants, laser therapy and tattoo removal. This past fiscal year has been quite difficult as many of our affluent clients have postponed treatment due to economic concerns with the U.S. We believe this trend to be transitory in nature, with a steady increase in treatments to occur in early 2012.

Oncology- The oncology department pertains mostly to cancer, its detection and diagnosis. The most common diseases in this department are various forms of cancer with the most common being breast cancer. We have recently overhauled our…… [Read More]

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Seasonal Ingredients Derived From Chinese Medicine

Words: 487 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 523504

Medicinal cuisine is based on seasonal ingredients. Spring, summer, fall and winter have their own specific diets. The concept of seasonal ingredients means that we must be careful to adjust our diet to get the necessary nutrition to survive the season. Seasonal ingredients help strengthen our immune system and prevent and treat the diseases which most often occur during those seasons.

During the spring, the liver can cause the body to exhibit fatigue, eyestrain, headaches, dizziness and drowsiness.

The seasonal food ingredients for the spring are (Korean) wild chive, shepherd's purse, water parsley. And angelica tree sprout.

TCM ingredients for the spring are chuan xiong, dang gui, ju hua, gou qi zi, jie geng, ge gen, bo he, fu pen zi and raisin tree fruit.

In summer, the weather is hot and fruits get ripe. Our body heat is elevated and there is an additional risk of heart problems and…… [Read More]

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A Concise Analysis of Coccidioidomycosis Erythema Nodosum

Words: 1439 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12231972

Coccidioidomycosis Erythema Nodosum

Also known as valley fever or desert rheumatism, coccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease commonly reported in the Western Hemisphere, especially South-western U.S. (mainly California, Arizona, and Texas), Northern Mexico, as well as parts of Central and South America (Chen, Lee & Li, 2010). In the U.S., estimates indicate that 150,000 people in the South-western region are infected every year (Garcia et al., 2015). As the disease is mainly concentrated in South-western U.S., its national prevalence remains unknown. The disease is commonly characterized by coughing, fever, shortness of breath, headaches, chest pain, night sweating, loss of weight, and erythema nodosum (Garcia et al., 2015). This paper reports a case of coccidioidomycosis characterized by erythema nodosum

Subjective

A 31-year-old Asian male visited his primary care doctor's clinic complaining of cough and malaise for two months. He had been a construction worker in Fresno County, California, for eleven months and…… [Read More]

References

Chen, C., Lee, H., & Li, S. (2010). Coccidioidomycosis with cutaneous manifestation of erythema nodosum in Taiwan. Dermatologica Sinica, 28: 154-158.

Garcia, S., Alanis, J., Flores, M., Gonzalez, S., Cabrera, L., & Candiani, O. (2015). Coccidioidomycosis and the skin: a comprehensive review. Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia, 90(5): 610-619.

Odio, C., Marciano, B., Galgiani, J., & Holland, S. (2017). Risk factors for disseminated coccidioidomycosis, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 23(2), 308-311.

Wilken, J., Sondermeyer, G., Shusterman, D., et al. (2015). Coccidioidomycosis among workers constructing solar power farms, California, USA, 2011-2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 21(11), 1997-2005.
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Lotus Root There's No Disputing

Words: 547 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50782483



Still, others claim that the physical resemblance of Lotus Root to the lungs holds the clue to understanding its healing properties ("Health enefits of Lotus Root"). Lotus Root is said to treat various respiratory problems. Small doses of the juice extracted from raw, finely grated Lotus Root is recommended for lung-related ailments such as tuberculosis, asthma, and coughing, for heart disease, and to neutralize toxins. Also, macrobiotic remedy combining Lotus Root and akuzu is often recommended to treat colds accompanied by fever and/or troubled stomach and intestines. Lotus Root is also said to be helpful for treating colds because it melts mucus accumulation in the respiratory system. When a Lotus Root plaster is applied to the face, it is believed to relieve sinus congestion and inflammation.

Still, there's no concrete medical authority that backs up the claims that practitioners of Alternative Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine make regarding the benefits…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Health Benefits of Lotus Root." http://www.naturalimport.com/health_benefits_of_lotus_root

Lotus Root. http://www.foodsnherbs.com/new_page_29.htm

Nutrition Facts. http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c20dz.html
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Recovery Plan Biological Attack in the U S

Words: 2773 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17134066

ecovery Plan: Biological Attack in the U.S. Congress

The havoc and deaths caused by the weaponized anthrax spores that were mailed to members of the U.S. Congress following the attacks of September 11, 2001 and the repeated attempted uses of botulinum toxin on U.S. Naval bases make it abundantly clear that governmental offices are vulnerable to biological pathogens. These agents have been and likely will be used by terrorists again to achieve their goals of bringing harm to the United States and it interests at home and abroad. The hypothetical comprehensive recovery plan developed in this project is in response to this type of food-borne pathogen attack and takes place in the cafeteria situated in the ayburn House Office Building in the U.S. Congressional complex in Washington, D.C. which serves members of Congress, staff members and visitors. The scenario begins with the telephonic notification to the Capital Police that all…… [Read More]

References

Botulinum toxin. (2011). State of Delaware Health and Social Services. Retrieved from http://

www.dhss.delaware.gov/dph/files/botulismems.pdf.

Dando, M. (2001). The new biological weapons: Threat, proliferation, and control. Boulder,

CO: Lynne Rienner.
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Abnormal Psyche

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24053231

Substance-Related Disorders

A "drug" is any substance, other than food, that affects our bodies or minds. Since not all drugs are bad, the book uses "substance" to clarify the issue. Substance abuse can cause temporary or long-term problems for the abuser. Dependence, tolerance or addiction can develop.

Depressants: slow the central nervous system (CNS) down. Alcohol is a CNS depressant.

Alcohol: nearly 6% of the U.S. population are heavy drinkers, some as young as 11. Men outnumber women 3:1. Ethyl alcohol is quickly absorbed in stomach and intestine. First it depresses the areas of the brain that control judgments and curbs on behavior. Next, motor control is affected. Alcohol can also interfere with both vision and hearing. As the liver metabolizes the alcohol, the blood levels drop and function gradually returns. Patterns of alcoholism vary among socio-cultural groups and by age. Alcoholism can destroy family life, sink a career, and…… [Read More]

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Economics Compare the Cases of Jennifer and

Words: 480 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18487932

Economics

Compare the cases of Jennifer and Tyron, in terms of (a) the identification of their problems

Jennifer was born pre-term and needed respiratory care and prolonged hospital stay in order to survive. Receiving that, she seemed fine. The family was referred to an early intervention program, Jennifer was regularly checked, and home visits were set up via the visiting nurse's agency.

Tyron was born on-term but showed developmental delays that only the mother noticed and became uneasy about when Tyron was 10 months old. These included inability to recognize mother, disinclination to smile or play with his parents, inclination towards solitude, and tantrums. Tyron was diagnosed with developmental delays.

(b) Features of the assessment process carried out

Jennifer's respiratory system was immature; she needed oxygen support. She was detained in the hospital where she was under constant monitoring and the family were referred to an early intervention program which…… [Read More]

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Fantastic Voyage Welcome Aboard the SS William

Words: 1587 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96147003

Fantastic Voyage

Welcome aboard the SS William Harvey! As you well know the human body is a complex system of intricate cells that work together to maintain a perfect and efficient environment on which an individual can thrive. Two systems in the human body that work together to ensure that a human individual remains healthy are the circulatory and the cardiopulmonary systems. Working in conjunction with each other, these systems help with the transportation of gasses, nutrients, and hormones to different organs within the human body. While the intricate mazes that make up the different systems in the human body may confuse some individuals, finding one's way from the femoral vein in the circulatory system to the lungs is not as complicated as it sounds.

Join us as we embark on this Fantastic Voyage through the human body as we visit and discover new cells and organs of the human…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cotterill, S. (2000). The cardiovascular system (heart and blood): medical terminology for cancer. Department of Child Health. University of Newcastle upon Tyne. Retrieved 27 July 2012, from  http://www.cancerindex.org/medterm/medtm8.htm 

Gregory, M (n.d.). The circulatory system. Clinton Community College. State University of New York. Retrieved 27 July 2012, from http://faculty.clintoncc.suny.edu/faculty/michael.gregory/files/Bio%20100/Bio%20100%20Lectures/Organ%20Systems/Circulatory%20System/Circulatory%20System.htm

How does the body fight infections? (n.d.). WiseGeek. Retrieved 27 July 2012, from http://www.wisegeek.com/how-does-the-human-body-fight-infections.htm

Inner Body. (2011). All systems. Retrieved 27 July 2012, from http://www.innerbody.com/htm/body.html
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PDF File Was Unable to

Words: 883 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90484901



8. Protethria-egg laying, medium length gestation inside the mother. Lactation occurs after hatching.

Metatheria-marsupial, short length gestation period inside skin pouch on the outside of mother. Lactation occurs upon gestation.

Eutheria-develop from embryos inside of the mother, long gestation period and lactation occurs throughout gestation.

9. First Row: Propagation is stopped as the two waves would cancel one another out. Propagation would occur if the nerve was stimulated in the middle and the two waves moved towards the tips.

Second Row: Initiation is slowed or will stop and result in cramps of the involved muscle. The ion channels are slow to respond or will not respond at all without sodium being present.

Third Row: Transduction will not occur as it relies on the Ca2+ gates to transfer the signal and change the stimulus.

10. Sight-Photoreceptor / Cells react to light hitting them / Optic Nerve

Smell-Olfactory, a-Rodopsin-like receptors / Binds…… [Read More]

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Nursing Ethics the Thought of

Words: 691 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66037953

Nurses can help family members by educating them on the dying process and the various signs to look for so they can plan their hospital time accordingly (Life Support http://www.deathreference.com/Ke-Ma/Life-Support-System.html).

It is important for nurses to recognize individual beliefs and traditions when it comes to the dying process and respect those in the families they work with. If a family believes a dying family member should have oil placed gently on the forehead the nurse can help the family accept the pending death of their loved one by allowing anything non-intrusive to be done. Whether the nurse agrees with the belief or not is not important, what is important is that the nurse respects the wishes of the family as much as possible while still providing required medical care.

Machines and medications keeping life support viable does not mean the person is still alive. Nursing professionals often have to help…… [Read More]

References

Do the poor deserve life support? - By Steven E. Landsburg - Slate (www.slate.com/id/2133518/?nav=navoa)

Life Support   http://www.deathreference.com/Ke-Ma/Life-Support-System.html  )

Life Support (http://www.canada.com/topics/lifestyle/fitness/story.html?id=5b0c3099-be0e-4119-81ae-02caba26ffa6&k=75397)
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Relationship Between Hours of Sleep and Both of Satisfaction With Life and Cognitive Functioning

Words: 1129 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61908318

Hours of Sleep, Life Satisfaction & Cognitive Functioning

Cognitive Functioning

ELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOUS OF SLEEP, SATISFACTION WITH LIFE AND COGNITIVE FUNCTIONING

elationship between Hours of Sleep and Both of Satisfaction with Life and Cognitive Functioning

Proper sleeping hours are very important for our body's functioning. When a person is sleeping, his body is in the process of repair; thus allowing his brain to have some rest and the needed down time. There are many negative effects of less sleeping hours on the cognitive function as well as life satisfaction of a person.

Just like a proper diet, sleep plays a very essential role in the maintenance of overall health of an individual. Unfortunately, Americans are facing some serious cognitive and life satisfaction problems due to lack of sleeping hours. According to an estimate from U.S. Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), approximately 25% of U.S. citizens have less sleeping…… [Read More]

References

National Sleep Foundation, 2005. Summary of Findings, retrieved on June 17, 2011 from www.sleepfoundation.org

Siri Carpenter, 2001. Sleep Deprivation May Be Undermining Teen Health. Monitor Staff, Vol 32, No. 9, pp.42.

Julia A. Shekleton, Naomi L. Rogers and Shantha M.W. Rajaratnam, 2009. Searching For The Daytime Impairments Of Primary Insomnia. Clinical Review, Brain & Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales

William E. Kelly, 2010. Sleep-Length And Life Satisfaction In A College Student Sample. Retrieved on June 17, 2011 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FCR/is_3_38/ai_n6249228/