Role Of Women Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Roles of Women in the 18th and 19th Centuries

Words: 1337 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28176167

Women's oles Then And Now:

Societies have continued to change in every century because of influences of cultures in that time period. As these societies grow and develop, the role of various people in the family structure and unit also changes. The changes in the role of women in the society are mainly influenced by societal perception regarding women. As a result, there are significant differences in the role of women in the 19th Century and the roles of women in the 18th Century. One of the main reasons for these differences is that the modern society has is so fast-paced because of increased technological advancements unlike the 18th Century society. An understanding of the changing role of women in the 18th and 19th centuries can be seen from the conversation between two notable women i.e. Maria Elisabeth of Austria and Queen Victoria of Great Britain.

Biographic Information for Each…… [Read More]

References:

Radek, M. (2008, April 21). Women in the Nineteenth Century. Retrieved from Illinois Valley

Community College website:  http://www2.ivcc.edu/gen2002/women_in_the_nineteenth_century.htm 

Sebellin, T., Woods, K. & Grove, A. (2006, February 20). Queen Victoria. Retrieved from King's College website:  http://departments.kings.edu/womens_history/victoria.html 

"The Role of the Woman: 18th, 19th, and 20th Centuries." (1997, April 17). My English ISP.
View Full Essay

Role of Woman in Society

Words: 1387 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40707384

She is the engine which drives the family.

Her attitude influences the one of the others. eing aware of this she succeeds to control the manifestation of her emotions. Another proof of her wisdom is the fact that she does not want to impose herself in all the circumstances. She lets Pa manifest himself, although she makes it clear for everybody that she has a strong authority as well. She is aware of her own condition.

Another woman whom Steinbeck uses in order to communicate the new dynamics of the men-women relationships is Rose of Sharon. One of the most famous scenes in the book is the one in which she feeds the man, helping him to survive. Her role is fundamental. She is the strong one, the provider. The man on the other hand is weak and dependent. The symbolism is very strong. "The fact that Rose gave birth…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Baillargeon, D. (translator Klein, Y.) "Making do: women, family and home in Montreal during the Great Depression." Google Books. Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books?id=-x65yYBTDTIC&printsec=frontcover&dq=women+great+depression&hl=it&cd=2#v=onepage&q&f=false

"Gender roles and sexual relations, impact of the great depression." http://www.novelguide.com/a/discover/egd_01/egd_01_00217.html

"Power of Women in the Grapes of Wrath." ***.com. 01 May 2010

.
View Full Essay

Roles of Women Figures in

Words: 1940 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51848216

Either as mothers, sisters, wives, daughters, mistresses, lovers or supernatural creatures, women populate the world of the Odyssey and bring thus an important source of information when it comes to finding parallels between their representations in real life as drawn from the representations they get in the Homeric epic.

Based on the same starting point as the Odyssey, another ancient author, the Roman irgil wrote the epic Aeneid. He lived in the most flourishing times of the Roman empire, in the first century BC, almost seven centuries after the Odyssey and the Iliad had probably been written. The heroes in irgil's epic are still men, but the women gain a new role: that of sounders and rulers. Analyzing the whole range of epics and poems written by ancient Greek and Latin writers, A.M. Keith points out that "classical Greek and Latin epic poetry was composed by men, consumed largely by…… [Read More]

Virgil. Aeneid. Trans. Stanley Lombardo. Indianapolis: Hackett, 2005.

Avery, Dorothy. Women in the Iliad. Copyright: D. Avery 2004. Retrieved: May 7, 2009. Available at: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/arts/tradition/tradavery1.html

Keith, A.M. Engendering Rome: Women in Latin Epic. Cambridge University Press, 2000.
View Full Essay

Roles of Women in America 1700-1780

Words: 2118 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23940219

omen's Roles in Early America (1700-1780)

hat were the roles of women in the early American period from roughly 1700-1780? Although a great portion of the history of families and people in early America during this period is about men and their roles, there are valid reports of women's activities in the literature, and this paper points out several roles that women played in that era.

The Roles of omen in Early America -- 1700 -- 1780

In the "Turns of the Centuries Exhibit" (TCE) relative to family life in the period 1680 to 1720, the author notes that colonial societies were organized around "…patriarchal, Biblically-ordained lines of authority." Males basically asserted the authority over their wives, their children, their servants and any other dependents that may have been in the household. One reason for the male dominance in this era was do to the fact that "…law did not…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Breneman, Judy Anne. (2002). The Not So Good Lives of New England's Goodwives. Retrieved February 23, 2012, from  http://www.historyofquilts.com/earlylife.html .

Cody, Cheryll Ann. (2003). In the Affairs of the World: Women, Patriarchy, and Power in Colonial South Carolina. Journal of Southern History, 69(4), p. 873.

Letters of Abigail Adams. (2002). Letters Between Abigail Adams and her Husband, John

Adams. Retrieved February 23, 2012, from  http://www.thelizlibrary.org/suffrage/abigail.htm .
View Full Essay

Women's Roles Then and Now

Words: 1333 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90992063

ole of Women

Womens' ole Then and Now

Women's ole Then and Now

Women's ole Then and Now

Women have played an important role at different times in various fields. They have faced many challenges bravely and gave a new direction for the women to follow in later periods. The achievements are unprecedented and give an idea about the level of courage the women have. Their determination helped them elevate not only their name but they also motivated uncountable other women.

Women's ole Then and Now

The history of the world is but the biography of great men is an old quote which is as true today as it was centuries ago. History has witnessed uncountable great individuals who earned good name and fame because of their service to their country or mankind. It would be biased to attribute all historical achievements to men only. Women, being the partners of…… [Read More]

References

Chung, K. (2010). Women Pioneers of Medical Research. USA: McFarland & Company.

Robbins, T., Martin, C. And Timmons, A. (2006). Elizabeth Blackwell: American's First Woman Doctor. USA: Capstone Press.

Somervill, B. (2009). Elizabeth Blackwell: America's First Female Doctor. USA: Gareth Stevens Publishing.

Tieck, S. (2006). Florence Nightingale. USA: ABDO Publishing Company.
View Full Essay

Women in Medieval European Society

Words: 1971 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5866127

Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001648096

Goldberg, Jeremy. "Girls Growing Up in Later Medieval England." History Today, June 1995, 25+. http://www.questia.com/. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27843659

Herlihy, David. Women, Family, and Society in Medieval Europe: Historical Essays, 1978-1991. Edited by a. Molho. Providence, RI: erghahn ooks, 1995. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001272076

Purkiss, Diane. "The Case for Women in Medieval Culture." Medium Aevum 68, no. 1 (1999): 106. http://www.questia.com/. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14413469

Richards, Earl Jeffrey. "Seulette a Part -- the Little WomanOn the Sidelines Takes Up Her Pen:the Letters of Christine De Pizan." In Dear Sister: Medieval Women and the Epistolary Genre, edited by Cherewatuk, Karen and Ulrike Wiethaus, 139-170. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=24951699

Stuard, Susan Mosher, ed. Women in Medieval Society,. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001272088

Tavormina, M. Teresa. "Medieval Marriage: Literary Approaches, 1100-1300." Medium Aevum 68, no. 1 (1999): 109. http://www.questia.com/. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002090486

Women and Religion in Medieval England." Medium Aevum 72, no.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14413469

Cherewatuk, Karen and Ulrike Wiethaus, eds. Dear Sister: Medieval Women and the Epistolary Genre,. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001648096

Goldberg, Jeremy. "Girls Growing Up in Later Medieval England." History Today, June 1995, 25+. http://www.questia.com/. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27843659

Herlihy, David. Women, Family, and Society in Medieval Europe: Historical Essays, 1978-1991. Edited by a. Molho. Providence, RI: Berghahn Books, 1995. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001272076
View Full Essay

Woman's Role

Words: 1085 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66142749

Women have, for a long time, been expected to fulfill certain roles. These roles varied through the ages but have remained rooted in their main objective, to have women raise children and assist and serve their husbands (Vishwanathan, 1994, p. 34). Women are seen as the ones who stay home, tend the hearth, and raise the young while men are the ones that earn the money, own the property, and control the household. In literature, women are depicted often as fulfilling these stereotypical roles and also rebelling against them. Karen Van Der Zee's "A Secret Sorrow" and Gail Godwin's "A Sorrowful Woman" are two works of literature that demonstrate the lives of women who belonged to a society that required them to conform to their selected role. Both narratives establish the anticipated place of women in society, but do so from dissimilar perspectives. "A Secret Sorrow" has a female character…… [Read More]

References

Foster, C.D., Siegel, M.A., & Jacobs, N.R. (1988). Women's changing role (1988 ed.). Wylie, Tex.: Information Aids.

Meyer, M. (2002). The Bedford introduction to literature: reading, thinking, writing (6th ed.). Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Vishwanathan, M. (1994). Women & society. Jaipur: Printwell.
View Full Essay

Women in Medieval Society During

Words: 1963 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62497475

This gave her husband the right to sell any of her property and she was not in a position to object in any way. Religious women with their vows of obedience and poverty really had no reason to get involved in legal matters and were untouched in any way by the legal structure.

idows were the only women who held in legal position in the society. "She (a widow) regained her legal personality, was entitled to a certain share of her husband's holdings and, for the first time in her life, could make independent decisions." Legally, this was the best position for women. It was not without problems especially for wealthy women. These women were frequently intimidated into a second marriage or into relinquishing parts of their holdings. They had no legal recourse against this kind of intimidation in the same way that married women could not object to domestic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barber, Richard. The Penguin Guide to Medieval Europe. New York: Penguin

Books, 1984.

Conway, Stephen. "Silent Voices: Women in the Middle Ages." 1991. http://www.subverbis.com/essays/medievalwomen.rtf.

Delort, Robert. Life in the Middle Ages. Trans. Robert Allen. New York:
View Full Essay

Women's History Questions After Reading the Introductory

Words: 1254 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61477113

Women's History Questions

After reading the introductory texts, how has your understanding of women's history changed? What did you think women's history was before your enrolled in the course and compare that to how these historians define women's history? Do you agree or disagree with them?

Do women benefit from the American Revolution?

In developing your answer, recognize there is no single "woman" that encompasses all women in America. As a result, you must be sure to fully defend why your examples demonstrate the benefits or detriments of the Revolution for women.

The results of the American Revolution created a situation in which the treatment of individuals as property was challenged. The treatment of individuals as property carried real ramifications for women. One salient example is the freedom to use your power is a slave owner to coerce women into sexual relationships against their will. Many minority women that were…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Women's Rights in India Violation

Words: 2284 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93011124

But sometimes the victims themselves are afraid to voice their grievances in the public because speaking up entails shame, ostracization, and even extra-judicial killings. The victims can express their grievances in public "only at certain times and in certain ways" because their rights are infringed on social and cultural levels (Dewey).

The fact that cultural and traditional beliefs and attitudes contribute to violations of women's rights in a systematic manner can be observed by reading literature on the practice of dowry. Many Indian legal and philosophical thinkers use relativistic terms to contest the notion that the practice contributes to the abuse of women. They contest the notion because they argue the concept of human rights is a estern notion, sometimes disregarding cultural variations and sensibilities of the Indian nation (Gupta). The general critique of the concept of human rights as a western notion may be valid in some matters, but…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dewey, Susan. "Dear Dr. Kothari': Sexuality, Violence Against Women, and the Parallel Public Sphere in India." American Ethnologist, 36/1 (2009): 124-139.

Duggal, Ravi. "The Political Economy of Abortion in India: Cost and Expenditure Patterns." Reproductive Health Matters, 12/24 (Nov. 2004): 130-137.

Grewal, Indu and Kishore, J. "Female Foeticide in India." International Humanist and Ethical Union. 1 May 2004. Web. 12 Dec. 2011

Gupta, Nidhi. "Women's Human Rights and the Practice of Dowry in India." Journal of Legal Pluralism and Unofficial Law, 48 (2003): 85-123. Web. 12 Dec. 2011
View Full Essay

Women's Role Women Have Always

Words: 3027 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4261841

Islamic women are now restricted from most activities, and their rights have been steadily decreasing. Her social and political as well as economic rights are all being violated everyday by unscrupulous men who have corrupted the very religion to their own advantage, and today, especially in most Arab countries, woman has become 'Awarah', or the very subject of concealment, wherein her public presence is banned; where even her very voice, must not be heard in public. (Women's Position, ole, and ights in Islam)

In India, there are only 960 women to 1000 men, a figure that when compared to the rest of the world, especially developed countries, which shows 105 women to 100 men, due to better health care for women, is quite miserable. It is in India that women are often considered to be burdens on their families, and the main reason for this is the 'dowry system', wherein…… [Read More]

References

Agarwal, Sita. Hindu Scriptural Sanction for the Crushing of Women. Retrieved at http://www.dalitstan.org/books/gowh/gowh6.html. Accessed on 16 March, 2005

Gender Equality. 2004. Retrieved at http://www.faithnet.org.uk/Ethics/genderequality.htm. Accessed on 16 March, 2005

John, MacArthur Jr., Women's Roles. 20 March, 2003. Retrieved at http://www.believersweb.org/view.cfm?ID=205Accessed on 15 March, 2005

Mbiti, John. The Role of women in African traditional religion. Retrieved at  http://www.afrikaworld.net/afrel/atr-women.htm . Accessed on 16 March, 2005
View Full Essay

Women of the Klan Chances

Words: 2345 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32123625

Pretention was key because the women knew that the men's focus stayed on preventing race mixing between blacks and whites. To distract the men from the issues that the WKKK were fighting for, they would cleverly get the men to focus on black men trying to flirt or what have you with them. This was just a ploy for them so that they could fully pursue their interests with little or no interference from the men.

Auxiliary or Organization

Clearly, the intent of the KKK was for the women to establish an auxiliary in order to support them. The women had other ideas. The men were used to further the women's cause unknowingly. "Klanswomen embraced the mixture of individualism and deference to authority that characterized the male Klan." (p. 36). The women did not and would not be a support group for the men. They did feel that other races…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Blee, K.M. (2008). Women of the Klan: Racism and Gender in the 1920s (2 ed.). Berkeley: University of California Press.
View Full Essay

Women's Roles During the Civil

Words: 1112 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31830688

The women whose husbands did serve the pro-Union cause (often Republicans) did not necessarily take over the farm work and other "male tasks" on the farm. Instead, the work was done with the "same kind of neighborhood and extended-kin support" that was in use prior to the Civil ar (Rodgers, 112).

Also, many soldiers wrote letters home "…virtually micromanaging their farms from the front," Rodgers continues (113). ives received a "steady flow of letters" with specific advice not only on how to run the farm, but on "how their children were to behave and be taught," Rodgers explained (113). And moreover, male farm laborers were available to harvest crops, and the women either paid them to harvest the wheat, or she gave them "a percentage of the crop" (Rodgers, 113). As for urban women in Indiana during the Civil ar, Rodgers explains that letters between wives and soldiers showed "gossip…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brown, Alexis Girardin. "The Women Left Behind: Transformation of the Southern Belle,

1840-1880." The Historian. 62.4 (2000): 759-779.

Rodgers, Thomas E. "Hoosier Women and the Civil War Home Front." Indiana Magazine of History, 97.2 (2001): 105-128.

Walker, Henry. "Power, Sex, and Gender Roles: The Transformation of an Alabama Planter
View Full Essay

Women's History

Words: 726 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55459562

Women's History

This report aims to present my views on the fact that wage work during the late 19th and early 20th centuries have more or less reinforced women's roles within their families or more accurately, have provided an extension to their familial roles. The objective of this work is to therefore present an argument that contradicts a belief held by many historians that wage work actually enabled women to develop a new sense of individualism as well as economic independence. These liberations are supposed to have liberated women from their roles in the traditional home. The report also attempts to incorporate how the effects of race and/or ethnicity come into play in this situation.

First and foremost, the idea of wage work and non-wage work must be explored to give credence to the topic at hand. Women have traditionally been unpaid for the bulk of their work while they…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Women Empowerment Women Comprise an Essential Part

Words: 607 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49653349

Women Empowerment

Women comprise an essential part of the society; the role of women in the modern world is becoming more influential compared to the traditional days. The society is realizing the importance of women as leaders in the community and calling upon their ability to ensure that there is growth in the society. The rise of women in the society has been faced with stiff opposition from the male counterparts. In some developing countries, gender equality has not been achieved, but the pressure from developed is pushing many governments to recognize equality. Nations that have recognized the contributions of women have high economic growth compared to other countries that have ignored women.

Women empowerment refers to providing equal opportunities to women as men. Traditional organizational setting considers division of labor in the organization. Women are given roles that are not physically challenging while leadership roles are reserved for men.…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Women in Television in the Late 1960s

Words: 1768 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88889163

omen in Television

In the late 1960s to early 1970s, as women burned their bras and took to the streets for equality, the female labor force grew three times more than that their male peers (Toossi), increasing numbers of educational opportunities made themselves available to the "fairer sex,"

and a cultural shift was taking place for women within the household and in society as a whole. As is frequently the case, television seized the moment and looked for ways to capitalize on this women's lib movement. As Fiske wrote, "Television often acts like a relay station: It rarely originates topics of public interest (though it may repress them); rather, what it does is give them high visibility, energize them, and direct or redirect their general orientation before relaying them out again into public circulation." Thus, Turner's MTM Enterprises introduced "That Girl" and followed it by the seven-year hit "Mary Tyler…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bodroghkozy, Aniko. "Where have you gone, Mary Richards? Feminism's rise and fall in primetime television." Iris: A Journal About Women 12.28 (2004). 5 November 2010 http://www.accessmylibrary.com/article-1G1-127160507/have-you-gone-mary.html

Bordo, Susan. The Male Body. A New Look at Men at Public and Private. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1999.

Douglas, Susan. Where the Girls Are. New York: Three Rivers Press, 1995.

Dow, Bonnie. Prime-Time Feminism. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1996.
View Full Essay

Woman and Islam

Words: 1693 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43051773

Women and Islam

Do Muslim women eally need saving?

Stengths and weaknesses

Between hee and thee: feminist solidaity and Afghan women.

Stengths and weaknesses

Do Muslim women eally need saving? Anthopological eflections on cultual elativism and its othes.

Topic oveview and famewok

The aticle deals with the topic of 'Wa on Teoism', the wa claimed to have been launched fo libeating the Afghan women fom Taliban and an agument with anthopological pespective to deconstuct the essentially flawed epesentation of Afghan women that Wa on Teoism hetoic makes. The aticle is aimed at investigating the nuances of identity that ae essentially devoid of histoical constuction of ole of women in Afghan society. The aticle also aims to identify the pocess though which women's ole in Afghan society is not constucted on anthopological gounds but athe influenced by one's own cultue, identity, and standads of living. Thus, cultual bias is said to…… [Read More]

references: Constructions of gender in the Bush administration discourse on the attacks on Afghanistan post-9/11. International Feminist Journal of Politics, 8(1), 19-41.
View Full Essay

Roles of Third World Women

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16547067

Benazir Bhutto later assumed a similar prominent role of leadership in the neighboring rival Muslim state of akistan. But these achievements came despite the fact that in a "study in rural unjab revealed that between the ages of one and 23 months, female mortality rates are nearly twice those of males. Girls born to mothers who already have one or more surviving daughters experience 53% higher mortality...although both sexes receive the same number of calories, girls are given more cereals, while boys receive more highly valued milk and fat" (Lane 1995). Dowry murder is still practiced in many regions of India, where women are murdered for their dowries, and as "female literacy in akistan improves about 5% per decade, at which rate it will take 60 years to raise the literacy rate of teenage women age 15 to 19 to 70%" (Lane 1995).

Such conflicting examples are not limited to…… [Read More]

Perhaps the first example of the new role of women in the developing world came with the election of Indira Gandhi to the position of Prime Minister of India. Benazir Bhutto later assumed a similar prominent role of leadership in the neighboring rival Muslim state of Pakistan. But these achievements came despite the fact that in a "study in rural Punjab revealed that between the ages of one and 23 months, female mortality rates are nearly twice those of males. Girls born to mothers who already have one or more surviving daughters experience 53% higher mortality...although both sexes receive the same number of calories, girls are given more cereals, while boys receive more highly valued milk and fat" (Lane 1995). Dowry murder is still practiced in many regions of India, where women are murdered for their dowries, and as "female literacy in Pakistan improves about 5% per decade, at which rate it will take 60 years to raise the literacy rate of teenage women age 15 to 19 to 70%" (Lane 1995).

Such conflicting examples are not limited to East Asia. Chile recently elected the doctor and single mother Michele Bachelet to the position of president. Bachelet said in her inaugural address: "Who would have said, 10, 15 years ago, that a woman would be elected president?" (Liberia and Chile elect female leaders," 2006, Spiegel International). Yet in Latin America as well as in Africa 40% of adolescent childbearing takes place before the age of 18 and female earning power lags behind that of males in the same occupations (Lane 1995).

Bachelet was not the only woman recently elected to prominence in the developing world. On January 16, 2006, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf took the oath of office as Africa's first elected female
View Full Essay

Women Disability Sexuality and the

Words: 5037 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85099237

Stocker, deaf since birth, admittedly attempted to compensate for her disability, her imperfection, through the relentless pursuit of achieving perfection physically and athletically, and even when she excelled, Stocker confesses, for a long time she remained emotionally tortured by disability for which no amount of body shaping or athletic skill in sports could change that disability (2001, p. 154). Stocker's struggle with her self-image, her identity and hers sexuality were in large part shaped by her disability.

While it is not an attempt here to disparage Stocker, or to belittle the significance of her disability; Stocker is a woman who suffered her hearing impairment from birth. Stocker suffered emotionally as a result of her disability, struggled with it for most of her life in the ways in which it impacted her self-esteem, self-image, and sexuality. So, might not a woman who acquired a disability at that point her life when…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108011400

Barker-Benfield, G.J. (2000). The Horrors of the Half-Known Life: Male Attitudes toward Women and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century America. New York: Routledge. Retrieved February 2, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108011402 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000224494

Bellerose, S.B., & Binik, Y.M. (1993). Body Image and Sexuality in Oophorectomized Women. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 22(5), 435+. Retrieved February 2, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000224494

DeFries, Z., Friedman, R.C., & Corn, R. (Eds.). (1985). Sexuality: New Perspectives. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. Retrieved February 2, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=51035002 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105657669
View Full Essay

Women in Engineering Gender Has

Words: 1196 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45784659

Dr. Hayden believes the reason for this change at the school level is due to greater recruitment efforts, financial and academic support, and more women role models to provide encouragement. Dr. Hayden sees a similar situation happening in the engineering field.

Dr. Lin, a male electrical engineer, on the other hand, somewhat ironically, seems to feel that women face a tougher challenge in engineering than Dr. Hayden stated. According to Dr. Lin, women can succeed as an electrical engineer if "they are determined." This is clearly a male-oriented view of how to succeed. According to typical male beliefs, success is an individual achievement. If you work hard you will succeed. If you do not succeed, it is because you did not work hard enough. However, Dr. Hayden emphasized in her response to the same question the role of peer mentors, academic support and other outside resources. This is typically a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baker, Wayne. Achieving Success Through Social Capital. New York: Jossey-Bass.

Dr. Hayden. Personal Interview. California Poly Pomona. 2006.

Dr. Lin. Personal Interview. California Poly Pomona. 2006.

Fuller, Georgina. "Recent Graduates Expect More from their Employers" Personnel
View Full Essay

Women's Social Role in Society Gender as

Words: 1090 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16873655

omen's Social Role In Society

Gender, as opposed to the physical classification of sex, has always been based upon societal construct. The current psychology of the masses dictates what proper or improper behavior for the given genders is. This has always been the way of things. In the 1900s in the United States of America, a woman's place was in the home. She was supposed to be the Angel in the House. In this role, a woman's purpose was to cook and clean and take care of her family. She was not allowed to busy herself with what was called the Public Sphere, wherein the husband and other men were in control. The wife's role was in the Private Sphere. This scenario, called the "Cult of Domesticity," gave women very little power. In this era, women did not have the right to vote, so females had no voice either in…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Baier, A. (1988). "The Need for More than Justice." Ed. Held. Justice and Care: Essential

Readings in Feminist Ethics. Westview: Boulder, CO.

Friedman, M (1987). "Beyond Caring: The De-Moralization of Gender." Ed. Held. Justice and Care: Essential Readings in Feminist Ethics. Westview: Boulder, CO.

Noddings, N. (1984). "Caring." Ed. Held. Justice and Care: Essential Readings in Feminist
View Full Essay

Women's Rights During the Nineteenth Century Many

Words: 2436 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17176597

omen's Rights

During the nineteenth century, many accomplishments in women's rights occurred. As a result of these early efforts, women today enjoy many privileges. They are able to vote and become candidates for political elections, as well as own property and enjoy leadership positions.

During the early nineteenth century, the women's rights movement came into effect. omen like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony created many organizations for equality and independence. However, even with these activist groups, victory would not be fast or easy.

Changing social conditions for women during the early nineteenth century, combined with the idea of equality, led to the birth of the woman suffrage movement. For example, women started to receive more education and to take part in reform movements, which involved them in politics. As a result, women started to ask why they were not also allowed to vote.

The Start of the Revolution…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berg, Barbara. The Remembered Gate: Origins of American Feminism. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.

Degler, Carl N. At Odds: Women and the Family in America from the Revolution to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.

Pessen, Edward. Jacksonian America: Society, Personality, and Politics. Homewood, Illinois: Dorsey Press, 1969, 1978.

Ryan, Mary P. Womanhood in America: From Colonial Times to the Present. New York: New Viewpoints, 1979.
View Full Essay

Woman's Studies Globalization

Words: 848 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12086887

omen Globalization

omen's Experience of Globalization

One of the factors that have shaped women's experiences of globalization has been the international demand for labor in various international locations. Much of the globalization trend has been driven by technological innovations that allow for greater communication, information sharing, travel, and other items that have allowed people to share different items across the globe. This trend has also shaped the manner in which labor demand can influence women. Before globalization labor was virtually static and immigration was sparsely used and there were a significant amount of resources required to migrate. However, there are many more opportunities for both migrant men and women.

The availability of options for men to work in migrant positions also places indirect pressures on women to do the same given the breakdown of the traditional family structure and relatively few domestic options. Many migrant women will leave a developing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Parrenas, R. (2008). The Force of Domesticity: Filipina Migrants and Globalization. New York: NYU Press.
View Full Essay

Women and Econ Develop Sometimes

Words: 994 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38821183

The women's work, therefore, continues to be arduous and tedious, potential productivity, unrealized and quality of life is substandard. According to Jehan, for example, solutions to bettering this situation include enhancing data on women's economic participation and increasing the proportion of women in education, rural incomes and productivity.

In India, for instance, a number of economic initiatives have been undertaken in regard to the role and status of women. These include the economic exposure and access to Meerut Seva Samaj (MSS), an entrepreneurship program that allows women to engage in home-based work. This allows them to continue to fulfill their domestic responsibilities at the same time as helping to financially support their family. Financial institutions, companies, and NGOs are discovering the impact that can be made by extending different forms of entrepreneurial assistance to women startup businesses, such as micro-credit, or small loans, Meerut Seva Samaj demonstrates the way that…… [Read More]

References

Jehan, Qamar "Role of women in economic development in Pakistan." PhD thesis, 2000

University of Balochistan, Quetta. 10/25/08  http://eprints.hec.gov.pk/442/ 

Nanu-Fabu, Stella. "An analysis of economic status of women in Cameroon." Journal of International Women's Studies 8.1(2006):148-162.

Roy, K.C., Tisdell, C.A., Blomqvist, H.C. Economic Development and Women in the World Community, Praeger, London, 1996