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We have over 56 essays for "Sleep Apnea"

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Business Plan for a Sleep

Words: 8375 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Business Plan Paper #: 84888867

Offered under the same roof are "consultative, diagnostic, and treatment services" which are stated to be provided "by board-certified practitioners in the fields of pulmonary medicine, otolarngology, family medicine and more." (2006)

Smith reports that the laboratories experiencing the most dramatic growth are two which are located the "farthest from the Hillsboro flagship" as they are located in two areas that were "formerly underserved." (2006) Smith additionally reports that the demand is stronger in the areas where the two fastest growing centers are located which supplies "plenty of fuel for expansion."

Smith states that the Sleep Health & Wellness NW is attempting to "fill a gap so that patients who previously were overlooked or not being reached or who fell through the cracks no longer are," she says. "We have no plans to open centers in areas where there are already quality sleep services programs. We only want to go…… [Read More]

References

Inspiration! Sleep Study Results & Analysis (2006) Q&a with Ron Richard, senior vice president of strategic marketing initiatives at ResMed HME Business April 2006. Online at  http://www.hme-business.com/articles/55305/ 

Johnson, Duane, PhD (2008) Are you Really Managing Your Sleep Lab? The Business of Sleep. Focus Journal May/June 2008. Online at  http://www.foocus.com/pdfs/Articles/MayJune08/Duane.pdf 

Kay DC, Pickworth WB, Neider GL. Morphine-like insomnia from heroin in nondependent human addicts. Br J. Clin Pharmacol. 1981;11(2):159-169

MacFarlene, James (2009) the Painful Pursuit of Sleep. Sleep Review Journal Jan/Feb 2009. Online available at  http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/issues/articles/2009-01_07.asp
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Proposal for a Sleep Lab

Words: 1393 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Business Proposal Paper #: 81228630

business plan for a unique business opportunity- a sleep lab. This paper investigates the unique business needs of this business as well as the challenges of engaging the surrounding community, its employees as well as clients on the health benefits of sleep as well as the necessity for the identification as well as treatment of various sleep disorders. The safety needs of the participant are also taken into consideration and well as the setup and running costs.

A sleep disorder is noted by Al Ghamdi (2009) to be a medical disorder of a person's sleep patterns and is a serious condition that affects an individual's normal mental, physical as well as emotional functions. Most sleep disorders can effectively be diagnosed and treated in a sleep lab or center via a common test referred to as polysomnogram (Patil,2010).

Sleeps disorders as a source of public health concern

Sleep is also being…… [Read More]

References

Al Ghamdi, M (2009). Business Plan for Sleep Center. Boise State University ScholarWorks

CDC (2011). Unhealthy Sleep-Related Behaviors -- 12 States, 2009.Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Weekly Vol. 60(8).

Ibis World (2012).Sleep Disorder Clinics in the U.S.: Market Research Report. Sleep Disorder Clinics Market Research Report. Available online at  http://www.ibisworld.com/industry/sleep-disorder-clinics.html 

Jonson, D. (May-June, 2008). Are you really managing your sleep lab. Focus Journal,
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Gerontological & Griatric Nursing Nursing Paper-Gerontological &

Words: 1693 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9956260

GEONTOLOGICAL & GIATIC NUSING

Nursing Paper-Gerontological & Griatric Nursing

End of Life Issues and the Elderly

(2) "Identify and discuss the role of the nurse in providing family centred care to an elderly client who is palliative and living at home with his/her spouse or another family member."

Palliative care is an approach to provide a coordinated medical, nursing, and allied health service to address the patient's physical, social emotional and spiritual needs for people with progressive incurable illness. Palliative care seeks to deliver allied health service within the environment of person's choice to improve quality of life for both an ill person and the family or friends. In the United States, Europe and other part of the world, number of people reaching the advanced age and having the need of specialities for the management of pain control continues to increase. (oyal College of Nursing, 2004).

Meanwhile, a nurse plays…… [Read More]

References

Bliwise, D.L. Bliwise, N.G. Partinen, M. et al.(1988). Sleep Apnea and Mortality in an Aged Cohort. Am J. Public Health.78:544-547.

Bruce, S.D. & Hendrix, C.C. (2006). Palliative Sedation in End-of-Life Care: The Role of The Nurse in Palliative Sedation. Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing.8(6):320-327.

Canadian Nurses Association (2008). Providing Nursing Care at the End of Life. Ottawa Canada.

Davies, E. & Higginson, I.J. (2004). Better Palliative Care for Older People. World Health Organization.
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Invention and Summarize the Significance of the

Words: 1156 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 42977589

Invention and Summarize the Significance of the Underlying Technology Innovation

The device titled the Thornton Adjustable Positioner or TAP is an oral/dental device worn in the patient's mouth during sleep to move the lower jaw slightly forward to create an open airway for proper breathing while sleeping. The device or some like them have been previously tried on minor sleep disturbances such as snoring, yet, their efficacy has been unknown for more serious problems such as mild to severe sleep apnea. Sleep apnea, a disorder that creates oxygen deprivation during sleep and can moderately to severely affect the health of the individual first by depriving the individual of restful sleep and in more severe cases by creating oxygen deprivation that can lead to other chronic diseases or even acute death from asphyxia.

Up to this point the most commonly prescribed device for sleep apnea is a device that forces oxygen…… [Read More]

Resources

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (2009, February 4). Small Device Helps Sleep Apnea Sufferers In A Big Way.  http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090203140147.htm
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Sleeping and Insomnia

Words: 1101 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56526180

Sleeping and Insomnia

Introduction have been observing my roommate's sleeping patterns. He has insomnia and takes sleeping pills every night, sometimes with alcohol. My hypothesis is that his dependence on sleeping pills and his mixing with alcohol are hindering his condition, rather than helping it. I think that there are many other, more natural things he could do to ease his insomnia.

General understanding of sleeping

We spend about one third of our life sleeping. Sleep is defined as the suspension of consciousness during which the powers of the body are restored (ThinkQuest, 2003). The brain is not at rest during sleep as popularly thought, but is extremely active and it is the brain that tells us when it is time to sleep. Sensations of light taken in from the retina are transferred through the nerves to an area of the brain determines the amount of light exposure and adjusts…… [Read More]

Bibliography

ThinkQuest Online Library. (2003). "Sleep From A To Zzz." Retrieved from the Internet at http://www.thinkquest.org/

Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia. (2003). "Sleep." MSN. Retrieved from the Internet at http://encarta.msn.com/

Coren, Stanley. (1996). "Sleep Thieves: an Eye-Opening Exploration into the Science & Mysteries of Sleep." New York: The Free Press, 1996.

Cardinal, Florence. (2003). "Insomnia- What Is Insomnia?." Retrieved on the Internet at http://sleepdisorders.about.com/cs/whatisinsomnia
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Born to Be Big Childhood

Words: 2102 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85178688

People can exercise their free choice at the grocery store by choosing organic foods, although because of generally higher costs of organic products, this will not be a solution for everyone. People in lower socioeconomic groups often get food at discount chains or even food pantries where organics are not even a choice at all.

There is no incentive for makers of agricultural chemicals to modify their products in response to charges about obesogens. As the documentary films the Future of Food and King Corn pointed out, the use of pesticides is very big business. Though detrimental effects of pesticides and genetically-modified seeds and food have been shown, further research is needed to prove the link between pesticides and genetic modifications that lead to obesity in infants and children. When and if that link is proven, the public will have to demand that the government take action. Consumer advocate organizations…… [Read More]

References

Adler, N.E., & Stewart, J. (2009). Reducing obesity: motivating action while not blaming the victim. Milbank Quarterly 87 (1), pp. 49-70. Retrieved from Academic Search

Premier database December 29, 2010.

Baillie-Hamilton, P.F. (2002). Chemical toxins: a hypothesis to explain the global obesity epidemic. Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine 8 (2), pp. 185-192.

DOI: 10.1089/107555302317371479. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database December 29, 2010.
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Nursing Practise Using Evidence Presented

Words: 2782 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Chapter Paper #: 52291579

Evidence-Based Practice

The following is the assessment of AB case, a first time visitor to the writer. The assessment will include checking the pharmacologic treatment, reactions to the drugs in the medicines consumed, advisory healthcare practices and exercises, and non-pharmacologic treatment. More information to be provided if need be.

Patient Background

AB, an overweight, 52--?year -- ?old, Hispanic, male comes for the first visit to your office for assessment of complaints about tiredness, nocturia x 2 -- ?3, and finding it difficult to do the required paperwork in the office (Masters, 2014). He informs that he is reportedly having diabetes type 2 for about six years when he first experienced same feelings of fatigue and nocturia x 2 -- ?3. The patient informs he has attended infrequent classes on diabetes that emphasized on importance of physical activity and weight loss (Masters, 2014). His was accompanied by his wife to these…… [Read More]

References

 http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/sleep-apnea/sleep-apnea-treatmentsBeckerman , J., MD, FACC. (2014). Sleep Apnea Treatments. from Food and Drug Administration. (2013). Drug Interactions: What You Should Know. from  http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ResourcesForYou/ucm163354 

James Beckerman, M., FACC. (2013). An Overview of High Blood Pressure Treatment. from  http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/guide/hypertension-treatment-overview 

Joel C. Marrs. (2010). Pharmacy Perspectives in Dyslipidemia Management. from  http://www.uspharmacist.com/USPExams/107084/PHS1005.pdf 

Lozanda, C., J, MD. (2014). Osteoarthritis Treatment & Management. from  http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/330487-treatment#aw2aab6b6b2
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Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Words: 1172 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38822122

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The articles explore separate studies about the topic. The author of this work discusses various aspects of each article and their merit. There were two sources used to complete this paper.

Each year in America thousands of parents walk into their infants room and discover that the child has died from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The tragedy shocks and baffles the medical community as it continues to search for answers not only to what causes the syndrome but also what parents can do to reduce the risk of it striking their child. Studies around the globe have been conducted to this end with mixed results.

The determination of factors that influence the existence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome is vital to the ability to stop its occurrence.

Study one

The first study examined whether the temperament of an infant has a bearing on whether that child…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Temperament ratings do not predict arousability in normal infants and infants at increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome. (Original Articles).

Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics; 10/1/2002; Adamson, T. Michael

Cosleeping in young Korean children.

Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics; 6/1/2002; Hahn, Hong-Moo
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Obesity Is When a Person Has an

Words: 1778 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 5029382

Obesity is when a person has an unhealthy amount of body fat. It causes a person to be overweight in all aspects of the body. There is a lot of body fat due to being overweight. It is important for every human being to have some body fat. However too much fat can lead to a lot of health problems. There are a lot of factors which contribute to obesity. Experts believe that the high calorie diets of our time are to blame for majority of the cases. A lot of people eat food such as burgers, nuggets, ice cream, cake, chips, candy and other various types of snacks. These snacks are full of fats and calories. Eating fatty foods contributes to obesity. Obesity is also linked to the genetics of a body. It can occur if a person has obesity in the family.

Fast Food's link to Obesity

People…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser, 2000

2. Mayo Clinic: Obesity www.cnn.com/mayo

3. BBC Health: Why fast food makes you fat, October 2003

4. Overweight and Obesity, Healthy People 2010: Leading Health Indicators and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
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Diagnosing for Various Scenarios

Words: 980 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5433812

Jennifer experienced fever and palpable cervical nodes. This means she could have an infection as a result her tonsils. The infection could have led to lymphadenopathy. Since most patients that contract lymphadenopathy experience localized lymphadenopathy, Jennifer most likely has localized lymphadenopathy. "Distinguishing between localized and generalized lymphadenopathy is important in formulating a differential diagnosis. In primary care patients with unexplained lymphadenopathy, approximately three fourths of patients will present with localized lymphadenopathy and one fourth with generalized lymphadenopathy" (Ferrer, 2015, p. 1).

Palpable nodes are often swollen nodes that can be a result of an infection. Because her fever climbed over time and stayed relatively high, Jennifer may be experiencing acute infection since her patient history revealed no signs of previous disease. Causes for lymphadenopathy are often obvious.

"The cause of lymphadenopathy is often obvious: for example, the child who presents with a sore throat, tender cervical nodes and a positive…… [Read More]

References

Calhoun, D., Jones, D., Textor, S., Goff, D., Murphy, T., & Toto, R. et al. (2008). Resistant Hypertension: Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Professional Education Committee of the Council for High Blood Pressure Research. Circulation,117(25), e510-e526. doi:10.1161/circulationaha.108.189141

Ferrer, R. (2015). Lymphadenopathy: Differential Diagnosis and Evaluation - American Family Physician. Aafp.org. Retrieved 13 June 2015, from  http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/1015/p1313.html  lni,. (2015). Clothing Dermatitis and Clothing-Related Skin Conditions. Retrieved 14 June 2015, from  http://www.lni.wa.gov/sharp/derm
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Restless Leg Syndrome

Words: 1477 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 94280149

estless Leg Syndrome

A simple way to define estless legs syndrome (LS) is an overpowering urge to move limbs, especially the legs that mostly take place when relaxing or during bedtime. This neural disorder is a major causative factor of nighttime blood pressure spikes and its associated circulatory consequences which reduces sleep quality and in some cases even eliminates the possibility of sleep. This sleep deprivation causes adverse effects such as nervousness, perpetual sadness and reduced comfort of living. Patients initially suffering from hemodialysis that develops LS have a much higher death rate. In most cases, they suffer from disorders that are difficult to explain. This paper's objective is to educate medical personnel on the need to understand and make deductions from the patient's signs, which are the factors considered and from which a conclusion is made if a patient has LS or some other disorder (Einollahi & Izadianmehr, 2014).…… [Read More]

References

Allen, R., Chen, C., & Garcia-Borreguero, D. (2014). Comparison of pregabalin with pramipexole for restless legs syndrome. N Engl J. Med, 370(7), 621-31.

Comella, C. L. (2014). Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome. Neurotherapeutics, 11(1), 177-87.

Einollahi, B., & Izadianmehr, N. (2014). Restless Leg Syndrome: A Neglected Diagnosis. Nephrourol Mon, 6(5).

Gangadharan, S., Perkins, L., Sauerbier, A., & Chaudhuri, K. R. (2016). The treatment challenges of restless legs syndrome. Prescribing In Practice.
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Obesity Is a Subject That

Words: 920 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 92209275



Effects

The effects of obesity are numerous and include both physical and psychological factors. The physical effects of obesity include heart disease, diabetes, high cholesterol levels, hypertension, respiratory issues, and sleep apnea (Health Consequences). Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the United Sates. In many cases heart disease is preventable or controllable through weight loss and healthy living. Another major effect of obesity is diabetes. Diabetes is a very detrimental disease because it can affect every organ in the body and it is a major cause of blindness in the United States. In addition, many people with diabetes experience kidney failure and even the amputation of limbs as a result of nerve damage and poor circulation (Health Consequences).

Respiratory problems and sleep apnea are also high amongst people who suffer from obesity. Respiratory problems may lead to dependence on oxygen machines. Sleep apnea is particularly…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Contributing Factors."

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  http://www.cdc.gov /nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/contributing_factors.htm

Health Consequences." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Supplements Fatigue and Lethargy

Words: 1207 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59874048

Supplements, Fatigue and Lethargy

DO THEY HELP?

Vitamin E (p 1- 1.5)

Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin and antioxidant, which inhibits the production of reactive oxygen species or ROS when fat is oxidized (NIH, 2013). The body produces ROS when it converts food into energy. As an antioxidant, Vitamin E protects body cells from the ill effects of free radicals. Free radicals are molecules containing an unshared electron. They damage cells and contribute to the development of heart diseases and cancer. Unshared electrons are very active and quickly react with oxygen to form ROS. Health experts conjecture that limiting the production of free radicals may, alone or through other mechanisms, help prevent or delay the formation of these dreaded chronic diseases associated with the action of free radicals. Vitamin E may serve that function (NIH).

As an antioxidant, it also plays a role in the immune function of the…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bain, J. (2001). Andropause: testosterone replacement therapy for aging men. Vol. 47,

Canadian Family Physician: Janvier. Retrieved on February 28, 2014 from  http://www.cfp.ca/content/47/1/91.long 

NIH (2013). Vitamin E Office of Dietary Supplements: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Retrieved on February 28, 2014 from  http://www.ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional 

Watson, S. (2014). The causes of women's fatigue. WebMD Magazine: WebMD LLC.
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Resolving Ethical Challenges in Clinical Tests

Words: 929 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51423116

Ethical Factors in Clinical Testing

The conduct of the medics during their course of duty is regulated and governed by the established regulations relating to their profession. The basis of all these regulations is mainly to safeguard the rights of the patients. The patients must be accorded the utmost respect and handled in a dignified manner that makes them feel respected. It also covers what sort of equipment to be used in the case of an operation. Besides, regulations in the medical fraternity also cover the conditions of the treatment facilities such as the hospitals. The level of hygiene among other conditions is put into consideration. This paper focuses on the ethical issues that surround the observation of patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea condition in the United States. This is a medical condition where a patient has difficulties breathing during sleep. However, it is unknown to these patients and can…… [Read More]

References

Brown, D.L. et al., (2011). Ethical Issues in the Conduct of Clinical Trials in Obstructive Sleep Apnea. J Clin Sleep Med. 2011 Feb 15;7(1):103-8.

Silverman H. (2007). Ethical Issues During The Conduct Of Clinical Trials. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 200 7 May;4(2):180-4; discussion 184.
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Effecting Change the Use of

Words: 4091 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 19489453

According to a 2002 survey conducted under the auspices of NIH, ecstasy abuse among college and university students in general is a widespread trend that impedes academic performance (Bar-on, 2002). The NIH survey targeted 66 4-year American universities and colleges alike. The projected findings indicated a diminishing trend in undergraduate academic performance amongst students who indulge in binge drinking and abuse ecstasy in the process. Elsewhere, a Harvard College drug study indicated persistent drug users were more likely to miss lectures and delay in their coursework than the average student (Montgomery & Fisk, 2008).

A parallel IP esearch dubbed "Predictors of academic achievement and retention among college freshmen" projected that while certain students manage to cope with the new life role upon entering college, a good number of students flunk out of college before completing their freshman year. According to this research, 75% of the freshman drop out is related…… [Read More]

References

Bar-on, R. (2002). Bar-on Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-I): Technical Manual. Toronto, Canada: Multi-Health Systems

Erikson, E (1956) "The problem of ego identity" (pdf) Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 4: 56 -- 121

Kotter, J & Cohen, D (2002) the Heart of Change: Real-Life Stories of How People Change Their Organizations Harvard Business Review Press

Montgomery C. & Fisk J.E. (2008) "Ecstasy-related deficits in the updating component of executive processes" Human Psychopharmacology 23 (6): 495 -- 511
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Fibromyalgia One Might Consider Fibromyalgia to Be

Words: 6457 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 37868620

Fibromyalgia

One might consider fibromyalgia to be one of the most confounding conditions around today. It is debilitating. It results in several quality of life issues. The confounding aspect of this condition is that it is difficult to diagnose. It is also difficult to treat. Most treatment modalities today recourse to treating one or more specific symptoms -- but there is no treatment that can comprehensively treat all the symptoms. (NIAMS, 2004) More holistic treatment modes however, are being researched, explored and considered. Fibromyalgia often presents symptoms of other diseases. Essentially therefore, fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain that cannot be localized to any part of the body. It is also associated with fatigue and other specific (though not necessarily widespread) symptoms that will be discussed later in this work.

Fibromyalgia syndrome is often referred to in its abbreviation FMS. Some of the symptoms (though not all) enjoy significant overlap…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adiguzel, O., Kaptanoglu, E., Turgut, B., & Nacitarhan, V. (2004). The possible effect of clinical recovery on regional cerebral blood flow deficits in fibromyalgia: a prospective study with semiquantitative SPECT. South Med J, 97, 7, 651-655

Baldry, P. (1993). Complementary medicine. The practice of acupuncture needs tighter safeguards. Bmj, 307, 6899, 326

Baumgartner, E., Finckh, A., Cedraschi, C., & Vischer, T.L. (2002). A six-year prospective study of a cohort of patients with fibromyalgia. Ann Rheum Dis, 61, 7, 644-645

Bennet, Robert. (2000). The Scientific Basis for Understanding Pain in Fibromyalgia. Myalgia.com. Retrieved August 21, 2004, from the World Wide Web:  http://www.myalgia.com/Scientific%20basis.htm
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Laws Affecting the Human Resources

Words: 4295 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48075020



Add to this confusion the growing prevalence of telecommuters and the issues of the FLSA become even more complicated. Of course some telecommuting positions fall into the exempt category, and therefore are not subject to overtime pay, however some do. Due to the freedom to engage in 'private pursuits', employers may monitor when a virtual employee logs onto his or her computer and may require that he or she get permission before working overtime (Gabel & Mansfield 2003, 316). Only by fully understanding the FLSA and the legislation that has evolved from its implementation, can Human Resource professionals be certain to obey the regulations and not compromise their organization.

Discrimination:

In addition to the monitoring of ever-changing compensation laws, Human Resource professionals must also be well versed in discrimination legislation as well. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, one of them of the most important pieces of discrimination legislation created,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Affirmative Action. (12 Oct. 2004). Online. Available at  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affirmative_action [accessed 15 October 2004].

Crampton, Suzanne M., Hodge, John W., Mishra, Jitendra M. "The FLSA and Overtime Pay." Public Personnel Management 32, no. 3 (Fall 2003): 331-354. Database online. Available from ProQuest database.

DeLeire, Thomas. "The Wage and Employment Effects of the Americans with Disabilities Act." Journal of Human Resources 35, no. 4 (Fall 2000): 693-715. Database online. Available from Business Source Premier database.

EEO Poster. (No date). Online. Available at  http://www.dol.gov/esa/regs/compliance/posters/pdf/eeopost.pdf [accessed 11 Oct. 2004].
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Childhood Obesity Epidemic Terms Defined

Words: 10017 Length: 36 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62547545

" (Dietz, 1998). Obese children are often taller than their non-overweight peers, and are apt to be viewed as more mature. This is an inappropriate expectation that may result in adverse effects on their socialization. (Dietz, 1998). Overweight children and adolescents report negative assumptions made about them by others, including being inactive or lazy, being strong or tougher than others, not having feelings and being unclean. (American Obesity Association, 2000).

This epidemic did not occur overnight. Obesity and overweight are chronic conditions.

Problem Statement

This study was concerned with genetics, family dynamics and parenting, and nutrition and dietary intake, all three of which contribute to childhood obesity. Specifically the researcher will attempt to determine what factors are contributing to the nations epidemic rises in obesity among children and what the effects are of the growing girth that is plaguing the nations children. The objective of the research study will be…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

American Obesity Association. (2004). Childhood Obesity. Retrieved March 20th, 2005, on the World Wide Web: http://www.obesity.org/subs/childhood/prevalence.shtml.

American Obesity Association. (September 1999). Obesity in Youth. (Conference outcomes). Washington, DC: Author retrieved March 20th, 2005, from the World Wide Web: http://www.obesity.com/Obesity_Youth.htm.

Axmaker, L. (2002). "Childhood obesity should be taken seriously." In Blasi, M.J.

2003). "A burger and fries: The increasing dilemmas of childhood obesity," Childhood Education, 79(5).
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States of Consciousness

Words: 952 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 11736261

consciousness has been studied actively since the 1960s. Interestingly, Taylor (2003) notes, "Consciousness is a subtle phenomenon, which has so far resisted all attempts to understand it." Taylor's statement may be an exaggeration, as the author of this assigned reading goes on to discuss a number of facets of consciousness that have been well studied. These include biological rhythms, facets of waking consciousness, automatic vs. controlled processing, shifts in self-awareness, sleep, and drugs that alter consciousness.

This article notes that circadian rhythms can be either short-term or longer term, and are simply biological rhythms that occur as regular changes in our bodily functions and processes. The pineal gland plays an important role in long-term biological rhythms like hibernation through its production of melatonin. Human differences between day and night people is a common example of biological rhythms in humans.

The author then moves on to examine common disturbances in circadian…… [Read More]

References

Morin, Alain. 2002. Self-awareness review part 1: Do you 'self-reflect' or 'self-ruminate'? SCR, December, No. 1. 26 August 2004.  http://www2.mtroyal.ab.ca/~amorin/Rumination.pdf 

Chapter: States of Consciousness. p. 121 -154.

Revonsuo, Antti and Valli, Katja. 2000. Dreaming and Consciousness: Testing the Threat Simulation Theory of the Function of Dreaming. PSYCHE, 6(8), October 2000. 26 August 2004. http://psyche.cs.monash.edu.au/v6/psyche-6-08-revonsuo.html

Tart, Charles T. 1975. States of Consciousness. First published by E.P. Dutton & Co., New York, in 1975. ISBN 0-525-20970-0. August 26, 2004.  http://www.druglibrary.org/special/tart/soccont.htm
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Night Eating Explore the Individuals

Words: 7427 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 41952902

"…people with NES tend to be more depressed than obese people without NES, and the mood of those with NES tends to worsen during the evening, something not seen in other obese people"(Logue, 2004, p. 185).

Among the many studies that provide insight into the background and origins of this syndrome, one of the most enlightening was Obesity by Stunkard, in Fairburn and Brownell (2002). This provides an in-depth analysis of night eating syndrome as well as a concise overview of the background of this condition. Stunkard also refers to a detailed overview of this condition.

Studies using the above criteria estimate that the prevalence of the night eating syndrome in the general population is approximately 1.5% and that prevalence increases with increasing weight, from about 10% of persons enrolling in obesity clinics to as high as 25% of patients undergoing surgical treatment for obesity…it occurs among about 5% of…… [Read More]

References

Allison K. et al. ( 2005) Neuroendocrine Profiles Associated with Energy Intake, Sleep, and Stress in the Night Eating Syndrome . The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 90(11), pp. 6214-6217.

Amanda Ursell's: Feel Good. (2001, January 7). Sunday Mirror (London, England), p. 16. Retrieved April 23, 2010, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5007796657 

Arieti, S. & Brodie, H.K. (Eds.). (1981). Advances and New Directions. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved April 23, 2010, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101519121 

Aronoff N., Geliebter a., and Zammit G. ( 2001) Gender and body mass index as related to the night-eating syndrome in obese outpatients. J Am Diet Assoc.101(1), pp.102-4.
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Food and Policy Discuss the

Words: 731 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65934494

As far as society is concerned, the effects of high obesity rates would include: an increase in health care costs, less productivity and increasing disability rates. This is significant, because the information provides a way of seeing the total impact that obesity is having on the individual and society. Where, the overall long-term costs for the individual will mean the possibility of being exposed to a number of different conditions simultaneously. At the same time, society will have to bear the economic impact that obesity rates will have on the economy, as it will lead to higher costs and less productivity. (Vissche 2010 pp. 355 -- 375)

Describe the Way in which the Issue is being Reported

The issue is being reported as a major health crisis that will have long-term implications on the country. During these reports, the high statistics and the total amounts of obesity are usually highlighted.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

F as in Fat, 2007, American Trails, viewed 4 Aug. 2010,

Doane, S, Battling Obesity in America, 2010, viewed 4 Aug. 2010,

Himba, T, 5 Causes of Obesity, 2010, viewed 4 Aug. 2010,

Visscher, T, 2010, 'The Public Health Impact of Obesity', Annual Review of Public Health, vol. 22, pp. 355 -375.
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Web Health Care Located in Wichita Kansas

Words: 1937 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35504884

Web Health Care

Located in Wichita, Kansas, Via Christi Health is the agency that serves the eponymous region through the site via-christi.org. Via Christi provides care through hospitals, outpatient centers, senior communities, and in-home care for individuals in Kansas. The services the agency provides a VCMA directory, which encompasses a search for physicians through Via Christi Medical Associates and the Via Christi Clinic, along with the Via Christi Hospitals. Via Christi Medical Associates is a group of fifty family practitioners, while Via Christi Clinics offer family care and immediate care. The thirteen clinics have been in place since 1948, 160 hired physicians, and encompassed 40 specialties. Via Christi agency offers a directory and location of special centers, which includes burn center, cancer care, cardiac care, and cystic fibrosis. As well, there's epileptology, neurosciences, obstetrics and gynecology, and occupational health services. Moreover, individuals are able to look up care for pediatric…… [Read More]

References

Via Christi Hospitals: VCFM Residency. (n.d.). VCFM Residency. Retrieved December 3, 2011, from  http://www.vcfm.net/details/via-christi/ 

HMR Clinic Program Weight Loss Surgery Weight Loss Class Corporate Wellness HMR at Home Meal Replacements ~ Via Christi Weight Management Wichita Kansas. (n.d.). HMR Clinic Program Weight Loss Surgery Weight Loss Class Corporate Wellness HMR at Home Meal Replacements ~ Via Christi Weight Management Wichita Kansas. Retrieved December 3, 2011, from  http://www.viachristiweightmanagement.com/ 

Via Christi Clinic - Multi-practice medical care in Wichita, KS . (n.d.). Via Christi Clinic - Multi-practice medical care in Wichita, KS . Retrieved December 3, 2011, from  http://www.viachristiclinic.com/ 

Via Christi to open cancer center | Wichita Eagle. (n.d.). Local and breaking news for Wichita and Kansas | The Wichita Eagle and kansas.com. Retrieved December 3, 2011, from http://www.kansas.com/2011/06/24/1906153/via-christi-to-open-cancer-center.html
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Renal Failure or Commonly Referred to as

Words: 551 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28794269

Renal failure, or commonly referred to as kidney failure, is a condition in which the kidneys do not sufficiently filter out the toxins and waste products that are transported in the body's blood stream. There are two basic forms of renal failure. The first is when there is an acute injury prevents the kidneys from functioning properly. The next is a more serious condition in which the kidneys are chronically inflicted. Chronic kidney disease has the potential to be irreversible and requires immediate medical attention. Some of the symptoms of renal failure include (Lin, 2011):

Appetite loss

General ill feeling and fatigue

Headaches

Itching (pruritus) and dry skin

Nausea

eight loss without trying to lose weight

Other symptoms that may develop, especially when kidney function has gotten worse, include:

Abnormally dark or light skin

Bone pain

Brain and nervous system symptoms:

Drowsiness and confusion

Problems concentrating or thinking

Numbness in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lin, H. (2011, September 21). Medline Plus. Retrieved from Chronic Kidney Disease:  http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000471.htm 

MedlinePlus. (2011, September 21). Chronic Kidney Disease. Retrieved from MedlinePlus:
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Obesity Is a Health Issue in Britain

Words: 2607 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74135406

health issue of obesity is gaining attention from diverse groups in society nowadays. For some years now, the many cases of health problems resulting from obesity have been the focus of research and studies of many scientists from different countries. Today, due to the increasing percentage of obese people in many nations, obesity research is among the major programs considered by health service groups and governments.

Obesity is a health problem that refers to excess fats in the body resulting to being overweight. Usually, obesity is caused by improper diet. Some critical illnesses that toll life are associated with obesity. Studies have shown that being obese causes an individual to lose a few years from his life expectancy.

Currently, countless of health articles, news, and journals regarding obesity are disseminated to bring attention to the public about its consequences. ecause of this, questions have been raised if such exposure of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Curtis, Tom. Glasgow and Edinburgh Named UK's Fattest Cities.

News Scotsman. 07 June 2003.  http://www.news.scotsman.com/topics.cfm?id=288892003&tid=677 

Josling, Leanne. Obesity: A Curable Epidemic.

World Socialist Web Site. 05 June 2003.  http://www.wsws.org/articles/2000/apr2000/obes-a29.shtml
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How to Help a Mother Feed a Child With Difficulty Swallowing

Words: 1546 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62639660

teaching and learning to patients with dysphagia. The situation involves the researcher's own personal experience teaching a Mom of 16-month-old diagnosis with dysphagia and how to learn how to feed him. This paper discusses the client's background, learning objectives, learning needs, outcomes, teaching strategies, and evaluation of outcomes and provides guidance for a mother facing these same issues.

Infants and children need to consume sufficient amount of nutrients in order to grow. Swallowing difficulties has an effect on dietary intake and affects a child's growth and development. For this reason, it is important to manage dysphagia in pediatrics.

Dysphagia is a disruption in swallowing that compromises safety, efficiency, or adequacy of nutritional intake. Swallowing and breathing share a common space in the pharynx, and problems in either of these processes can affect a child's ability to protect their airway during swallowing and ingestion of fluid or food safely.

About 1%…… [Read More]

References

Dysphagia and swallowing disorders. Retrieved from  http://nursing.advanceweb.com/Regional-Articles/Features/Nurses-Role-With-Dysphagia.aspx .

East, L., Nettles, K., Vansant, A. & Daniels, S. Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia With the Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study. Journal of Radiology Nursing.

Gosa, M. & Coleman, J. Thickened Liquids as a Treatment for Children with Dysphagia and Associated Adverse Effects A systematic Review.

Nurses' Role With Dysphagia. Retrieved from  https://consultgeri.org/try-this/general-assessment/issue-20 . Preventing Aspiration in Older Adults with Dysphagia
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Enlarged Growth and Pituitary

Words: 726 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61723804

What is the most likely diagnosis?
John is believed to be suffering from gigantism or acromegaly.
Symptoms of acromegaly
The term 'acromegaly' has its roots in the Greek terms for "enlargement" and "extremities"; these terms reflect one among the ailment's most commonly occurring signs of abnormally expanding feet and hands (Marieb & Hoehn, 2018a; 2018b). Swollen feet and hands typically manifest as an initial sign. Those suffering from the acromegaly notice changes in their shoe or ring sizes, especially shoe width. Slowly, changes in the bone begin to transform their facial features, with their lower jaw and brow protruding, spacing out of the teeth, and enlargement of their nasal bone (Colao et al., 2019).
Abnormal cartilage and bone growth frequently results in arthritis. Tissue thickening can trap nerves and result in the development of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that in turn produces weakening and numbness of hands. Enlargement may also…… [Read More]

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Childhood Obesity in Australia Childhood

Words: 2730 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22024766



Development of Policy esponses

The first step in the development of these policy strategies was to identify that a problem existed with childhood obesity and frame the problem so that it could brought to light and intervention strategies debated. While some of the framing of this issue may have been based upon misinformation, policymakers did attempt to frame the problem which is in line with the Australian policy development cycle. This initial framing is an example of how misinformation can lead to poor policy decisions. When looking at childhood obesity from a policy perspective it is imperative to understand the difference between obesity prevention and obesity treatment and this has often been confused in attempts to develop policies for the Australian people (O'Dea 2005).

The Australian policy cycle is comprised of stages including problem identification, analysis of policy options, policy instrument, consultation, coordination, decision, implementation, and evaluation. While this policy…… [Read More]

References

Coveney, J. 2008. The government of girth. Health Sociology Review, 17, pp. 199-213.

De Silva, A.M., Bolton, K., Haby, M., Kremer, P., Gibbs, L., Waters, E., and Swimburn, B. 2010. Scaling up community-based obesity prevention in Australia: background and evaluation design of the Health Promoting Communities: Being Active Eating Well initiative. BMC Public Health, 10, pp. 65.

Henderson, J., Coveney, J., Ward, P., and Taylor, A. 2009. Governing childhood obesity: Framing regulation of fast food advertising in the Australian print media. Social Science & Medicine, 69(9), pp. 1402-08.

Hesketh, K., Waters, E., Green, J., Salmon, L., and Williams. 2005. Healthy eating, activity and obesity prevention: a qualitative study of parent and child perceptions in Australia. Health Promotion International, 20(1), pp. 19-26.
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Rural Obesity The Missouri Example

Words: 3204 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 79504761

Nanney et al. (2007) state that policies aimed at promoting nutritional awareness in schools and about local healthy food choices would influence the food choices that people make within their own homes, possibly leading to better health outcomes.

Past studies on obesity in Missouri have identified obesity risk factors and nutritional deficiencies in populations of inner city youth, rural elderly, rural poverty-stricken, and rural youth (Kohrs, Wang, Eklund, Paulsen, & O'Neal, 1979; Kohrs, O'Neal, Preston, Eklund, & Abrahams, 1978; (Kohrs, Nordstrom, O'Nea, Eklund, Paulsen, & Hertzler, 1978). Previous measures to address obesity in Missouri have focused on school nutrition programs. However, the obesity rates continue to rise, and Missouri has adopted a program through the establishment of the Missouri Council on the Prevention and Management of Overweight and Obesity aimed at increasing activity levels, improving nutritional intake, creating an effective health care system, and creating effective obesity-related policies (Missouri Department…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Boehmer, T., Lovegreen, S., Haire-Joshu, D., & Brownson, R. (2006). What Constitutes an Obesogenic Environment in Rural Communities. American Journal of Health Promotion, 411-421.

Casey, a., Elliott, M., Glanz, K., Haire-Joshu, D., Lovegreen, S., Saelens, B., et al. (2008). Impact of the food environment and physical activity environment on behaviors and weight status in rural U.S. communities. Preventive Medicine, 600-604.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Obesity and Overweight. Retrieved June 25, 2010, from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:  http://www.cdc.gov /obesity/" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Military Readiness the Issue of

Words: 10587 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 93817147

In addition, the Marines have a much smaller force than the army.

On the other hand, the army cannot be as selective as the marines because it needs to maintain a much higher number of troops. The article explains that the army "needs 80,000 new soldiers this year and must find them in a populace that is in many ways less willing and less able to serve than earlier generations were (Mockenhaupt, 2007, pg.86)." The article explains that teenagers and young adults are overweight and less fit than any previous generation. In addition, this generation of young Americans eats more unhealthy foods, watches more television, and engages in less physical activity than previous generations. The article further asserts that this generation is "more individualistic and less inclined to join the military. And with the unemployment rate hovering near historic lows, they have other choices (Mockenhaupt, 2007, pg.86)."

Overall it is…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, P.M., & Butcher, K.F. (2006). Childhood Obesity: Trends and Potential Causes. The Future of Children, 16(1), 19+.

Body Mass Index. http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/

Belkin D. (February 20, 2006) Struggling for recruits, Army relaxes its rules: Fitness, education, age criteria change. The Boston Globe Retrieved March 16, 2008 from;  http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2006/02/20/struggling_for_recruits_army_relaxes_its_rules/?page=1 

Daniels, S.R. (2006). The Consequences of Childhood Overweight and Obesity. The Future of Children, 16(1), 47+.
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Researching a Call for Action

Words: 1208 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24638629

com. (2006) Nutritional information database retrieved 13 Dec
2006 at


Fitday.com. (2006) Nutritional information database retrieved 13 Dec 2006
at
< http://fitday.com/>

Severson, Kim. (13 Dec 2003) "New York Gets Ready to Count Calories."
The New York Times. Retrieved 13 Dec 2006 at


Schlosser, Eric. (2005) Fast Food Nation. New York: Harper Perennial.

"Supersize Me." (2004). Directed by Morgan Spurlock.

"Overweight and Obesity."(2006) CDC: Council for Disease Control.
Retrieved 13 Dec
2006 at… [Read More]

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Childhood Obesity Problem and Solutions

Words: 2831 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75856773

197).

Further, Robinson and Sirard posit that applying a "Litmus Test" helps to identify the specific research questions, study designs, and methods that will most likely contribute to improving individual and overall population health (198). The researchers suggest that a study should only be performed if the researcher(s) knows what the conclusion from each possible result (negative, null, positive) will be, and how the result will incline intervention to address policy, clinical or a public health problem like childhood obesity. If research is conducted as suggested, the authors maintain that studies with a greater possibility of advancing science and directly, not suggestively, improving well being and health, would be the result. Therefore, greater assurance that will be provided that ethical responsibilities of not devaluing the contributions of research participants, and responsibly responding to the need for useful research to the public, particularly if public funds are used for the project,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Allison, D.B., Pietrobell, A., Faith, M.S., Fontaine, K.R., Gropp, E., & Fernandez, J.R.

(2003). Genetic influences on obesity. In Eckel, R. (ed). Obesity: Mechanisms

and Clinical Management. Elsevier: New York, pp. 1-74.

Ballard, M.B., & Alessi, H.D. (2004). The impact of childhood obesity upon academic.
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Thousands of Diseases Afflicting Humans

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 97399852

" This drug has already won approval for use in Europe and the United tates. tudies conducted show that the drug "targets the tumor to control in four areas: in the site where hypersecretion starts, in GH secretion, IGF-1 and in the symptoms associated with the disease (Unknown, 2004)." While the drug has been approved, there are still contraindications to taking it such as a patient who has an irregular or slow heart rate, or blood sugar levels which are either too high or too low.

Occurrence

Although gigantism begins prior to puberty, the "majority of giants eventually demonstrate features of acromegaly, of which the mean age for the onset is within the 3rd decade of life. Even a congenital onset of GH excess has been suggested by linear growth acceleration occurring within the first few months of life in young children with documented gigantism (http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/84/12/4379)." Although there is no…… [Read More]

Simmons, Kirt E. (01 October, 1999). "Growth Hormone and Craniofacial Changes: Preliminary Data From Studies in Turner's Syndrome." Pediatrics.

Skatssoon, Judy. (21 May, 2002). "NSW: New discovery could lead to cure for dwaftism, gigantism." AAP General News (Australia).

Unknown. (01 June, 2004). "Novartis Sandostatin LAR approved in Japan for Acromegaly. Worldwide Biotech.
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Dwarfism According to the Website

Words: 648 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 14193835

For example, dwarfism can result in significant loss of mobility due to the bone abnormalities and "in some instances, breathing difficulties, gradual paralysis and even death may result," (Little People's Research Fund). Most of the problems associated with skeletal dysplasias cannot be reversed, but through forms of physical and occupational therapy, people with dwarfism can overcome some of the debilitating symptoms associated with the condition. For example, if the dwarfism is detected and treated early enough, the person will be able to enjoy near to full mobility throughout their adult life. Reconstructive surgery can also be useful to correct certain symptoms. Joint replacement surgery is necessary for some persons with dwarfism. Some surgeries, such as lengthening the limbs using pins, is more cosmetic than a functional necessity. According to the Little People's Research Fund, "surgery on Little People involves bone grafts, fusions, steel screws, pins and plates, then months of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dwarfism." Dwarfism.org. Online at  http://www.dwarfism.org/ .

Dwarfism -- What is it?" Little People's Research Fund. Online at http://www.lprf.org/dwarfism.html.

Living with Dwarfism." Nemours Foundation: KidsHealth.org. Online at  http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/bones/dwarfism_p4.html .

What are the Signs of Dwarfism?" Nemours Foundation: KidsHealth.org. Online at  http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/bones/dwarfism_p3.html .
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Obesity An Overview What Is the Disease

Words: 693 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58097195

Obesity: An Overview

hat is the disease?

Obesity is an increasingly prevalent metabolic disorder whereby a patient's BMI or body mass index, defined as the patient's weight in kilograms divided by the patient's height in meters squared in kilograms, is greater than 30. Obesity puts one at greater risk for a number of ailments, and a BMI less than 21 is associated with the greatest protection from coronary heart disease mortality and other life-threatening ailments affecting the heart, other vital organs, and the body's metabolism. (Eckel, 1997)

However, there are problems with the BMI-based definition of obesity, as many women with a BMI of near 30 may be less at risk for heart disease if their increase in adipose tissue is distributed in the pelvis and not the abdomen. Substantial evidence now indicates that an increased waist circumference, or waist-to-hip ratio, better predicts co-morbidities and mortality from obesity, such as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Benson, Lorna. (2003) "MPR: Obesity as a Disease." Minnesota Public Radio (MPH) Special Report. Retrieved 11 Aug 2005 at  http://news.minnesota.publicradio.org/features/2004/03/29_bensonl_desease/ 

Eckel, Robert H. (1997) "Obesity and Heart Disease: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the Nutrition Committee, American Heart Association. Circulation. 96:3248-3250. Retrieved 11 Aug 2005 at  http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/96/9/3248#SEC1
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Food as a Public Good and Obesity as an Externality

Words: 1729 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 51126364

Health Public Good

Public Health as a Public Good

The United States has one of the lowest cost food options available to its consumers in the world. For an extended period, people assumed that this was a benefit of capitalism and that competition had helped push down the prices and made food available at lower costs through the market. However, many externalities have arisen in these circumstances that are now pointing researchers to question the consequences of having mass processed food available to consumers. The United States, as well as many other industrialized nations, currently has epidemic rates of obesity as well as the related obesity diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.

This trend is not restricted to just adult and the obesity rates among children have subsequently risen as well. This has made many instructions and activists compare the effects of poor diets and their health consequences to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adams, R. "Fat is a financial issue: Litigation over obesity could consign Big Mac, large fries and bucket-sized." 27 December 2002. The Guardian. Web. 28 March 2013.

Benloulou, J. "Pelman v. McDonald's: An In-depth Case Study of a Fast Food -- Obesity Lawsuit." April 2005.

"CASE 2-7." McDonald's and Obesity. N.d.

Chicago Defender. "Obesity and Fat Farm Subsidies." Chicago Defender (2003): 1. Online.
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Sociological Problem in the U S

Words: 1638 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41684237

Childhood Epidemic

Obesity is a significant problem for today's American children. In fact, the NCCC calculates that more than 23 million children and teenagers are overweight. Since 1980, the obesity rate amongst children has more than doubled and amongst children aged 2-5 years almost tripled, whilst it has more than tripled in adolescents aged 12-19 years (Ogden et al., 2008.).

The problems of childhood obesity in children include the following:

Obese children are at a higher risk for asthma

Obese children are more likely to suffer from psychosocial problems, fatty liver, orthopedic-related problems and sleep apnea

Childhood obesity has also corresponded with a rise in with type 2 diabetes, particularly among adolescent minority populations

Obese children are found to be at greater risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure and abnormal glucose tolerance

The causes of childhood obesity have been reduced to various…… [Read More]

References

Arizona law blog http://blog.sdsfamilylaw.com/child-custody-debate-state-intervention-to-remove-obese-children-from-their-homes/

Building a healthier America  http://www.buildinghealthieramerica.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC= {FEB23E39-070A-4D02-8B7B-D9E360BDFF8B}

Boon, R & Clysedale, P (2005) Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 45

Cleveland.com (December 04, 2011) Childhood obesity: Government was wrong to intervene in Cleveland Heights casehttp://blog.cleveland.com/letters/2011/12/childhood_obesity_government_w.html
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Role of Nutrition in Health

Words: 1891 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17001618

Role of Nutrition in Health

Nutritional Assessment is a detailed evaluation of objective as well as subjective data, relating to an individual's food intake, along with giving due consideration to factors such as medical history and lifestyle of the said individual. The purpose of a nutritional assessment is to identify the malnourishment and/or undernourishment in an individual's diet and to eradicate the factors that make it unhealthy and unfit. Once the data relating an individual's eating habits has been collected and organized, it can be used to evaluate the nutritional status of that person. The assessment is followed up by a plan to either intervene or to devise a new proper nutritious diet plan to help the individual attain a healthier status (Carol Rees Parrish, August 2003).

In keeping up with the current obesity and overweight statistics, the need for a balanced nutrition profile has increased tenfold. Australia today is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ageing, D. o. (1998). Australian Guide to Eating Healthy.  http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/content/E384CFA588B74377CA256F190004059B/$File/fd-cons.pdf .

Carol Rees Parrish, M.R. (August 2003). Nutritional Assessment: Current Concepts and Guidelines for the Busy Physician.

Institute, M.O. (June 2012). Obesity in Australia.

Institute, N.H. Obesisty.  http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/obesity/ob_gdlns.pdf .
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African-American Female Obesity

Words: 1847 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26794483

Obesity is a serious social problem in America. The effects of obesity in childhood are well documented in both the social science literature and medical journals. During the last 30 years, the percentage of obese children between the ages of 6 and 11 has risen 200% while the percentage of obese children between 12 and 19 has tripled (CDC, Preventing Childhood Obesity, 2010). Obesity in the nited States has increased among all cohorts and ethnicities, spans across generations, and is not limited to income or educational levels. However, the incidence of obesity among African-American women is of particular concern given the prevalence and severity of the issue in America.

Public health issue

More than two-thirds of Americans are now obese or overweight (Ogden et al., 2010).

Rates of adult obesity now exceed 20% in 49 states and D.C and 25% in 40 states. By way of comparison, in 1991, rates…… [Read More]

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2011). Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Vital Signs: Prevalence, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension -- United States, 1999 -- 2002 and 2005 -- 2008

Ward, S., Gray, A., Paranjape, A. (2008). African-Americans' perceptions of physician attempts to address obesity in the primary care setting. The Journal of General Internal Medicine, 24(5), 579-584.

Coenen, K.R., Hasty, A.H. (2007). Obesity potentiates development of fatty liver and insulin resistance, but not atherosclerosis, in high-fat diet-fed agouti LDLR-deficient mice. Retrieved from:  http://ajpendo.physiology.org/content/293/2/E492.short
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Obesity Can Be Defined as a State

Words: 740 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 30634368

Obesity can be defined as a state where surplus body fat is accumulated to the point that turns out to create an unfavorable consequence on an individual health. According to Haslam DW, James WP (2005) this situation brings about shortens life expectancy as well as amplified health complications. Individuals are well thought-out to be obese the moment their body mass index goes past 30 kg/m2. This extent is reached at by dividing an individual's heaviness in kg against the square of the individual's height in meters. It has been observed that obesity inflates the probability of a range of diseases, for the most part heart disease, type 2 diabetes, disruptive sleep apnea, particular kind of cancer, as well as osteoarthritis.

This condition (obesity) is usually caused by a mixture of extreme energy foods ingestion, be deficient in physical activity, as well as hereditary defenselessness, even though a small number of…… [Read More]

Reference

Adams JP, Murphy PG (July 2000). "Obesity in anaesthesia and intensive care." Br J. Anaesth 85 (1): 91 -- 108. doi:10.1093/bja/85.1.91. PMID 10927998 Retrieved October 5, 2013 from  http://www.iasj.net/iasj?func=fulltext&aId=47995 

Haslam DW, James WP (2005). "Obesity." Lancet 366 (9492): 1197 -- 209. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(05)67483-1. PMID 16198769 Retrieved October 5, 2013 from  http://www.ijser.org/researchpaper%5CA-Review-on-Obesity-and-its-Management.pdf 

Imaz I, Martinez-Cervell C, Garcia-Alvarez EE, Sendra-Gutierrez JM, Gonzalez-Enriquez J (July 2008). "Safety and effectiveness of the intragastric balloon for obesity. A meta-analysis." Obes Surg 18 (7): 841 -- 6. doi:10.1007/s11695-007-9331-8. PMID 18459025 Retrieved October 5, 2013 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18459025 

Kushner, Robert (2007). Treatment of the Obese Patient (Contemporary Endocrinology). Totowa, NJ: Humana Press. p. 158. ISBN 1-59745-400-1 Retrieved October 5, 2013 from  http://www.webmedcentral.com/wmcpdf/Article_WMC001927.pdf
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Myxedema Is a Potentially Deadly Endocrine Regulation

Words: 1022 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8566461

Myxedema is a potentially deadly endocrine regulation disease that usually arises in connection with pre-existing hypothyroidism, when the normal homeostatic mechanisms for responding to hypothyroidism are overwhelmed. It occurs most often in elderly women, and is usually characterized by swelling of the skin and other soft tissues (Wall, 2000).

The thyroid gland is central to homeostatic metabolic functions, and operates as part of a complex feedback loop involving both the pituitary and hypothalamus to control essential elements of fluid and electrolyte balance and thermoregulation. Under normal conditions, the hypothalamus influences pituitary hormonal output of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) via the secretion of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TH). Virtually any disruption of the precise functioning of these individual glands, or their complex interrelationships can precipitate conditions of hyperthyroidism and Grave's Disease or hypothyroidism and myxedema (MedicineNet, 2002).

Classic symptoms of myxedema include facial puffiness caused by subcutaneous accumulation of mucoploysaccharide, coarsening or…… [Read More]

References

Information on Hypothyroidism. (MedicineNet.com website)

Accessed July 25, 2004, at  http://www.medicinenet.com/hyperthyroidism/page1.htm 

Last updated: July 2, 2002

Manifold, C.A. Hypothyroidism and Myxedema Coma. (E-medicine.com website)
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Program Design for Childhood Obesity

Words: 1348 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14043348

Program Design on Childhood Obesity

Childhood obesity has become a very serious epidemic today, it is estimated that about 16.3% of children all over the world are obese.in the past four decades the rate of obesity for children that are aged between 6 and 11 years has gone up by more than four times.it is a serious pandemic since obese children are likely to suffer health consequences not only in their childhood and adolescence but also throughout their lives as adults. They are at risk for problems of joints and bones, sleep apnea, psychological and social problems, health diseases, type II diabetes, cancer, osteoarthritis, and stroke. Childhood obesity is an epidemic that cuts across the lines of ethnicity, family income, and race however, there are certain populations that are at a higher risk as compared to others. Some of the populations that are at risk include Latinos, African Americas, Native…… [Read More]

References

Digate, N.(2010). Preventing Childhood Obesity. Retrieved April 10, 2014 from  http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/preventing-childhood-obesity 

Segal, E. (2009). Fighting Obesity: What Works, What's Promising. Retrieved April 10, 2014 from  http://www.sparkpe.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Fighting-Obesity-Report.pdf 

Pekruhn, C. (2010). Preventing Childhood Obesity a School Health Policy Guide. Retrieved April 10, 2014 from  http://www.rwjf.org/content/dam/web-assets/2009/01/preventing-childhood-obesity -

WHO. (2014). What can be Done to Fight the Childhood Obesity Epidemic. Retrieved April 10, 2014 from  http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/childhood_what_can_be_done/en/
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Cleft Palate and Cleft Lip

Words: 2961 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 15691615

Cleft lip / Cleft palate

Introduction to the disorder

When the upper lip and top of the mouth do not join successfully early in the pregnancy, a strange condition known as cleft lip/palate is said to have occurred. The lip and palate grow independently, so it is feasible for an infant to be conceived with just a cleft lip, or just a cleft palate, or a blend of both. When there is a gap or opening reaching out from the lip as far as up as the nose then it is a complete cleft lip. In some cases, some tissue stays underneath the nose, leaving a piece of the lip joined beneath the nose - this is referred to as an incomplete cleft lip. The roof of the mouth is comprised of two principle parts - a bony segment called the hard palate and a soft tissue / muscular part…… [Read More]

References

Dixon, M., Marazita, M., Beaty, T., & Murray, J. (2011). Cleft lip and palate: understanding genetic and environmental influences. Nature Revies Genetics, 12, 167-175.

Mendoza, M., & Perez, A. (2013). Anatomical closure technique of the nasal floor for patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. J Plast Surg Hand Surg, 47, 196-199.

Nyberg, J., Peterson, P., & Lohmander, A. (2014). Speech outcomes at age 5 and 10 years in unilateral cleft lip and palate after one-stage palatal repair with minimal incision technique - A longitudinal perspective. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 1663-1668.

Paniagua, L., Signorini, A., Selaimen, S., & Collares, M. (2013). Velopharyngeal dysfunction: a systematic review of major instrumental and auditory-perceptual assessments. Int. Arch. Otorhinolaryngol, 17(3), 251-256.
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Post Surgery Measures

Words: 1732 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 60748866

Tonsil Problems

Surgery is a traumatic and often dangerous event. While tonsillectomies are somewhat common in the history of surgical procedures, it is necessary to investigate the problems of Amy as listed in the case study following a post operative procedure in which her tonsils were removed. In order to determine the patient's pathophysiology it is necessary to identify the problematic or typical physiological processes that are occurring with the patient.

The first step in discussing this problem should identify any problems or situations that are out of the normal set of circumstances for a tonsillectomy. Most of these types of surgeries are simple and require little to no healing time and prescriptions to finish the process. Here in Amy's case however, there seems to be a definite problem. The main problems deals with the patient's mental state and her fear of not healing. This fear has no doubt complicated…… [Read More]

References

Audit, N.P.T., & van der Meulen, J. (2004). Tonsillectomy technique as a risk factor for postoperative haemorrhage. The Lancet, 364(9435), 697-702.

Aukburg, S.J., Ketikidis, P.H., Kitz, D.S., Mavrides, T.G., & Matschinsky, B.B. (1989, November). Automation of physiologic data presentation and alarms in the post anesthesia care unit. In Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Computer Application in Medical Care (p. 580). American Medical Informatics Association.

Berry, J.G., Blaine, K., Rogers, J., McBride, S., Schor, E., Birmingham, J., ... & Feudtner, C. (2014). A framework of pediatric hospital discharge care informed by legislation, research, and practice. JAMA pediatrics, 168(10), 955-962.

Brar, M.S. (2009). Airway management in a bleeding adult following tonsillectomy: a case report. AANA J, 77(6), 428-430.
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Letter to Appeal a Dismissal to Be Reinstated

Words: 683 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21344835

diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea, and my doctor urged me to take time off from school to pursue effective treatment. However, as an international student with no health insurance coverage, I did not handle my situation as well as I could have and regret that sincerely. I continued with my studies, but my condition led to failing grades in my major course of study and I find myself in my current predicament.

Now I am insured and prepared to rectify my situation with the hard work necessary to complete the remaining two classes I need to graduate with my Bachelors in the field of economics. I am writing this letter to appeal the school's decision to dismiss me. I understand why the school made this decision initially; without knowing the context of my failing grades, the school could not have known what I was going through at the time. I…… [Read More]

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Obesity and Health Care Concerns for Nurses

Words: 1197 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Peer Reviewed Journal Paper #: 33558540

Incidence rates of obesity are rising globally, with tremendous impacts to the cost and nature of healthcare intervention. As measured as body mass index (BMI) of 25 or over, being overweight affects as many as 67% of all American adults, while up to 40% can be classified as obese with a BMI of 30 or more. About 5% of Americans are classified as morbidly obese with a BMI of 40 or more. Obesity affects persons from all demographic groups, and has been on the rise in all demographic groups, even though some groups have higher rates of obesity than others. As many as 10% of all children worldwide are either obese or overweight. Being overweight and being obese are associated with a number of health conditions including cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Moreover, obesity may cause psychological and social issues ranging from depression and anxiety to stigma and prejudice, with…… [Read More]

References

Camden, S.G. (2009). Obesity: An emerging concern for patients and nurses. OJIN 14(1).
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Social Entrepreneurialism and Sustainability

Words: 4420 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61337118

Social Entrepreneurship

Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and he can feed himself for life. How could you put this principle into practice through the development of a social entrepreneurship venture?

Development of Social Entrepreneurialism

Corporate Social Responsibility

Externalities

Social Inequality

Social Entrepreneurship and Food

Social entrepreneurship was introduced in the 1970s to address the issue of social sustainably and the term "social entrepreneur." This analysis will begin by providing a brief history as well as a working definition for the concept of social entrepreneurialism. It will also discuss some of the related movements that have been working towards some of the same goals, albeit, from different directions to address various challenges in society and the environment. Furthermore, a more detailed overview of the exact challenges that are present in society that social entrepreneurialism can work to address will…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abu-Saifan, S., 2012. Social Entrepreneurship: Definition and Boundaries. [Online]

Available at:  http://timreview.ca/article/523 

[Accessed 28 April 2016].

Ashoka, N.d.. Vision and Mission. [Online]
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Diabetes in the Literature

Words: 720 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 93647462

Diabetes -- Literature eview

It is estimated that nearly five and a half million people, or over a third of the population, have prediabetes in some populations such as the City of New York; diabetes and diabetes-associated cardiovascular diseases have become the leading cause of death in the region accounting for roughly two-thirds of the deaths and the rates of diabetes has lead this trend to be referred to as the diabetes epidemic (Frieden, 2006). The same trends can be found in a greater or lesser extend in most Western nations in the world. Furthermore, there has been a strong correlation between childhood obesity and childhood diseases, such as diabetes, that has now been identified (Dietz & Bellizzi, 1999).

The link between childhood obesity and adult diseases has been the subject of much attention in recent years. Much of the research has considered the programming of adult metabolic processes and…… [Read More]

References

Dietz, W., & Bellizzi, M. (1999). Introduction: the use of body mass index to assess obesity in children. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1235-1255.

Fernandez-Twinn, D., & Ozanne, S. (2010). Early life nutrition and metabolic programming. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 78-96.

Frieden, T. (2006). Diabetes in New York City: Public Health Burden and Disparities. Retrieved from New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: http://home2.nyc.gov/html/doh/downloads/pdf/epi/diabetes_chart_book.pdf

John, W., Hillson, R., & Alberti, S. (2011). Use of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. The implementation of World Health Organisation (WHO) guidance . Practical Diabetes, 12-13.
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Childhood Obesity Epidemic in USA

Words: 3294 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48004817

Childhood Obesity Focused on 6 to 11-Year-Olds in Tyler, Texas

Obesity is associated with a condition of calorific imbalance in which the ratio of consumption of calories consumed and the ones expended is skewed such that the amount of the ones spent is much lower than the amount consumed. The condition is influenced by a range of factors that include genetics, behavioral patterns, and environmental influences. In data availed by the Centre for Disease Control, children between the age of 6 to 11 with obesity condition stood at 7% in 1980 and increased to almost 18% in 2012. In 2014, figures from the Obesity Prevalence Map from the CDC showed that all states had obesity prevalence rates of 20% and above. Three of the states reflected an alarming 35% prevalence in their populations. The state of Texas was rated as having 30 to 35% people with obesity. Two states among…… [Read More]

References

Arons, A. (2011). Childhood Obesity in Texas, The Costs, The Policies, and a Framework for the Future. Retrieved from  http://www.childhealthtx.org/pdfs/Childhood%20Obesity%20in%20Texas%20Report.pdf  on 28 February 2016.

Center for Disease Control, (CDC). (last updated: June 19, 2015). Childhood Obesity Facts. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov /obesity/" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Info Sheet on Diabetes

Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98054694

Diabetes Handout

Diabetes was chosen as a topic because of the high percentage of the population that it affects coupled with the fact that it is a relatively preventable disease for most people. It is estimated that nearly five and a half million people in New York City, about a third of the population, have prediabetes, diabetes, and/or diabetes-associated cardiovascular diseases and similar frequencies have been noted throughout the Western world. Diabetes has become the leading cause of death in the region accounting for roughly two-thirds of the deaths and the rates of diabetes has lead this trend to be referred to as the diabetes epidemic (Frieden, 2006). There are a range of different factors that can lead to diabetes but the two main culprits are an improper diet and lack of exercise.

Furthermore, this condition is not reserved for only adults. The number of children who have diagnosed with…… [Read More]

References

Dietz, W., & Bellizzi, M. (1999). Introduction: the use of body mass index to assess obesity in children. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1235-1255.

Fernandez-Twinn, D., & Ozanne, S. (2010). Early life nutrition and metabolic programming. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 78-96.

Frieden, T. (2006). Diabetes in New York City: Public Health Burden and Disparities. Retrieved from New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene: http://home2.nyc.gov/html/doh/downloads/pdf/epi/diabetes_chart_book.pdf

John, W., Hillson, R., & Alberti, S. (2011). Use of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. The implementation of World Health Organisation (WHO) guidance . Practical Diabetes, 12-13.
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Childhood Obesity

Words: 1816 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 55871553

Childhood Obesity

In the last three decades, the rates of childhood obesity have increased by more than three times. This is according to the American Health Trust (2013), which further reports that 30 states have over 30% of their children above the overweight mark. Weight ranges greater than what is considered healthy for a given height, is what is considered overweight or obese by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These weight ranges are considered to increase the likelihood of some health complications such as Type 2 Diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea and liver disease. Both the CDC and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend the Body Mass Index (BMI) as the screening tool to identify possible weight problems in children.

Overweight and obese children are at a risk of developing serious health complications such as diabetes type 2 and hypertension (CDC, 2015b). Children and adolescents are the ones…… [Read More]

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015a). Healthy Weight. Retrieved from  https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/  on August 29, 2016

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015b). Childhood Overweight and Obesity. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov /obesity/" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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What Causes Down Syndrome

Words: 848 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44471201

Pathophysiology—Down Syndrome
Introduction
Down Syndrome is a chromosomal disorder that can produce a range of intellectual and physical defects in the individual. Depending on the phenotypic variation, these defects can be more or less severe for some than they are for others (Karmiloff-Smith et al., 2016). It is the most common genetic disorder in the U.S. and the most common cause of learning in young children. It can also lead to other health-related issues and complications such as heart as well as gastrointestinal disorders (Mayo Clinic, 2018). This paper will discuss the pathophysiology of Down Syndrome; the signs, symptoms and complications of the disorder; what current research and evidence-based practices focus on; and the most common treatment and management practices for Down Syndrome.

Pathophysiology
In all but 5% of cases, Down Syndrome is caused by trisomy 21—i.e., the individual has three chromosome 21 copies (Antonarakis, Lyle, Dermitzakis, Reymond & Deutsch,…… [Read More]

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Neurofibroma Genetic Traits and Impact

Words: 5537 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 52789543

However, recently, anesthesiologists have suggest a low to mid thoracic epidural combined with adequate general anesthesia. This anesthetic technique will allow for adequate inter-operative monitoring. After the operation, the anesthesiologist must continue to monitor the patient for either hypertension, hypotension and hypoglycemia. The presence of either of these conditions may alter the course of the medication given to the patient once the patient is removed from the anesthesia.

Respiratory System

Neurofibroma can cause systemic problems within the various components of the Respiratory System. As has already been presented, Neurofibromas can cause partial blockages within upper parts of the trachea. However, Neurofibromas can also pose challenges or the anesthesiologist when dealing with nasal, sinus or maxilofacial cavities with Neurofibromas present within. One example of how devastatingly complex the Neurofibroma can become is seen when a benign neurofibroma can cause a superior vena cava compression. Such was the case of a 21-year-old…… [Read More]

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Migraine Headache

Words: 2110 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 23860251

Migraine Headaches

Patient

Nancy Smith

9/10/66 (46 years old)

Gender

Female

ace

African-American

eligion

Marital Status

Married

Occupation

Caregiver

Chief Complaint

Extremely painful headache that won't go away.

Differential Diagnosis:

Possible Diagnosis

Migraine Headache

Potential Diagnosis

Deep pounding headache more pronounced behind eyes;

- Headache has lasted more than 72 hours

- OTC Pain medications ineffective (Tylenol)

No accompanying nausea or vomiting

Physical Exam: Elevated blood pressure

Diagnostic Testing: Frequency of symptoms log; More than 72 hours of pain; Two or more of unilateral, pulsating, moderate or severe pain; not reporting nausea or sensitivity to light; lack of response to pain medication

TMJ (Tempormandibular Joint Disorder)

Unlikely Diagnosis

History: Emanating pain but no jaw spasm or difficulty chewing or biting

Physical Exam: No clicking or popping of TMJ when opening or closing mouth

-No inflammation of muscle around jaw

Diagnostic Testing: No jaw pain or face pain, no earache so…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

American Headache Society. (2010). Pathophysiology of Migraine. Retrieved from:  http://www.americanheadachesociety.org/assets/1/7/NAP_for_Web_-_Pathophysiology_of_Migraine.pdf 

Borsook, D. (2012). The Migraine Brain: Imaging, Structure and Function. New York: Oxford University Press.

Davodpff. R. (2002). Migraine: Manifestations, Pathogenesis, and Management. New York: Oxford University Press.

Goadsby, P. (2009). The Vascular Theory of Migraine. Brain: A Journal of Neurology. 132 (1): 6-7.
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Maercker Et Al 2006 Cite

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17830258

However, the study sought to determine if new or additional CBT techniques were effective. The control condition for this study should have been broken up into two different groups: a WLC group and a group that received traditional CBT without new techniques involved. The current study only affirms that CBT is effective in treating PTSD; however, it does not determine if the new additional techniques over the traditional CBT techniques offer any incremental validity in the treatment of PTSD. Therefore, the overall design of the study is flawed. Moreover, we do not know which CBT techniques were beneficial in treatment. Perhaps a mixed design could have assisted in better understanding this.

2. Chemtob, Nakashima, and Carlson (2002) report that up until the current study there was only one controlled treatment study of children with PTSD following a natural disaster. The current study was designed to look at a brief treatment…… [Read More]