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We have over 14 essays for "Richard Wilbur"

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Warren Roethke and Wilbur Exterior

Words: 735 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11389176



Like Roethke and arren, Richard ilbur blends classicism and philosophy with humble images: "Throughout his career ilbur has shown, within the compass of his classicism, enviable variety. His poems describe fountains and fire trucks, grasshoppers and toads, European cities and country pleasures. All of them are easy to read, while being suffused with an astonishing verbal music and a compacted thoughtfulness that invite sustained reflection" ("Richard ilbur," Poets.org, 2010). Like Roethke, ilbur's use of nature tends to be personal, even though ilbur's diction is more formal and archaic in tone than "My Papa's altz." For example, in "The riter," ilbur writes of his young daughter, writing a story in her room, and compares her effort to chasing a frightened starling out of her room: "It is always a matter, my darling, / of life or death, as I had forgotten. I wish / hat I wished you before, but harder."…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Theodore Roethke." Poets. org. March 10, 2010.

 http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/13 

"Richard Wilbur." Poets.org. March 10, 2010.

 http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/202
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Boy at the Window

Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57229743

Boy at the Window

ichard Wilbur's "Boy at the Window"

"Boy at the Window" by ichard Wilbur is a poem about the reciprocal pity that a young boy and a snowman have for each other as they both watch the other interact in an environment in which they cannot exist. The poem presents a story of sadness and eventual understanding that is easily relatable to any reader, and Wilbur does a remarkable job of making his poem resonate in the minds of his readers with the use of vivid imagery, relatable context and engaging language, which work together to make this short poem touch a deeper level in the minds and hearts of readers than one might imagine it would at first glance.

The poem opens with the young boy staring out the window at the snowman he has presumably made, standing alone in the cold and darkness of a…… [Read More]

References

Lowell, R. 1987. "Elizabeth Bishop." Collected Prose, 76(1): pp. 76-77.

Stange, T. And Wyant, S. 2011. "Poetry proves to be positive in primary grades."

Reading Horizons, 48(3): pp. 5-9.
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Senses Meet the Spirit When

Words: 3295 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 50825353

Diehl also points out that the poet's retrospective outlook cannot be overlooked, for "by placing this description in the realm of recollection, the speaker calls into question the current status of her consciousness" (Diehl). Here we come into contact with vivid imagery of the poet losing her faculties. Another interesting aspect we find in this poem is how it represents a personal experience. The poet's thoughts are coming from within. After all is said and done, we read "And the windows failed, and then/I could not see to see" (Dickinson 16). Obviously, the poet does not crack the mystery of death but she does seem to come to terms with it, at least.

The poet takes us on another journey in "I heard a Fly Buzz hen I Died." e are told about the "stillness of the air" (3) to the grieving to the distraction of a fly. The poet…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. Emily Dickinson. Broomall: Chelsea House Publishers.1999.

The Western Canon. New York: Harcourt Brace and Company. 1994.

Dickinson, Emily. "Because I Could Not Stop for Death." The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Ed. Thomas Johnson. New York: Little, Brown and Company. 1960.

Death is a Dialogue" the Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Ed. Thomas Johnson. New York: Little, Brown and Company. 1960.
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Cuckoldry in School for Wives

Words: 1452 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43496084

8). Under such circumstances, the theme of tragic love in the seventeenth century is rife with passionate rebellion against such marital arrangements. Moreover, Arnolphe's view of wifedom is base: "And there are four things only she must know: to say her prayers, love me, spin, and sew" (I.1). Women are to remain austere peasants, obedient to their masters, and kept free from emulating flirtations wives upon threat of Hell (III.2). With such a view of women, it is not surprising he is afraid of their challenge and seeks to inoculate himself through rational schemes.

Arnolphe's tyrannical grip is broken through fate. As with all forms of tyrannical insulation, it could not last. The plight of Agnes is softened in two ways: by chance and through her own skillful rebellion against ignorance. y chance, first, and despite Arnolphe's best efforts to keep Agnes ignorant and secluded from worldly corruption, fate brings…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Moliere, Jean Baptiste Poquelin. The School for Wives: Comedy in Five Acts, 1662. Translated by Richard Wilbur. New York: Harvest/HBJ, 1971.
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Misanthrope- Honesty in One of the Best

Words: 1001 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91116085

Misanthrope- Honesty

In one of the best plays of Moliere, The Misanthrope, we come across honesty as the main theme, which has been carefully incorporated to show the adverse effects of tactless honesty and the consequences of complete lack of honesty. The play was written in the 17th century and the society it depicts is the one that prefers flattery to honesty and conceit to modesty. Despite the fact that the play was meant for audiences of 17th century, it amazingly retains a universal appeal because of the treatment that Moliere extends to the central theme of honesty in the play.

The play revolves around four important characters, Alceste, Celimene, Philinte and Eliante. It is through the characters of Alceste and Celimene that the author conveys his views on honesty. Philinte serves the important purpose of balancing honesty and deceit by adopting a middle path, which is both sensible and…… [Read More]

Reference:

Rousseau, Jean Jacques "Letter to M. D'Alembert on the Theatre" (1758).

Moliere. The Misanthrope and Tartuffe. Trans. Richard Wilbur. New York, 1954.
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Orgon and Candide the Enlightenment Philosophers Believed

Words: 770 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15265941

Orgon and Candide

The Enlightenment philosophers believed that God created the world, and as God is the most benevolent, capable mind possible, then the world must be the best possible world. Humans are incapable of understanding the role of evil in the world because they do not understand how the force that God set in place to govern the world. Therefore, when humans see bad things happening, they are unable to comprehend that every bad thing occurs for a greater good. This philosophy is grounded in a strong sense of cause and effect, the pursuit of which leads humans to misperceptions and, ultimately, to misplaced faith.

Orgon's misperceptions are so acute, that it leaves one wondering if his gullibility was native. Orgon's search for salvation brings him to set aside the cautions and warnings of his friends and fall completely for Tartuffe's flattery and trickery. Orgon's blind faith is driven…… [Read More]

References

Bottiglia, W.F. (Ed.). (1968). Voltaire: A collection of critical essays. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice.

Moliere, Jean-Baptiste Poquellin. (1664). Tartuffe. Translated by Richard Wilbur. Department of English, Miami-Dade College | Kendall.

(2004, June 1). Voltaire. Whitefish, MT: Kessinger Publishing.

[Type text]
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Technology Society and Culture Most

Words: 1455 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 41519016

The Mechanical Clock has been invented in Europe in the 13th century, and, despite of the fact that it had been obvious that it would bring benefits to the world, it received little to no recognition from outside of Europe.

Printing has been invented by the Chinese in the ninth century and later perfected by the Europeans, as the Chinese did not seem interested in the act. The Europeans became fond of printing and millions of books had been printed in just a short amount of time. The Islam did not seem to be interested in having the Koran printed, nor did it seem interested in having printing present in their territory. The Asian world also appeared to be reluctant from accepting printing for the important technological advancement that it had been. The Chinese apparently treated every European invention with lack of enthusiasm because of the fact that they did…… [Read More]

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How American Corporations Harnessed the Media to Further Their Goals Between 1890 and 1940

Words: 1850 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 36473651

American Corporations and the Media, 1890-1940

American corporations have never been reticent to use available media to reach their goals, and in the years between 1890 and 1940, there are impressive examples of how U.S. corporate interests have utilized various media to realize additional profit and power -- sometimes employing unorthodox and unethical methods. This paper delves into instances of corporate use of media, and points to the dynamics that allowed those associations to flourish.

"Today's critics of media conglomerates fail to grasp the reality that corporate power, in league with the state, [has] made a mockery of prospects for a democratic global media system… [and it's vital to recognize that] the U.S. radio industry subsequently followed a similar pattern of monopolization in the 1920s…" (Peterson, 2004, p. 86).

Author James Schwoch points to the fact that the American radio industry had a profound impact on Latin American activities between…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Belrose, John S. (1994). Fessenden and the Early History of Radio Science. The Radioscientist,

5(3), 1-19.

Forrest, Wilbur. (1925). Political Notes: Ford Speaks. Time Magazine. Retrieved June 17,

2011, from  http://www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,720534,00.html .
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Print Media Affects & Education

Words: 3044 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3112319

The media is involved in all stages of policy-making, including in identifying what type of policies are needed. In many cases, the print media and social journalism draw attention on the problems that society has as they bring into discussion issues that interest the American public. Although print media is not the sole identifier of policy issues, it has the power to make the subject reach a great deal of the population, but most importantly, it has the power to reach to the decision-making responsible.

It is a known fact that politicians and politics can not be made without print media because only print media has the power to make the connection between a politician and his policies and the general public. In all times, print media was the main connector between politics and the people. This is why print media has a crucial importance in the political life of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barker, Michael, Manufacturing policies: the media's role in the policy making process, 2005, available at http://live-wirez.gu.edu.au/jea.papers/Barker.doc;

Davis, Richard and Diana Owen, New Media and American Politics, Oxford University Press, 1998;

The Media Influence on American Society in Politics, October 29, 2006, available at http://www.gather.com/viewArticle.jsp?articleId=281474976826497.

Campaign for Fiscal Equity, available at  http://www.cfequity.org/ ;
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Groups During the Reconstruction Area

Words: 1002 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55313685



They other group that faced quiet a bit of resistance was that of the colored women. In a work by Watkins Harper, Colored Women of America, the plight of colored women during this era was discussed in detail. The white and black women during this time period were constantly aggravated by the lack of backing for reprieve, land transformation, and compensations that they believed as just. This radical position was thwarted by a male biased society that dishonored female restructuring and tried to stop black reliance on the federal government. The women's visualization of liberty, turned out to be very different from that of the men's.

Black women played a vital role in econstruction. In numerous manners these militant women had further in common with their white equals than the freed women whose agony they wanted to alleviate. All through the Civil War, abolitionist and ex- slave Harriet Jacobs toiled…… [Read More]

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Georgia the Former Soviet Republic

Words: 3591 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 96113922

Lastly, a loss of Ajaristan (Ajaria) would weaken Georgias buffer with Turkey and increase loss of lack Sea shoreline:

In the conflict between the Ossetians and Ingush, the Russian government favored the "always loyal Ossetians" over the discontented Muslim Ingush. The conflicts with the Georgians in the south and the Ingush in the west have fueled the growth of Ossetian nationalism, but the majority hope for autonomy, not full independence, fearing the loss of Russian protection in the volatile region they have inhabited since ancient times. The Ossetians, although needing Russian protection in the mostly Muslim region, continue to work for the unification of their small nation in a single political entity. In 1996, the governments of North and South Ossetia signed a treaty of friendship and cooperation. Relations between the South Ossetians and the Georgian government improved in the late 1990s. The Georgian government of Eduard Shevardnadze proposed in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abbott, Wilbur Cortez. The Expansion of Europe: A History of the Foundations of the Modern World. Vol. 2,. New York: H. Holt and Company, 1918.

Atal, Yogesh, ed. Poverty in Transition and Transition in Poverty: Recent Developments in Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania, Georgia, Russia, Mongolia. New York: Berghahn Books, 1999.

Black, Cyril E., Robert D. English, Jonathan E. Helmreich, a. James McAdams, and Paul C. Helmreich. Rebirth: A Political History of Europe since World War II. 2nd ed. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2000.

"Bulgaria, Romania Pledge Support in Georgia's EU Aspiration" May, 9th 2005,  http://www.washprofile.org/en/node/6355
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Poe and the Dreck of Poverty

Words: 1205 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 807943

Poe

"Always in debt, Poe both sought and sneered at the popular audience of his day." -- Andre Carrilho

Poe is said to have believed that fiction was art only as much as it avoided didactics and carried the meaning lightly, leaving much to the imagination of the reader (Jannaccone 1974). Telling a story that engages readers deeply and introducing characters that readers truly care about are attributes of interesting fiction. Poe's literary style is invitational, encouraging readers to fully engage in the story. Fans of Poe will enjoy his "virtuosic, showy, lilting, and slightly wilting quality, like a peony just past bloom" (Lepore 2009). If the readers are enthralled in a gothic tale, they may anticipate an ending capable of thrilling and astonishing them; nonetheless, they will remain gripped by the emerging story until the dramatic ending. Poe further compelled his readers by setting realistic details in his fiction…… [Read More]

References

Corbett, Edward P.J. (1985), "Introduction." Rhetorical Analyses of Literary Works. Oxford University Press.

Gursimesek, Odul and Krotner, Kirsten. (2014, November). Lost spoiler practices: Online interaction as social participation. Participations: Journal of Audience and Reception Studies, 11(2). Institute for the Study of Culture, Media Studies, University of Southern Denmark.

Jannaccone, Pasquale (translated by Peter Mitilineos) (1974). "The Aesthetics of Edgar Poe." Poe Studies, 7 (1). doi:10.1111/j.1754-6095.1974.tb00224.x

Lepore, J. (2009, April 27). The humbug: Edgar Allan Poe and the economy of horror. The New Yorker.
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Texas History

Words: 3692 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43630442

German Influences on Texas Culture

If one has lived in Texas for any length of time, they will realize immediately that the Texas culture is influenced by German culture in a number of ways. Modern day Texas culture would not exist as it does today if it were not for German influence. Today Texas culture can be described as a blending of German and Texas traditions. Though German culture is not the only culture that has impacted the Texas of today, it is often considered one of the most significant influences historically.

Whether one examines the architectural landscape of the towns and cities, examines the art and music or simply talks with many of the German descendants living in Texas, one must immediately acknowledge the significant influence the German people have had on the development of Texas as known today. In early Texas history German influence was widespread, often comprising…… [Read More]

References:

Alvarez, A. (2002). "Oktoberfest in Fredericksburg." Texana Food and Events. 19, November 2004:  http://texana.texascooking.com/news/oktoberfest_fred2002.htm 

Butt, H.E. (2004). "Oktoberfest in Texas." 20, November, 2004:  http://www.heb.com/mealtime/celeb-oktoberFestTx.jsp 

Galan. (2001). [Online]. "Accordion Dreams: cultures of music and dance." Available

from:  http://www.pbs.org/accordiondreams/cultures/index.html