Social Change Essays (Examples)

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Social Business and the Retailer

Words: 9885 Length: 34 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5588703

Social Media etailing Applications: Opportunities and Threats

How Has Social Media Developed and What are the Benefits and Downsides of Using Social Media for etailers Today?

This study examines social business in general, how it developed and the benefits of using social media in particular. Second, this study provides a discussion concerning the potential positive as well as the effects of social business in the retail sector which is followed by a description of optimal business strategies for social media applications, the pros/cons of using these tools in the industry, and some representative case studies concerning companies that succeeded and some that recently failed in their use of social media. Finally, the study provides a summary of the research and important findings is followed by a series of recommendations concerning how retailers should use social media technologies in their own businesses in the concluding chapter.

Social Media Business Applications

Chapter…… [Read More]

References

About Honda. (2013). Honda. Available: http://corporate.honda.com/america/philanthropy.aspx?id=philanthropy_overview. Last accessed 1 November 2013.

About Virgin. (2013). Virgin America. Available: http://www.virginamerica.com/about/airline-company.html.

Baumann, M. (2010, June). @Twitter Discloses Business Model #Promotedtweets RT.

Information Today, 27 (6) 1-5.
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Social Enterprise What Is Meant by the

Words: 2339 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9807950

Social Enterprise

What is meant by the term 'social enterprise' and what do social enterprises contribute to society and the economies in which they operate?

The acceleration with which the world is changing day by day is continuous. A majority of organizations that have a motto of 'not-for-profit' are looking out for prospects with the help of which they can begin or widen their projects in order to get their missions fulfilled and offer the needy the earned profits. Thus, any organization or scheme that brings about the mentioned twofold objectives is considered a social enterprise. Social enterprises sell mission-related goods or services and by doing so they try to create a more impartial and fair environment through specific market-based strategies (Bornstein & Davis 2010).

In other words, a business is regarded as a social enterprise when the main objective is to cope up with the prevailing societal problems and…… [Read More]

References

Baptiste, T. (2009). Being a Leader and Making Decisions. 1st. ed. New York: Chelsea House.

Beerel, A. (2009). Leadership and Change Management. 1st. ed. Los Angeles: SAGE.

Bornstein, D. & Davis, S. (2010). Social Entrepreneurship: What Everyone Needs to Know. 1st. ed. New York: Oxford University Press.

Borzaga, C. & Defourny, J. (2001). The Emergence of Social Enterprise. 1st. ed. London: Routledge.
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Social Psychology of Gender-Based Sex

Words: 2019 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42182877



Western Sexual Mores and Fundamental Beliefs about omantic Love:

Beyond the unfair effect of gender-based differential sexual socialization on sexually liberated women in dating relationships, another component of American social psychology often undermines romantic happiness. Specifically, the many messages about romance and marriage that help shape the American view of love suggest that: (1) sexual desire between couples who love each other is exclusive; (2) sexual desire for others indicates a failure of a relationship (or lack of character or sincerity of one's partner); and (3) sexual jealousy is an indication of romantic love (Branden 2002).

Sexual jealousy is practically universal in romantic love within Western society (Buss 2000), but the fact of the matter is, at least in human beings, it is a learned reaction that is virtually unknown in several known aboriginal societies (Barash & Lipton 2001).

Despite the fact that psychologists consider sexual fidelity a matter of…… [Read More]

References

Ackerman, D. (1994) a Natural History of Love. New York: Vintage.

Baker, R., Elliston, F. (2002) Philosophy & Sex. Buffalo: Prometheus

Barash, D.P., Lipton, J.E. (2001) the Myth of Monogamy: Fidelity and Infidelity in Animals and People. New York: Henry Holt.

Branden, N. (2002) the Psychology of Romantic Love.
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Social Innovation Workplace the Role That Social

Words: 894 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14625689

Social Innovation Workplace

The role that social innovation plays in the global marketplace

It is clear that online marketing is becoming popular in all global corporations. Just as most things in life have shown significant progress, companies such as Wal-Mart and Apple are seeking for convenience. Wal-Mart and Apple have taken note of this and are offering online marketing and display of products. While marketers have an option of making sales through online-based infrastructures such YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, they have a wide range of variety in the market place. This makes us wonder about the pros and cons of online media (oberts, 2007).

Marketers with busy schedules throughout the day are able to continue with their sales and marketing efforts through online strategies. Here, customers are potential customers can log onto such as Facebook and Twitter at their convenient time and bump into adverts selling products and services. egular…… [Read More]

References

Cassin, R.L. (2008). Bribery abroad: Lessons from the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Morrisville, N.C: Lulu.com.

Mulgan, G., Tucker, S., Ali, R. & Sanders, B. (2009). Social innovation What it is, Why it matters and how it can be accelerated. London: Kogan Page.

Roberts, J. (2007). Stanford Social Innovation Review. What's Next Let's Play Microloan. Boston, Mass: Harvard Business School Press.

Saul, J. (2011). Social innovation, Inc.: 5 strategies for driving business growth through social change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
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Social Movements Social Reformers Recognized

Words: 2359 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43531425

King called upon Black churches to challenge the status quo and to change the pervasively oppressive social order. acism, economic and labor exploitation and war were named by King as the three greatest evils of American society and they needed to be fully eradicated to resolve social disparity.

King's idea of integration was complex; he struggled to eliminate or reduce poverty by linking political power, wealth, and poverty...."King's unfinished search for more radical reforms in America may have been the central reason he was killed."..."Martin Luther King and Malcolm X were both assassinated," Allen (1983: 322) writes, "at precisely the point at which they began working actively and consciously against the racism and exploitation generated by the American capitalist system..." (Jalata, 2003, p. 67)

The value of understanding the issue of class had been one that was a significant aspect of social reform research, since the post war period. One…… [Read More]

References

Curran, L. (2003). The Culture of Race, Class, and Poverty: The Emergence of a Cultural Discourse in Early Cold War Social Work. Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare, 30(3), 15.

Hon, L.C. (1997). To Redeem the Soul of America: Public Relations and the Civil Rights Movement. Journal of Public Relations Research, 9(3), 163-212.

Howe, B., & Pidwell, R. (2002). Poverty Research and Social Policy. Australian Journal of Social Issues, 37(2), 113.

Jalata, a. (2003). Comparing the African-American and Oromo Movements in the Global Context. Social Justice, 30(1), 67.
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Social Movement the 2008 Upcoming

Words: 3390 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12765902



The perspectives presented in the first instance by the two main candidates for the Democrat nomination is essential. Their presence of the ballots raises serious questions that in the end target defining issues for the American society. On the one hand, Hilary Clinton addresses the issue of women in the society and in the political and civil arena; on the other hand, Obama underlines the existence of the African-American community, the issue of discrimination, and the need for emancipation in this sense. Although these matters have been discussed along the decades, their importance is greater at this point because these problems and issues are raised at the highest level.

The other dimension of the idea that the current electoral campaign is labeled "a social movement" is the actual electoral platforms the two candidates have. Indeed, both Clinton and Obama are running for the same nomination and one of them will…… [Read More]

Bibliography: Hilary Clinton. 2005. 24 March 2008.  http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=43 

The New York Times. Politics. Issues. 2008. 24 March 2008 http://politics.nytimes.com/election-guide/2008/issues/index.html#/context=detail/issue=immigration/candidateA=obama/candidateB=allDem
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Social Theory the Wide Diversity

Words: 1801 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89491339

Teachers will continue to lead the educational process, but they need to be very sensitive about the issues facing the society as a whole and the children as individuals in this society. Then, education becomes a means of identifying the issues in the life of the students and gaining knowledge and understanding about them. Education in this global society also has to acknowledge that cultural diversity is valued and preserved (Tozer, Violas, & Senese, 2002, p. 190). Teachers have to ensure that their students are taught in ways that respond to cultural groups without bias (Tozer, Violas, & Senese, 2002, p. 420). In education, there is a responsibility for students to gain a respect for other races, religions and gender that are different from their own. This is the only way that a diverse society can successfully survive.

eferences

Best, S. And Douglas, K. (1991) Postmodern Theory: Critical Interrogations, New…… [Read More]

References

Best, S. And Douglas, K. (1991) Postmodern Theory: Critical Interrogations, New York, the Guilford Press.

Byrne, a. (1998). Interpretivism. In Roberto Casati (ed.), European Review of Philosophy. Stanford: CSLI Publications

Dewey, J. (1997). Experience and education. New York: Touchstone Books.

Giroux, H. (1997) 'Crossing the Boundaries of Educational Discourse: Modernism, post-modernism, and Feminism' in a.H. Halsey, H. Lauder, P. Brown and a.S. Wells (eds.) Education: Culture, Economy, and Society, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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Social Science Methods a Comparison of Social

Words: 582 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12092243

Social Science Methods

A Comparison of Social Science Methodologies

Unlike the physical sciences, social science is intrinsically bound up in the complexities of human nature and interpersonal relationships. Because these can be defined and understood in a variety of different and sometimes conflicting ways, social science is subject to a degree of interpretation and disagreement that is not normally present in the other sciences. As a result of differing assumptions about the nature of human interaction and the purpose of a human science, three main methodologies have developed in social science: positivist, interpretive, and critical. Of these, the critical approach is the most complex, and is best understood in comparison to the other two.

The least complex and most intuitively grasped of the three approaches is positivism. Positivist social science shares fundamental attributes with the physical sciences, and is in line with what most people think of as "science" in…… [Read More]

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Social Media Facebook Facebook A Vehicle

Words: 4720 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3817057

As recent events in the Middle East have clearly demonstrated, Facebook is more on the side of the politically disadvantaged and the poor as they have increasingly embraced Facebook and other social media while the governments in the region tried to ban them. Many governments such as that of China do not allow Facebook primarily because they want to avert scenarios they have seen in the Middle East.

Facebook revolutions

It was in the wake of 2008 when Oscar Morales, a young man in Columbia, decided that he had had enough of FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia), a Marxist group which routinely kidnaps people, keeping them as hostages for months or years, while many of the hostages die in captivity. Angry and depressed by the actions of FARC, one night he turned to Facebook which he had been using to connect with his friends and high school classmates. He…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexanian, Janet A.. "Eyewitness Accounts and Political Claims: Transnational Responses to the 2009 Postelection Protests in Iran." Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 31.2 (2011): 425-442. Project MUSE. Web. 3 Oct. 2011. .

Burns, Alex and Ben Eltham, "Twitter free Iran: an evaluation of twitter's role in public diplomacy and information operations in Iran's 2009 election crisis," in Papandrea, Franco & Armstrong, Mark (Eds.). Record of the Communications Policy & Research Forum 2009. Sydney: Network Insight Institute. Web. 26 Nov. 2011 .

China, Walid. "The Facebook Revolution." New African 503 (2011): 24. MasterFILE Premier. Web. 26 Nov. 2011.

Eltahawy, Mona. "The Middle East's Generation Facebook." World Policy Journal 25.3 (2008): 69-77. Academic Search Premier. Web. 26 Nov. 2011.
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Social Partnership' and the Implications for Trade

Words: 2311 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66320813

Social Partnership' And

The Implications for Trade Unions

This report attempts to explain what is meant by the term social partnership and it also evaluates some implications of social partnerships on trade unions. Social Partnerships have been elevated to be more of the foundation of industrial relations policies. Industrialized nations in these highly global, competitive and technologically advanced economic situations have all new social demands and issues. Labor parties and management teams today have come to realize and understand that if there are going to be economic success stories in their future, then both sides will be required to put emphasis on the importance of partnerships in the workplace. These partnerships entail new methods for problem solving, quality control and productivity. Today, both sides must understand that partnership agreements will help produce more socially adept workers who are well trained, prepared and competitive. Labor and management must come to a…… [Read More]

References

Baccaro, Lucio, et al. (1999). "The Brave New World of European Labor: European Trade Unions at the Millennium." Oxford: Berghahn Books.

Boucher, Gerry, & Collins, Grainne (2003). Having One's Cake and Being Eaten Too: Irish Neo-Liberal Corporatism. Review of Social Economy, Vol. 61.

Ferner, A. And Hyman, R. (eds) (1998) "Changing Industrial Relations in Europe." Oxford: Blackwell.

Guest, D.E. And Peccei, R. (2001) "Partnership at work: mutuality and the balance of advantage" British Journal of Industrial Relations, vol. 399 no.2 pp.207-236
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Social Movements

Words: 730 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77642142

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS & INTELLIGENCE

Intelligence

On a basic or fundamental level, social movements are changes made mostly by the people and not a government or law enforcement agency. Social movements are not immediate and take years and often decades to yield results. Social movements are often but not always a response to unfairness, injustice, intolerance, and imbalance within a culture and/or society. In recent global history, the decade that saw a great deal of change due to social movements was the 1960s. In the 21st century, greatly in part to the advent of certain forms of digital technology, social movements are on the rise and grassroots activism has dispersed to deeper levels around Earth. Social movements are forms of organized actions usually taken by those who are disenfranchised, marginalized, or otherwise isolated or oppressed by the mainstream culture in which the social movement takes place. Social movements can enact a…… [Read More]

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Changing the Status of Women Status of

Words: 661 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49003925

Changing the Status of Women

Status of Women

In order to properly address gender inequality in a country requires knowledge of the sources and the depth of discrimination. Legitimate indicators that capture various aspects of gender inequality are indispensable for informing and directing policy. Existing indicators tend to focus on gender disparities related to access to education, health care, political representation, earnings or income and so forth. The aggregate indices that have received the most attention are the United Nations Development Program's (UNDP) Gender Development Index (GDI) and the Gender Empowerment Measure (GEM). The UNDP's Human Development eports regularly cover both for individual countries. The GDI is an unweighted average of three indices that measure gender differences in terms of life expectancy at birth, gross enrolment and literacy rates and earned income. The GEM is an unweighted average of three other variables reflecting the importance of women in society. They…… [Read More]

References

"Innovative approaches to promoting women's economic empowerment." (2008, September 25). United Nations Development Programme. Retrieved February 16, 2013, from http://content.undp.org/go/cms-service/stream/asset/?asset_id=2524504

Jutting, J., & Morrison, C. (2005). Changing social institutions to improve the status of women in developing countries. OECD Development Centre. Policy Brief No.27. Retrieved February 16, 2013, from http://www.oecd.org/dev/poverty/35155725.pdf
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Change in Society 1868-1968

Words: 1974 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59471788

Changes 1868-1968

Life in the United States in 1868 was though different from what it was a century later because racial discrimination was not as severely crippling as it was immediately after the abolition of slavery, still economic growth of blacks accelerated after the introduction of affirmative action and not exactly after the passage of Civil ights Act of 1964. During this period, numerous political, economic and social changes were witnessed but civil rights for blacks a perpetually contentious issue. The status of women, however, improved significantly during this 100-year period, as they became a major part of American workforce and also gained suffrage rights.

Black men and women in 1868 continued to suffer at the hands of a weak proslavery government of Andrew Johnson and tensions between Democrats and epublicans was making life miserable for the blacks. Civil rights were though granted by the Congress, they were not approved…… [Read More]

References

Roberta Hughes Wright, The Birth of the Montgomery Bus Boycott (Southfield: Charro Press, 1991) 52-53.

Lori Johnson, Forgotten heroes:

 http://go.hrw.com/eolang/pdfs/ch10-6.pdf .

Joseph T. Wilson "The Black Phalanx - A History of the Negro Soldiers of the United States," American Publishing Company, 1890
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Changing Ideas of Identity and

Words: 1902 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20119057

His rejected and criticized Montaigne's self-indulgence. He stressed the need to be concerned for others and to temper one's self-expression so that it more closely resembled an ordered society.

Reading these three authors gives the reader a feeling for the changes in society that dictated a sense of identity and self from the 16th to 18th Centuries. Society went through some radical changes during this time that can be characterized by the ability and acceptability of indulging in self-expression. During the 16th century, one was free to express themself in almost any way possible. By the 18th Century, one had to temper what they had to say so that it fit within society's rules.

The rebellious self-indulgence of the 16th century was confined to within certain limits by the 18th century. As time progressed, even these limits were tightened and society dictated more of what a persons was allowed to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Addison, Joseph. "The Spectator No. 476." 1712. Quotidiana. Ed. Patrick Madden. 12 Mar 2007.  http://essays.quotidiana.org/addison/spectator_no_476/ . Accessed June 2, 2008.

Addison, Joseph. "The Spectator No. 562." Google Books. http://books.google.com/books?id=loE0AAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=+the+Spectator+no.+562&source=gbs_similarbooks_r&cad=2_1#PPA214,M1.

Montaigne, (2005) Saggi ii, Milano, Adelphi, pp. 1543-1544.

Montaigne. The Complete Essays of Montaigne. Donald M. Frame (trans). Stanford University Press. 1958.
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Social Problem and Human Services

Words: 993 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90968914

Social Problem Related to Human Services

Social justice implies citizens’ equal entitlement to the self-same services and rights. In this paper, the inequalities in providing various human services to different societal groups in the nation will be addressed.

Beginning with education, a fundamental human service, it is a highly concerning fact that the nation’s educational system continually fails unwanted, abused and neglected children. Also, foster children totally at society’s mercy for survival are largely ignored. As children don’t have any avenue for voicing their views and demands, and cannot finance political campaigns, protest for improved services, or lobby elected representatives in order for being heard, it is the responsibility of society’s adults to speak for this faction of society. Attempts at organizing an effective child welfare system can be traced back to the late nineteenth century, when the nation’s contemporary system of foster care was established and Charles Loring Brace…… [Read More]

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Social Work as a Social Movement

Words: 660 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14051042

Social Work as a Social Movement

During the early part of the 20th century, social work was a way of helping individuals, but did little to question the status quo of larger groups of people. However, beginning in the 1950s, broad-based social movements began to challenge relationships that had previously been seen as private. While the underpinnings of these movements began in the 1950s, they became prominent in the 1960s. These movements made issues that had previously been considered private, such as the relationship between the sexes, public issues. In fact, it is fair to say that social movements politicized previously private issues, bringing broader attention to certain inequities. This led to some change, though not as much change as movement-leaders sought. Galeano and Klein both discuss the idea of social work as a social movement, and the relationship between the everyday work of helping individual people and the larger-concept…… [Read More]

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Social Marginalization by Race Economic Deprivation and

Words: 1262 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26965752

Social Marginalization by Race: Economic Deprivation and White American Resistance in the allot or the ullet by Malcolm X

The rigorous history of African-Americanism and their emancipation within the American society reflects the struggles and perpetuation of discrimination among black Americans even during the 20th century. Malcolm X, considered one of the most radical and influential leader of the black American civil rights movement, centers on the issues of discrimination and white American resistance among the blacks in his famous discourse, The allot or the ullet, delivered in April 3, 1964.

The relevance and significance of Malcolm X's discourse must be put into context in the events happening during his time. Historically, the socio-political landscape of the United States during the 1960s is characterized by the emergence and development of the civil rights movement for the marginalized sectors of the society, such as the youth, women, poor, and particularly, African-Americans.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Malcolm X (1964). The Ballot or the Bullet. Available at: http://www.indiana.edu/~rterrill/Text-BorB.html.
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Social Entrepreneurialism and Sustainability

Words: 4420 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61337118

Social Entrepreneurship

Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and he can feed himself for life. How could you put this principle into practice through the development of a social entrepreneurship venture?

Development of Social Entrepreneurialism

Corporate Social Responsibility

Externalities

Social Inequality

Social Entrepreneurship and Food

Social entrepreneurship was introduced in the 1970s to address the issue of social sustainably and the term "social entrepreneur." This analysis will begin by providing a brief history as well as a working definition for the concept of social entrepreneurialism. It will also discuss some of the related movements that have been working towards some of the same goals, albeit, from different directions to address various challenges in society and the environment. Furthermore, a more detailed overview of the exact challenges that are present in society that social entrepreneurialism can work to address will…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abu-Saifan, S., 2012. Social Entrepreneurship: Definition and Boundaries. [Online]

Available at: http://timreview.ca/article/523

[Accessed 28 April 2016].

Ashoka, N.d.. Vision and Mission. [Online]
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Change Management in Healthcare Organizations

Words: 16366 Length: 42 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93329389



1.3. Summary of argument, Hypothesis

The role of leadership styles and their applicability to the success or failure of mergers, acquisitions and alliances is the focus of this research. Any leadership study, to be relevant, must also focus on the needs of those served by the organizations studies. That is why in the proposed Change Management Equilibrium Model have customer-driven processes at their center or core. The focus of the research to either validate or refute the model is based on consistency and collaboration as two factors that also serve to create greater levels of integration between the two or more healthcare providers merging or changing their organizational structures to better serve the market. This market orientation is what many public-ally-owned and operated healthcare providers struggle with, as often the source of funding becomes their "customer" or whom they serve (Brinkmann, O'Brien, 2010). Studies by AM esearch for example show…… [Read More]

References

Abbott, R., Ploubidis, G., Huppert, F., Kuh, D., & Croudace, T.. (2010). An Evaluation of the Precision of Measurement of Ryff's Psychological Well-Being Scales in a Population Sample. Social Indicators Research, 97(3), 357-373.

Faten Fahad Al-Mailam. (2004). Transactional vs. Transformational Style of Leadership-Employee Perception of Leadership Efficacy in Public and Private Hospitals in Kuwait. Quality Management in Health Care, 13(4), 278-284.

Antonakis, J., & House, R.J. (2002). The full-range leadership theory: The way forward. In B.J. Avolio & F.J. Yammarino (Eds.) Transformational and Charismatic Leadership, Volume 2, p. 3 -- 33. Boston: JAI Press.

Avolio, B.J., & Yammarino, F.J. (2002). Introduction to, and overview of, transformational and charismatic leadership. In B.J. Avolio & F.J. Yammarino (Eds.) Transformational and Charismatic Leadership, Volume 2, p. xvii -- xxiii. Boston: JAI Press.
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Social Sciences Background- for Centuries

Words: 1340 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67274474

It was originally established in the early 19th century by Auguste Comte who tried to unify history, psychology and economics through an understanding of society as a broad paradigm. Emile Durkheim took this a bit further and focused on the way societies could maintain a sort of integrity within the modern work where past cultural trends (religion, ethnicity, etc.) were no longer the singular part of society. His view, which has become the modern view of sociology, surrounded questions of what binds individuals together as a formal group (society) and what happens to this group both collectively and for the individual. This is a broad discipline as well, and clearly an academic response to the modern age (industrialization, urbanization, secularization, etc.). The field looks at social rules, the way those rules were formed, and the way that individuals coalesce into groups, communities, institutions, and even powerful social organizations that transcend…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Anthropological Association. (2012, January). What is Anthropology. Retrieved from aaanet.org: http://www.aaanet.org/about/WhatisAnthropology.cfm

Backhouse, R., & Fontaine, P. (Eds.). (2010). The History of the Social Sciences Since 1945. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Bernard, H. (2011). Research Methods in Anthropology. Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press.

Fernald, L. (2008). Psychology: Six Perspectives. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
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Social Innovation and Change

Words: 1282 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11523024

The Social Media Age
A social change that I have experienced is the arrival of the Digital and Information Age, which has led to a revolution in the way people communication, obtain knowledge, and engage with ideas. Mainly the big change is the arrival of social media which has made everything private suddenly public. There is no more line between a private life and a public life. Everything is blurred together. People are less genuine and more interested in building their “brand” than in actually being human—because, after all, being human does not necessarily get one a million subscribers on YouTube. As Olsen (2013) notes, everything is “leading to a world that feels less personal, less polite and less human.” So while there have definitely been some good points about the Digital Era and the Information Age—such as the ability to now share information more easily than ever before, to…… [Read More]

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Social Effects Did the Early

Words: 2309 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90991241

The education system of the Byzantine region spread through to the other nations, with them adopting new words from the Arab language, hence enriching their language. The social status of the slaves improved, whereas that of the elite and those who fought against the invasion deteriorated as they lost control over their territories.

The effects on Arab society

The interactions between the Arabs and the non-Arab community resulted in several changes within the Arab society. At the time of the conquest, the Arab received support from the Christians of the Syrian and Egypt territories because the Arabs promised them less taxation as compared to that of the Byzentine (Rogan 157). Therefore, the Arabs, after the conquest was over, feared that the interactions between the Muslim and the non-Muslim community would lead to undesirable results. For this reason, the Umayyad sought to keep the Muslim worriers concentrated in the garrison towns…… [Read More]

Works cited

Bagnall, Roger S. Egypt in the Byzantine World, 300-700. Cambridge [u.a.: Cambridge Univ.

Press, 2007. Print.

Brownworth, Lars. Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire That Rescued Western

Civilization. New York: Crown Publishers, 2010. Print.
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Social Economic and Political Changes the Country

Words: 1500 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53321462

social, economic, and political changes the country as experienced since 1783 are fulfilling the promises of the Revolution?

The American revolutionary war is one of the most significant events in the history of today's United States of America. It involved a war between the American colonies and Great Britain. This great historical event took place in the years 1775 to 1783 and led to the formation of United States of America. Conflicts leading to the war of independence arose from the tension between the 13 colonies of North America's residents and the Britain colonial government. The tensions leading to the America's independence war emerged from attempts by British government to raise revenue by taxing her colonies.

Discussion

The war with Great Britain created awareness to Americans and pushed the nation into the search for a new and long-lasting society based on equality, liberty and independent ideas. Following the war of…… [Read More]

Works cited

Morton, C.J. The American Revolution. United States of America: Green wood press, 2003. Print

Frank, A. American Revolution: People and perspectives. California: ABC-CLIO, Inc. Print
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Social Work and Advocacy

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46253960

.....fellow colleagues provided a varied and thoughtful perspective on social work professionals and social policy. One thing noted was the lack of available resources for social workers regarding their clients. Often clients may come from a foreign background and require translation. This can be difficult because most people in the United States speak only English with some speaking Spanish and Chinese. Having tools available to make translation easier can lead to more effective communication and ability to help the clients in what they need regardless of potential obstacles like language.

When looking at the entirety of the social work profession, it was built on social change. It has long been the purpose of social workers to ensure everyone has equal access to opportunities and resources that permit them to meet basic needs such as food, shelter, and healthcare. That is why it is important to continue to persist for tools…… [Read More]

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Social Revolutions Over the 20th

Words: 2190 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17759428

For example, Krishan Kumar of the University of Kent at Canterbury11 states,... "in sum, a fine piece of properly political sociology, of which there are in truth very few examples. Society gets its due share of attention; but as is fitting and absolutely essential in any discussion of revolution, it is the peculiar nature of and crisis of the state that occupies the centre of the stage."

Similarly, Michael Kimmel of the University of California -- Santa Cruz,12 states that "Theda Skocpol is perhaps the most ambitious and exciting of a new generation of historical-comparative sociologists who have focused their attention squarely on the big issues of social change that once preoccupied the classic sociologists."

The difficulty that some reviewers had about this book is because of some of the misinformation. For example, George Yaney 12 of the University of Maryland states it is based almost entirely on secondary sources…… [Read More]

References

Kimmel, Michael. "States and Social Revolutions: A Comparative Analysis of France, Russia, and China. By Theda Skocpol." http://www.jstor.org.libdb.fairfield.edu/browse/00029602" the American Journal of Sociology. 86 No.5 (1981): 1145-1154

Kumar, Krishan. States and Social Revolutions: A Comparative Analysis of France,

Russia and China by Theda Skocpol" the British Journal of Sociology. 31, no. 2

1980): 310-311.
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Changing Role of Women in the Late

Words: 1398 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70311083

Changing Role of Women in the Late 1800s

In "A azard of New Fortunes," William Dean owells explores a number of themes through the interaction of the major characters in the novel. Much of his focus revolves around the women in the book and the interaction of these women with each other and with men. owells writes about issues contemporary to the time of the book's publication in 1890. Not coincidentally the 1880s marked the beginning of a significant upsurge in the women's movement. "A azard of New Fortunes" presents women who abide by the old values in contrast to women who have begun to adopt the values that eventually lead to full suffrage for women, more education opportunities for women, and more career choices for women. Women would become increasingly vocal about their opinions and begin to organize themselves for a direct assault on the institutions that were so…… [Read More]

Howells illustrates the crosscurrents of the late 1800s in the United States by conceiving two conflicting characters, Mrs. March and Alma Leighton. Mrs. March represents the traditional good wife who is her husband's confidant and who supports him in every way. Alma represents the petulant "new woman" who has no sense of compromise and no sense of responsibility except to her. Howells portrayal of Mrs. March is much kinder than his portrayal of Alma. With the wave of social change yet to crest, Howells is more inclined to the traditional than to the radical. Ultimately though the ideal situation would be a balance between the traditional and the radical.

Works-Cited

Howells, William Dean. A Hazard of New Fortunes. Aug 2002. Produced by David Widger for The Project Gutenberg Etext. 23 Feb 2002.
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Social Policy Kiwisaver as a

Words: 3323 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60464989



The authors believe that some citizens have become "...socialized into a particular ideological system that molds their values, attitudes, beliefs and/or symbolic predispositions on a wide range of issues, including political parties and the economy." And this article also found that most party interests and self-interests revolve around both ideological considerations and economic considerations; however, those voters who are on the lower rung of the economic ladder tend to be less ideological and more economically-motivated, which makes sense.

Labour...[which is] traditionally welfare state in ideology, was the party that initiated the conversion to neoliberalism" prior to the election of the Alliance in 1999, the article continues. Allen and Ng write that many members of the Labour party "felt confused and betrayed" when the Alliance moved away from the welfare state policies and into neoliberalism. Another result of the Labour Alliance's shift from welfare to neoliberalism was an "increase in poverty…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Allen, Michael W.; & Ng, Sik Hung. (2000). Self-Interest, Economic Beliefs, and Political Party Preference in New Zealand. Political Psychology, 21(2), 323-345.

Blair, Tony. (1998). Tony Blair, the Third Way. Goucher College History Department. Retrieved 9 July 2008, at http://faculty.goucher.edu/history231/blair.htm.

Blair, Tony, & Schroeder, Gerhard. (1999). Europe: The Third Way. Retrieved 9 July, 2008, at http://www.socialdemocrats.org/blairandschroeder6-8-99.html, also available from www.labour.org.uk;produced by Social Democrats.

Giddens, Anthony. (2000). Social Democracy and the Third Way. In the Third Way and Its Critics, Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.