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Women's Isolation Despite Representing Half of the

Words: 1982 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 28863694

Women's Isolation

Despite representing half of the human population, until very recently women were not afforded the same rights and freedoms as men. Furthermore, in much of the world today women remain marginalized, disenfranchised, and disempowered, and even women in the United States continue to face undue discrimination, whether in the workplace, at home, or in popular culture. However, this should not be taken as a disregarding of the hard-fought accomplishments of women since 1865, because over the course of intervening years, women have managed to gain a number of important rights and advantages. In particular, after spending the nineteenth century largely isolated within the domestic sphere, over the course of the twentieth century women won the right to vote, the right to equal pay and housing, and freedom over their own bodies in the form of birth control. By examining the history of these important developments, one is able…… [Read More]

References

Adams, C. (2003). Women's suffrage: A primary source history of the women's rights movement in america. New York: Rosen Publishing Group.

Chen, L.Y., & Kleiner, B.H. (1998). New developments concerning the equal pay act.

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, 17(1), 13-20.

Gordon, L. (2002). The moral property of women: A history of birth control politics in america.
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Women's Rights in India Violation

Words: 2284 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 93011124

But sometimes the victims themselves are afraid to voice their grievances in the public because speaking up entails shame, ostracization, and even extra-judicial killings. The victims can express their grievances in public "only at certain times and in certain ways" because their rights are infringed on social and cultural levels (Dewey).

The fact that cultural and traditional beliefs and attitudes contribute to violations of women's rights in a systematic manner can be observed by reading literature on the practice of dowry. Many Indian legal and philosophical thinkers use relativistic terms to contest the notion that the practice contributes to the abuse of women. They contest the notion because they argue the concept of human rights is a estern notion, sometimes disregarding cultural variations and sensibilities of the Indian nation (Gupta). The general critique of the concept of human rights as a western notion may be valid in some matters, but…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dewey, Susan. "Dear Dr. Kothari': Sexuality, Violence Against Women, and the Parallel Public Sphere in India." American Ethnologist, 36/1 (2009): 124-139.

Duggal, Ravi. "The Political Economy of Abortion in India: Cost and Expenditure Patterns." Reproductive Health Matters, 12/24 (Nov. 2004): 130-137.

Grewal, Indu and Kishore, J. "Female Foeticide in India." International Humanist and Ethical Union. 1 May 2004. Web. 12 Dec. 2011

Gupta, Nidhi. "Women's Human Rights and the Practice of Dowry in India." Journal of Legal Pluralism and Unofficial Law, 48 (2003): 85-123. Web. 12 Dec. 2011
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Women Participation in Marine Industry the Relation

Words: 2063 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49781867

Women Participation in Marine Industry

The Relation Ship between the Participation of Woman in Maritime Sectors and Various Policy Organizations

Women represent a considerable portion of the world's labor force. However they face the hurdles of wage discrimination, harassment, and occupational segregation which ultimately limit their economic advancement. Historically, marine industry does not tend to be a successful career path for women. However, with the passage of time women have penetrated quite deeply in this marine industry. This essay highlights the participation of women in marine industry and the role played by policy making organizations like International Transport Federation (ITF), Seafarers International Research Center (SIRC), International Labor Organization (ILO), and International Maritime Organization (IMO). It explains the extent to which these various marine bodies are addressing the issue of gender.

The Relation Ship between the Participation of Woman in Maritime Sectors and Various Policy Organizations

Traditionally marine industry has been…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Belcher, P. Sampson, H., Thomas, M., Veiga, J. & Zhao, M. (2003). Women Seafarers: Global

Employment Practices and Policies, Geneva: International Labor Organization.

Dcomm (2003). Women seafarers: Fighting against the tide? As on land, so by sea: Women join

the ranks of seafarers, World of Work Magazine, 49, Retrieved September 29, 2012, from  http://www.ilo.org/global/publications/magazines-and-journals/world-of-work-magazine/articles/WCMS_081322/lang  -- en/index.htm
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Women's Rights After the Civil

Words: 1442 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99684794

This made the United States the only estern nation to criminalize contraception at that time (Time). hile women (and men) continued to illegally access birth control, often using devices labeled differently for contraceptive purposes, it would be decades before birth control could be openly used within the United States. In 1916, Margaret Sanger opens the first birth control clinic in the United States, but it is shut down in 10 days (Time). It was not until 1938 that the federal ban against birth control was lifted by a federal judge (Time).

hile women did not enjoy an abrupt increase in civil rights following the Civil ar, it is important to realize that there was a gradual increase in attention towards civil rights and support for women's rights after the Civil ar. In 1868, the National Labor Union supported equal pay for equal work, which was the first real call for…… [Read More]

Works Cited

A&E Television Networks. "The Fight for Women's Suffrage." History.com. N.p. 2012.

Web. 16 May 2012.

The Prism. "The Path of the Women's Rights Movement: A Timeline of the Women's Rights

Movement 1848-1998." The Prism. N.P. Mar. 1998. Web. 16 May 2012.
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Women's Rights in Her Personal

Words: 1162 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43170342

Women winning the right to vote, far too long after the founding of America, was of course an important 'first step' in ensuring that women become full participants in the American experiment. But understanding the subtle cultural discrimination, as manifest in John Adams' treatment of his wife, and the subsidiary complaints of Stanton, Wollstonecraft, and Woolf also demonstrate that simply passing a law is not enough to change the rights of women. Women have been treated as children, and also viewed as incapable of truly realizing their dreams because of their capacity to be mothers. This has remained unchanged in the cultural discourse and memory in a way that affects all of our perceptions, male and female, and unless we remember this, we may be too easily seduced by the achievements, however remarkable, of a few talented women who have been able to chip away at the 'glass ceiling.'

Part…… [Read More]

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Women's History Phyllis Schlafly Wrote

Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 35754042

Many women took up the cause of temperance. omen like Jane Adams, worked to expose political corruption and economic exploitation and established philanthropic programs for the poor.

By 1900 over one-third of the wage-earning women in this country were employed as domestics or waitresses." As business grew, the privileged class grew. Domestics were in demand and were expected to do every kind of household chore in addition to cooking, serving, laundry, sewing, and anything else required by her mistress.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony in 1865 joined in their work to equalize the rights of men and women. They declared that women had a natural right to happiness, and the opportunities and advantages, and denied that women were made simply for men and that her best interests must be "sacrificed to his will" (Kerber, pg. 225).

In 1923, a feminist conference in Seneca Falls, New York developed a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Modern Feminism and American Society, 1965 to the Present, Publisher, city, date?

Kerber, Linda K. And Jane Sherron DeHart Women's America, Refocusing the Past, Oxford University Press, New York: 1995.
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Women Struggles in EL the Rights of

Words: 1287 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55195335

omen struggles in EL

The rights of women in society have always been a topic shrouded in a great deal of discussion. In many ways women are still struggling for equality within society and will likely continue to struggle for some years to come. The purpose of this discussion is to focus on how this theme of women's rights has informed English Literature and the manner in which it has been expressed including those thing that have changed and those things that have remained constant. More specifically the research will focus on women's rights in English literature from the Romantic Age until the 21st century.

The Romantic Age

In the real of English literature the Romantic age (1789-1830) was an extremely important time because it marked a new birth in the type literature that was written and the manner in which readers were exposed to the literature. As it pertains…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bronte, Charlotte. (1847) Jane Eyre. London, England: Smith, Elder & Co

Rich, A. (1995) Of Woman Born - Motherhood As Experience And Institution

Showalter, E. (1982). A literature of their own. Princeton University Press

Woolf. V. (1989) A Room of Ones Own.
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Women's Philosophy the Issue of

Words: 3162 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 82398577



This brings us to the idea of ideal femininity. What is the ideal woman? What should we expect of the female gender in the new millennium? When comparing the two views above, I would say that Chan's ideal of the woman as one who is worthy of recognition for her efforts in any context is far more valid than that forwarded by Campbell, who creates an emotional victimhood for women. When combining these views, I would say the ideal woman is indeed emotional, but she is also capable of using her emotion to energize her efforts towards the life she desires. Emotion can translate into passion, and I believe that women have a possible advantage here. A woman's emotion for her family can create a passion for creating the perfect home. Her passion to contribute economically to her relationship with her partner or her family can lead to great excellence…… [Read More]

References

Campbell, S. (1994, Summer). Being Dismissed: The Politics of Emotional Expression. Hypatia, Vo. 9, No. 3. Retrieved from: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3810188

Chan, Z. (2002, Nov.) Cooking Soup to Writing Papers: A Journey Through Gender, Society and Self. Journal of International Women's Studies, Vol. 4, No. 1. Retrieved from:  http://vc.bridgew.edu
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Women of the Klan Chances

Words: 2345 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 32123625

Pretention was key because the women knew that the men's focus stayed on preventing race mixing between blacks and whites. To distract the men from the issues that the WKKK were fighting for, they would cleverly get the men to focus on black men trying to flirt or what have you with them. This was just a ploy for them so that they could fully pursue their interests with little or no interference from the men.

Auxiliary or Organization

Clearly, the intent of the KKK was for the women to establish an auxiliary in order to support them. The women had other ideas. The men were used to further the women's cause unknowingly. "Klanswomen embraced the mixture of individualism and deference to authority that characterized the male Klan." (p. 36). The women did not and would not be a support group for the men. They did feel that other races…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Blee, K.M. (2008). Women of the Klan: Racism and Gender in the 1920s (2 ed.). Berkeley: University of California Press.
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Women's Rights During the Nineteenth Century Many

Words: 2436 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17176597

omen's Rights

During the nineteenth century, many accomplishments in women's rights occurred. As a result of these early efforts, women today enjoy many privileges. They are able to vote and become candidates for political elections, as well as own property and enjoy leadership positions.

During the early nineteenth century, the women's rights movement came into effect. omen like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony created many organizations for equality and independence. However, even with these activist groups, victory would not be fast or easy.

Changing social conditions for women during the early nineteenth century, combined with the idea of equality, led to the birth of the woman suffrage movement. For example, women started to receive more education and to take part in reform movements, which involved them in politics. As a result, women started to ask why they were not also allowed to vote.

The Start of the Revolution…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berg, Barbara. The Remembered Gate: Origins of American Feminism. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.

Degler, Carl N. At Odds: Women and the Family in America from the Revolution to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.

Pessen, Edward. Jacksonian America: Society, Personality, and Politics. Homewood, Illinois: Dorsey Press, 1969, 1978.

Ryan, Mary P. Womanhood in America: From Colonial Times to the Present. New York: New Viewpoints, 1979.
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Women Klan Understanding the Women

Words: 1580 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 38125332

Others, however, saw things differently.

Perhaps the clearest way to come to an understanding of the status of the WKK as either an independent or an auxiliary organization is to examine the central philosophies of the two groups. While the leadership of the WKKK by and large supported the racial and religious policies of the larger Ku Klux Klan -- i.e. A mistrust or outright hatred of blacks, Catholics, and Jews -- there were fears that even "Protestant men…were likely to be 'unyielding' in opposition to gender equality since they benefited directly from the current situation" (Blee 1991, pp. 76). Given this level of mistrust and irreconcilable difference, it seems unlikely that the most vocal, staunch, and long-standing members of the WKKK considered themselves a part of the same organization as the man they viewed as their oppressors. Though working in tandem with the Ku Klux Klan and using many…… [Read More]

Reference

Blee, K. (1991). Women of the Klan. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
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Women in Medieval Society During

Words: 1963 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62497475

This gave her husband the right to sell any of her property and she was not in a position to object in any way. Religious women with their vows of obedience and poverty really had no reason to get involved in legal matters and were untouched in any way by the legal structure.

idows were the only women who held in legal position in the society. "She (a widow) regained her legal personality, was entitled to a certain share of her husband's holdings and, for the first time in her life, could make independent decisions." Legally, this was the best position for women. It was not without problems especially for wealthy women. These women were frequently intimidated into a second marriage or into relinquishing parts of their holdings. They had no legal recourse against this kind of intimidation in the same way that married women could not object to domestic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barber, Richard. The Penguin Guide to Medieval Europe. New York: Penguin

Books, 1984.

Conway, Stephen. "Silent Voices: Women in the Middle Ages." 1991.  http://www.subverbis.com/essays/medievalwomen.rtf .

Delort, Robert. Life in the Middle Ages. Trans. Robert Allen. New York:
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Women Prior to Taking This

Words: 1948 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: A-Level Coursework Paper #: 26470927

139). When she is "taken for a man," she is "not fat," because of the different gendered social norms related to body size (Bergman, 2009, p. 139). Thinness is also a type of privilege, as is external or socially acceptable beauty. Beauty ideals and norms are also tied in with race, culture, and class. Economic class and social class often determine access to healthy food, which is why low-income people are more likely to be obese and have related problems. Although generally, African-American women have healthier body images than white women, white cultural hegemony has started to infiltrate black culture, especially in what iley (n.d.) calls "bourgeois black families," (p. 358). iley's (n.d.) experiences reveal the interconnectedness, or intersectionality, between race, class, and gender. Just as it is important to recognize different gendered identities for women from different cultural backgrounds, it is also important to acknowledge that not all women…… [Read More]

References

A, Ijeoma. (n.d.). Because you're a girl.

Bergman, S.B. (2009). Part-time fatso. In The Fat Studies Reader. Eds. Ester Rosenblum and Sandra Solvay. NYU Press.

Douglas, S. (2010). Enlightened sexism.

"Examples of Institutional Heterosexism." Appendix 9H
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Women's Role Edmund Spencer the

Words: 2486 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 56683014

She argues that the evasiveness and incongruites in the narrative exist since Spenser is facing issues that are not easily answered.

From the start, Britomart represents an authority figure, a power not found in any other knight in the Faerie Queene. Spenser says that Britomart literally cannot be beaten, since she carries a powerful magic spear, or phallic symbol (depending on the interpretation) that refers back to the theme of woman's chastity. Britomart easily knocks Sir Guyon off his horse at the beginning of Book 3. She then comes to a castle and once again pushes her authority, characterized as "masculine" with her armor and spear, and confronts six of Malecasta's knights at the Castle Joyous at the end of the first canto.

At last as nigh out of the wood she came,

A stately Castle farre away she spyde,

To which her steps directly she did frame.

That Castle…… [Read More]

References

Abate, Corinne S. Spenser's 'The Faerie Queen. The Explicator 55.1 (1996): 6+.

Heale, Elizabeth. The faerie queene: a reader's guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,

1999.

Spencer, Edmund. The Faerie Queene. Gutenberg. 29 April 2010.  http://www.gutenberg.org
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Women Disability Sexuality and the

Words: 5037 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85099237

Stocker, deaf since birth, admittedly attempted to compensate for her disability, her imperfection, through the relentless pursuit of achieving perfection physically and athletically, and even when she excelled, Stocker confesses, for a long time she remained emotionally tortured by disability for which no amount of body shaping or athletic skill in sports could change that disability (2001, p. 154). Stocker's struggle with her self-image, her identity and hers sexuality were in large part shaped by her disability.

While it is not an attempt here to disparage Stocker, or to belittle the significance of her disability; Stocker is a woman who suffered her hearing impairment from birth. Stocker suffered emotionally as a result of her disability, struggled with it for most of her life in the ways in which it impacted her self-esteem, self-image, and sexuality. So, might not a woman who acquired a disability at that point her life when…… [Read More]

References

 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108011400 

Barker-Benfield, G.J. (2000). The Horrors of the Half-Known Life: Male Attitudes toward Women and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century America. New York: Routledge. Retrieved February 2, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com /PM.qst?a=o&d=108011402" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Women's History Women vs Men

Words: 1344 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 86806380

It is possible that early American history would be taught very differently today if based on history books such as this. To play devil's advocate, there perhaps would have been women historians who agreed with the men's decisions, women historians who did not believe in the actions of their fellow females. Those histories, too, would have had an impact on today's perspective of that period.

Similarly, what would have happened if the topic of women's equality had been covered by a famous female historian who did not support the suffragist cause? The early 1900s saw some women, called the anti-suffragists, who were strongly opposed to giving the vote to their gender. These women were afraid of change and believed the family would fall apart if women could vote. They also feared suffrage would overload women already burdened by their own many responsibilities. They called the suffragists communists, among other things,…… [Read More]

References Cited

Des Jardins, Julie. Women and the Historical Enterprise in America: Gender, Race, and the Politics of Memory, 1880 -- 1945. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003.

Sherr, Lynn. Failure is Impossible. New York: Random House, 1995.

Weatherford, Doris. A History of the American Suffragist Movement. Santa Barbara, CA:

ABC-CLIO, 1998.
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Women's Education 1840s an Analysis of Women's

Words: 888 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33826392

Women's Education 1840s

An Analysis of Women's Education in the 1840s

Women in both Britain and America were set to receive greater attention in the realm of academia in the 1840s than they had in decades prior. The Bronte sisters had both begun their writing careers that same decade and Elizabeth Gaskell's first novel was published at the end of it. Mary Shelley had been writing for nearly three decades already -- Frankenstein being published a year after the death of Jane Austen. Women of letters had obviously received an education -- but from where? This paper will look at women's education in the 1840s and show how it was changing.

Changes

Jane Sherzer (1916) notes that "in West Virginia, in Southern Indiana and Illinois there were no schools for the higher education of women up to 1840" (p. 1), however, she adds that "early in 1840, in Indiana there…… [Read More]

Reference List

Sherzer, J. (1916). The Higher Education of Women in the Ohio Valley. Ohio Archeological and Historical Quarterly 25(1): 1-22.

Solomon, B.M. (1985). In the Company of Educated Women. Yale University Press.

Tennyson, A.L. (1847). The Princess: A Medley. Boston, MA: Ticknor and Fields.
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Women's Issues Women's Education in

Words: 686 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 39074769

While in 1971 only 22% of Indian women were literate, by the end of 2001 54.16% female were literate. The growth of female literacy rate is 14.87% as compared to 11.72% of that of male literacy rate (Women's Education in India, n.d.).

Women's education in India has played a very important role in the overall development of the country. It has not only helped in the development of half of the human resources, but in improving the quality of life both inside and outside the home. Educated women tend to promote education of their girl children while providing better guidance to all their children. Furthermore educated women can also help in the reduction of infant mortality rate and growth of the population. Gender discrimination is still a major problem in India and lot more needs to be done in the field of women's education in India. The gap between the…… [Read More]

References

Velkoff, Victoria A. (1998). Retrieved November 30, 2009, from Web site:

 http://www.census.gov/ipc/prod/wid-9801.pdf 

Women's Education in India. (n.d.). Retrieved November 30, 2009, from India Education Web

site: http://www.indiaedu.com/education-india/women-edu.html
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Women's Movement Triumph Over History

Words: 2200 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 3844246

Support like this was not uncommon. omen were demonstrating how useful they could become and by asserting their knowledge along with their feminine nature, they were showing men they could be a positive influence on society. As the effort grew, it became more organized and it gained momentum. In 1869, Lucy Stone helped establish the American oman Suffrage Association (ASA), which worked for women's right to vote. The association became a powerful force behind the women's movement. Its main goal was to force individual states to grant women the right to vote to women. In 1890, the ASA joined with the National oman Suffrage Association, which Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Stanton formed in 1869. The new organization was called the National American oman Suffrage Association, and it held conventions, waged voting campaigns and distributed literature in support of women's voting rights.

The Equal Rights amendment was passed in 1972.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anthony, Susan B. "Declaration of Rights of the Women of the United States 4 July 1876."

Rutgers University Online Database. 06 May, 2010. Web.

http://ecssba.rutgers.edu/docs/decl.html

Binder, Frederick. The Way We Lived D.C. Heath and Company. 1994. Print.
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Women in Education Educational Opportunities

Words: 2563 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 3124359

The disparity in income of male vs. female heads of household is striking. Analysis of census data revealed that, in 1949, approximately thirty percent of households headed by white males were living in poverty, compared to just under thirteen percent a decade later. For women, more than half lived in poverty in 1949; by 1959, that figure declined to thirty-eight percent. The prosperity of the 1950s was not universally enjoyed. Female heads of household at the end of the decade were not better off than their male counterparts had been ten years earlier.

Financing for decent, inexpensive homes was readily available to servicemen returning from World War II. Coontz (1992) argued that this boom in home ownership led to "increasingly pervasive and sophisticated marketing [that] contributed to socially constructed perceptions of "need" and to unprecedented levels of consumer debt (Edwards, 2001). It was new consumer values that helped propel mothers…… [Read More]

References

Coontz, S. (2000). The way we never were: American families and the nostalgia trap. [Amazon

Kindle editions version.

Delmont, S. (1996). A woman's place in education. Great Britain: Avebury.

Edwards, M.E. (2001). Home ownership, affordability, and mothers' changing work and family roles. Social Science Quarterly, 82 (2), 369-383.
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Women and the Enlightenment the

Words: 1350 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 53346087

" (Janes, 1978) It was also not due to Wollstonecraft's "assertion that the 'sexes were equal" or due to her demand for opportunities for education for women. The proposals stated by Wollstonecraft for education met with public approval and her political and economic views are stated to have "...excited little negative or positive comment at the time of publication." (Janes, 1978) In fact, it is stated by Janes (1978) that the "element that cam disturbingly close to men's bosoms was the attack on the sexual character of women, the denial that a peculiarly feminine cast of mind was desirable." (Janes, 1978)

III. Nicholson (1990)

The work of Nicholson (1990) entitled: "The Eleventh Commandment: Sex and Spirit in Wollstonecraft and Malthus" that Wollstonecraft "reaches a concept of female emancipation hardly realized in nearly 200 years...by rigorous deduction from her image of God." However, Wollstonecraft's sexual argument is stated to hinge "on…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barker-Benfield, G.J. (1989) Mary Wollstonecraft: Eighteenth-Century Commonwealthwoman," Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 50, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1989): 95-115.

Ferguson, Susan (1999)The Radical Ideas of Mary Wollstonecraft," Canadian Journal of Political Science / Revue canadienne de science politique, vol. 32, no. 3 (Sep., 1999): 427-50.

Nicholson, Mervyn (1990) The Eleventh Commandment: Sex and Spirit in Wollstonecraft and Malthus," Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 51, no. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1990):. 401-21.

Janes, R.M. (1978) On the Reception of Mary Wollstonecraft's: A Vindication of the Rights of Woman," Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 39, no. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 1978): 293-302.
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Women's Rights in the Twentieth

Words: 557 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5601044



In 1963, the Equal Pay Act equalized pay between men and women by law, but did not apply to many types of employment such as administrators, professionals, and executives. The following year, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed discrimination based on gender (and race), in conjunction with the creation of the Equal

Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to enforce employment rights and redress violations of law in that regard.

Homophobia, Limitations of Equality, and Room for Future Improvement:

Today, American women enjoy most of the same rights and privileges and men, although certain inequalities still persist. In a practical sense, female wages still lag substantially behind many of their male counterparts in wages in non-regulated employment areas. One of the areas in which civil rights and privileges still reflect considerable inequality is in the realm of same-sex unions. While some states recognize the equality of same-sex couples…… [Read More]

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Women's Suffrage in Indiana in

Words: 1610 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 39056313

432). In fact, northwest Indiana became home to several literary and cultural groups for women over the second half of the nineteenth century (Croly). Among these were The Helen Hunt Club of Cambridge City, which originally began as The Two O'clock Club, who stated that "ith an earnest desire to obtain a higher degree of literary culture, a greater fund of knowledge, and a better appreciation of the dignity of womanhood, we associate ourselves together as a club" (Croly, 436). This club did not even restrict itself to esoteric pursuits, but actively engaged in a political and historical study and analysis of the United States, which necessarily colored their perspectives and enlightened them on current political issues such as the suffrage movement (Croly, 436).

No human issue exists in a vacuum. Intermingled with the issue of women's suffrage we find issues of women's education, rights to property, and a host…… [Read More]

Works Cited

J.C. Croly. The History of the Women's Club Movement n America. New York, NY: H.G. Allen & Company, 1898. Accessed online 24 February 2009. http://asp6new.alexanderstreet.com+wam2.object.details.aspx?dorpid=1000672402

Elizabeth Cody Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage, eds. History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 1: 1848-1861. New York, NY: Fowler and Wells, Publishers, 1881. Accessed online 24 February 2009. http://asp6new.alexanderstreet.com+wam2.object.details.aspx?dorpid=1000685759

M.G. Stapler, ed. Women's Suffrage Yearbook. New York: National Woman Suffrage Pub. Co., 1917. Accessed online 24 February 2009. www.everydaylife.amdigital.co.uk+Document.aspx?docref=TheWomanSuffrageYearBook1917
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Women's Suffrage Movement in the

Words: 2295 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31382692

This public visibility had an extremely positive effect on the movement, reaching people their more passive campaign would never have touched.

Needless to say, the strategy of marching in the streets was not one typically associated with normal female behavior. Yet, through this brazen tactic, suffragists were able to elevate their public image to a position where they were seen as legitimate participants in the public political arena. Onlookers began to see suffragists as serious and dignified, and as individuals who had courage to make public appearances, presenting themselves to onlookers (McCammon). Much of the effectiveness of these parades was due to the manner in which they were held.

As McCammon notes, woman suffrage parades were neither festive nor frivolous. The women typically marched in formation. They wore white dresses and carried signs and banners stating reasons why women should have the right to vote. In eastern parades, primarily, a…… [Read More]

References

Beck, E., Dorsey, E., & Stutters, a. "The Women's Suffrage Movement: Lessons for Social Action." Journal of Community Practice 11(3) 2003: p. 13-33. Academic Search Premier database. EBSCOHost. University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ. March 9, 2008  http://web.ebscohost.com .

Borda, J. "The Woman Suffrage Parades of 1910-1913." Western Journal of Communication 66(1) Winter 2002: p. 25-52. Academic Search Premier database. EBSCOHost. University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ. March 9, 2008
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Women's Culture in Iran Westerners

Words: 1108 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 88213092

It should be pointed out, however, that many of these issues exist for women in developed countries such as the United States.

Voices from Iran, however, also looks at aspects of Iranian women's power and influence, an issue that often receives little notice with Western scholars and activists. Iranian wives, the interviewees point out, possess a great influence over their husbands, giving them great power within their families. Among younger generations, women have made strides towards amassing greater social capital, through institutions such as education.

More than fifty percent of new college admissions, for example, are female students. After the Islamic Revolution (1978-1979), and the following war with Iraq, female college graduates began to enter emerging businesses and industries. Many women, for example, enter the publishing industry, open private medical clinics or enter artistic fields such as film. Younger women have turned to writing and graphic design. This influx has…… [Read More]

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Woman in Slavery A Body

Words: 815 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 87476162

"

The lack of authority over the slave woman's body is exemplified by an 1850 daguerrotype of a young slave woman named Delia, found in the photo history of the era at the Peabody Museum (Sterling and ashington18). Delia was a slave girl in Columbia, South Carolina, and belonged to an owner named B.F. Taylor (18). She was "ordered" to pose partially dressed, nude to her waist (in the picture in Sterling's book), for purposes of "scientific studies (18-19)." The photographer, Louis Agassiz, a Harvard University professor, wanted to "study the anatomical details of the 'African race' to bolster his theory that blacks were a separate species, separately created (19)." As the authors of the book, e Are Your Sisters: Black omen in the Nineteenth Century, Dorothy Sterling and Mary Helen ashington (1997) note that Delia no doubt experienced humiliation during the photo session, but the photograph portrays a young…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Appleton, Thomas H. And Boswell, Angela. Searching for their Places: Women in the South Across Four Centuries. University of Missouri Press, 2003. Print.

Coontz, Stephanie. The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia

Trap. Basic Books, 2000. Print.

Jacobs, Harriet Ann. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Prestwick House, Inc., 2006.
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Women's Rights Cases for Gender

Words: 4162 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 90558822

The United States Supreme Court ruled in favor of Illinois and argued that the Fourteenth Amendment was designed to protect against race discrimination only…" Gibson, 2007, Background to Muller v. Oregon section ¶ 1). The Court ruled that the Fourteenth Amendment did not include the protection of women's rights.

The following depicts Justice Bradley's concurring opinion regarding Bradwell's

Man is, or should be, woman's protector and defender. The natural and proper timidity and delicacy which belongs to the female sex evidently unfits it for many of the occupations of civil life. The constitution of the family organization, which is founded in the divine ordinance, as well in the nature of things, indicates the domestic sphere as that which properly belongs to the domain and functions of womanhood.... The paramount destiny and mission of woman are to fulfill the noble and benign offices of wife and mother. This is the law…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Babcock, Barbara Allen. (1975). Sex Discrimination and the Law: Causes. Retrieved April 3,

2009, from  http://books.google.com/books?id=pi5AAAAAIAAJ&q=Liberti+v.+York&dq=Li 

erti+v.+York&lr=&ei=ub3YScLeEIqKNKT3vIAD&pgis=1

The Columbia World of Quotations. (1996). Columbia University Press. New York.
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Women's History

Words: 2097 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 82218295

Women's History

The passing of time does not necessarily denote progress: women made little noticeable social and economic advancement and almost no political or legal advancements between the European settlements of Jamestown in 1607 until the end of the Reconstruction era in 1877. In fact, most Native American women lost a considerable degree of power and status due to the imposition of European social values on their traditional cultures. African women, brought to the New World against their will and in bondage, likewise did not enjoy the fruits of social progress. White women of European descent, however, did make some progress over the course of more than two centuries of early American history. Divorce laws became more favorable toward women, who over the course of these few centuries were increasingly able to extricate themselves from violent, abusive, or unsatisfying unions. However, divorce laws were one of the only legal progress…… [Read More]

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Women's Studies Gender and the

Words: 2891 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 73045139

As in most other places around the world, the demands of family - caring for children, keeping house, obtaining and preparing food for meals - fall predominantly on women. In the case of Cuba this situation is made worse by the distortions of the communistic economy:

People's motivation to work waned as there was little to work for. Money came to have little meaning in the legal economy - but not by design as, according to Marxism, it was supposed to do in a utopian communist society. There simply was little to buy through officially sanctioned channels, and the government provided most social needs gratis or for minimum fees. Under the circumstances, material as well as moral incentives became ineffective in the legal economy. The burdens of sheer survival and transport difficulties also led people to miss work with increased regularity, above all women on whom the burdens fell most.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

 http://www.questia.com /PM.qst?a=o&d=5020460643" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Women and Outsourcing

Words: 3390 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 84353288

Women in the Major Religions

The role of women in organized religion has been an issue of discussion and debate for many years. It gained significant attention as the "women's rights" movement gathered momentum, and it has been fueled further by recent global events. After the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, interest in religious practices in Afghanistan gathered a lot of attention. That is because the recently deposed Taliban government had extremely harsh restrictions on virtually every aspects of an Afghan woman's life.

While most people realized that the Taliban held an extremely distorted view of what the life of a Moslem woman should be, many people didn't know what a more reasonable interpretation of women's role would be within Islam. In addition, little mention was given in the media to the role of women in other major religions.

This paper will look at how…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Arin, Canan, "Far Reaching Reforms-Legal Rights of Women in Turkey." Manushi, January, 1998, pp 12-18.

Author not available. "What the Koran Says About Women." Christian Science Monitor. December 19, 2001.

Author not available. "Women in the Church: Scriptural Principles and Ecclesial Practice, Part III." A Report of the Commission on Theology and Church Relations of the Lutheran Church -- Missouri Synod. September, 1985.

Author not available. "Woman's ordination: Rome's Position on Women's Ordination." Report of the Women's Ordination Conference. Accessed via the internet 2/16/02.
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Women and Islam the Western

Words: 4510 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52859105

Esposito finds that the premodernist revival movements of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries contributed to the pattern of Islamic politics that developed and left a legacy for the twentieth century. These movements were motivated primarily in response to internal decay rather than external, colonial threat (Esposito 40-41).

At the same time, many areas of the Islamic world experienced the impact of the economic and military challenge of an emerging and modernizing est beginning in the eighteenth century. Declining Muslim fortunes also reversed the relationship of the Islamic world to the est, from that of an expanding offensive movement to a defensive posture. Muslim responses to these changes ranged from rejection to adaptation, from Islamic withdrawal to acculturation and reform. Some responded by secular reform, and by the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Islamic modernist movements had also developed in an attempt to bridge the gap between tradition and modernity…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ahmed, Leila. Women and Gender in Islam: Historical Roots of a Modern Debate. New Haven: Yale University, 1992.

Binder, Leonard.

Islamic Liberalism. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1988.

Eickelman, Dale F. The Middle East: An Anthropological Approach. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1989.
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Women as Rabbis the Ordination

Words: 3899 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85405568

Conservative Jews use a different prayer book and have somewhat shorter services. Some of the prayers are in English, while in the Orthodox synagogue the entire service is in Hebrew.

Reform Jews take a radical approach and declare that revelation is not central to belief and that even the commandments in the Torah can be discarded if they conflict with the demands of modern living. Reformed Jews agree that God may have revealed Himself to Moses, but they deny that God revealed the Torah as an eternal covenant with His people.

In America, the different Jewish sects have taken a different approach to maintaining their specific community and have shaped their different synagogues to reflect differences in belief. Reform and Conservative synagogues have no separate section for men and women, who sit together during the services. In Orthodox practice, separation of the sexes is an absolute law. The reason given…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adler, Ruth. Engendering Judaism: An Inclusive Theology and Ethics. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 1998.

Asheri, Michael. Living Jewish. New York: Everest House, 1978.

Bronner, Leila Leah. From Eve to Esther: Rabbinic Reconstructions of Biblical Women. Louisville, Kentucky: Westminster/John Knox Press, 1994.

Darr, Katheryn Pfisterer. Far More Precious Than Jewels. Louisville, Kentucky: Westminster/John Knox, 1991.
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Women Called to Witness by Nancy a Hardesty Second Edition

Words: 2542 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 86234799

Women Called to Witness by Nancy a. Hardesty, Second Edition

The biblical feminists of today reinterpret the original scriptures with reference to women while trying to find religious reasons for their actions. An example of this is Women Called to Witness: Evangelical Feminism in the Nineteenth Century by Nancy Hardesty, as also other writers like Lucretia Mott, the Grimke sisters and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. It is suggested by the book that the motivation of women leading the fights for temperance, female ordination, abolition and women suffrage in the beginning of the nineteenth century was from their evangelical Christian faith. 1 The Second Great awakening revivals touched the lives of each of these great warriors. The author proves that the traditional, evangelical activist was as intelligent as the Christian feminist. The differences between public and private, male and female, and politics and religion that were defined through the Industrial evolution were…… [Read More]

References

Hardesty, Nancy A. 1984. Women Called to Witness: Evangelical Feminism in the Nineteenth Century. Nashville: Abingdon Press.
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Women in 20th Century Canadian Society

Words: 2218 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32832303

Women in 20th Century Canadian Society: Social Conventions and Change

20th century society placed Canadian women within restrictive conventions and norms. There was a very pronounced domestic expectation placed upon women that they would have jobs or careers, but only until they married. Once married, the expectation was that they would abandon their careers to be housewives, working within the domestic sphere of the home, cooking and cleaning and tending to the general needs of the family. During this period, the expectation was that the husband and father was the man of the house and the sole financial provider or “breadwinner” for the family. Given the narrowness of existence for these women, and how limited their choices were, their reactions to this type of domestic captivity were all very diverse. Some women responded to the limiting social conventions by conforming to the expectations placed upon them, while others made great…… [Read More]

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Women and Religion

Words: 624 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99253924

Women involving in religious issues have been within the abundant concerns in religious studies. In the context of several literatures speaking about women and religion, it can be inferred that the issues discussed on women and religion may have emerged from the norm that we have come to grow with, in that men are the customary gender that enter religious vocations and vows, and that men dominates religions.

All of the major world religions deprecate women to some degree.

The above statement is an assertion indicated in a web site with the subject of Women and Religion. Some perspectives claim the unacceptability of women being engaged in religious activities, while others support the purpose of women in religion. My perspective on this subject is that men and women are of equal rights. Hence, women deserve to have equal opportunities and rights in religion.

There are several feminist groups that have…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Lewis, Jone Johnson. Comments on Genesis - Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

2003. Women's History. 07 Jan 2004.  http://womenshistory.about.com/library/etext/blwomansbible02a1.htm 

Women and Religion.

Sacred Text. 07 Jan 2004.  http://www.sacred-texts.com/wmn
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Women's Issues When the Term

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Interview Paper #: 78793662

However, Suzanne is a white woman. Obviously, a woman of color would have had a different experience in that same time period, because there were not darker skinned women in powerful roles in the media. When they did appear, they may have been relegated to subservient positions or be women with very Caucasian features, like Dorothy Dandridge. Therefore, it is important to keep in mind that Suzanne's experience is probably not reflective of all women of her time period.

In fact, to me it appears clear that media images are another issue that could be seen as a comparable harmless or less important inequality rather than an evil. For instance, "North American feminism, in particular, has focused on securing equal political and economic rights for women (inequalities) and prioritized these problems rather than focusing on domestic violence and traffic in women and girls (evils)" (Brennan, 2009, p. 146). While women…… [Read More]

Role of the Media in Woman's Self-Image

Another interesting historical factor in Suzanne's interview is that the media impacted her self-image in an almost miniscule way. Suzanne pointed out that the women of her time period reflected real women, seeming to suggest that the pressure that modern women feel to be size 0 or have plastic parts did not exist during her time period. However, Suzanne is a white woman. Obviously, a woman of color would have had a different experience in that same time period, because there were not darker skinned women in powerful roles in the media. When they did appear, they may have been relegated to subservient positions or be women with very Caucasian features, like Dorothy Dandridge. Therefore, it is important to keep in mind that Suzanne's experience is probably not reflective of all women of her time period.

In fact, to me it appears clear that media images are another issue that could be seen as a comparable harmless or less important inequality rather than an evil. For instance, "North American feminism, in particular, has focused on securing equal political and economic rights for women (inequalities) and prioritized these problems rather than focusing on domestic violence and traffic in women and girls (evils)" (Brennan, 2009, p. 146). While women are objectified often in media and are faced with many issues that affect self-image and self-esteem, these are not necessarily issues to be addressed by the feminist movement. Instead, the attitudes of women and men should be changed on a larger scale in order for this aspect of society and American culture to be altered.
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Women First Wave Susan B

Words: 1812 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Reaction Paper Paper #: 15247087

She is the daughter of Alice Walker, who wrote the Color Purple. She took her mother's maiden name at the age of 18. Rebecca graduated cum laude from Yale University in 1993, and moved on to co-found the Third Wave Foundation. She is considered to be one of the founding leaders of third-wave feminism. In addition to her contributing editorship for Ms. Magazine, Walker's work has also been published by Harper's, Essence, Glamour, Interview, Buddhadharma, Vibe, Child, and Mademoiselle magazines. Her relationship with her mother has been strained because of various public indictments the younger Walker made against her. Nevertheless, some believe that Rebecca might not have been as famous or powerful today without her ties to the illustrious Alice Walker.

Jennifer Baumgardner is a prominent voice for women and girls. She works as a writer, speaker and activist. During 1993-1997, she worked as the youngest editor at Ms. Magazine,…… [Read More]

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Women's Movement

Words: 612 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 93274418

WOMEN'S MODEN HISTOY

Women's Issues

Critical Moments in Women's Modern History

Critical Moments in Women's Modern History

In the United States of America, for the first time in its short history, there is a convention held in Seneca Falls, NY for women's rights.

In Brooklyn, NY, Margaret Sanger opens the first clinic to offer birth control in the United States. The clinic was shut down and she was arrested ten days later.

Title VII of the Civil ights Act formally makes illegal discrimination with respect to employment on the basis of race and sex. Title VII simultaneously establishes the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Women have held the position of Secretary of State to the President of the United States.

The convention for women's rights is included on the timeline because this is the first time in the prominent country of the U.S.A. that women have formally gathered under the transparent…… [Read More]

References:

Information Please Database. (2007). Women's Rights Movement in the U.S. Pearson Education, Web, Available from:  http://www.infoplease.com/spot/womenstimeline3.html . 2013 January 19.

Wolf, N. (1999). Timeline Special: Women in the United States. The New York Times, Web, Available from:  http://www.nytimes.com/library/magazine/millennium/m2/wolf-timeline.html . 2013 January 19.
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Women in History Problem of

Words: 2121 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 50192508

Author Goldman continues, "ather than assuming that all women are incapable of performance by virtue of the average woman's lack of capability, specific requirements should serve as the selection criteria, not gender" (Goldman 271). Gender should not matter if it does not matter to the women who want to join.

The government could open up more combat jobs to women to help solve the problem, and women who were interested in combat positions should be encouraged to serve in the armed forces. Indeed, in their own study, the government found that with the right training, women's physical capabilities can increase. Another author notes, "An Army esearch Institute of Environmental Medicine report (January 26, 1996) shows that intensive training of motivated women can increase their physical abilities" (Jernigan 51). Thus, physical limitations are simply an excuse many people use to argue against women in the military. Even the military itself recognizes…… [Read More]

References

Goldman, Nancy Loring, ed. Female Soldiers -- Combatants or Noncombatants?: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1982.

Jernigan, Pat. "Women at War: Gender Issues of Americans in Combat." Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military 19.1 (2001): 51.

Marley, David John. "Phyllis Schlafly's Battle against the ERA and Women in the Military." Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military 18.2 (2000):

Toktas, Sule. "Nationalism, Militarism and Gender Politics: Women in the Military." Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military 20.2 (2002): 29+.
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Women in History

Words: 2541 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 20379272

women in the American est during the estward movement. Specifically, it will discuss historic evidence to support the position that the westward movement did indeed transform the traditional roles of American women, just as it transformed the American est. omen traveling west during the estward movement created opportunities for themselves, became active in business and politics, and created new and exciting lives for themselves. These women transformed how America looked at women, and how women looked at themselves, which was probably the most important transformation of all.

The estward movement began in the early 1800s, after the explorers Lewis and Clark opened up the first trail from St. Louis Missouri to Oregon, and proved overland travel was possible, if not difficult. Migrants began heading for Oregon and other areas of the est as early as the 1830s - in fact, the first women to cross the Continental Divide were Eliza…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Armitage, Susan, and Elizabeth Jameson. The Women's West. Norman, OK: The University of Oklahoma Press, 1988.

Butler, Anne M., and Ona Siporin. Uncommon Common Women: Ordinary Lives of the West. Logan, UT: Utah State University Press, 1996.

Morris, Esther, and Carrie Chapman Catt. "Winning the Vote in the West." Women of the West. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 1998. 75-86.

Myres, Sandra L. Westering Women and the Frontier Experience, 1800-1915. Eds. Ray Allen Billington, et al. 1st ed. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico, 1982.
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Woman Question Float John Stuart

Words: 560 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19385440

Thus, due to women's continued dependence on men in order to survive in society, women inadvertently helped create the thinking that they cannot survive and live within their own means, not without the help of society, most particularly, men. Mill's discussion of male-female relations may be blatantly honest in acknowledging women oppression, but his arguments were strong in that he was able to specifically determine the factor which made women suppressed by men (that is, socio-economical dependence).

Elizabeth Browning had been aware of the plight of the women sector in her society. While Mill's analysis showed that women were subjugated by men because they are dependent on males socio-economically, Browning's explication in the poem "Aurora Leigh" illustrated how oppression had been able to penetrate and affect the mindset of women, who feel that their oppression was inherent and part of being a woman. This was reflected in her assertion that…… [Read More]

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Women and Gender International Human Rights

Words: 5450 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39241588

International Human ights, Women and Gender

International Human ights: Women and Gender

Women are the most assaulted segment of the human society. A shocking statistic reveals that a majority of the females are subjected to violence and sexual violence by the time they reach their late teens (Fergus, 2012).

Definitions of Violence against women, constitutes the mental and physical torture they are subjected to by way of restricting their right to freedom in the broader sense of the term. The crimes and exploitation against younger girls implies, by definition, violence based on gender discrimination. It has been observed that this act of violence is fallout of the negligence shown towards equality of the female child and womenfolk in general (Fergus, 2012).

The act of violence exposes the women and specifically the younger female child to isolation, loss of identity, unhealthy overall development, psychological and social stigma (WHO, 2006) and hence…… [Read More]

References

Arbour, L. (2007). Human Rights. Yes! Human Rights Resource Center, University of Minnesota.

Bhattacharya, D. (2013). Global Health Disputes and Disparities: A Critical Appraisal of International Law and Population Health. Routledge.

CEDAW (n.d.). Strengthening Health System Responses to Gender-based Violence in Eastern Europe & Central Asia: A programmatic package. A United Nations Publication.

CEDAW. (2010). General recommendation No. 28 on the core obligations of States parties under article 2 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. United Nations Publications.
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Women and the Economy

Words: 1812 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71605597

Pursuit of Equity: Women, Men, and the Quest for Economic Citizenship in Twentieth Century America, the social historian Alice Kessler-Harris clearly defines the intertwined relationship between full political citizenship in America and full economic citizenship in America. Women's citizenship, that is, full participation in the sphere related to articulating one's political rights, was once often seen as coming to its full fruition after women won the right to vote. However, Kessler-Harris makes clear that even today, because women's work is not perceived as being as necessary and as legitimate as work performed by men, women laborers continue to be discriminated against in political legislation. This discrimination is not only evident in terms of the way that women are treated at work. t is still incorporated and woven into the fabric of pre-existing political social legislation, ideology and rhetoric meant to address the inequities of the workforce. Social Security is only…… [Read More]

In recent years, more and more men have taken on housekeeping duties, and even, in the recent economic downturn evident in America, become full-time child care providers themselves. This has expanded the notion of what constitutes a head of household, and thus changed and shifted the notion of what it means to be a worker in America. Work is not only quantifiable in terms of paid employment. Furthermore, the challenge posed by non-white workers and women to the current feminist movement has made the country more socially aware of such political blindness. The 'right to work' has been a right 'enjoyed' by many non-white women for some years -- however, the right to education and professional work has come to these women with far greater difficulty. However, if these social shifts will change the fundamental political structure of the nation and give rise to a gender-neutral economic citizenship for all laborers still remains to be seen in the future.

Alice Kessler-Harris, In Pursuit of Equity: Men, Women, and the Quest for Economic Citizenship in America, New York: Oxford University Press, 2001, p.20.

Ibid., pp.173-175; 199-200.
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Women With HIV Have Reproductive

Words: 3942 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18245249

" (International Conference on Population and Development ICPD) (ibid)

However the meaning of reproductive right extends into other areas. For example, this includes the right to non-discrimination based on sex/gender and the right to privacy as well as the right to information. The issue of the reproductive rights for women becomes problematic and often fraught with controversy when it is applied to those infected with the HIV virus. This dilemma has far-reaching implications for the millions of women with HIV throughout the world.

3.2. Different perspectives

The different views on the subject of reproductive rights range from the more conservative view that all reproductive rights should be denied in Women with HIV to more perceptive views that links the denial of reproductive rights to other human rights issues. For example, one view from a survey conducted by the International Community of Women Living with HIV / AIDS (ICW) states that,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Albury, R.M. (1999). Beyond the Slogans. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin.

Almond, B., & Ulanowsky, C. (1990). HIV and Pregnancy. The Hastings Center Report, 20(2), 16+. Retrieved June 15, 2005, from Questia database,  http://www.questia.com .

Amaro, H., & Raj, a. (2000). On the Margin: Power and Women's HIV Risk Reduction Strategies. 723. Retrieved June 15, 2005, from Questia database,
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Women Work and Childcare Issues

Words: 1705 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87323800

Women are just as capable (and more capable in some areas) as men are, and they should be treated equally in the workplace. In addition, men should take on some of the household duties, and women should have more than simply part-time opportunities open to them. The Canadian economy is facing many threats from overseas, and to devalue women and the contribution they could make is shortchanging Canadian women, and keeping the Canadian economy in a 20th century mentality when it needs to move along, modernize, and look toward the future. Childcare must move into the 21st century, as well, and there should be enough childcare for all the families who need it, at a low cost, so women can truly afford to work outside the home.

eferences

Caplin, E. (2003, January/February). Canadian rights for women worldwide. Canadian Speeches, 16, 60+.

Dhruvarajan, V. And Vickers, J. (2002). Gender, race, and…… [Read More]

References

Caplin, E. (2003, January/February). Canadian rights for women worldwide. Canadian Speeches, 16, 60+.

Dhruvarajan, V. And Vickers, J. (2002). Gender, race, and nation: A global perspective.

Fenwick, T. (2004). 8 Gender and the new economy- Enterprise discourses in Canada: implications for workplace learning and education. In Globalizing Education for Work: Comparative Perspectives on Gender and the New Economy, Lakes, R.D. & Carter, P.A. (Eds.) (pp. 131-152). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Kainer, J. (2003). Valuation, resistance and women's work: A review essay. Journal of Canadian Studies. 1-9.
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Women Serving in the Infantry

Words: 2412 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 88624709

Female Soldiers in the Contemporary Society

Implementation

Effectiveness of having women soldiers

Impediments preventing female soldiers from being considered equal

Typical solutions

Education as the solution

There is much controversy regarding the presence of women in the military, in spite of the fact that the contemporary society has reached a particularly advanced level of civilization. Although women tended to be discriminated when being involved in military corps over the years, some situations required their presence and thus made it mandatory for men to accept them. The military in general acknowledged the important role that women can play in the army but there is still a lot to do in order for them to actually be appreciated for their abilities. Education is the key to better integrating women in the military and in order for army corps to be as effective as possible individuals who are part of them have to…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Agosin, M. (2001). Women, Gender, and Human Rights: A Global Perspective. Rutgers University Press

Benatar, D. (2012). The Second Sexism: Discrimination Against Men and Boys. John Wiley & Sons.

Irby, I. "FET' to fight: Female Engagement Team makes history." Retrieved August 14, 2013, from  http://www.army.mil/article/101111/ 

Lapidus, L.M. "How far has the women's movement moved in the last 40 years?." Retrieved August 14, 2013, from  http://www.trust.org/item/20130425123242-hj209/
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Women in Candide Is a

Words: 2153 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 27333786

he has lived through violence, rape, slavery, and betrayal and seen the ravages of war and greed. The old woman's story also functions as a criticism of religious hypocrisy. he is the daughter of the Pope, the most prominent member of the Catholic Church. The Pope has not only violated his vow of celibacy, but has also proven unable and unwilling to protect his daughter from the misfortunes that befell her.

Candide also displays this sense of hope in light of his many hardships. He honors his commitment to marry Cunegonde at the end of the story despite the physical abnormalities that have plagued her. Cunegonde is a young and beautiful woman at the beginning of Candide. Mirroring Candide's naive optimism, their love plays out in unrealistic romantic cliches: a blush, a dropped handkerchief, a surreptitious kiss behind a screen. However, this romance in the shelter of the Baron's estate…… [Read More]

Stromberg, Roland. "The Philosophes and the French Revolution: Reflections on Some Recent Research." Eighteenth-Century Studies 21: 321-339.

"Francois-Marie Arouet Voltaire" Literature Network

 http://www.online-literature.com/voltaire/
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Women Empowerment in Iran

Words: 3007 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12831759

In order to understand the position of women in Iran as far as their roles, rights and empowerment is concerned, it is significant to understand the wider picture of the prevailing condition in the Middle East and the contrast that there is in the West. These two represent different polarities in the context of culture, perspective on women, roles assigned, rights granted and the positions that women hold in these two societies. There is a still not an in depth understanding of the lives of women in the Middle East and the roles that they are meant to play. In majority of the societies therein, women are hardly seen carrying out any meaningful role, let alone being heard. They are assigned a background role in this Muslim world and the persistent stereotypes and judgments about the social practices form a single dimensional depiction of women that rarely reflects the real…… [Read More]

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Harold Smith on Women's Suffrage

Words: 1884 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17251858

omen's Suffrage in the UK

Harold Smith emphasizes that the origins of the women's suffrage campaign in Victorian England stemmed from a larger campaign for reform concerning the franchise in general. Smith is, in fact, careful to note at the very beginning of his study that there has been a recent historiographical shift, which emphasizes the "specifically women's protest against a gender system" by adding some distance between women's suffrage and the different (but related) campaigns for electoral reform in the U.K. In the earlier nineteenth century (Smith 7). In the first three decades of the nineteenth century, for example, British qualifications to vote were determined not only by gender (males only) but also by property ownership and monetary worth, meaning that effectively speaking only 3% of the adult male population could vote. (There were also additional difficulties in this period related to religious qualifications for electoral office: until 1829,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Smith, Harold. The British Women's Suffrage Campaign, 1866-1928. Second edition. New York: Pearson, 2007. Print.
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How Women Achieved Educational Opportunities in the 19th Century

Words: 780 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 27383962

omen in Higher Education -- 1785-1890

Higher educational opportunities for women in the U.S. were scarce in the late 18th century through the nineteenth century, and even into the 20th century as well. omen were expected to stay in the home, raise the children, cook and clean for the husband, not go out and get an advanced education. This paper reflects the few opportunities that were available to women and how those opportunities were seized upon by women eager to better themselves and pursue careers -- notwithstanding firm resistance by society and by colleges and universities run by men.

omen and Higher Education by 1860

In his book A History of American Higher Education, author John Thelin points out that by 1860, just before the Civil ar, there were "…at lease forty-five institutions" that were offering college and university degrees to women (Thelin, 2012). Those higher education institutions were referred…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Norgren, J. (2010). Ladies of Legend: The First Generation of American Women Attorneys

Journal of Supreme Court History, 35(1), 71-90.

Spillman, S. (2012). Institutional Limits: Christine Ladd-Franklin, Fellowships, and American Women's Academic Careers, 1880-1920. History of Education Quarterly,

52(2), 196-224.
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The development of women rights

Words: 1390 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25465261

Women Activists Dilemma to support or Oppose the 15th Amendment as evidenced by the split in the Women’s suffrage Movement
Introduction
After the Civil war, three amendments were passed which massively transformed the women’s rights movement. These were the thirteenth, fourteenth and fifteenth amendments. The thirteenth amendment approved in the year 1865 declared slavery illegal (Parker, 1849). Thus, all the women who were previously enslaved became free and acquired protection by human rights. The fourteenth amendment declared that everyone born in the U.S was a legal U.S citizen and should not be deprived off their rights including all slaves. Moreover, the law added that all male American citizens had the right to vote (Anderson, 590).
Finally, there was the controversial Fifteenth Amendment, passed in 1870. The amendment granted black American men the right to vote by stating that the rights of U.S citizens to participate in elections must not be…… [Read More]

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Women Sex Discrimination in Career

Words: 2792 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 30862379

Yet women with similar or comparable education and experience or achievement still earn less than men in work organizations. A missing link or the absent ingredient, between performance and a just payoff, was identified as women's own ability to comfortably and consistently draw the attention they deserve to the contributions they made or gave. Findings of a study conducted on 322 male and female executives showed that women were less comfortable in promoting themselves than men. Many of them still believed that self-promotion by women was still unacceptable and that hard work alone would not put them in the same level as men. Women were also found to be "over-preparers" who wanted their work to be technically correct but who did not bring this sense of accuracy and care to the attention or notice of influential individuals in the organization. Goodson found that even women who understood the importance of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Auster, Ellen R. professional Women's Mid-career Satisfaction. Sex Roles: a Journal of Research, June 2001

2. Hultin, Mia. Wages and Unequal Access to Organizational Power: an Empirical Test of Gender Discrimination. Administrative Science Quarterly: Connell University Johnson Graduate School

3. Lemons. Mary A. Contextual and Cognitive Determinants of Procedural Justice: Perceptions in Promotion Barriers for Women. Sex Roles: a Journal of Research: Plenum Publishing Corporation

4. Moya, Miguel. Close Relationships, Gender and Career Salience. Sex Roles: a Journal of Reserch: Plenum Publishing Corporation, May 2000
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Women's Rights in America What

Words: 980 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 51806289

S. Constitution, and Susan B. Anthony was very upset at that.

For one thing, the women's suffrage movement had vigorously supported the abolition of slavery well prior to (and, of course, during the Civil War); and now that blacks were free, and were given the right to vote (although many blacks in America didn't really get to vote until the Voting ights Act of 1965 guaranteed their right to cast votes) prior to the women in American having the right to vote.

For another thing, many women were already stretched to the maximum in terms of the patience over their lack of voting rights.

According to an article in www.About.com (Women's History: Susan B. Anthony), "Some of Susan B. Anthony's writings were...quite racist by today's standards." She made the point that "educated white women would be better voters than 'ignorant' black men or immigrant men." In the late 1860s, she…… [Read More]

References

About.com. "Women's History: Susan B. Anthony; Seneca Falls Convention;

Declaration of Sentiments." 2004. Available

 http://www.about.com .

History of the American Suffragist Movement (2004). "Timeline: 1861-1867,"
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Women's Role Women Have Always

Words: 3027 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4261841

Islamic women are now restricted from most activities, and their rights have been steadily decreasing. Her social and political as well as economic rights are all being violated everyday by unscrupulous men who have corrupted the very religion to their own advantage, and today, especially in most Arab countries, woman has become 'Awarah', or the very subject of concealment, wherein her public presence is banned; where even her very voice, must not be heard in public. (Women's Position, ole, and ights in Islam)

In India, there are only 960 women to 1000 men, a figure that when compared to the rest of the world, especially developed countries, which shows 105 women to 100 men, due to better health care for women, is quite miserable. It is in India that women are often considered to be burdens on their families, and the main reason for this is the 'dowry system', wherein…… [Read More]

References

Agarwal, Sita. Hindu Scriptural Sanction for the Crushing of Women. Retrieved at  http://www.dalitstan.org/books/gowh/gowh6.html . Accessed on 16 March, 2005

Gender Equality. 2004. Retrieved at http://www.faithnet.org.uk/Ethics/genderequality.htm. Accessed on 16 March, 2005

John, MacArthur Jr., Women's Roles. 20 March, 2003. Retrieved at  http://www.believersweb.org/view.cfm?ID=205Accessed  on 15 March, 2005

Mbiti, John. The Role of women in African traditional religion. Retrieved at  http://www.afrikaworld.net/afrel/atr-women.htm . Accessed on 16 March, 2005
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Women's Suffrage the Suffrage Question

Words: 933 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 2385106

They argued that women would not have any reforming effect on the country because they would vote with their husbands (opposite of what they argued earlier). In states where they already had the vote, they had made no difference. Finally, they argued that women didn't really want the vote, anyway. This last charge had some truth to it. Susan . Anthony observed that the apathy of most women about the vote was the biggest obstacle for the movement. President Theodore Roosevelt in 1912 said that women would get the vote when "women as a whole show any special interest in the matter" (Woloch 242).

Terborg-Penn (113) points out that between 1910 and 1920 middle-class black women became active in the cause. She states that black feminists could never overlook the issue of racism; for them, it wasn't just a matter of being women; their color was a major cause of…… [Read More]

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Women Abuse of Women A

Words: 2083 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 47862644

, 1994)." (Salazar, 253) This is not just troubling as a statistical illustrator of the problem's prevalence but it is indicative of a much larger cultural condition predisposing us to violence toward women. ith ties to the patriarchal machinations of the country's monarchical origins and a dependency upon the fortification of such leanings in modern legal, social and even familial structure, the issue of domestic violence is very much a result of a long-standing and still present heritage of sexism. As we contend with the apparent root causes of domestic violence by helping women find ways out of negative relationships, we are yet contending with a more deep-seeded impulse toward misogyny and violence.

The rationale for further study on this subject will be to provide those in social services, outreach programs and other positions of counsel with the understanding of this problem to address and navigate the correlation and cycle…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

An Abuse, Rape and Domestic Violence Aid and Resource Collection (AARDVARC). (2008). Long-Term Effects of Domestic Violence. Aardvarc.org.

Belmonte, J. (2007). Domestic Violence and Abuse. Helpguide.org.

Butter, V. (2006). The Physical and Psychological Effects of Domestic Violence on Women. Inver Hills Community College. Online at http://faculty.inverhills.edu/vbutter/domesticviolenceweb.htm

Goelman, Deborah M. (2004). Shelter from the Storm: Using Jurisdictional Statutes to Protect Victims of Domestic Violence after the Violence against Women Act of 2000. Columbia Journal of Gender and Law.
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Women and Human Rights Summaries

Words: 1705 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 14799107

Nonetheless, Lu sees some hope for transgressive representations of Asian women in media, particularly in those films which actively seek to explode stereotypes regarding Asian women not simply by fulfilling the desires of a white, patriarchal society but rather by demonstrating full-fledged, unique characters whose Asian and female identity is only one constituent part of their personality and whose expression is not limited to the roles prescribed for Asian women in American media (24-26).

orks Cited

Lu, Lynn. "Critical Visions: The Representation and Resistance of Asian omen." Dragon

Ladies: Asian-American Feminists Breathe Fire. 1st ed. Cambridge, MA: South End

Press, 1999. 184-189. Print.

Mihesuah, David Abbot. "Feminists, Tribalists, or Activists?" Indigenous American omen:

Decolonization, Empowerment, Activism. 1st ed. Omaha, NE: University of Nebraska

Press, 2003. 115-123. Print.

Smith, Andrea. "Sexual Violence as a Tool of Genocide." Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide. 1st ed. Cambridge, MA: South End Press,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lu, Lynn. "Critical Visions: The Representation and Resistance of Asian Women." Dragon

Ladies: Asian-American Feminists Breathe Fire. 1st ed. Cambridge, MA: South End

Press, 1999. 184-189. Print.

Mihesuah, David Abbot. "Feminists, Tribalists, or Activists?" Indigenous American Women:
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Women Historians United States Historian

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 649811



According to Enstad, historians did not cover the earlier years of the labor movement at the beginning of the 20th century any better. She says that the information was actually incorrect. Many women at this time were into popular culture, reading cheap dime novels and wearing stylish clothes. Historians say that the women were therefore distracted from the serious issues that were taking place in the labor movement. The situation was the opposite says Enstad.5 She researched how working-class women used these books and clothes to identity themselves as workers, Americans, and ladies.

Foreign-born working women proudly read books in English to show off their Americanization. Sometimes working-class women felt like ladies when they wore middle-class stylish dress, such as silk underwear. More often, though, they invented their own styles of large hats and piled pompadours, brightly colored clothes, and French heels. Enstad says that this incorrect idea about the…… [Read More]

Kleeck studied New York City's female factory workers and child laborers. For decades she served as director of the Russell Sage Foundation's department of industrial studies, where her work helped bring about legislative reform by providing valuable information on the conditions in various trades. After her retirement from Russell Sage in 1948, she ran unsuccessfully for the New York State Senate on the American Labor Party ticket.

Salmon earned an M.A. In history in 1883. After three years of teaching at the Indiana University in Terre Haute, she was awarded a fellowship for a year's graduate study in American history at Bryn Mawr College. From there she went to Vassar in 1887 and became that college's first history teacher. Her pioneering use of statistical reports helped make her study Domestic Service, a major contribution to both history and historiography.

Unfortunately, U.S. history is still primarily seen through